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Veterinary Anatomy - Science topic

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Questions related to Veterinary Anatomy
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Please suggest me for the journals with impact factor (>1.5) with less article processing and publication charges for publication related to veterinary Anatomy?
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Journals:
Veterinary science and practice
Annal of Anatomy
Journal of Morphology
Acta veterinaria Eurasia
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I want to find the target receptor for a ligand ,whose effects can be beleived to vary in physiological system of underdeveloped or new born pupps than in adult dogs. How to find the function and mechanism of the same ligand in mice models ,for the treatment of neurological disorders in dogs.
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Hi Shruthi
I have in my past life heard/learnt at Vet school about dog condition similar to Duchenne muscular dystrophy reported in golden retrievers.
Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is neuro-muscular disease caused by a genetic problem in producing dystrophin, a protein that defends muscle fibers from breaking down when exposed to enzymes in muscles and particular regions of CNS. DMD occurs mostly in young males, though in rare cases may affect females. The symptoms of DMD include progressive weakness and atrophy of both skeletal and heart muscle. Respiratory insufficiency contributes to morbidity of muscular dystrophy and, along with cardiomyopathy. In dogs, condition was originally reported in golden retrievers and termed golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD).
Here you can read PMID: 33071066 about study performed on young dogs
Here is more about the disease PMID: 11834588
You may decide after all reading to check GRMD more closely, if there are studies showing comparison of young pups vs. older and how they are neurologically examined by Vets in the clinic. Hope this helps
Filip
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I have used Allen Mouse Brain Explorer for years and it was awesome but it no longer works on my Mac and its super depressing. Any recommendations for anatomy/ comparative anatomy atlases with advanced features or photos as apposed to illustrations ?
Many Thanks in advance
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I think grays anatomy is nice book for anatomy
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I am planning to measure the craniometry of the Philippine native dog so as to have a basis of proof to consider them as mesaticephalic breed of dog.
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Hello, Can I find craniometry in sheep ? Thanks you
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I observed some thing that resemble an unfertilized egg in my tank of captive Homalopsis buccata. I am curious about this because as far as i know there is only oviparous species who could lay an unfertlized egg. Anybody can explain what is this and suggest some paper about it? Thanks
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I will refresh this topic, because is interesting me a bit. Is there any option in captive breed viviparous snakes (I mean Corallus genus) that we can do to avoid this kind of situation, when the adult female lay slugs instead of alive newborns? Some of the breeders recommend to keep a female with male as long as possible (longer than POS occurs).
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What are the parasitology guides that you are recommending to identify the helminth infections of wild animals? Especially helminth infections of amphibians.
Please mention links of guides/books which are available to refer online or titles of the books that you know.
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I invite you to see this paper.
Good luck,
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Thank you
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This paper may be useful:
Experimental mammary carcinogenesis - Rat models.
Alvarado A, Faustino-Rocha AI, Colaço B, Oliveira PA.
Life Sci. 2017 Mar 15;173:116-134. doi: 10.1016/j.lfs.2017.02.004. Epub 2017 Feb 8. Review.
Best regards,
Daniela
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In many cases,  pre-cervical uterine torsion in ewe and does are mis-diagnosed as deficiency in cervical dilatation. We reach the definite diagnosis only after CS. Could these cases be diagnosed before operation?     
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Scott. PR. Applications of diagnostic ultrasonography in small ruminant reproductive management. Animal Reproduction Science Volume 130, Issues 3–4, February 2012, Pages 184–186
A. Wehrend, H. Bostedt, E. Burkhardt. The use of trans-Abdominal B mode ultrasonography to diagnose intra-partum uterine torsion in the ewe. Vet. J., 176 (2002), pp. 69–70
P.R. Scott. Ovine caesarean operations: a study of 137 field cases. Br. Vet. J., 145 (1989), pp. 558–564
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Are there any websites that host downloadable ct/mri datasets ? I know about some websites but not many
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Hi David, I can say I know who to contact and they can be shared but not publicly for example....
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The importance of clinical cases related to veterinary anatomy
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Í use clinical cases for my veterinary anatomy courses frequently. It is a very motivating resource that places the students in a position in which they see themselves already in their future practice. I also give them many biotechnological possibilities for the knowledge they are acquiring. The response Í get from them is one of high attention and participation.
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It is possible to make the Veterinary Anatomy as Blended learning
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Hi!
I try in my research to see "blended learning" in a longer historical perspective to get some conceptual distance to it. Otherwise it easily becomes "half-distance", "half-technical" and "half-online" teaching and learning - all of these are conceptually unsustainable, ageing concepts. In the bigger and longer context, it is about integrating a new kind of technology in teaching and learning, until it becomes so integrated you do not notice it anymore. As you already probably have the technology of printed materials integrated, you probably have email as well, and a recorded lecture. See there, already blending! It becomes more reasonable to look at ICTs in education if you for example use a time and process perspective, how synchronous or asynchronous modes are shifting along the track of the course, be they digitally enabled or not. The use of new technology creates more affordances for adaption and facilitaion designs of the teaching and learning process, they don't do much magic in other ways. Don't misunderstand me - the "blended learning" discourse has been very produ uctive, as it has enabled teachers to work under an umbrella with their experiments with new technology in teaching and learning. But we are soon beyond the blend, into vaying new solutions where we cant proceed without ICTs. Attaching my paper about the time perspective on blends, and a thought experiment that tries to go from "unblended" learning  through history until today. Then we have a new blend in front of us, a real challenge - the blend with functions of artificial intelligence (as learning analytics, adaptive learning - see my PhD synthesis on this, attached). 
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While studying M. electricus, my co-author and I were observed that, the skull of M. electricus was consisted of both bones and cartilage, as the frontal, parietal,
supraoccipital, postparietal, sphenotic and pterootic were remained cartilages in mature fish (J. Morphol. Sci., 2014, vol. 31, no. 3, p. 162-170). I wonder is this observed by researchers worked on other electric fishes, as we suggested that, these cartilage may play a role in protecting the electric fish brain from electric shocking.
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Dear Gloria, your note is reasonable, if you have an article describing embryo-genesis of skull in M. electrics, kindly send it to me. I did not think that the roof of skull was over-stained. However, I have little success to find articles about  developing of bones in M. electrics, so we could not confirm their chondral origin.  In my opinion, each fish skull is a separate puzzle and nothing stable. I am trying to test our findings by reviewing other researches as it is hard to study the fish embryo-genesis. Thank you very much for your notes.
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At which stage of cranial suture obliteration one can assume the maturity in red deer male (and/or other modern species of deer)? Which is onthogenetic significance of the obliteration of fronto-parietal and interfrontal sutures (between pedicles) in this case?
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just in case if somebody is interested, here is the reference to the article that describes the correlation of cranial sutures and individual age in modern red deer:
Mystkowska, E. 1966. Morphological Variability oi the Skull and Body Weight oi the Red Deer. Acta Theriologica, 11 (5): 129-194.
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I'm looking for any sources, thanks in advance.
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J Morphol. 1985 Jan;183(1):87-115.
Anatomy of raccoon (Procyon lotor) and coati (Nasua narica and N. nasua) forearm and leg muscles: relations between fiber length, moment-arm length, and joint-angle excursion.
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I wanted to know if it's a matter of manual capability or is it a standard? What is more valuable nowadays?
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Dear Katarzyna,
I have been lecturing Human Anatomy for 25 years. Here's my personal view:
A classic is a classic, whatever you do, you cannot change this.
In terms of Arts in general, you have to refer to classics, before you start innovating. (This is true for classic ballet, classical music, or even pictorial Art...)
In terms of Anatomy, and of Anatomy teaching, I will always refer to classic books, before recurring to modern images. The more different pictures you present on a lecture, on the same subject, the more you grab student's attention and the better results you get.
I usually project animated versions of images from classical Anatomy books, and then add a photographic proof of the same element, for comparison and modernised approach to a subject. (sometimes, you can refer to classic errors of concepts, and then correct with a parallel better photographic image, taken from a different perspective.)
Hope this was useful.  
Best regards from Portugal !
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Especially bacterial etiology associated with nasal cavity and lung in goats.
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Dear Mohammed,
I am not familiar with castles but these publications may open a new way  for you,
Good luck
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the link typed bellow is a source of the subject in humans, but I do not find a recent study in dogs, some have any experience with resurfacing?
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Do you have casese in cats with double or duplex gallbladder? I didn't found much literature about this.
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J Small Anim Pract. 2007 Jul;48(7):404-9.
Duplex gall bladder associated with choledocholithiasis, cholecystitis, gall bladder rupture and septic peritonitis in a cat.
Moores AL1, Gregory SP.
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Have anyone experience with diagnosis of Tritrichomonas fetus in bull?
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Laboratory diagnosis of tritrichomonosis in infected herds is usually based on microscopic identification of the parasite from preputial washings samples from herd bulls either before or after culture in appropriate media. We used the  Sutherland modificated medium. Culture development may take up to 7–10 days (35-37ºC), and even after that the unambiguous identification of T. foetus from other Trichomonas may be difficult. Then you could think about doing in addition PCR for diagnosis. I attached a paper.
Good luck!!
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I need to research Labrador carpal injuries.  Is there any information available?
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Dear Josep
Injuries to the carpal and tarsal joints are common in performance dogs. These
joints act as shock absorbers during weight bearing and are prone to injury due to their
anatomic complexity and lack of muscular support. It is this complexity that creates a
diagnostic problem for many veterinarians, and many carpal and tarsal injuries,
particularly those that go undiagnosed or untreated, can result in an increased risk
of osteoarthritis and potential long-term lameness. find out more information by click on this link : http://www.vosm.com/upload/CT-inj-wp.pdf
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Formalin is quite harmful and irritating. Plastination is too expensive.
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Dear Maria,
Thank you for quoting my work.
In reference to the above issue, I should remark and emphasize a few more topics:
Our 15 years experience with these conservation methods are still under improvement.
In our next work, we will present reference to the experimental use of several embalming techniques, with conservation times between one or one and half year, up to five years.
Our best results were obtained during our first years of experimentation, when we developed our perfusion pump in straight collaboration with CEFITEC and the Department of Physics of the Faculty of Technological Sciences of our University.
The development of this perfusion pump allows complete vascular perfusion in closed circuit with perfect control of debits and capillary perfusion, with pulsed impregnation of tissues, simulating the cardiac rhythms.
The specimens we use, both for undergraduate dissections (over a period of six weeks of manipulations), as for post graduation courses and surgical training sessions, bear great quality and endurance, as you can check from this Prezzi presentation in attachment http://prezi.com/qk-muuogpev7/eaca-lisbon-dissection-room-june2013/?utm_campaign=share&utm_medium=copy
The materials we use for current conservation, consisting of a modified mixture of Theil, are quite inexpensive and easy to purchase, and, most of all, less toxic than Formaldehyde, for the staff. (Should I remind that Formaldehyde is one of the few -9- well-documented cancerigenic materials still in the market)
 
All the best,
João
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Avian anatomy is so different from mammalian that this seems like a risky procedure, but I know people do these successfully. Any tips or resources to recommend?
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Yes Christine (and Lindy), the target sites for a true IP injection are poorly described, often because many clinicians and researchers are confused by, or sometimes unaware of the complexities of the avian peritoneal cavities. It is very easy to place the material into an abdominal or caudal thoracic air sac, yet if the volume is small that will likely be a non-event. In the house sparrow (and most small passerines) the intestinal peritoneal cavity is a potential space that occupies the middle portion (approx. 0.25 cm to either side of the midline) of the post sternal abdomen.
With the bird held in ones hand in dorsal recumbency, the feathers of the ventral belly moistened with an alcohol swab and parted along the midline a large midline featherless area is exposed. (There is no concern about using an alcohol swab if the application is judicious - the bird need not be soaked!) The caudal edge of the ventral sternum is visible as the cranial landmark and the unfused pelvic bones are visible caudally. Placing the bird in dorsal recumbency and picking up the skin (along with the thin body wall) with forceps is advisable to avoid penetrating an intestinal loop in a normal bird without a peritoneal effusion. In passerines, an injection site slightly to the left of midline and near the middle of the landmarks described above is ideal (bird is in dorsal recumbency so the left side of the bird is to your right hand!) . I have attached a photograph of a passerine for reference.  Please excuse the crude lines: the yellow line represents approx. right lateral border, green line the LEFT lateral border and red the centerline (bird is slightly rotated) and has a pathologically enlarged liver. The white circle represents the target area for IPC injection.
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Mostly soft tissues (liver, spleen) and bone marrow need to be homogenized prior to DNA extraction. Fitting into a 1.5ml tube is a must.
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I've always liked the OMNI - TH models.  Here's a link for the TH115:
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My final thesis is going to be on canine hip dysplasia in german shepherd. I have already started the bibliography, but in order for me to know how to assess the radiographies I need to see sites on radiographies assessed by expert doctors on this subject. Can anyone help me find articles & Hip dysplasia radiographies that are fully explained on how to put the degree of dysplasia?
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Your best bet is probably to access (and probably pay for, sorry) articles from the American College of Veterinary Surgeons or the European College of Veterinary Surgeons. If your university has a veterinary school (or you have access to one), you may have free access to these journals. These will likely be the best sources of published articles on hip dysplasia. As far as assessing the radiographs, you can contact either the American or European College of Veterinary Radiologists. I haven't had to do these kind of radiographs in a while, but back when I did there are at least 2 different grading systems for hip dysplasia (at least early grading), so that may also complicate things. Hopefully these two sets of specialists can help you make sense of everything.
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I am wondering if it would be possible for a ruminant to grow as large as some of the largest land mammals to have lived. If it is not possible, one of the constraints might be the functionality of such a large rumen. Or what other factors are there to consider as well?
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There is a paper by Clauss et al. (2003) about body size limitations in living and fossil ruminants:
They find only one fossil group possibly surpassing maximum body size in extant ruminants of about 1000 kg: sivatheriine giraffids.
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I am looking for someone who can help us with H&E staining of ~150 slides (mouse, fish, quail, and toad colons) that have been professionally prepared and embedded in paraffin mounts. I have another ~150 identical slides that I would like to get stained with Alcian Blue also, so we can visualize the mucin layers too if that is possible. I can pay for the costs of staining, but would prefer to offer someone a collaborative role in the manuscript that will be generated from this study. Any help would be appreciated.
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Dear Dr, Marshall, my lab is available to collaborate in this research. I have also experience of histochemistry with Lectins for the characterization of mucins and IHC with MUC1, 2, Gal3, etc.
You need only of the "technical" part of the work or even the reading of slides and prepared tables Tab with semiquantitative scores of the different parameters??
Let me know if I can help.
Hello to you soon. Giacomo.
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What is the physiological significance of double trachea? It is seen in penguins,sea lions, dugongs spoonbills petrels .
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It would be surprising if penguins did not perform their phonation by means of the syrinx, the unpaired vocal organ that is situated at the bifurcation of the trachea. Therefore, the penguin's ability to "speak with two voices" is obviously limited by only one available voice-producing organ (sorry Anja!). Additionally, the term "double trachea" sounds a bit exaggerated, as it refers only to a tracheal septum which divides the tracheal lumen in its caudal part, just a few centimeters before it reaches the syrinx. The cranial and middle part of the trachea, at least three quarters of its length form a normal bird trachea with unpaired lumen. However, the presence of similar structures in other aquatic/diving species suggests a function within the complex of respiratory regulation.
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The affected mullet was 5 years old. The swim bladder was formed on the outside of the fish's body. This fish survived and was easily collected from the surface of Caspian Sea. (Picture below).
What are your comments and diagnosis?
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It is a completely rare case, especially among the wild fish species. The observed swim bladder extruding from the body can be probably occurred following a historical impairment in early developmental period. I do not think that infectious agents predispose this abnormality. Contaminants (organic and inorganic) have been associated with many kind of deformation in fish body. I, however, suppose that one or some undesired environmental factors led to engender of that. For etiology of this abnormality, more clinical investigations should be done. Beside the morphological observation, I think the anatomical investigation must be applied to elucidate any changes in connection of swim bladder to body (i.e. this species is a physioclistous teleost with two chambers). The histological technique should be included to determine swim bladder wall changes (if any).
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Dogs with ataxia have less P cells.
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Thank you so much I am reading the literature