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Is there an actual proof that visual-spatial cues enhance early or late visual processing (as compared to uncued visual processing)?
Without saying that what is implied by this question is "true", we know that when it comes to response times (RT), peripheral (or exogenous) and central (or endogenous) cues will have a different impact (e.g., Doallo et al., 2004). However, I struggle to find any event-related potentials (ERP) study that demonstrates an enhancement of perceptual processes following a cue (preferably peripheral) when compared to "self-generated", or spontaneous, gazes (i.e., overt spatial attention).
For instance, say that you have to look out for forest fires all day long. You will probably end up doing something else to fight boredom, and hence end up looking for possible smoke from time to time.
Now the question is: Will you be able to report(RT) a smoke faster if you are spatially cued because the cue allowed you to perceive(ERP) it faster?
To summarize:
Endogenous Cue – Spontaneous = ?
Exogenous Cue – Endogenous Cue = ?
Exogenous Cue – Spontaneous = ?
Reference
Doallo, S., Lorenzo-Lopez, L., Vizoso, C., Holguı́n, S. R., Amenedo, E., Bara, S., & Cadaveira, F. (2004). The time course of the effects of central and peripheral cues on visual processing: an event-related potentials study. Clinical Neurophysiology, 115(1), 199-210.
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This is a great question because spatial cueing research is mainly about variations on a paradigm and it's important to stop and think again about what it all means. So, there is a big literature on ERP effects of spatial cueing, beginning (according to a quick search) with Eimer (1993). Many of these studies would however involve "self generated gazes" - or self-directed attention. For example, Nobre et al. (2000) performed an experiment in which the same (bicoloured, central) stimulus had two possible interpretations (i.e. target is probably right or probably left), according to prior instructions, and got early negative ERP enhancement contralateral to the cued hemifield.
However if we limit the question to exogenous cueing, a recent review by Slotnick (2017) concludes that early ERP effects in visual cortex (C1 component) are more likely to be observed for exogenous than endogenous cues, in upper visual fields, with distractors and with high attention load.
Presumably gamma enhancement and reaction time effects occur later than C1
Eimer, M. (1993) Spatial cueing, sensory gating and selective response preparation: an ERP study on visuo-spatial orienting Electroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology/ Evoked Potentials, 88 (5), pp. 408-420.
Nobre, A.C., Sebestyen, G.N., Miniussi, C. (2000) The dynamics of shifting visuospatial attention revealed by event-related potentials Neuropsychologia, 38 (7), pp. 964-974.
Scott D. Slotnick (2017) The experimental parameters that affect attentional modulation of the ERP C1 component, Cognitive Neuroscience, 9:1-2, 53-62, DOI: 10.1080/17588928.2017.1369021
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Memory components in MANNs are pretty basic. I know of models with multiple attention components. Are there Deep Learning (DL) architectures that employ a multiple-component approach for memory as in Baddeley & Hitch, 1974 and Baddeley, 2000?
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Have such models been given a Deep Learning spin? Has anyone tried to run them on / integrate them with a Neural Turing Machine (NTL) / Differentiable Neural Computer (DNC), for instance?
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distance from  the fixation gaze can affect attentional response in human attentional control system.is there any mathematical function to clarify it?
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For overt shifts of attention (ie saccades), and distractor effects there is a spatial structure. These have been described geometrically (ie mapped). See  Walker et al (1997)  J Neurophysiol 78:1108-1119 and cites. Not sure about covert shifts of attention. 
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I know some studies which show that stimuli considered as phylogenetically fear-relevant, such as snakes or spiders, benefit of a greater attentional capture than other stimuli, even for babies. I would like to know if some studies have investigated this effect with stimuli considered as ontogenetically fear-relevant, such as guns, in a young population without experience of those stimuli (babies ?).
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Hum… very good question. If it is about guns... A gun has a single usage… I mean, is there any other purpose to the object other than to kill or remind you that you can be killed? Guns induce the fear of death. I recommend Ernest Becker’s work on this topic… Guns incite and trigger violence, even if it’s only by their presence.
Best wishes,
Pedro
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the protocol is somewhat like that- 2 set size was applied (12 and 16) in each set size 1 is target and remaining are the distractors. Total sets of trials 16- 8 with target present and 8 without target. I have used the eye tracking technique to assess the visuospatial attention while performing the visual search. What element of the eye tracking data will be useful to interpret the scenario ?
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This sounds like it fits the 'selective attention' definition of visual attention (Perry and Hodges, 1999; Tsotsos et al., 1995). How are you operationally defining attention for this task? Looking at the two prior references and how they measure for similar constructs might be useful here.
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Hey,
I am looking for research on spatial memory, but not on the scale of cities or buildings (spatial navigation), but rather a small scale spatial memory of objects in a room, hall or even just on a workbench. 
Preferably done in a real world setup and not on desktop. Possibly also done in VR (rather on HMD than just desktop VR. could also be CAVEs).
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Hi,
Please see publication listed on my profile, first author Jonna Nilsson, which looks at allocentric and egocentric spatial reference frames using a virtual reality programme under fMRI conditions. The specific aims of this research however was to compare a group of patients suffering from depression with that of health controls. Not sure if that was what you were after.
Thanks
Lucy Stevens
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Dear all,
How can one define visuo-spatial working memory capacity of subjects reporting a continuous value? Subjects are shown a set of stimuli and after a given delay, they have to report using a cursor where one of the stimulus was shown. I'm aware of this kind measure for discrete reports, but I guess those are not useful here.
Thank you in advance,
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You can look at the probability of a report from memory times the set size. If you are modelling the response according to any number of mixture models there is typically a value for the proportion of guessing. You can take [(1-guessing)*set size] to estimate the number of items in memory; you are limited by the goodness of your model fit. 
Another approach that Wei Ji Ma suggested was reporting the standard deviation of recall errors as a function of set size, and compare the functions. See Ma, Husain, & Bays, 2014 for a review. 
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I would like to create an experiment which can be shared on internet (like Facebook for exemple).
But the experiment that i want to built needs accurate presentation time (my faster frame is 25ms) and i need to collect accurate reaction times (around 1/2ms of accuracy).
Is there a software or a website that can do that ?
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Unlikely: your RT data would be distorted by the computer performance, the monitor specs and the connection lag. I also believe that 1/2 ms of accuracy in RT recording is implausible even on YOUR computer in an offline test, as the keyboard has a lag that can be up to 30 ms (although it should be fairly constant, so it would not be much of a problem). 
I know that the people from Project Implicit (https://implicit.harvard.edu/implicit/) collect RT data across the web. I don't know how they deal with these problems (I suspect they don't), but you can try to ask them. 
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Ask for advice: Comparing the delay or retrieval activity in object color-based working memory with corresponding activity in object location-based WM.
I would be grateful if someone could give me some advices and paper.
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Maybe the attached publication by
Ma et al. (2014). Changing concepts of working memory. nature neuroscience, 17(3): 347-356
could give you some orientation?
Regards,
Klaus Blischke
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According to the literature, caffeine affects on cognitive performance (memory, attention, etc.). Also, the location of attention focus may affects postural stability. Now, what is the best research design or protocol to assess the effects of caffeine and attention focus on postural control?
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You may want to use structural equation modeling to test the effects. SEM is more flexible than standard regression in terms of treating a given variable as both dependent and independent variable. For instance, perhaps you would seek to treat attention as a mediating variable between caffeine consumption and postural control.
Best wishes,
Damian
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I made a study with two types of targets (3 shematic faces or 3 schematic houses). The task where participants had to detect the 3 schematic houses and ignore distractors (photo of houses or faces) seems to be more difficult (reaction time bigger, more false alarms) than the task where participants had to detect the 3 shematic faces.
As the heterogeneity of the 3 schematic houses is more pronounced than the heterogeneity of the 3 schematic faces, i wanted to know if some studies have investigated the impact of the heterogeneity of the target on attentional capture by distractors ?
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We are practically hardwired to pay attention to faces, which makes sense from the perspective of evolution.  Houses are recent in our history.  It would thus be easier to resist distractors when looking at pictures of faces than when looking  to pictures of houses.  That might account for your results perhaps more than heterogeneity.
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Or are general tests for dementia administered such as the MMSE and MoCA? I am interested in all tests that measure cognitive function, but particularly visual attention.
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Personally, once testing (or even simple conversations with the person) has identified that all is not right in memory/judgement/decision-making I find that collateral from family/carers frequently indicates whether the changes have been gradual over time or if there have been 'steps down' in function. Especially if they are told how TIAs can appear to an observer. Hindsight, as they say, gives us all 20:20 vision and when looking back family members will frequently recall a day when their relative may have been exceptionally sleepy, hard to wake, confused but following a good night in bed were recovered, although not quite back to where they were before.
Don't forget that people with vascular dementia often display moments of insight which is different to that displayed by suffers of AD.
Also, as we age I firmly believe that we all experience vascular events - smoking, diet, cholesterol etc combine to fur up those arteries and eventually there will be small blockages in the brain.  It's all about reducing the risk of a 'major' event which could alter our personality and/or performance.
My advice - do tests by all means, but get good collateral, use your gumption and look after your arteries!
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I believe some metrics related to the eye, such as pupil dilation, may give an indication of the extent to which something being looked at is being actively processed. However, I am interested in ways to determine whether someone is paying attention to (cognitively processing) what they are looking at in natural, real-world conditions, where changing light levels may make it difficult to use pupil dilation as a measure. I am therefore wondering if there are any tell-tale signs from eye movements that can reveal whether something is being actively processed and has some cognitive importance to the observer.
For example, research on inattentional blindness shows that just because something in our environment is fixated does not mean it is perceived or processed. Also, research has been carried out about mind-wandering during reading which suggests eye movements may be qualitatively different during periods of mind-wandering compared with when what is being read is being processed. Are there any similar findings for natural situations such as just walking through an environment?
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Bear in mind that covert shifts of attention can happen in the absence of eye movements (which is why they're called covert).  See for example the introduction of the article linked below.
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We know, for example, that some action games and mathematics can be capable of developing these skills. What other activities can?
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I would say navigation, either on urban or non-urban environments, that can add some changes to the daily activity that routes us from house to work/school to shopping: walking, cycling, driving or sailing, out of / expanding the daily routine surrounding environment. And perhaps also using external imagery like maps in paper or smart devices with LBS (Location Based Services) and possibly AR (Augmented Reality), that can reference or inform the place and the corresponding bodily experience, spatial cognition and the mental imagery of the surrounding environment. If all this can be reproduced in a complete VR (Virtual Reality) environment, is an issue that is being study by Neurosciences and Design, and maybe there is not a definite answer ... 
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Based on the “Object-Spatial-Verbal Cognitive Style Model” from Kozhevnikov, Kosslyn and Shephard (2005), Are there any available instruments to measure the visuospatial dimensions (Object imagery – ability to mentally represent object details like form, color, etc; and Spatial Imagery – ability to mentally represent and manipulate spatial relations between objects and its parts) separately?
Any tips will be welcome, thank you!
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Tiago, the MARMI and the MASMI are in Research Gate. I am sending you the MASMI and a article. If you need more information, please tell me it.
Bye
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I am studying spatial imagery and want to know participants' visuospatial working memory capacity.
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Thank you!