Antoine Cribellier

Antoine Cribellier
Wageningen University & Research | WUR · Department of Experimental Zoology

PhD of Biomechanics

About

6
Publications
1,366
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49
Citations
Citations since 2017
6 Research Items
49 Citations
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Introduction
I am a biomechanist and I am mainly interested in the study of insect flight dynamics to answer relevant biological questions. For this I use three-dimensional videography, experimental fluid mechanics, deep learning and Bayesian statistics as well as various data exploration and visualization techniques. During my PhD in the Netherlands, I investigate the capture and escape of malaria mosquitoes. More about that here: https://www.wur.nl/en/Persons/Antoine-A-Antoine-Cribellier-MSc.htm

Publications

Publications (6)
Article
Flying insects have evolved the ability to evade looming objects, such as predators and swatting hands. This is particularly relevant for blood-feeding insects, such as mosquitoes that routinely need to evade the defensive actions of their blood hosts. To minimize the chance of being swatted, a mosquito can use two distinct strategies—continuously...
Thesis
Hematophagous female mosquitoes have to get a blood meal to obtain the proteins necessary for egg production. To get this blood meal, mosquitoes need to detect a vertebrate host such as a bird or a mammal, fly towards this host and land on it. When interacting with their hosts, flying mosquitoes have to be quick and stealthy to avoid being detected...
Article
Full-text available
When approaching a landing surface, many flying animals use visual feedback to control their landing. Here, we studied how foraging bumblebees (Bombus terrestris) use radial optic expansion cues to control in-flight decelerations during landing. By analyzing the flight dynamics of 4,672 landing maneuvers, we showed that landing bumblebees exhibit a...
Article
Full-text available
Our understanding of animal locomotion in air and water has progressed considerably, based on studies of their wakes. Wake vortices are the hallmarks of momentum transfer and enable an inverse inference of the forces applied by animals. Such approach has recently been extended to locomotion at the air–water interface, focusing on the familiar water...
Article
Full-text available
When seeking a human for a blood meal, mosquitoes use several cues to detect and find their hosts. From this knowledge, counter-flow odour-baited traps have been developed that use a combination of CO2, human-mimicking odour, visual cues and circulating airflow to attract and capture mosquitoes. Initially developed for monitoring, these traps are n...
Article
Full-text available
Host-seeking mosquitoes rely on a range of sensory cues to find and approach blood hosts, as well as to avoid host detection. By using odour blends and visual cues that attract anthropophilic mosquitoes, odour-baited traps have been developed to monitor and control human pathogen-transmitting vectors. Although long-range attraction of such traps ha...

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