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Video Game Design - Science topic

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Hello all,
In my recent research into the use of educational games, I have noticed that there appears to exist an overall distaste for playing them.
I was wondering - do any of you have any comprehensive, peer-reviewed papers or even books explaining why educational games are often considered to be worse or inferior to more commercially successful games? While I do have my suspicions, it would be great to gain some proper insight from others in the field.
Many thanks in advance!
- Kristoffer S. Fjællingsdal
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Hello!
Maybe some of these papers can help you out?
Wish you all the best!
Michelle
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There's a chapter by Isaac Soon that addresses gamification in theological education in Learning and Teaching Theology: Some ways ahead, Les Ball & James R. Harrison (eds.). It's worth being aware of.
Soon, I. (2015). Video game design and the theological classroom: gamification as a tool for student-centred learning. In L. Ball & J. R. Harrison (Eds.), Learning and Teaching Theology: Some Ways Ahead (pp. 159–170). Eugene, OR: Wipf & Stock Publishers. Retrieved from https://books.google.ca/books?id=lIycCQAAQBAJ
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In Catholic education there are just a few "saints" that have used games or even game mechanics in education. For example Don Bosco's playground is a great way to start.
Lydon, J. (2009). Transmission of the charism: A major challenge for Catholic education. International Studies in Catholic Education, 1(1), 42-58.
Collison, H. (2011). A Game for the Good?: Football, Youths and the Liberian Civil Conflict. African Research & Documentation, (116), 53.
Redig, G., & Coussée, F. (2017). youth work in flanders–playful usefulness and useful playfulness. THINKING SERIOUSLY ABOUT YOUTH WORK, 27.
Best Regards
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I am interested in making a suite of Unity Engine video games for second language acquisition in character based languages. The language of peak interest is Mandarin Chinese. Currently, I'm aware of the nature of how the characters are constructed from the fundamental 214 radicals. I'm now interested in understanding the cognitive steps to learning to write these characters. I'm looking for linguists or psychologists who can point me in the right direction so that I can optimize the game's serious elements.
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Chinese logographic writing renders meaning through a symbol or picture, arbitrarily or vaguely related in terms of visual representation with the object or the notion it stands for, and is not initially based on phonological decoding although there is a word (pronunciation) attached to it. Please check my paper concerning the profiles for brain activation in reading Chinese characters DOI: 10.1016/S0911-6044(03)00027-7. I suggest, once you've got the neuroanatomy picture right, to come up with some brain training (neurofeedback) method to enhance the control of the respective areas and aim at character learning.
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Blind and Deaf game mechanics are often mutually exclusive as one emphasis on parallel vision and the other on echolocation. Is there not a middle ground? something reachable to both? Visual Narratives and descriptive narratives could be the way to go as one could be translated to the other, however this requires two different types of work. Is there any game mechanic that works in the same way for both that is engaging for everyone?
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@Elaine Hayashi
Thank you for sharing. It is very interesting and I have the idea immersive narrative is one way to go and provide the best results so far.
However my intention is to autotomize the process and not replace for example kiosks that do automated service. In fact in our project we are doing a kiosk that is automated and helps the deaf, which is the sort of thing I want. More like an improvement of the automated kiosks we have, or a automatic way to build immersive narrative for games. Because immersive narrative for games is not easy to make, requires a lot of specialists and has a big cost, which reduces content for blind and deaf.
I searching for a way to deliver the same content, to the blind and deaf so no one loses anything and so it can be inclusive and by being inclusive it could be potentially also immersive.
In your work there are many interesting details I will take in consideration and I think I can use them in a serious game, once again thanks for sharing.
Right now I have an idea for a serious game that could work and as it is being built I'm trying to think on scenarios where it could not work, because in the past we also made other games and they always had some issue, for example a turn game can make the players waiting for the blind or deaf impatient as they could need extra time to think.
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Worldbuilding has become a topic of interest in many fields. Literature, media studies, game studies are addressing it as a creative process. Social sciences are reflecting on how it relates to the construction of political possibilities. In your opinion, what are the best works bridging these two perspectives on Worldbuilding?
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Hi Cesar. Thank you for the references. Indeed, there aren't many studies bridging the gap between the two forms of worldbuilding you mention in your comment. Dan Hassler-Forest has tried to do this in his 2016 book titled "Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Politics: transmedia world-building beyond capitalism". My question seeks to identify other authors that might have explored the articulation between the two forms of worldbuilding you highlight in your answer.
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I am busy with research on IPR awareness in the video game industry.
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Can anybody suggest a method to track the ball in an indoor soccer game.
The input will be video frames.
Any matlab or opencv code would be very nice.
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I have seen videogames that change their mechanics and story depending on parameters given by (or taken from) the players, like player genre, player personality and game difficulty. Which other approaches have been used and keep being used? Do you know about approaches that shown to be really hard or impossible to use?
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There are a lot of papers on this topic.  Look up Dynamic Difficulty Adjustment and Procedural Content Generation on Google Scholar and you'll find a ton.  This is a very active area of games research so lots going on!
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I am designing the next version of an educational video game, and want it to be appealing to young people and not so young ones too, making it useful from elementary school to the university. This sounds quite challenging because people's minds change a lot through those ages. What should I be aware of when doing this? Can you suggest a previous work about this topic? Thanks in advance
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Hi Juan,
This is truly a challenge! Children and young adults are very different target groups. Educational games already have the challenge to be appealing for a very broad usergroup. I think asymmetric games could be a solution. Having different roles for different user groups. I am not aware of any work on this for educational games but there is a lot of work on parameterizable games (attached paper) as well as different types of gamers (link to gamasutra). Maybe you can be successful combining both concepts. The idea is that players can customize the game to their play style with some parameters. You can either ask players or make a self adapting game. I hope this was helpful. If not do not hesitate to ask ;-).
Cheers,
 Markus
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Someone can suggest me bibliography to analyze the video game´s design learning, that is to say, playing, learning and creating content such custom maps or development V.G. ( Like  Warioware D.I.Y or Project Spark )
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On creating content for video games, you might take a look at this recent survey: A Survey on Procedural Modeling for Virtual Worlds (at CGForum). 
Specifically regarding dungeon generation: Procedural Generation of Dungeons (at IEEE TCIAIG)
You might as well take a look at the PCG Book in the make: http://pcgbook.com/
For evolutionary and search-based methods, J Togelius is indeed the best starting point.
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One of my professors, Prof. Dr. Viknes Waran Mathaneswaran, is toiling with the possibility of developing simulated neurological surgery. It would be wonderful if anyone familiar with such an endeavor is willing to share their experience with us or if you know anyone within the the said field who might be interested to start a discourse.
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I suggest to read proceedings of Medecine Meets Virtual Reality ( also referred as NextMed) and to attend the next conference, that will be likely in 2016 not 2015. We just had one conference this year. In this group you will find prior art and researchers engaged in these areas. Jannick
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We have been working on a game idea which is now in the stage of Game Design Document. Can we publish it as a research paper ?
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Hi,
I like Dominic's answer.
Personally I'm not sure.
But by way of comparison (with film, say) - here's an excerpt from a recent email by Craig Batty at RMIT (if it helps):
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"...a special scriptwriting issue of the Australian writing journal, TEXT.
What's special about this, well, special issue is that it predominantly features scripts as creative practice research works. Here in Australia creative practice 'as research' is valued by our equivalent of the REF - what is called ERA - and so all creative works (writing, films, art, design, fashion, etc.) with a supporting 2000-character research statement and evidence of peer review (or equivalence) can be counted for research returns. TEXT, which is an A-ranked journal, has always sought to publish creative works where possible (a bit like the New Writing journal)"
------------------ (end of excerpt by C Batty)
Not sure if this helps (re: a GDD) or not...?
Best
JT
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I'm interested in learning how researchers gather quantitative data (and gaming metrics) from participants that are not physically in the same room as the researcher.
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I asked a similar question to myself in 2006, and wasn't able to find a 'key word' to describe this remote data collection method, so I coined one for my research, 'Information Trails'. In 2010, Zoeller's presented how he used Dragon Age to track players data (using a company server to collect data of players), and he used the term 'telemetry'. If you search Google using this term, you will find that computer scientists have pretty much picked up on this term.
Zoeller has a chapter in Seif El Nasr's new book "Game Analytics" on the same telemetry. I believe the book is useful in your case.
If you are interested in "Information Trails" you can find my papers by looking me up in Research Gate.
My research Lab created an Information Trails (telemetry) tracking system used Neverwinter Nights 2 as the game engine. (we are looking towards expanding, but progress is slow, because the NWN2 system works very well... if not broken, why fix?)
If you don't mind the medieval limitation to your 'game story', and are interested in simply learning how to collect data remotely, you are welcome to send me an email with more specific questions.