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Which country and university is the best one to study environmental archaeology?
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Can anyone recommend me a topic for research in the environmental archaeology?
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You may think of studying palaeo-environment and how human have affected the same in yours study area, may be identified/ shortlisted base don previous literature. Similarly, in identified study area, you may study how climate change has taken place and further how man or more precisely anthropogenic activities have affected its pace.
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International Symposium on environmental archaeology or geoarchaeology in 2019?
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Developing International Geoarchaeology (DIG) is held every other year. https://www.developinginternationalgeoarchaeology.org/ The next conference is in 2021.
The Association for Environmental Archaeology (AEA) conference is held every year; see link in answer by Niklas Hausmann.
The European Geosciences Union (EGU) annual conference always has several sessions dedicated to geoarchaeology and quaternary environments. EGU 2020 will be held in Vienna, Austria. https://www.egu2020.eu/
The 2020 Landscape Archaeology Conference (LAC) will be held in Madrid. https://lac2020.cchs.csic.es/
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Different zooarchaeological studies have referred to canids (domestic dogs, wolves, coyotes, foxes, jackals, and dingoes) as the species having the most detrimental effects on skeletal remains. However, an article by Nicole M. Reeves in the Journal of Forensic Science on the "Taphonomic Effects of Vulture Scavenging" noted that vultures and other carrion birds also have a detrimental impact on bone material. Further, the peck marks of the carrion birds sometimes resemble the bite marks of canid canine teeth. Are there any studies comparing the taphonomic effects of these animals and how to differentiate between canids and carrion birds and their damage to faunal material?
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Hi Joel,
Regarding your title question, I would probably go for Hyenids.
However, differentiating between different carnivores impact on bones is complicated mission that many scholars works very hard to solve.
Generally, by the damage to the bone only, it is almost impossible to determine the agent. More parameters are included like the place it was found, the prey composition ect.
(for example: Kuhn, B. F., Berger, L. R., & Skinner, J. D. (2010). Examining criteria for identifying and differentiating fossil faunal assemblages accumulated by hyenas and hominins using extant hyenid accumulations. International Journal of Osteoarchaeology, 20(1), 15-35.)
I would recommend beginning with brain's iconic book (Brain, C. K. (1981). The hunters or the hunted?: an introduction to African cave taphonomy).
Some more detailed papers (out of many):
Marín‐Arroyo, A. B., & Margalida, A. (2012). Distinguishing bearded vulture activities within archaeological contexts: identification guidelines. International Journal of Osteoarchaeology, 22(5), 563-576.
Serra, A. S., Margalef, C. R., Pérez, J. V. M., Ripoll, M. P., Cuñat, C. T., Marco, Y. C., ... & Bonilla, V. V. (2014). Towards the identification of a new taphonomic agent: an analysis of bone accumulations obtained from modern Egyptian vulture (Neophron percnopterus) nests. Quaternary international, 330, 136-149.
Domínguez-Rodrigo, M., Yravedra, J., Organista, E., Gidna, A., Fourvel, J. B., & Baquedano, E. (2015). A new methodological approach to the taphonomic study of paleontological and archaeological faunal assemblages: a preliminary case study from Olduvai Gorge (Tanzania). Journal of Archaeological Science, 59, 35-53.
Yravedra, J., Aramendi, J., Maté-González, M. Á., Courtenay, L. A., & González-Aguilera, D. (2018). Differentiating percussion pits and carnivore tooth pits using 3D reconstructions and geometric morphometrics. PloS one, 13(3), e0194324.
Gidna, A., Domínguez-Rodrigo, M., & Pickering, T. R. (2015). Patterns of bovid long limb bone modification created by wild and captive leopards and their relevance to the elaboration of referential frameworks for paleoanthropology. Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, 2, 302-309.
Stiner, M. C., Munro, N. D., & Sanz, M. (2012). Carcass damage and digested bone from mountain lions (Felis concolor): implications for carcass persistence on landscapes as a function of prey age. Journal of Archaeological Science, 39(4), 896-907.
Sala, N., Arsuaga, J. L., & Haynes, G. (2014). Taphonomic comparison of bone modifications caused by wild and captive wolves (Canis lupus). Quaternary International, 330, 126-135.
Best,
Meir
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The problem is that the 3d model of a bone fragment, made in slicer, does not only contain the outer, directly visible parts, but (obviously) also the inner bone structure, which uses a lot of polygons. 
Is there a way to remove these, rather than using (too) aggressive decimation techniques to bring the polycount (and filesize) down?
The goal would be to share this model online, which is without decimation 2.2 GB.
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Sir
Best greeting for you and thank you for this very important question.Unfortunately many of the new generation doctors after 2000 or the new millennium are unaware about the global changes which have become mandatory especially with the introduction of Evidence Best Medicine
Since the year 2000 all papers should have sample sizes which are evaluated by a statistical procedure called POWER ANALYSIS.
Accordingly most of the software issued after this date contains the power analysis. However PA is not a always a straight forward procedure nor it is applicable in every paper.
In your kind question I couldn't pick up 34 variables? in CT scan? may be i am wrong anyhow- the advice of a colleague statistician can be invaluable to your paper so the minimum required number is collected to fulfill your hypothesis
Hope my answer provide some help to your idea and good luck from me.
Wisam
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Someone who can help me in Environmental archaeology or Geoarchaeology
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Prof. Dr. Roberto Risch (Autonomous University of Barcelona)
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Several archaeozoological evidence from the Upper Paleolithic to the Neolithic show that not just classical projectiles, but simple blade fragments, trapezes were used for this purpose also.
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Dear Edward,
thank you very much for your answer! I will check your results then because I am interested nowadays in projectiles, both in utilization and in symbolic aspect also. My impression is that there was a strict difference between what was considered as a hunting weapon and what was used actually for hunting during the Neolithic.
Best wishes!
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In the Early Middle Ages (the period from 6th to 12th century) animals accompanied human societies. Birds started every day with a choir of their songs, big mammals were hunted (or bred) for meat and skins, and dogs were kept for protection. Several animal species held important roles during the various pre-Christian rituals, and after the conversion some of them become symbols linked to Christian religion.
Recently, during excavations on archaeological sites in Europe, numerous bones of inter alia mammals and birds have been discovered in various contexts. They were found on settlements or on the beds of lakes (or rivers). Moreover, their bones have also been discovered in various inhumation and cremation graves of men, women and children. After Christianisation, these creatures were no longer present in the graves, but their depictions appeared in ornamentations on grave monuments (e.g. hogbacks or shrines).
The variety of animals, as well as fantastic beasts or fauna, were depicted in simplistic or more detailed way on numerous artefacts. They were part of the complex pre-Christian ornamentation on weaponry, jewellery and Christian art (e.g. illuminated manuscripts, liturgical paraphernalia, architectonic details).
This session will explore different aspects of human-animal relations in Europe in the Early Middle Ages. Its aim is to discuss the roles of animals in pre-Christian and Christianised societies (e.g. Anglo-Saxon, Vendel Period, Viking Age or Western Slavic societies) from interdisciplinary angles. The meaning of various fauna in farming, craftsmanship, trade and rituals will be taken into account.
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Chris De Vos Of course. Thus, we can underline the link between astronomy, astrology and divine understanding: even if astrology had been seen as an esotheric knowledge for many centuries, we can’t ignore that the contemplation of the stars - and of the sky as a whole- defined the will to reach a better comprehension of God. Since early antiquity, we can see how this attitude was shared in the Jewish tradition, in particular during the first six centuries BCE. I do think that this aspect became important also in almost all the Western civilisation, especially in its theological dimension.
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Call for papers International Meeting of the International Council for Archaeozoology (Ankara, September 2-7 2018)
Session: Identifying and interpreting food taboos: a zooarchaeological approach
Organisers: Veronica Aniceti, Idoia Grau-Sologestoa, Mikolaj Lisowski (U. Sheffield), Marcos García-García (U. Granada), Silvia Valenzuela-Lamas (CSIC-IMF)
This session aims to highlight the important role of zooarchaeology in assessing the presence of dietary taboos in faunal assemblages, and interpreting their socio-cultural, religious, and economic significance. The session is open to all zooarchaeological studies dealing with dietary taboos in different geographical areas and periods, from prehistory to contemporary times.
This session aims to highlight the important role of zooarchaeology in assessing the presence of dietary taboos in faunal assemblages, and interpreting their socio-cultural, religious, and economic significance. The session is open to all zooarchaeological studies dealing with dietary taboos in different geographical areas and periods, from prehistory to contemporary times.
Despite the considerable amount of animal bones and teeth recovered from archaeological sites, this valuable material is not often used to determine identities in past societies. Nevertheless, animal remains are often associated with food consumption, an important cultural identifier. When humans recurrently eat a specific food, this becomes part of their cultural roots, whatever the origin of such consumption practices.
Equally, the prohibition of some food products can be associated with specific cultural backgrounds. In the literature, the avoidance of eating certain foods (beef, pork, fish, etc.) is commonly defined as ‘food taboo’. This definition, however, does not only refer to the avoidance of consuming specific animal species, but also to the rules on how animal products were processed.
Please submit paper abstracts visiting http://www.icaz2018ankara.com before the 30th March 2018.
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This looks like a terrific conference! I will distribute to colleagues and students. Good luck!~
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Hi there, I am doing a zooarchaeological analysis in rodent bones. I have identified the taxons involved and group them in size groups (Big, medium and small). So, besides that, I need to take measures from my bone ensemble. What do I have to measure for each one of the different bone types? (Long bone, short, flat, irregular and besides, teeths). For example: In a femur, should I measure the size of the diafisis and also the whole bone? or what? I do not have clue at all above this
I would really appreciate any advice in this matter
Thank you for your time
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Hi,
I am not a zooarcheologist, so may be my answer would not fit your needs but it my help you.
Here is some interesting stuff to read/follow:
- you have to identify clearly to which taxon is your bones
- you have to know which methods or measurement techniques to use and its bias
- you have than to check it through the Virtual Zooarchaeology of the Arctic Project (VZAP) : http://vzap.iri.isu.edu/ViewPage.aspx?id=230, direct access to the project database is here: http://bones.iri.isu.edu/ (in the classification field you choose mammalian than rodentia)
- check these links/papers:
+ Animal Bone Specimens Preparation Method: http://www.nara.accu.or.jp/elearning/2011/animal.pdf
+ Integrating Zooarchaeology and Paleoethnobotany: A Consideration of Issues, Methods, and Cases (Springer) : http://www.springer.com/la/book/9781441909343
Best.
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What would be the best way to determine if a piece of bone in an archaeological artefact is human or non human? A story associated with the object is that the bone is human. As it is not able to be damaged, destructive testing is not allowed. The bone has been worked into a fish hook so its original form or which element it is from is unknown. Any suggestions?
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An additional possibility is microCT.  Vasculature patterns can be used to indicate human versus, say, artiodactyl bone.  If you have nanoCT, and can visualize the distribution and number of osteocyte lacunae, this is also a very effective way of determining the probability that the bone was from a human or not.
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Zooarchaeology - I currently have a copy of Simon Hillsons - Mammal Bones and Teeth but am after some additional literature to assist me in practicing species identification.
My study deals mostly with mammals and is focused in China. 
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Here is a list of resources I found useful in the American Southwest, it certainly is not China, but may serve as a useful starting point to build your own literature list:
Broughton, Jack M. and Miller, Shawn D.
2015 Zooarchaeology and Field Ecology: A Photographic Atlas. University of Utah Press, UT. (in press).
Chavez, Angela
2008  Comparative Vertebral Morphology in Medium-Sized North American Artiodactyla. The Artifact. 46:1-17. El Paso Archaeological Society, Inc., El Paso, Texas.
Elbroch, Mark
2006  Animal skulls: a guide to North American species. Stackpole Books, Mechanicsburk, PA.
Gilbert, Miles B., Larry D. Martin, Howard G. Savage
1996 Avian Osteology. Missouri Archaeological Society, Inc., MO.
Hillson, Simon
2005  Teeth. Cambridge University Press.
Lawrence, Barbara
1951  Post Cranial Skeletal Characters of Deer, Pronghorn, and Sheep-Goat, with Notes on Bos and Bison. Papers of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology 35:12-43. Peabody Museum, Cambridge, MA.
Olsen, Stanley J.
1964  Mammal Remains from Archaeological Sites. Papers of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology Vol. 56, Number 1. Peabody Museum, Cambridge, MA.
1972 Osteology for the Archaeologist: American Mastadon and the Woolly Mammoth; North American Birds: Skulls and Mandibles; North American Birds: Postcranial Skeletons. Papers of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology  56(3-5). Peabody Museum, Cambridge, MA.
Schmid, Elizabeth
1972  Atlas of Animal Bones: For Prehistorians, Archaeologists, and Quaternary Geologists. Elsevier Publishing Company, University of Virgina, VA.
Smart, Tamela S.
2009 Carpals and Tarsals of Mule Deer, Black Bear and Human: An Osteology Guide for the Archaeologist.  Master’s Thesis, Western Washington University.
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Hello,
I look desperately for the reference of a publication (Poland ?, 1960s) about the ribs of large Ice Age Mammals. It contains wonderful plates with illustrations of the ribs of woolly rhinoceros (Coelodonta antiquitatis), of horse, aurochs, deer etc., and figures of sections of the ribs. Unfortunately, I lost the paper and do not remember author, title and journal. I would be grateful if anyone can give me the reference.
Best regards,
Stefan Wenzel
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Unfortunately, I do not know of such publication. I can give email to Paul Wojtala. He is an employee of the Institute of Systematics and Evolution of Animals, Polish Academy of Sciences, Cracow
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It is possible to know the subspecie by its measures or morphology? Are there any studies respect?
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You can see all the works from Vera Eisenmann,
You can find a lot of information, I think she is the best researcher on this subject...
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I am trying to determine the season of occupation of archaeological sites in the Port Clarence area of the Seward Peninsula, AK. The majority of bones are from eiders and ringed seals, suggesting that they were captured during the early breakup in ice leads, but I have not been able to find modern eider migration/nesting data from this specific portion of the Seward Peninsula. I would like to determine the earliest month different eider species are found near the coastline, if they nest in the immediate area, and when they leave the nest and return to the open ocean.
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Hello Stephanie,
I don't know the answer to this specific question, but I can point you to some sources likely to either have the information in them, or contain references to search further.
The Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Division of Subsistence has over 400 reports online about uses of fish and wildlife in Alaska.  Google the website and use the search function to narrow down reports for Port Clarence area (Teller, Brevig Mission, and further to include Wales, Nome, Shishmaref and Deering).  You might also look at the annual reports in the Subsistence Division technical report series dealing with annual household surveys of migratory waterfowl harvests.  Those reports may have references to waterfowl biology that address your question, and to TEK about seasonality.
Work by Henry Huntington and others looked at TEK for belugas in eastern Norton Sound....not your species of concern and east of Port Clarence, but again, may have references that are more on target with your question. 
Huntington, Henry P. and the communities of Buckland, Elim, Koyuk, Point Lay, and Shaktoolik
1999 Traditional Knowledge of the Ecology of Beluga Whales (Delphinapterus leucas) in the Eastern Chukchi and Northern Bering Seas, Alaska. Arctic 52(1):49-61.
Another recent publication that might be of interest and have relevant data or references:
Mason, Owen K., Matthew L. Ganley, Mary Ann Sweeney, Claire Alix and Valerie Barber
2007 An Ipiutak Outlier: A 1,500 Year Old Qarigi at Qitchauvik on the Golovnin Lagoon. Final Report on the Golovin Heritage Field School, 1998-2000. NPS Technical Report Number NPS/AR/CRR/2007-67. U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Alaska Region, Shared Beringian Heritage Program, Anchorage, AK.
Finally, you might want to contact Madonna Moss and look at her blog about faunal analysis.  Madonna is at University of Oregon, Eugene, and has a faunal reference collection.  mmoss@uoregon.edu
Moss, Madonna L. and Peter M. Bowers
2007 Migratory Bird Harvest in Northwestern Alaska: A Zooarchaeological Analysis of Ipiutak and Thule Occupations from the Deering Archaeological District. Arctic Anthropology 44(1):37-50.
What is the Port Clarence project you are working on?  I know BLM and other agencies have been looking at the beach ridges out there since the USCG abandoned the LORAN site several years ago.  Please let me know if any of these leads help you.  Would enjoy seeing any of the reports that come out of your work....we strive to stay on top of the research going on in Alaska.
Cheers, Richard
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Dear Collegues,
My name is Aritza Villaluenga, I am Postdoctoral researcher in zooarchaeology in MONREPOS Research Centre, Neuwied, Germany.
I am writing a new postdoctoral project, involving a holistic faunal analysis of a Middle Palaeolithic site of Germany, known as Buhlen(55.000-60.000BP), located SW of Kassel (Germany).
This site was excavated in 60s by Prof. Bosinski and in 80s by Dr. Fiedler. However, macromammal remains never have been studied, only in 2004 a partial analysis of Dr. Fiedler excavation was produced in the University of Leiden (Netherlands).
In one of the excavated areas, known as Upper Site, were discovered 1586 egg shell fragments. Avifauna bone remains were taxonomically analyzed by  Anne Eastham in 1998.Due to some,  problems was not possible to develop a microscopic method for identifying taxonomically those egg shells. 
Egg systematical recollection by neanderthals would be an interesting behavior, with clear seasonal implications, in the exploitation of small vertebrates and energy adquisition.
I would like to contact a researcher able to identifying taxonomically these egg shell fragments.
Aritza Villaluenga.
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The best researcher I know is Miguel Moreno-Azanza who finished his thesis in fossil egg-shells. he is in RG
best
Gloria
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Dear all, I'm trying to develop a better interpretation framwork on the Bronze Age subsistence in Huai River basin, China. Could you please recommend some references related except Amber and Tanya's Integrating Zooarchaeology and paleoethnobotany?
Thank you for your interest,
Best regards.
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The papers in the 2009 Current Anthropology issue are available online (they originated in an SAA symposium)
Integrating Plant and Animal Data: Delving Deeper into Subsistence: Introduction to the Special Section(pp. 883-884) , by Alexia Smith and Naomi F. Miller
DOI: 10.1086/605867
Plants and Animals Together: Interpreting Organic Remains from Building 52 at Çatalhöyük (pp. 885-895) , by Katheryn C. Twiss, Amy Bogaard, Michael Charles, Jennifer Henecke, Nerissa Russell, Louise Martin, and Glynis Jones
DOI: 10.1086/644767
Resource Exploitation at Late Neolithic Domuztepe: Faunal and Botanical Evidence (pp. 897-914) , by Sarah Whitcher Kansa, Amanda Kennedy, Stuart Campbell, Elizabeth Carter
DOI: 10.1086/605910
From Food and Fuel to Farms and Flocks: The Integration of Plant and Animal Remains in the Study of the Agropastoral Economy at Gordion, Turkey (pp. 915-924), by Naomi F. Miller, Melinda A. Zeder, and Susan R. Arter
DOI: 10.1086/606035
A Holistic Approach to Examining Ancient Agriculture: A Case Study from the Bronze and Iron Age Near East(pp. 925-936), by Alexia Smith and Natalie D. Munro
DOI: 10.1086/648316
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I have found papers on the use of GMM on pinniped and phocidae skulls but nothing so far on long-bones, vertebrae or pelvis.
Thank you
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Dear Edouard
Some work has been done on the pinniped ankle by David Polly (http://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007%2F978-1-4020-6997-0_9). The taxonomic focus is broader than just pinnipeds though and tarsals are not exactly long-bones, but it might still be of use to you.
Best wishes,
Anneke
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Most abundance counts in paleontology and zooarchaeology use one of two major methodologies, Number of Identified Specimens (NISP) or Minimum Number of Individuals (MNI). However, in many situations, I have seen fossils from a given locality catalogued as several different specimens, even if it is obvious they belong to a single individual. For example, in several cases, a complete mammal skull will have the cranium be given one specimen number, the left dentary a second, and the right one a third, even if the jaws were found in occlusion. In these situations, especially if the counts are being done on a locality where elements are not found close to one another and therefore two given specimens are normally unlikely to belong to the same individual (e.g., a multi-square kilometer outcrop of a geological formation), does one count associated and articulated parts as a single "specimen"?
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In answer to the question asked, if there is a very good reason to believe that material belongs to one individual, standard curatorial practice would be to catalogue them with one specimen number.  But if there is any doubt, it would likely be preferable to catalogue them with separate numbers, perhaps with a note in the catalogue indicating a possible association.
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I am excavating in Jordan this season, and I am unfamiliar with their fauna. I'm assuming there are going to be Ovis/Capra remains, but what else should I be expecting?
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I've excavated and studied faunal remains from those period sites in Jordan and Israel for some years. I would expect, beyond Ovis/Capra, to find Bos remains and a small number of Gazella and Dama bones. Also, likely a small amount of Sus. There may be a few wild birds (chukar partridge for instance), tortoise, hare and even (saltwater, traded) fish. The Tal al-'Umayri report (volume 5) and/or the Madaba report (vol 13?) both have excellent faunal reports in them, at least in terms of comprehensive species lists. There are other papers of relevance, of course, that you might consult before heading out.
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In 2010 we discovered two unusual artifacts with unique characteristics made of dog mandibles, in the tell settlement of Sultana-Malu Roşu, Romania (see attachment). From a chrono-cultural point of view the site belongs to the Gumelnița culture (ca. 4600–3950 BC) part of the large Eneolithic cultural complex Kodjadermen-Gumelniţa-Karanovo VI from Balkans.
Does anybody know other artifacts made ​​of dog mandibles from prehistory or other time periods?
Thanks in advance.
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Sorry - missed adding the photo.
Col