Science topics: Neuroscienceapathy
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apathy - Science topic

Lack of emotion or emotional expression; a disorder of motivation that persists over time.
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Do you think COVID-19 pandemic would deepen the human’s tragic sense of life? And in relation to this, do you think the individualistic and instrumentalist philosophy of European culture marks its eventual end, bearing in mind that on the deprivation of “agony” and care for the “other” any culture could not survive?
The twentieth century has become the age of great tragedies, and it seems that the twenty-first century is not at all exempt from such a tragedy. Witnessing tragedy reveals two emotional states in a lethal contradiction with one another; apathy and attachment. In the first one, in the comfort of his own fictional self, the self is buried in an uncanniness, and in the second, he is drawn into a pathetic showdown accompanied by a deep agony. In the first, a pathos deprivation that triggers a hug with a blind passion to life characterizes the self, and in the second, the self is fermented by a pathetic confrontation within deep in the tragedy.
At a time when the extraordinary destructions of the first world war had not yet been witnessed and on the dates where European high intelligentsia was enjoying its most prolific periods, in 1912, Miguel de Unamuno, one of the most influential thinkers of Spain, declared that the reason was the enemy of life in his extraordinary book called “The Tragic Sense of Life”. He, in fact, stressed the vital role spiritual anxiety plays in driving man to live the fullest possible life.
It seems that Miguel had made a tragic prediction based on the inner reality of the human condition before the tragedy had a global appearance. What sort of affectional mood would you predict in the Covid crisis where the feeling of tragedy ever deepens day to day? Does Apathy point to the end of Western philosophy? Or is it an euphoric and ominous humming-up of the death instinct in the Lacanian sense?
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My philosophical conclusion is that a more human species-appropiate life-style is required, e.g. mutuality. Rajkumar Rajendram has already hit the nail on its head.
I do not think that academic phlilosophy will be affected by this global health 'event'. Western philosophy is dominated by Aristotelian eternal matter assumptions and the early Kalamists were right to refute this assumption as they opted for 'created matter' (=creator, creation, creatures, creativity).
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How far digital technological innovations have succeeded in overcoming political apathy and political disengagement? If your answer goes utopian way, how sustainable will that change be? Do we have any empirical evidence which may suggest that the change in real sense is sustainable?
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Obviously, real democracy is possible only when each voter has enough intellectual power and knowledge. It would be great to have something like exams for driver or shooter licence - "voter licence" - basic questions from history, logic, fundamentals of natural sciences (school level). Otherwise, it is not democracy, it is ochlocracy: TV stars, sportsmen, populists, etc. (of course, paid by serious persons - oligarchs, who will get real power) to be elected.
There is one nice movie "Idiocracy" (2006), looks like a prediction...
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Gus Speth, a US advisor on climate change said:
“I used to think that top environmental problems were biodiversity loss, ecosystem collapse and climate change. I thought that thirty years of good science could address these problems. I was wrong. The top environmental problems are selfishness, greed and apathy, and to deal with these we need a cultural and spiritual transformation. And we scientists don’t know how to do that.” Cited from http://winewaterwatch.org/2016/05/we-scientists-dont-know-how-to-do-that-what-a-commentary/
How can this transformation be facilitated?
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John C Carr , What "New" norms are you proposing to the world population? Are you suggesting that mulitcultural populations who value diversity, liberty and freedom of choice will unify behind a single set of "new norms"? Seven billion living beings will eat, drink and produce waste products today. We are producing waste at rates that can only be processed in sewerage treatment facillities using oil and electricity for power. Were it not for the expenditure of this energy none of the worlds great cities would exist. This is a worthy discussion and it is good to consider new possibilities. I think we are a bit naiev to think that human society will give up its tribal nature in favor of a single unified world view It may be that your "New Norms" will offer a positive direction..
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Do the theories of education suitable for scientific subjects such as math, physics, chemistry, etc...?
It seems clear that most of the developing countries and some of the developed ones use the theories of educations and obligate their teachers to train on some of these theories, Do these theories suitable for non-literature such scientific subjects? Some trainers say that these theories could be used for scientific subjects with little modifications. However, from my experience in the real classroom, the 21st-century methodologies of education which based on gaming much more than traditional education show bad results in the students' knowledge and their academic background. In my opinion, the bad results are due to unsuitable or incomplete educational environments such as apathy of students as well as teachers toward education -teaching and learning-, teacher ability to control the classroom, and number of students per classroom versus the period length of the lesson and the activities amount that required to deliver the lesson.
What are the particular strengths of developed countries such as Singapore’s instructional regime that helps it perform so well? What are its limits and constraints? Is Singapore’s teaching system transferable to other countries?
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I taught at the National Institute of Education in Singapore from 2003 to 2008. All Singapore science teachers are trained at the National Institute. My area of interest was in primary science education (grades K-6) . The training of primary teachers focused on preparing them to teach a specific curriculum, the national curriculum. The Singapore primary science curriculum model aligned closely with the Science Curriculum Improvement Study (SCIS) developed in the US in the 1960's. Science Content, Science Process Skills and Science Themes gave structure to the K-6 curriculum. Singapore adapted the SCIS model to make the science content more rigorous and strengthened both the science content and process skills by adding accountability through assessment. I believe the structure of the Singapore's primary science curriculum can be successfully adapted and implemented in other countries. One particular strength of the Singapore primary science curriculum is its success in preparing students to pass the high stakes, national, 6th grade leaving test. The problem solving ability required in this test correlates highly and often surpasses that required in many international exams such as the TIMMS. There are limitations, such as the narrowing of the curriculum to what is covered in tests, and cultural constraints. As you point out, educational environments and resources play a large factor in the successful transfer of such structured curricula and their underlying theories.
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A 70 YOF with a hx of ulcerative colitis, lupus, anemia, chronic kidney disease, gastro-esophageal reflux disease w/ esophagitis & hyperprolactinemia, is presenting with symptoms of nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, bladder incontinence, rapid fine motor decline, memory loss, apathy, depression, loss of appetite, weight loss & executive functioning & cognitive impairment. It is determined that the pt has normal pressure hydrocephalus through MRI.
The pt undergoes ventriculo-peritoneal/lumbo-peritoneal shunt procedure. Initially, her symptoms improve, but 11 days later, the nursing home staff report she has a fever of 101.9 & all of her symptoms reappear (vomiting, diarrhea, no appetite, apathy, etc.). She is brought to the ER & a CT scan is done. The CT scan is unremarkable. Blood panels are ran & her stool sample is tested for c-diff & the results are negative.
Are her symptoms caused by a shunt malfunction, infection, obstruction, etc.?
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Shunt malfunction due to infection is plausible.
Not clear in the question is whether the patient underwent VP or LP shunt.
Since the patient improved initially, high volume lumbar puncture would have yielded a similar result, indicating a shunting surgery. Despite lack of any positive findings in the CT, chances are that the shunt has stopped working, likely due to infection. Antibiotics, shunt removal, and interval shunting recommended.