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Visual Culture - Science topic

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It is just something like reimagining of one’s childhood and personhood, like a re-engagement with the ‘shadow child’ within, in the face of the disturbing ephemerality of self alongside the destabilising onset of modernity. What is your opinion?
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What about the works of and theories of the art group COBRA (Karel Appel, Asger Jorn, Constant)?
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I am planning a research about environmental education, and I would like to make children draw mind maps and analyse their perception of space, favourite areas, and hope to be able to withdraw some conclusions from these drawing. However if another project already exist it could be useful to see its methodology.
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Thank you very much, Mary and Orlando!
Orlando, probably I didn't explain my ideas well... The idea is not to analyze childern's ability to draw maps but to analyze their maps and understand which spaces are important for them, by which spaces are they attracted in general, in order to understand which are the ideal areas to use for environmental education. This might not be the best question to ask, but to begin with, I started with this one... For this reason I was looking for studies in this topic, to see how others have dealed with this topic.
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With respect to “public art,” an examination of the state of the question points to at least two ways in which that concept may be defined, two “circles” within which it may fall: It may be related either to the space the art object is to occupy (which might be called a “public space”) or to the art object itself (which might then be called “public art”). Here, we might pose several questions that seem either to make it easier to understand the public art/ public space duality, or to make such an understanding impossible. We might, for example, ask questions about:
Legitimacy (Is the work an art object?)  
The constitution of the cultural imaginary with respect to what a “public space” is and what “public art” is (Does the work reflect my identity?)
Ownership of the space and the work (Who owns what?)
Authorship (Is the work created by an individual with personal title to it, or is it created on behalf of a collectivity?)
Decency and decorum (Is the art appropriate to the space it occupies or will occupy, and is it suitable for being seen by men, women, and children?)
Preservation and conservation (Who shall assume the ownership of the patrimonial work and be responsible for its explanation and esteem, defense, custody, maintenance, restoration, and permanence?)
Each of these issues raises a debate, implicit in the very existence of the public-art object, and each debate may be different. And each potential controversy suggests its own “public,” in the sense of audience or interest group, each with its own defining expectations. Below a polemical article I wrote about a country-wide public art project:
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Excellent questions, Marcel. I have the impression that your questions are actually tentative answers. I like them for their polemical value. The challenge is precisely that: is it possible for an art object to have a relatively stable meaning throughout a community? If that communal meaning could exist, could it last through time? How long and why? Thanks for sharing your questions! 
Best regards, Lilliana
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In my research I will use a measuring scale based in McCroskey Studies. (http://www.jamescmccroskey.com). I would like to know more about another research in this field or theme.
Thanks.
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Hi Riccardo Puglisi,
Thank you very much for your help. I will sure to read the website of the professor Gabriel Lenz with more attention.
I saw here fast by my phone and really liked
Thanks!
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I am busy completing a masters degree at DUT on shadow in photography in the field of children's magazine covers. I need ti cite what other researches have written about it.
Thanks
Mark 
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1)  Michael Baxandall, Shadows and Enlightenment Ed.  Yale, 192 pp, £19.95, June 1995, ISBN 0 300 05979 5
and regardind visual perception:
2) David Marr, (1982). Vision: A Computational Investigation into the Human Representation and Processing of Visual Information. New York: Freeman.
3) J.J. Gibson, The Senses Considered as Perceptual Systems , ISBN-13: 978-0313239618 
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I'm very interesting on digital ethnography and visual methods. We have a laboratory on digital visual cultures at my univerisity and we are developing experimental research within a postgraduate course using those technologies and methods, mainly on urban subjects (gentrification, minorities, public space, social movements) 
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I'm looking for examples where social representations embodied in visual cultural products were studied. I found very few examples. Does anyone know some work  that help me to study social representations in  images? Is someone doing  a research of this kind?
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Hi Carolina
You could try some of these; 
Gill, R. (2011) ‘Bend it Like Beckham? The Challenges of Reading Gender and Visual Culture’ in P. Reavey (ed) Visual Methods in Psychology: Using and Interpreting Images in Qualitative Research, pp. 29-42. London: Routledge.
Goffman, I. (1979) Gender Advertisements. New York: Macmillan.
Morant, N. (1998) ‘Social Representations of Gender in the Media’, in: Miell, D. and Wetherell, M. (eds) Doing Social Psychology, pp. 234-283. London: Sage.
Moscovici, S. (1998) ‘Social Consciousness and its History’, Culture & Psychology 4(3), 411-429.
Mulvey, L. (1975) ‘Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema’, Screen 16 (3): 6-18.
Zarzycka, M. (2012) ‘Madonna’s of Warfare, Angels of Poverty: Cutting through Press Photographs Photographies 5 (1): 71-85.
I have recently finished a study on intergenerational breastfeeding, where participants brought artefacts to interviews, and I am going to do some SR stuff around motherhood but not written up yet. Also, I have a small section in a chapter I am drafting up for a forthcoming book that looks briefly at SR and visual images, get in touch if you would me to send this
best wishes
Dawn
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I'm currently winding down my data collection and at the conclusion I will have roughly 2100 images and 300 .txt surveys to analyze. Currently I have folders with each participant's 7 images (drawings) along with their survey.txt file. I'm looking at NVivo and MAXQDA at the moment and trying to figure them out. I'm curious to know what software others have used with this type of data and what their experience was with organizing and tagging the data? Any info on making my thesis project go faster and more efficiently would be appreciated!
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After testing NVivo I'm pretty confident that its way of handling images will suit me fine.
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Since there are no topics that address Visual Literacy I thought it was overdue. So how do you define these literacies and what goals should we set at each level of development to educate students on the consumption and production of images?
How can we help develop/ instill a critical approach to visual culture where students thoughtfully question the motivations and sites of production of the imagery they encounter on a daily basis?  
Looking at the recent release of National Core Arts Standards (in the US) http://www.nationalartsstandards.org/ does it do enough to address visual and media literacies? What competencies or components might you add? 
Should the teaching of such literacies be restricted to the arts? What other subjects areas do you see these literacies playing an important role in?
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In the English National Curriculum for English Language and Media Studies at both GCSE and A Level there are requirements for students to consider the messages in visual imagery. See the attached website for one exam board (there are others) http://www.aqa.org.uk Younger students in the UK are expected, as part of their English Language course, to develop an understanding and appreciation of how images can be constructed to convey messages and to analyse them. As a starting point students are asked to look at an image and describe what they see, to try to stay with only what is in the picture and refer to specific aspects. They are then encouraged to think about what emotions/feelings the image evokes in them. They may then consider an image in a range of contexts - appeal for donations, attached to a newspaper story, illustration in a story, illustration in a non-fiction text. They would produce their own text with images for a specific purpose. In moving image the sequencing of shots, and angles would also be explored. There has been lots of interesting work done.
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Also what are the differences between the two and the different implications each have?
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Dear Pooja! I think watching a movies will be the best option for this. Ms.Sasirekha have said that non verbal comm have much more effect than verbal comm already in her post. and itgs really true. by reading the script u may get info about the sentences used and the plot of the film but the tones in which those sentences were said and the expressions would be missing.
secondly, camera shots play a very important role. they register some points in our minds. like it brings a huge difference if u select a tilt high instead of tilt low.
so I ll recommend u to go for watching movies than to read the stories only.
thnx :)
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In some developed countries, functional illiteracy continues to be a very serious problem, partly due to their crisis in education.. Do you think digital technologies might influence an increase in the level of literacy - particularly among children. In countries where illiteracy has historically been a persistent problem, Book publishers have been making efforts to give their books away to poorer children who have access to the internet because they believe that by introducing children to online stories these children will eventually be encouraged to read 'classical' books.
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Yes, but I think 'reading' and 'writing' is a continuous spectrum from txts to blogs to online comments, to published articles, to books. The number of txts that are circulating is in the billions, and this includes poor and previously poorly literate communities.
I worked in literacy programmes in many countries, and always tried to work with the texts that people already had in their environment - street and shop signs and advertising for starters. If I were to design a literacy programme today (for children too), I would start with their txts, or start by getting them mobile phones, and work up from there.