Science topic

Visual Anthropology - Science topic

Explore the latest questions and answers in Visual Anthropology, and find Visual Anthropology experts.
Questions related to Visual Anthropology
  • asked a question related to Visual Anthropology
Question
42 answers
I would like to add some visual example to illustrate the different types of participant observation (complete observer, observer as participant, participant as observer, and complete participant). Any suggestion is welcome.
Thank you,
Isabella
Relevant answer
Answer
  • asked a question related to Visual Anthropology
Question
4 answers
Do you know any visual anthropological references about self-representation on dating apps?
Relevant answer
Answer
Thank you everyone for that great help!
  • asked a question related to Visual Anthropology
Question
4 answers
Andrew N Margioris, University of Crete, Retimo, Crete, Greece 
Kenneth Ain, University of Kentucky
E. Dermitzaki, University of Crete
Publication on KAT45 in Endocrinology, 1998
Relevant answer
Answer
I could not get KAT45.
  • asked a question related to Visual Anthropology
Question
20 answers
Dear Sirs and Madams,
Your contribution to a collection of images depicting systems of organization for color and species will be used in a study. I am gathering images that represent graphically the organization of colors and species. The images may be from folk taxonomy, Linnaean taxonomy, iBOL, cladistics, Munsell, Goethe, and other sources.
If you add an image, please indicate its source. Thank you!
The images will provide the materials for a follow-up research I conducted on nomenclature of color and species (World to Word: Nomenclature Systems of Color and Species https://mospace.umsystem.edu/xmlui/bitstream/handle/10355/60517/Dissertation_2017_Kelley_replacement.pdf?sequence=5&isAllowed=y)
Tanya Kelley
Relevant answer
Answer
From the small amount of information that you have provided, I think that you are operating at a fairly high level of pattern recognition. However, since you are dealing in part with phylogenies, you should be aware that some hominin cladograms are based on single specimens. For example, in the case of the meme "Homo floresiensis" the phylogenies are based on a single skull (LB1) that is developmentally abnormal, so the phylogenies are misleading.
  • asked a question related to Visual Anthropology
Question
8 answers
The focus on facial expressions in art is commonly mentioned in caricature or in mangas and animation (ex: in "Art and Illusion" of Ernst Gombrich, "Grapholexique du Manga" of Denis Sigal and "Understanding comics" of Scott McCloud's respectively) and rarely in classical western artworks (ex: "L'art de la grimace" of Martial Guédron). However, I wonder if some research are led in facial expressions in tribal (or primitive) art.
Relevant answer
Answer
excuse my poor english, but as referes the study of masks (levi strauss) is a good guide, if you can read in Portuguese, demand this Benjamin Pereira work "Máscaras Portuguesas".
Studies of masks associated with the festive cycles (carnaval) seems to me a good foothold (Europe);
  • asked a question related to Visual Anthropology
Question
3 answers
I am researching non figurative judeo and islamic visual arts  and I have been looking for the possible consequences in the social makeup of the people within those cultures.
Relevant answer
Answer
Nasta'liq calligraphy is a non-figurative artistic practice tied to Islamic faith. I found this book helpful in gaining some insight into the artistic and philosophical aspects of education in early 20th ct. Turkey (a country with many historic religious influences, both Judeo-Christian and Islamic). It contains passages that vividly describe Turkish children/students practicing Nasta-liq calligraphy, among other things.
The book:
"Behind Turkish Lattices, The Story of a Turkish woman"
By Hester Donald Jenkins 1869-1941
Another article I found helpful was:
"The Status of the Individual in Islam"
By Fazlur Rahman
Journal: Islamic Studies, Vol. 5, No. 4 (DECEMBER 1966), pp. 319-330
(Accessed from JSTOR)
This article relates to non-figurative trends in the western art-historical cannon, which might be helpful in connecting to more abstract ideas of faith and human spirituality:
"Abstract Expressionism: The Mystical Experience" by Edward M. Levine
From: Art Journal > Vol. 31, No. 1, Autumn, 1971  (Accessed from JSTOR)
  • asked a question related to Visual Anthropology
Question
3 answers
i need better definition of this increasingly popular vernacular demographic...
Relevant answer
Answer
It may be related to glocal studies and the perception of the local community within complex social environments, as in Weiss, Brad (2012). "Configuring the authentic value of real food: Farm-to-fork, snout-to-tail, and local food movements". American Ethnologist, v. 39, issue 3, pp. 614-626.
And Agriculture related researchs, as Thilmany, D. et al (2008). "Going Local: Exploring Consumer Behavior and Motivations for Direct Food Purchases". American Journal of Agricultural Economics, 90, issue 5, pp. 1303-1309.
  • asked a question related to Visual Anthropology
Question
41 answers
I'm looking for examples where social representations embodied in visual cultural products were studied. I found very few examples. Does anyone know some work  that help me to study social representations in  images? Is someone doing  a research of this kind?
Relevant answer
Answer
Hi Carolina
You could try some of these; 
Gill, R. (2011) ‘Bend it Like Beckham? The Challenges of Reading Gender and Visual Culture’ in P. Reavey (ed) Visual Methods in Psychology: Using and Interpreting Images in Qualitative Research, pp. 29-42. London: Routledge.
Goffman, I. (1979) Gender Advertisements. New York: Macmillan.
Morant, N. (1998) ‘Social Representations of Gender in the Media’, in: Miell, D. and Wetherell, M. (eds) Doing Social Psychology, pp. 234-283. London: Sage.
Moscovici, S. (1998) ‘Social Consciousness and its History’, Culture & Psychology 4(3), 411-429.
Mulvey, L. (1975) ‘Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema’, Screen 16 (3): 6-18.
Zarzycka, M. (2012) ‘Madonna’s of Warfare, Angels of Poverty: Cutting through Press Photographs Photographies 5 (1): 71-85.
I have recently finished a study on intergenerational breastfeeding, where participants brought artefacts to interviews, and I am going to do some SR stuff around motherhood but not written up yet. Also, I have a small section in a chapter I am drafting up for a forthcoming book that looks briefly at SR and visual images, get in touch if you would me to send this
best wishes
Dawn
  • asked a question related to Visual Anthropology
Question
6 answers
We would like to de-construct the fans' comments and learn about the nature of these relationship
Relevant answer
Answer
Thank you Lars
this is so helpful
  • asked a question related to Visual Anthropology
Question
17 answers
What is the role of myths in today's culture? How could they be reinterpreted? What is the role of myths and folklore in diasporic communities (particularly for Iranian)?
Relevant answer
Answer
Hi Sara,
The great Jazz pianist, Charlie Mingus, said "Making the simple complicated is commonplace; making the complicated simple, awesomely simple, that’s creativity."  I applaud your stance as first, researcher, then artist.  As a researcher, you use intentional thoughtful scientific tools to collect your thoughts, explore the background, gaher the information, to arrange your thoughts and direction.  As an artist, you will then interpret your thoughts and information into a tangible, artistic production that brings to bear all of your obvious communication and creative abilities (light, dark, color, texture, composition) to distill and convey in very simple, emotional, and intetional terms, everything you have learned.  To paraphrase the quote from Charlie Mingus, the artist in you will be able to simplify the complex for all of us, those of the diaspora and those who stand outside the diaspora experience, with the compassion to try to understand.  Just as love, hope, and dreams are universal to all mankind,  diaspora, an experience or sense of displacement, is also one of the universal experiences of man.
1) Keep doing your research.  If you are blocked at the moment, there is a fact, a story, or a lesson that your research and your ongoing life experiences will bring, at exactly the right time, to provide a building block, an inspiration, a foundation, or a perspective that you require to complete this project.  Keep doing the work.  The pathway from potential to performance is paved with persistence and perseverance.
2) Look at your history, your culture, your myth, and your experiences, as though examining an expensive and precious jewel.  Look from every conceivable direction, with both eyes open, ready to learn.  Are there other artistic interpreters (sculptors; musicians; actors; speakers; leaders) of the Iranian myths or culture that you admire, and from whom you might draw inspiration, different viewpoints, or fresh perspectives as you seek to share your experiences and distilled findings?
3) After doing the research, you may have to face a monumental decision: will you insert yourself into the story, making it a first person experience and thereby welcoming others into the myth and experience, or will you draw some frame or foundation from the myth, making it a third person experience, to serve as a foundation for the message, the story you wish to show and tell the world?  
4) As the artist, you have the opportunity and the responsibility to make the courageous decision to help us experience, to see, feel, hear, taste, and even smell the essence of the lessons you've learned, and the next steps you want us to take with you in your journey. 
  • asked a question related to Visual Anthropology
Question
83 answers
Academic culture understood as organizational culture has its artifacts, values ​​and hidden assumptions, according to Edgar Schein (2006).
Definitions of rituals have many dimensions I share one concept:
"The word " ritual " commonly brings to mind images of primitive exoticized others diligently engaged in mystical activities, they can find rituals , both sacred and secular , throughout" modern " society: collective experiences, from the Olympics to the commemoration of national Tragedies ; cyclical gatherings, from weekly congregations at the local church to the annual turkey carving at Thanksgiving to the intoxication of Mardi Gras, and personal life-patterns , from morning grooming routines to the ways in Which We greet and interact with one another.
Ritual is in fact an inevitable component of culture, extending from the largest- scale social and political processes to the most intimate aspects of our self - experience . Yet within this universality, the inherent multiplicity of ritual practices , both between and within cultures , also reflects the full diversity of the human experience " (source: http://www.culanth.org/curated_collections/4-ritual ).
I'm interested in rituals during conferences in the world in many aspects.
I wonder what rituals are present during conference moderation panels, coffee breaks, lunches and dinners?
What ritual is connected with so called scientific "stars" and "celebrities" and their demands on conferences court life?
Do you experience interesting rituals during the conference in different dimensions as:(in material and symbolic) negotiation of access, accommodation of your stay, rituals moderation panel session, ritual of greetings, coffee breaks, meals, etiquette and rituals of social life?
Have you experienced the rituals that were complicated, ridiculous or comic to you?
Images analysis welcome.
Below I share some image from last International Conference I participated as guest speaker in 14-15 May in Warsaw.
Very interesting in my opinion are greetings, presenting self with hand shake to new colleagues, coffee breaks and rituals of meeting friends not seen for months or years and "introductions" to famous Professors, whose books are well known.
I share one photo I made on 14th May during International Conference at Maria Grzegorzewska University in Warsaw, Poland in assebley hall. I found that in time, when many places were taken, some of the were free - but students listening to the speeches preferred to sit on the stairs or upstairs, behind the chairs. What is the ritual (I saw it a few times in different situations) of sitting lower ? I'll think about that.
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear @Beata, there are many rituals during scientific conferences. "Elements and rituals of a scientific meeting" is a subject of the following article! "A scientific conference is meant to exchange thoughts and ideas. But it often ends up being an absurd but entertaining ritual"! It is fine reading!
  • asked a question related to Visual Anthropology
Question
11 answers
Whether documentary or fiction films that are made based on documentation of the visual anthropology?
Relevant answer
i think this is a good article to get more clue about visual anthropology http://anthroweb.ucsd.edu/~jhaviland/AudVid/AudVidReadings/Banks&Morphy.pdf