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I need to find the mean average annual rainfall and temperature for four specific locations in the UK, all in South Wales. I have explored the websites of the Met Office, The Centre for Ecology and Hydrology and Digimap for this information but have had no luck. I have found some fairly descriptive maps but nothing that allows me to elucidate the specific figures I need. Would someone be able to help me out on this one?
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Dear Scarlet,
which locations in Wales specifically are you looking for? If these are towns or cities, they might well be included in global climatological data bases. If you could provide me with the names of these places, I'd be happy to have a look. Alternatively (or in addition!), you could also check which weather stations are located close to these places. If these weather stations have a WMO (World Meteorological Organization) number, you could proceed from there. I'd be happy to assist, if I can.
Best,
Julius
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I have some data on the landings of crab and lobster in Wales from 2002-2019 and I also know whether they were landed into ports in North or South Wales. What statistical test(s) do I need to do to compare landings of both species between North and South? Should I conduct two separate t-tests for each species or is there a test I can do that does it all in one go? Crab and lobster are caught in the same pots so their abundances are linked.
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Every basic course in biometrics teaches t-test, chi-squared and factorial ANOVA, with a warning that the latter is sensitive to normality. Students are rarely taught that it is normality of the error term, not the data, that is relevant (so that a test for normality won't help!), nor that ANOVA is far more sensitive to heterogeneities in variance than to departures from normality (a big problem with most fisheries data). You will need to go far beyond such over-simplifications to make much of your data -- which may well lead you into entirely different kinds of hypothesis tests.
However, I think that Stefan hit the essential point: "you'll first need to formulate a more precise question or hypothesis". Your data are not drawn from a simple two-way experimental design (crab-lobster, crossed with north-south). You have multiple years and multiple months. The spatial variations in availability of the two species will certainly be on a much finer scale than north/south, which might complicate analysis or might suggest more useful questions to ask of the data. That is all a way of saying that the data rows within the north/crab group (or the south/crab, north/lobster or south/lobster) are not replicate measurements of the same thing, differing only because of the value of a random error term.
Meanwhile, most of your data rows appear to be from one boat fishing for one day but some have the catches of multiple days on one row -- whether a combination of many trips or a single long trip isn't clear to me.
And what were the fishermen doing? Crab and lobster may be taken with the same traps but are some set with the aim of taking one species, some the other and some a mix? Does the targeting differ between places or times? Do fishermen from some harbours do one thing and those from another something else, even though both fish in the same times and places at the scales for which you have data? Does targeting change with season? Perhaps more-expensive lobsters more often targeted in the run-up to Christmas (when Canadian lobster are air-freighted to parts of Europe to get the best prices) or in summer (when there are more tourists in Wales and perhaps a higher demand for fresh seafood)?
If you don't know, then you risk asking the wrong questions of the data and you will misunderstand what it is telling you.
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How come I can view everybody's score on my list, but I can't view my own score?
Can you guide me to view my research contributions?
Sincerely,
Waleed Al-Bazzaz
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thanks everyone, I am also searching for the answer as I have joined two days back both in google scholar and RG
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I am currently working on my dissertation and I selected Peter Garrett's theoretical framework for Language Attitudes, I am not able to access many studies but the critical one is the one mentioned above. I will be highly obliged if someone shares the complete study with me.
Thank You.
Garrette, P., Bishop, H. and Coupland, N., 2009, Diasporic ethnolinguistic subjectivities:
Patagonia, North America and Wales. International journal of the sociology of the
language 195, 173-99.
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I have the following books by Peter Garret (and allia) that I can provide to you if they are useful to your research:
Investigating Language Attitudes: Social Meanings of Dialect, Ethnicity and Performance.
Attitudes to Language.
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Is there anyone here from Wales, UK that have been subject to or witnessed social exclusion?
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Do you have any question forms to analyze social exclusion in migrations? I'll do an in-depth interview with the immigrants. Would you share it with me, please?
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The Gower peninsula around Swansea is my target area
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I ask this question because when I worked at ADAS Pwllpeiran Research Centre in mid Wales, common rush had become invasive in the improved areas of the grazed upland organic pastures The control measure was cutting and grazing as it was held that this was more effective than either cutting or grazing alone. On my own organic holding, similar management also led to increased rush infestation in permanent pasture and so in 2017 we ceased grazing and planted 9 hectares of broadleaved trees under the Farm Woodland Improvement scheme. The site is steeply sloping and the land is wet, so mechanical weeding has not been possible. Despite the lack of weed control, trees have established and in two years a significant depth of grass biomass has developed and grasses appears to be dominating and out-competing the rush.
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Since the flowers of rushes are wind-pollinated, they are highly sensitive for movement. Hence, animal grazing is more likely to aid the dissemination of flower pollens into a large area. That may be the reason you primarily observed an increase in Juncus infestation. In fact, one of the factors for invasion of many invasive plants around the globe is cattle grazing. On the other hand, rushes could help minimize soil erosion especially in sloppy areas. But in your case, the establishment of trees obviously had a greater impact on regeneration of undergrowth grasses that could outcompete the common rush. Therefore, this is another evidence that agro-forestry interventions could mitigate weed problems.
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I need this paper : The Origin of the Structure known as Guilielmites
EXTRACT
During the course of palaeontological work in the North Wales coalfield, shining discoidal bodies were noticed on the bedding planes of various shales. They were found to be identical with objects described as Guilielmites by Geinitz (4) in 1858. The literature concerning them is reviewed below, and a new theory of their origin is advanced.
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Merci Didier
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Wales has managed to test 90% of people suspected of being infected with novel coronavirus in their own homes, after implementing community testing for covid-19.
Vaughan Gething, minister for health and social services in Wales, credited the NHS with making the process “as convenient as possible for people whilst also protecting our ambulance and hospital resources for those who need it most.”
More than 100 people had been tested in Wales as of 13 February, with no positive cases. Around the UK, nine cases have been confirmed. Gething said that health services in Wales were trying to “manage as many people as possible outside of hospital.”
He said, “Testing in the community is proving very effective and works well whilst we are in the detection of infection phase. We are working closely with the NHS and social care to ensure that, should the situation change and we see some spread of coronavirus in the community, our services are ready to provide a swift response.”
Self-isolation
In Wales, members of the public who call NHS Direct Wales or 111 Wales and meet the current case definition are referred to Public Health Wales’s health protection team. If assessed as a possible case a decision is then made as to whether people are suitable for home testing on the basis of their self-reported health status and their ability to self-isolate at home.
NHS Wales has seven health boards that provide local healthcare services. Public Health Wales’s microbiology team then coordinates with the relevant health board community testing teams to arrange home testing within 12-36 hours.
Gething said that he was “grateful to the public for following our clear message that they should not attend their GP practice or present at hospital emergency departments.”
Community testing for covid-19 has also been rolled out in other areas of the UK including London, where doctors working in a number of NHS trusts came together to share best practice.1 The team explained in The BMJ how they had rolled out community testing.2
Covid-19 has so far resulted in the deaths of 2008 people worldwide, more than the combined total from the 2003 SARS outbreak (774) and MERS in 2012-19 (858 deaths).3 This is despite the novel virus being branded as less deadly because of its lower case fatality rate—2%, compared with 10% from SARS (8098 cases, 774 deaths) and 35% from MERS (2494 cases, 858 deaths)—reflecting instead the higher number of cases of covid-19 (75 240 as of 18 February).
References
    1. Mahase E
    2. . Coronavirus: home testing pilot launched in London to cut hospital visits and ambulance use. BMJ2020;368:m621. doi:10.1136/bmj.m621 pmid:32060015FREE Full TextGoogle Scholar
  1. ↵Coronavirus: rolling out community testing for covid-19 in the NHS. BMJ Opinion 2020 Feb 17. https://blogs.bmj.com/bmj/2020/02/17/coronavirus-rolling-out-community-testing-for-covid-19-in-the-nhs/.Google Scholar
    1. Mahase E
    2. . Coronavirus covid-19 has killed more people than SARS and MERS combined, despite lower case fatality rate. BMJ2020;368:m641. doi:10.1136/bmj.m641 pmid:32071063FREE Full TextGoogle Scholar
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The COVID-19 is not the first pandemic and will not be the last. Of course it would be helpful to test an alternative action to control the virus outside the health institution. From the point of view of community health, this pandemic is to some extent related to socio-cultural behaviour, and more precisely, the personal hygiene and the tradition of preparing and eating food. Therefore, raising the level of awareness and involving the public as individuals and groups in taking the responsibility for their own health will be necessary for the success of any plan intended to manage control of pandemic.
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In a speech today, Queen of England, Ireland, Scotland, and Wales, Elizabeth II announced that the United Kingdom plans to withdraw formally from the European Union as of January 31, 2020. Why was this decision made? Is it timely, long overdue, or hasty and premature?
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@Srini, the General elections on 12/12/2019was won by the conservatives by the same lies AS in 2016 and even more of them... But what would have Bern the alternative? An old Marxist?;
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Hello,
I am interested in learning how to process EEG data to use in clinical setting, I have a humble background in programming. I am a physician and I do not have much knowledge about the basic sciences of biosignals and signal processing. What would be a good resource to learn the important basics that will help me build my skills in EEG processing. Which software that allows me to import EEG data for analysis.
Waleed
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Hi,
first of all is important to preprocessing the EEG signals, for this reason you must improve your knowledge in EEG processing.
I recommend you to read:
Bigdely-Shamlo N, Mullen T, Kothe C, Su KM, Robbins KA. The PREP pipeline: standardized preprocessing for large-scale EEG analysis. Front Neuroinform. 2015 Jun 18;9:16. doi: 10.3389/fninf.2015.00016
Moreover, for the first step of analysis i suggest to try to analyze resting state EEG with a matlab toolbox with GUI as eeglab.
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If you are a police officer, teacher, nurse, occupational therapist, fire fighter, social worker, doctor, accountant, administrator, youth worker, childcare worker, auditor, paramedic, HR officer, procurement officer, solicitor or have any other role in the Welsh public service your help would be very much appreciated!
I’m a research student at the University of South Wales studying a doctorate in business administration. My area of interest is the relationship between self-awareness and leader effectiveness and how this changes across different job levels across the Welsh public service.
I'm looking for anyone who is employed in any of the Welsh public service organisations to help me with my study.  It would involve completing a quick questionnaire which would take a maximum of 15 minutes.  
Please drop me a line and I'll send you a link to the questionnaire
Thank you
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am not living in Kenya.thanks
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To what extent does the criminal justice system provide justice for victims in the UK and Wales?
#victims #justice #criminaljusticesystem #uk
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Though I am not familiar with UK law law but residing in common law following country gives me a urge to answer this question in a nut Shell. The cardinal principal of criminal Justice system is that no one should be condemned convict until proven guilty beyond reasonable doubt. Further,it can be comprehended that to safeguard the inhabitants of the society from the fury of the goons and corrupts application of a due criminal Justice system is prerequisite. Other wise people would people would resort to different avenues other than court.which will create miscarriage of justice.
Regards,
Irfan
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Hello Mr. Asghar Khan,
I am a research scholar in China doing my research in computer science in the field of networks. I am very much interested in the area of UAV and want to continue the research and build my career in it. Could you please provide me the simulation code or method that how can i deploy the network for UAV. I want to implement some protocol on it. Please provide me the related source code if you can. It would be a great pleasure for me.
Thank you so much
Best Regards: Waleed Ahmad
Research Scholar at Hebei University of Technology China
Whatsapp: +923316619106
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Stimulation is an act of arousing an object or organism to action. GPS stimulation code is a GPS software tool box. For example we have IRIG (Interrange Instrumentation Group) time code. They are standard formats for transferring timing information. Atomic frequency standards and GPS receivers designed for precision timing are often equipped with an IRIG output. Thanks.
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Interested to know whether this might work in West Wales, where there is no granite!
Thanks
Brian
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Hi Brian,
Thanks for your question. To use this technique on dolerite and rhyolite, you would first have to demonstrate a relationship between surface exposure age (e.g. 10Be, 36Cl) and degree of surface weathering (SH R-value).
In our original paper, we found that there is a clear relationship for granite surfaces. However, this was not the case for other lithologies (e.g. Quartz, Gneiss, Sandstones). This may be a consequence of our sampling design i.e. incorporating dated surfaces from large geographical regions. At the local scale, it may be possible to predict exposure ages from SH R-values for these lithologies and at a minimum, use those surfaces for relative age estimates. However, the assumption that all lithologies are equally suitable for SHED is probably not valid.
So the first step would be to sample a large dataset of dated rhyolite and dolerite surfaces using the SH to determine if there is a clear relationship between exposure ages and SH R-values. If so, the associated calibration curve could then be used to predict exposure ages for undated surfaces.
Hope that helps,
Matt
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When I was young hardly anyone took degrees. Only the privileged went to university. Now it has become a necessity and rite of passage. Unfortunately, in the UK, with changes to the attainment of university fees and rising costs, it is costing students far more and they are now entering adult life with huge debt. Universities continually increase their fees, or appear to. There has recently been some expressed concerns about teaching, especially in the traditional, older universities (Where I went to, and with which accusations I am in agreement . The best teacher there, stimulating and innovative, was Italian).
It seems to me that we need to re-look at first degrees, make them shorter and cheaper, with fewer holidays. Make sure there are far more ways open to students, those who want the qualification but can do without the experience, to study rather than say attending in this committed way to a single school/university. This is an extension of school life surely. Weekend study perhaps? As long as the standards are kept up, should there really be a problem?
Kingsley Amis, the British novelist, considered extending degrees to so much of the population a mistake as thereby degrees get diluted, but in the modern world it is essential for as many people as possible to obtain qualifications. Need they be degrees? Amis himself was the product of university life being extended in the UK to the Middle and Lower MIddle-Class (British obsessions of the time), now the poor can can as long as they get into debt. Degrees function after all as a way of influencing and ensuring social mobility.
In Amis' day professional work and jobs in general gave day to day training (TV, journalism), but usually there was little for young entrants to learn compared to today and competition now is fiercer. Amis taught at many of the New Universities of the times (such as Wales) but never acquired a PhD (not generally popular then) nor a BLitt, the equivalent of a Masters. How times have changed!
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when I engaged in my university study, there was just 10 medical colleges in my country. and we were about 50 students. now there is about 30 colleges, with about 150 students per year, with same facilities, this explosion, pull the education down.
As well the number of those with master and doctorate, was very little, now they are more than those with primary school graduated, at that time.
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In many countries there is a discussion about the possibility to remunerate the service of voltage regulation and reactive power provision. The English market is a good example. But it looks complex. The offered capability curve seems rectangular so the whole reactive power capability of the generators isn't exploited entirely. is there any paper that describes clearly this market ?
Figures are available ?
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Interested
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There is only a little passage in WWikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orthogonal_polynomials) about the history of orthogonal polynomials, namely: "The field of orthogonal polynomials developed in the late 19th century from a study of continued fractions by P. L. Chebyshev and was pursued by A. A. Markov and T. J. Stieltjes. Some of the mathematicians who have worked on orthogonal polynomials include Gábor Szegő, Sergei Bernstein, Naum Akhiezer, Arthur Erdélyi, Yakov Geronimus, Dave Gwyn, Wolfgang Hahn, Theodore Seio Chihara, Mourad Ismail, Waleed Al-Salam, and Richard Askey." I would like to known more details about how this theory and the theory of orthogonal functions envolved along the centuries, but I did not find any reference. Any comments will be appreciated.
Best,
Ricardo.
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The following are some Books involving certain historical information about orthogonal polynomials and function.
But I have not seen yet any book specialized in the history of orthogonal polynomials and functions.
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Dear colleagues,
I am looking for this publication:
Jaanusson, Valdar, 1976. Faunal Dynamics in the Middle Ordovician (Viruan) of Balto-Scandia. In: The Ordovician System: Proceedings of a Palaeontological Association Symposium Birmingham, September 1974. University of Wales Press and National Museum of Wales, Cardiff, 301–326.
Does someone have a digital copy that they can share?
Many thanks in advance,
Hendrik
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Thanks, Anders!
Cheers,
Hendrik
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Dear all,
I'm looking for the difference between WALE and Smagorinsky sub-grid scale models in filtering the scalar transport equation.
Does anyone know something about it?
Thanks
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Dear Shahin,
The original and dynamic Smagorinsky-Lilly models are essentially algebraic models in which subgrid-scale stresses are parameterized using the resolved velocity scales. The underlying assumption is the local equilibrium between the transferred energy through the grid-filter scale and the dissipation of kinetic energy at small subgrid scales. The subgrid-scale turbulence can be better modeled by accounting for the transport of the subgrid-scale turbulence kinetic energy.
Wall-Adapting Local Eddy-viscosity (WALE) model is designed to return the correct wall asymptotic behavior for wall bounded flows.
Here is a good paper where 3 (SGS) models are compared:
Assessment of SubGrid-Scale Modeling for Large-Eddy Eimulation of a Spatially-Evolving Compressible Turbulent Boundary Layer”.
Regards
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Hello all,
I am trying to attempt morphological identification of ticks and fleas collected in Wales on wild small rodents.
My samples have been frozen and after the morphological identification I need to extract DNA to attempt molecular identification and to check whether DNA from various pathogens is present.
My question is what is the best technique to treat the samples during morphological identification in order to identify the key morphological features and avoid DNA degradation?
I am using a dissecting microscope for big specimens and I used ethanol to fix them, but I am really struggling with tiny larvae. I thought about mounting slides, but I am not sure which medium to use.
Thank you very much,
flavia
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Additionally to that- you can try to narrow down the possibilities. I am guessing that your ticks will be only several species (ricinus, trianguliceps- anything else?)- so knowing what to expect could help to distinguish between your specimens as they will be pretty different for example in size.
As for the fleas- I have spent some time identifying them, and generally most of the males you can tell apart without any further preparation; as for the females- and difficult specimens I often just dissected off the head and the end part of the body (as that is where the diagnostic features are) and cleared those in KOH (works magic) and use the middle part of the body (with the blood meal) for DNA extraction and analysis (for pathogen and host DNA). Can discuss this further if you want, just email me on the Cardiff University email.
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This feature occurs in Katian / Hirnantian transition strata in West Wales - in laminated hemi-pelagite. It is about 200mm high and 100mm across. There are a number of similar features in the strata 25m or so below this one (it occurs at least 8 times with varying details of morphology. Much of the rock below this level is full of Chondrites style burrows. Looks to me like some form of infilled Dominichnial shaft between surface and deep burrows...any further thoughts?
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 As to me it is a sedimentological "story", instead of beeing a trace fossil.
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How can one design a gating system for thin waled ductile iron differential case casting?
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Hi Sir. Attach you can find a paper from Norberto Rizzo, an internacional expert in ductile iron. Especifically, thin walls have lowest cooling module, like the automotive pieces, area of your work. If you want you can read the part 3 of the paper that talks about gating systmes.
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Holocene lake sediments from S Wales, UK (ORS lithology), reveal stiff, cream/grey silt with clay intercalated with dark peats and red/brown local slopewash. Origin of these pale-coloured facies remains enigmatic - lake marl is discounted on account of low carbonate values (<3%) and lacustrine diatomite rejected - no diatoms. Pollen may suggest a shallow lacustrine environment. Also revealed at lake margins (see photo).
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Thank you. To clarify, this lake is a small, enclosed basin in a mountain setting (altitude 500 m.a.s.l), and is not subject to marine influence.