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I am working in the field of social sustainability research. I am struggling to find the theories used in Social Sustainability. Actually, for the development of the theoretical framework of my thesis, I need a theory that explains social sustainability and its themes, for example, Health, Transportation availability, Satisfied with Space, Open Space, and so on.
Would you please help me to provide the information about which theory can explain social sustainability and its themes?
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Hello, I am a senior grade student in university and nowadays conducting a study about change of the urban structure(in terms of commercial activities) after certain transportation project.
After the project, several pedestrian roads will be installed(which is correspond to axial line in SSA) so that the number of people in the area will grow to much larger degree.
If I can quantify the differences of number of pedestrians between before/after of business commensement I will eventually reflect this as a variable to making a model(ex: regression, whatever) that analyzing commercial activity.
I've been studying SSM theory and notions, but couldn't find materials that I can get technical information...And as I heard, the procedure is AutoCAD or QGIS > depthmap > R, but so what? I have no idea how to do this in detail, and above all, I don't know how to use AutoCAD. So can anyone tell me how to analyize space syntax with QGIS? I've downloaded depthmapX 0.35 and QGIS space syntax toolkit already but don't know how to do further. I'm despairing now.
So please give your hand regarding this to this poor novice student :(
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Younes Nori Thank you so much. I'll go on keeping your advice in mind
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There is no doubt that green building envelopes have become a significant role in urban development. Just hesitant to explore policy or potential for green building envelopes.
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Green roof substrates (i.e. growing medium) are the most important aspect for green roofs. Good substrate selection will ensure the longevity of green roof vegetation as well as thermal comfort of residents. The following research article provide great information on green roof substrates:
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I was gathering data about Arsi University Bekoji campus, and I observed something about the city planning. On the right side of the google image (in 2019), you can see the new urban development, and on the left side, what is most probably agricultural villages and Greenfield. The new urban development follows one of the typical city plannings I have seen all over Ethiopia, which follows a grid pattern to arrange the urban blocks and in contrast, the Greenfield has its own block pattern, which I think is the result of the social, cultural, and historical way of arranging plot of lands. It shows the trails of what is left of the ‘traditional planning.’ My whole point here is, why don’t the city planners appreciate and try to incorporate the traditional/ unexplored knowledge into the planning. That way, each city can have a unique experience and preserve the inhabitants’ lifestyle. Of course, my assumptions might be wrong, so if you are from, visited, or lived in Arisi, I would like to know what you think? Or let me know what you think about the planning ? About Arsi: Location: Bekoji, Arsi zone, Oromia region, Ethiopia Population as of 2015: 181, 906 Built-up area: 0.76 sq. km google map: https://lnkd.in/g74-VAm5 #arsi #bekoji #arsiuniversity #agriculturalvillages #savetraditionalplannings
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Thank you for the insight!
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Cities are increasingly aware of sustainability issues (economic, social & environmental) as part of their long term development but many cities in developing countries are still dealing with basic and most urgent concerns like economic growth, employment generation, housing needs, infrastructure development, water and sanitation etc. How urban plans and planning systems can be put into use to deal with all these concerns particularly in terms of potential development conflicts, barriers and trade-offs?
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In my opinion, in the contemporary scenario of cities, one could argue that today's urbanism occurs as a result of a negotiation between two critical forces that, in contrast, direct the construction of cities around the globe. The first, strongly present after the Industrial Revolution, is the implosive trend driven by an understanding of global development as massive accumulation, encouraging the concentration of the urban fabric in mega agglomerations that operate under the precepts of ‘impatient capitalism’. Thus, in those places where capital is massively placed, what we could call ‘hyper-city’ appears, a series of settlements that exacerbate the attributes of the urban in dense large-scale metropolitan centers. In these contexts, the design of the city emerges as an almost exclusively material exercise, usually disconnected from the deeper understanding of the social implications of urbanism. Here, those who make the city are obsessed with creating urban shows with global resonance. This is the impulse that towards the end of the last century generated the greatest transformations of the built environment, encouraging creation and focusing attention on the appearance of mega urban agglomerations that came to accommodate more than twenty million people. These 'hyper' urban formations, such as Mexico City, Bombay, Sao Paulo or Istanbul, were for a long time the great engines of economic and social growth, but as a consequence of their rapid and expansive uncontrolled development they became largely responsible for the global warming, urban vulnerability and the appearance of the most extreme expressions of social exclusion. Its growth was in a way, faster than any possible reflective conceptualization, and therefore faster than the formulation of the correct intervention protocols. Today, the urban condition is in a very different position. The ‘implosion’ patterns have become ‘explosion’ patterns, repositioning cities at a breaking point, facing an unprecedented condition that offers the possibility of amending the mistakes of the past. The urbanization processes are leaving the massive agglomerations and have begun to move towards a secondary network of urban agglomerations that is growing, expanding, and is still under construction. In this way, at this precise moment and especially in contexts of the global south, urban growth patterns are changing.
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I am currently working on my MSc dissertation with a focus on 'Impacts of urban surfaces i.e. roof surface, pavement surface and vegetation on urban micro-climate in hot arid regions'.
Envi-met simulation software was used to predict the air temperature of the micro-climate. However, due to the software's limitations the surface air temperature of the roof can not be calculated.
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Hi dear Farah.
Climate Consultant software
Climatic studies include reviewing the climate file and providing diagrams and data related to temperature change, amount of radiation and sunlight, etc. , This software is a graphic-based computer application that helps architects, students, etc. to better understand the climate of their desired location and be able to analyze it. , For sustainable design and design of zero energy buildings, we need climate design, which this software leads us to this goal. , This software uses 8760 hours of annual data in EPW format recorded by meteorological stations.
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Urban Development Authority Sri Lanka prepares urban development plans for declared urban areas in Sri Lanka. Recently, 40 development plans were prepared and different spatial analysis techniques were used during the process.
GIS was the main tool used for the analysis. Multi criteria analysis like Development Pressure, Environmental Sensitivity, Suitability, Optimum Space were mostly used.
It is good sign that spatial analysis and sophisticated planning tools came in to adaptation in the planning process.
With the lessons learned during past development planning processes and prevailing issues of the adaptation sophisticated tools & techniques what are the gaps still remain or occur in spatial analysis techniques in development planning process of Sri Lanka?
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Hello Lasantha Bandara . You may want to look at Colombo Metropolitan Area with regards to land-change intensity, gradient analysis and land-change modeling.
Good luck
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What will be the specific purpose of the urban strategic development framework? Does it has relation with the urban planning
what is the main difference between urban management and urban planning
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Urban management is executing urban planning everything that involves costs, budgets, resources, mobility, it would be the main difference
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How can property investors/developers benefit from land valuation maps?
Can Local Authorities benefit from land valuation maps?
Is spatial analysis key to property investment and development?
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A mayor información, las decisiones deberían ser más acertadas. Y los mapas son un instrumento de mucha utilidad para obtener información actualizada.
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Like a spatial transition, urban development has a strong relationship with its water systems. Based on a historical analysis of the technical and institutional arrangement in urban water management over time, this is captured by the urban water transitions (UWT) framework (Brown et al., 2008). The UWT framework identifies six distinct development stages that cities go through when they progress towards greater water sensitivity.
Our CATCH-project (Water Sensitive Cities in the North Sea Region) is in its final stage. https://www.researchgate.net/project/CATCH-Interreg-North-Sea-Region-Climate-Resilient-Cities
Based on a set of indicators we have allocating scores to the six city states of the Urban Water Transitions (UWT) framework. This is based on so-called idealized city states – situation in the North Sea Region.
Is there any reference to existing research/ publications available re. UWT framework - idealised city states?
[Figure: Characteristics of the city-states in the Urban Water Transitions framework
(Hoekstra et al., 2018, adopted from Brown et al., 2008)]
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I want to explore daily passenger volume at railway stations in the selected region.
Should I take into account the number of people getting on the train or getting off the train? Maybe the sum of passenger getting on and getting off the train at particular railway station? Is this correct in this case? I will count double passengers who commute to work and come back from work in the same day. Maybe the average number of passenger getting on and getting off the train?
Best regards,
Wojciech Jurkowski
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if you are interrested in the number of passengers using a particular railway line, then you should sum all boarding or alighting passengers at all line stations to get the demand of this line.
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The current product of architects and urban developers will it be at one time a legacy for our future generations and they will be proud of it or will they criticize it and leave it and blame us for its future view and heritage is the beginning of a new term that is The inheritance of urban
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It is all about land value speculation.
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Rural development, Urban Development, Rural-urvan partnership, Sustainable development, Federal Nepal.
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Actually there is no problem in Federal Setup in Nepal but the coordination between the central, provincial and local government is not practiced as intended during the federal formation. The rural-urban partnership is being one of the crucial topics for the implementation of federalism in Nepal.
Regards
Ishwor Thapa
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¿Does the urban development planning takes into account the generation of biological corridors that allow the transit of nativenative and and migratory species and their minimum survival requirements?
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This is one of many ecological items that must be considered but often neglected in urban planning and design.
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Trying to explore new avenues of study linking urban development and pollution in aquatic ecosystems.
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Dear Kudzai:
The coupling between urban development and pollution in aquatic ecosystems is quite interesting. Many factors of both affect each other. You could analyse demographic dynamics and migration and its impacts on fresh water ecosystems pollution.
Additionally, since 2009, Rockström, J. et al. from Stockholm Resilience Centre have been developing a novel approach known as Planetary Boundaries (PB). Global freshwater use, and change in land use are two of this PB, that could give another perspective on your research, and maybe you find a gap here.
Plus this could illuminate your research:
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I'm modelling insect populations over time (1968 - present) in the UK at over 500 sites. I have detected a decline in sites that are mainly suburban (based on 500m radii using the CEH Land Cover Map 2015). I would like to know which of these sites were already suburban in 1968, and which had been developed at some point over the time series. Ideally, I would like something like a gdb file showing the urban/suburban land cover of 1968 so I could calculate exactly how much development has occurred at each site, but I know this probably does not exist. My best idea so far is to go on old-maps.co.uk and inspect each site manually, looking for the closest map to 1968 and judging on a yes/no basis whether development has occurred since then. Can anyone recommend a better method for measuring urban development since the 1960s?
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Sure, USGS is the best site to find landsat images for land cover trends, have used the same and it worked
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I like to know the main topics that may govern such relationship.
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"Design gives form to the future, says architect Bjarke Ingels. In this worldwide tour of his team's projects, journey to a waste-to-energy power plant (that doubles as an alpine ski slope) and the LEGO Home of the Brick-- and catch a glimpse of cutting-edge flood resilience infrastructure in New York City as well as an ambitious plan to create floating, sustainable cities that are adapted to climate change.
Bjarke Ingels · Architect
Bjarke Ingels believes that architecture is the art and science of making sure our cities and buildings fit with the way we want to live our lives.".
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Could you please suggest what is/are the best resource(s) for Nature-based solution (NBS) strategies for Urban Development in the context of China?
suggestions for associated documents, books, working papers, and policy reports would be appreciated.
Many thanks.
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Hello colleagues.
We are looking for examples of cities that have changed their regulations to introduce improvements in adaptive capacity. We have been able to detect that small regulatory changes, such as increasing the surface of green areas per inhabitant in new or existing urban developments or modifying other urban standards such as incorporating a certain number of trees per building area or establishing a percentage of permeable surface, are elements that increase adaptive capacity and makes our cities more resilient to climate change.
Any experience on this aspect that you can share with us will be welcome.
Thank you.
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Thank you Bryan.
I knew two of them, great! These links are very interesting.
They are very useful.
Best,
Francisco
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It is noticeable from the photo and talk of the previous generation that cities were the cleanest and most beautiful. Is this true or nostalgic?
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In Iraq; No
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i am working on a paper the role of affordable housing to attain inclusive urbanization in developing countries, I have already conducted interview with experts and now I am going to analyze the result of the expert interviews, if there is any other method used by any scholar please share your experience.
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Dear Osama
Have a look on this paper, it applies that methodology in very similar context
Brano
Glumac B, et al. Brownfield redevelopment features: Applying Fuzzy Delphi. Journal of European Real Estate Research 2011; 4; 145-159.
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Classically speaking, hazards (H) in the risk equation are natural. However, given that urban areas are highly anthopogenic constructs, where can one put 'unplanned urban development' in the equation? Or do we need another equation to study this ?
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Planning for urban development, whether efficient, or not, may be a source of risk. To understand this statement, lets pose a bit, and think the following: what is the source of risk? or how do risk situations, come about? The straight answer is that, assumptions is the main source of risks in urban development planning. Since assumptions are made in both sufficient and insufficient planning, it is fair to say that risks shall always be potential. The only difference being that in sufficiently planned development, the potential for risk is low, while it may be large in insufficiently planned development. The stem of this argument is that for every assumption made, there is a chance, it may not be true, hence the risk factor. This is my expert view.
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what is your opinion on this statement?
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The World Bank (2011) reckons the main urban challenges in India relate to:
Planning
  • Many urban governments lack a modern planning framework
  • The multiplicity of local bodies obstructs efficient planning and land use
  • Rigid master plans and restrictive zoning regulations limit the land available for building, constricting cities’ abilities to grow in accordance with changing needs.
Housing
  • Building regulations that limit urban density—such as floor space indexes—reduce the number of houses available, thereby pushing up property prices
  • Outdated rent control regulations reduce the number of houses available on rent—a critical option for the poor
  • Poor access to micro finance and mortgage finance limit the ability of low income groups to buy or improve their homes
  • Policy, planning, and regulation deficiencies lead to a proliferation of slums
  • Weak finances of urban local bodies and service providers leave them unable to expand the trunk infrastructure that housing developers need to develop new sites.
Service Delivery
  • Most services are delivered by city governments with unclear lines of accountability
  • There is a strong bias towards adding physical infrastructure rather than providing financially and environmentally sustainable services
  • Service providers are unable to recover operations and maintenance costs and depend on the government for finance
  • Independent regulatory authorities that set tariffs, decide on subsidies, and enforce service quality are generally absent.
Infrastructure
  • Most urban bodies do not generate the revenues needed to renew infrastructure, nor do they have the creditworthiness to access capital markets for funds
  • Urban transport planning needs to be more holistic—there is a focus on moving vehicles rather than meeting the needs of the large numbers of people who walk or ride bicycles in India’s towns and cities.
Environment
  • The deteriorating urban environment is taking a toll on people’s health and productivity and diminishing their quality of life.
Source: India's Urban Challenges, July 14, 2011, available at http://www.worldbank.org/en/news/feature/2011/07/04/indias-urban-challenges
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Bhubaneshwar “smart city”
I’m always impressed by the ability of India to show itself to the world. It is true that there are so many richness and heritage in Odisha, but there is still so much poverty and dirt all around there... so this is only a part of the story, just like Dalits and poor is a part of what makes India. India is a mix of modernity and tradition, the place within contradictions are evident and make sense at the same time. It is much more than is “visible to our eyes” (referring to L.Sandercock) that is why I don’t think smart cities is the core priority for now: to deliver and to implement politics in order to give an answer to basic need question seems more appropriate to me!
If course, this is only my modest opinion, I’m open to critics and comments.
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I've lived & worked in Bhubaneswar between 1986 and 1991, when it was a small sleepy town, and have gone back many times thereafter, most recently about 6 months ago. I see that the stark poverty of the past is slowly disappearing (in-fact, just a month ago I was in Kalahandi, the poorest part of Orissa, and even there, there is a sharp improvement on Human Development Indices). On cleanliness, I do agree, there is a cultural issue as well, but the newer parts of Bhubaneswar as good as any other modern city & comparable to Hyderabad, where I live. Being a small city and in the growth phase, there is a good prospect that the Smart City project will work for Bhubaneswar.
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I am doing my final year of my master's and am working on a thesis question and would like to know your thoughts. Do you think it can be more sustainable, from an urban development view, to develop a high-performance building/multiple or retrofitting/redesigning the existing site and building? At the moment I believe that even with the lose of embodied energy, new development will always be more sustainable. What are your thoughts?
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I have calculated Liquid Limit, Plastic Limit, Soil type, SPT and Fine Contents.How can it be applied in urban development especially making some zonal maps, risk factors, bearing capacity, settlement & foundation issues etc. I would be grateful if you kindly suggest.
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From the parameters you've listed, it is possible to approximate the compression index, strength parameters, soil types, pre-consolldation pressure, re-compression index and many other compression and strength related parameters. These could then be used to help determine settlement, slope stability, bearing pressure. etc.
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TIA comes with the legal background. Therefore it has been allowed normalize traffic level for all. But there are significant road segments that cannot allow the legal level.
If there any article journals related this please let me know. I like to make a framework for my study. therefore I need the base that other localities use.
Thank you,
Dilshan
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Good answer by Kundan.
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I am from Nosótricos Tik-Tank (www.nosotricos.com), an action tank located in Mexico. We'd love to collaborate with you.
I am an alumni from the MSc. Urban Development Planning, at DPU (UCL), which is coordinated by Caren Levy. Our team is compounded by anthropologist, psycologist, economist, among others.
Let me know if there is any chance to explore some partnerships.
Best wishes,
Alejandro
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Not my expertise.
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There are people who would like to see the kind of high school-to- industry and business integration of apprenticeship programs.
Are any of our RG community working to bring apprenticeships to the US that are as coordinated with industry and business as those are in Germany?
How can this be achieved in the US?
What obstacles are there to creating such apprenticeships?
Do you have research in this area to share?
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Having served as an educator in the United States and in Europe, I would suggest that we might consider clearly defining the term apprenticeship within the context of the US. For example, there is a legal difference between and Apprenticeship (with a capital A), which pertains to a formal agreement with trade and business organizations (and is protected within US labor law), and informal apprenticeship, and an internship when it comes to High School aged students in the US. If there might be a bit more information I might be able to more appropriately respond as this is an area where I have experience. Thank you for your consideration.
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I am looking for feedback on significant publications (environmental psychology, urban design, architecture and planning) since 2000, that could be used as directives.
 
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I do not see meaning in looking for a correlation. What are the precise variables? There are many...With regard to psychological aspects, consider this very comprehensive and authoritative review by Robert Gifford, published in 2007. 
The Consequences of Living in High-Rise Buildings (PDF Download ...
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third bridge over the Bosphorus, the new airport, redevelopment of the suburbs.
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Have a look at the publications below. I am certain there is something of interest
There has been plenty published on urban development in Istanbul. A few publications that covers various themes and aspects I have listed below. I sincerely hope htat they are helpful to you.
Tolga İslam, Current Urban Discourse, Urban Transformation and Gentrification in Istanbul Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)   Architectural Design     Year:2010, Volume:80, Issue:1, First page:58, Last page:63
Idil Arslan-Alaton; Gulen Iskender; Aysegul Tanik; Melike Gurel; Suleyman Ovez; Derin Orhon         Current situation of urban wastewater treatment plants in megacity Istanbul , Elsevier Desalination, Year:2009, Volume:246, Issue:1-3, First page:409, Last page:416
Ahmet Karaburun; Ali Demirci; I-Shian Suen, Impacts of urban growth on forest cover in Istanbul (1987–2007) , Springer-Verlag, Environmental Monitoring and Assessment, Year:2010, Month:07, Volume:166, Issue:1-4, First page:267, Last page:277
C. Nil Uzun, Globalization and urban governance in Istanbul, Springer-Verlag, Journal of Housing and the Built Environment, Year:2007, Month:03, Volume:22, Issue:1, First page:127, Last page:138
DIKMEN BEZMEZ    The Politics of Urban Waterfront Regeneration: The Case of Haliç (the Golden Horn), Istanbul             Wiley Blackwell (Blackwell Publishing)            International Journal of Urban and Regional Research Year:2008
Month:
Day:
Volume:32
Issue:4
First page:815
Last page:840
ÖZLEM ÖZ; MINE EDER     Rendering Istanbul's Periodic Bazaars Invisible: Reflections on Urban Transformation and Contested Space         Wiley Blackwell (Blackwell Publishing)            International Journal of Urban and Regional Research             Year:2012
Month:
Day:
Volume:36
Issue:2
First page:297
Last page:314
Sencer Ayata   Migrants and Changing Urban Periphery: Social Relations, Cultural Diversity and the Public Space in Istanbul’s New Neighbourhoods          Wiley Blackwell (Blackwell Publishing)            International Migration             Year:2008
Month:
Day:
Volume:46
Issue:3
First page:27
Last page:64
Tahire Erman; Aslýhan Eken    The “Other of the Other” and “unregulated territories” in the urban periphery: gecekondu violence in the 2000s with a focus on the Esenler case, Istanbul           Elsevier            Cities   Year:2004
Month:
Day:
Volume:21
Issue:1
First page:57
Last page:68
Ülke Evrim Uysal         An urban social movement challenging urban regeneration: The case of Sulukule, Istanbul             Elsevier            Cities   Year:2012
Month:
Day:
Volume:29
Issue:1
First page:12
Last page:22
Kuyucu, T.; Unsal, O. 'Urban Transformation' as State-led Property Transfer: An Analysis of Two Cases of Urban Renewal in Istanbul      Sage Publications         Urban Studies Year:2010, Volume:47, Issue:7, First page:1479, Last page:1499
Arzu Kocabaş Urban conservation in Istanbul: evaluation and re-conceptualisation      Elsevier            Habitat International             Year:2006, Volume:30, Issue:1
Ozan Karaman            Urban Renewal in Istanbul: Reconfigured Spaces, Robotic Lives         Wiley Blackwell (Blackwell Publishing)       International Journal of Urban and Regional Research Year:2012
Lovering, John; Türkmen, Hade           Bulldozer Neo-liberalism in Istanbul: The State-led Construction of Property Markets, and the Displacement of the Urban Poor       Informa UK (Taylor & Francis)           International Planning Studies             Year:2011, Month:02, Day:
Volume:16, Issue:1, First page:73, Last page:96
Dinçer, İclal     The Impact of Neoliberal Policies on Historic Urban Space: Areas of Urban Renewal in Istanbul             Informa UK (Taylor & Francis)           International Planning Studies   Year:2011, Month:02, Day:, Volume:16, Issue:1, First page:43, Last page:60
Lovering, John; Evren, Yigit     Urban Development and Planning in Istanbul    Informa UK (Taylor & Francis)             International Planning Studies   Year:2011, Month:02, Day:, Volume:16, Issue:1, First page:1, Last page:4
Demir, Hülya; Yilmaz, Ahmet   Measurement of Urban Transformation Project Success Using the Analytic Hierarchy Process: Sulukule and Tepeüstü-Ayazma Case Studies, Istanbul          American Society of Civil Engineers     Journal of Urban Planning and Development        Year:2012, Month:06, Day:, Volume:138, Issue:2, First page:173, Last page:182
Enlil, Zeynep Merey     The Neoliberal Agenda and the Changing Urban Form of Istanbul       Informa UK (Taylor & Francis)           International Planning Studies   Year:2011, Month:02, Day:, Volume:16, Issue:1, First page:5, Last page:25
Karaman, Ozan           Resisting urban renewal in Istanbul       Informa UK (Taylor & Francis)           Urban Geography             Year:2014, Month:02, Day:17, Volume:35, Issue:2, First page:290, Last page:310
Ozus, Evren; Turk, Sevkiye Sence; Dokmeci, Vedia    Urban Restructuring of Istanbul            Informa UK (Taylor & Francis)           European Planning Studies       Year:2011
Month:02, Volume:19, Issue:2, First page:331, Last page:356
Mills, Amy       Cultures of assemblage, resituating urban theory: A response to the papers on ‘Assembling Istanbul’             Informa UK (Taylor & Francis)           City      Year:2014, Month:11, Day:02, Volume:18, Issue:6, First page:691, Last page:697
Schoon, Danielle van Dobben ‘Sulukule is the gun and we are its bullets': Urban renewal and Romani identity in Istanbul             Informa UK (Taylor & Francis)           City      Year:2014, Month:11, Volume:18, Issue:6, First page:655, Last page:666
Eyüboğlu, Engin; Sema Kubat, Ayşe; Ertekin, Özhan   A New Urban Planning Approach for the Regeneration of an Historical Area within Istanbul's Central Business District         Informa UK (Taylor & Francis)           Journal of Urban Design Year:2007, Month:06, Day:, Volume:12, Issue:2, First page:295, Last page:312
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Dear Research Gate Colleagues,
Comments please.
I saw some very emotionally moving videos of the tremendous damage in Gary, Indiana, a consequence of the massive withdrawal of industrial investment as the steel mill has downsized.
Thousands of houses, schools, public buildings, are sitting vacant and falling into ruins. How can all the industrial "ruins porn" videographers increase the impact of their films?
I was impressed but I wonder if many people know about all these videos in places like YouTube.  I sent links out to friends of a couple videos about Gary, Indiana.  I gave these videos descriptions and ratings.  I also wonder how we can start some award for industrial ruins videos named something like The Steel Phoenix.
BELOW: PLANET GARY’S Thousands of abandoned buildings. (Videos)
(Some wobbly camerawork but goes right around town. It’s got heart. You can click on individual buildings that the film maker entered.  The Memorial Auditorium is one I recommend.)
Gloria’s rating ***
LINK: More professionally-shot footage, longer, with historic photos mixed in
Gloria’s rating ***1/2
Projects are mentioned: Stewart House Urban Farms and Gardens Project.
“Gary’s time” house renovating project using ex-offender labor.  Some good references to social justice and self-help projects at end of film.
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Three suggestions to increase the impact of industrial urban decay videos in Gary Indiana.
1. Timeliness is important -  invent time machine and start filming in the 1970s.
2. Have a celebrity (preferably from the performing arts) narrate the video.
3. A dramatic musical score.
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We think urban vilages are caused by dual land policy, but why the urban developer choose to skip these area. And the adjent land parcel may influence the development of urban village. Maybe there are some land use pattern can lead to a higher density or complex operation of urban village in China. Do you think its valuable to be researched?
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There is a large body of literature on urban village in Chinese cities.  You appear to be trying to connect urban spatial structure to urban village.  First, in terms of the location of urban village, there are two types: those located on urban fringe and those located inside the city.  You can try (both theoretically and empirically) to find some connection with urban spatial structure, which is also related to the size of the city.  Second, an interesting question might be about the relationship between land use type and the location of urban village.  In other words, do urban villages appear more often surrounded by residential use than by industrial use?  This might be an interesting approach.
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In the context of urban (spatial explicit) modelling, what is the difference between agent based simulation (ABS) and micro simulation (MS)?
Both are individual based modelling approaches. Are ABS models typically theory driven while MS models are typically data driven? Do ABS models contain intelligent and non intelligent objects (have a memory; capable of making decisions based on their own judgement; capable of learning) while MS models only contain non intelligent objects (making decisions based on distributions derive from historic data)? What is the simulation execution algorithm they follow - do they differ?
Please provide some simple examples that clarify your explanations.
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Hi there, this answer is exactly one paragraph of a text I am just writing (a chapter in a policy-based ABM). What I have so far:
According to Gilbert & Troitzsch, 2005, p.8 in Hamill & Gilbert, p. 4
"Microsimulation takes a set of data about a population – of people, households or firms – and applies rules to reflect changes, enabling the modeller to look at the overall impact. Such an approach is particularly useful for modelling policy changes, for example, to see who is made better or worse off by tax changes. However, although allowing for heterogeneity, microsimulation does not allow interaction. Only with the arrival of ABM did modelling interaction between agents become possible".
Crooks & Heppenstall, 2012, p. 92 argue that:
"However, crucially in contrast to ABM, MSM only models one-direction interactions: the impact of the policy on the individuals, but not the impact of individuals on the policy and interactions between individuals are not simulated. Furthermore MSM models do not have the behavioural modelling capability of ABM".
More importantly, I think, is the difference between ABM and Systems Dynamics (which for me are greater). And I was upset to find a text (by a famous author) that uses deterministic differential equations (one direction only) but calls it a ABM...
I hope it helps.
Best,
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I am pursuing a degree in Urban Development, focusing on Urban Sociology and I would like to have suggestion so as to where this can lead me as I am sort of lost at the moment.
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You can work at city hall, at academic institutions, at think tanks, etc.
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Some cities face land shortage, there are large amount of existing high rise building structures in some of the existing highly dense areas, but in those areas there is also always a lack of public green open space supply, such as parks, gardens, playgrounds etc. What are the ways to provide satisfactory amount of green open area in an existing high dense area which only has limit of land?
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Dear Pak,
Greening of existing dense urban areas is one of the challenges facing urban sustainability transformation. As of now, there are some limited options available such as green roof, green wall, rain gardens, and tree planters along the side of the streets. Such practices have been already adopted successfully by cities in the US and Europe. 
Having green open space is a bigger challenge, and depends upon context. In cities where small open parking spaces are available at different locations close by, multi-storey parking ramps can be constructed and those open small parking areas can be converted into green spaces. Another option could be narrowing of street lanes, if they are too wide, and using the additional space for greening. Third option could be providing financial incentives for building owners to convert their roofs to open public gardens.     
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Generally, speaking, what is the international population limit for a city to be called as Metropolitan? or any other features that turn a city into a metropolis.
And what make it differs from an urban city? 
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researchers are more focusing on the visible impacts factors such as financial, public participation, suitable facilities  that directly helps to improve the system, however, those invisible factors were left out. if it is been addressed appropriately, it may create bigger impacts in improving the system. what do you think?
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 Dear Erni mariana
Please Read this article for your appreciate answer
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Dear Researchers,  
Currently I am looking at different policy level decisions and their impacts on the housing development in India.  Can you share some research done and publications on the similar studies in other countries? 
Regards
Uma
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Yes there is need planning guidelines, housing construction standards that specify the minimum requirements for housing and also ensuring quality meeting requirements of all sectors appreciably
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By applying remote sensing techniques, how can we effectively map urban sprawl?
What are the different methods and techniques?
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There are several research papers related to this plz go through. by applying supervised classification you can demarcate urban sprawl area.
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Hi! My dissertation is about the establishment and development of towns in a region in the Philippines from the late 16th to the 17th century. I'd like to show the region I'm studying and the significant settlements there using a custom-made map. If you know of any program (free, if possible), please give me a shout. Thanks!!
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Thank you very much!
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The use of construction methods has changed as society has but also the introduction into new technology. What construction methods could benefit the industry and society if they were reintroduced or modified with new materials?
Body of knowledge or regulations into new methods of construction.
Case studies
Researchers/ Developers  
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A topic at the moment is the re-use of materials cq buildings/ building components (often called circular economy). The problem is not the avalibity but getting the information about what is available (size, material, color, texture, schape, etc) into the design an descision process. Another issue is logistics (how and when to get it to where you want it) and storage (the time difference between availability and re-use).  To fill the gap between availability and design/ descision/re-use is a challenge. This apporach will need a fundamental mindshift and another "re-use" industry. 
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There are numbers of theories on causes of urbanization within different disciplines. There are also various listings on generic drivers combining multitude of these findings. I am now looking for a drivers list that has sound references to relevant theories yet provides a notion on (systemic) relationship between these drivers.
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The main and constant drivers of urbanization are the following:
- National and regional economic development
- Demographic growth
- Increase of personal income
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How can we take the measure of walkability of a city? with what tools?
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Check out the work of Paul Hess, he has done some really valuable work on walkability and pedestrian issues in both Seattle and Toronto. He is on Research Gate.
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In the framework of my phD on Heritage-based Urban Development i am looking for literature that is analyzing or critizinging the place-based approach of urban rehabilitation. Any suggestion is welcome!
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Here is the issue in a nutshell: negative externalities. If one is trying to rehabilitate an area which is surrounded by sources of negative externalities (e.g., noise, crime, whatever), it is useful to think about devices to insulate the area from these sources. Often it can be done by the strategic placement of public capital: a road, a hospital complex, a parking lot, etc. Sometimes a berm can be used. Limited vehicular access is another device. That is, it is not necessary for the public sector to do the rehabilitation itself. Instead, it is useful to create an environment in which rehabilitation can proceed in the private sector.
The bottom line is that it is not so much the quantity of public investments but the spatial configuration of investments that is important.
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i'm looking forward a paper which describe Tod & syntax method completely how social and economic parameters are used in this method ?
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Dear Ali,
 This question is already answered by RG member on the following address. Please check it out:
 also, I would like to refer you to the following website. It can help you in this regard.
Regards,
Seyed Ehsan Afsahi
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Which countries have developed a systematic approach to housing policy that addresses effectively different modalities of housing provision (government, market, civil society) and housing options (informal/formal, finished/incremental, ownership/rental)? I am currently preparing a presentation on urban development challenges in the Global South and would like to show some telling success stories of the Global South. Thank you for all your help and input!
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The key concepts, "systematic" and "approach"  need to be located in the actual lived experiences of people, [cf Pierre Bourdieu etc in this regard]. In this case you have to contrast different housing policies in different socio-historical contexts and then try to define what would be considered as "systematic" and "approach" in general and in relation to your own research context (s) -- as there are different systems and approaches. See my work on Pierre Bourdieu, etc
Best wishes with your research!
John J
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If you had to state illustrative examples under this heading, which countries/cities would you mention to illustrate the scale of the program and/or emerging solutions? I am currently preparing a presentation of urban development challenges in the Global South and would like to show a larger geographical scope than my own expertise. Thank you for all your help and input!
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 The inability of governments to provide appropriate infrastructure and public services is at the core of many urban challenges
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I am evaluating the process and product of collaborative governance in housing regenertions and for assessing product I need to be clear with the indicators. 
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Neighborhood improvements are usually capitalized into housing market prices, so a good practical method for ex-post evaluation is to compare before and after home prices.
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The details of this question are as follows:
what are the key technical and practical issues involved in creating a single national planning system for Australia and discuss the relative merits and demerits of pursuing such a goal in the current constitutional and political environment.
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Dear Salman
Here are some issues to consider:
1. You must first define "planning". In Australian English, it is an ambiguous word. Listed from broadest to narrowest uses, it can refer to strategic policy-making; or more narrowly confined to spatial land use planning (also called urban and regional planning) or even more narrowly, just statutory development control (zoning + development assessment).
2. You must take into account the division of powers between levels of government under Australia's constitution. When the former British colonies federated (1901), The Commonwealth was assigned only those powers that the States were prepared to relinquish – the States came first. The States retained all powers over land, natural resources and development. Since then, the Commonwealth has assumed responsibility for implementing external treaties within Australia's boundaries, including some such as biodiversity which impinge upon state rights. Local government is a creature of the States, so like the Commonwealth, its existence does not reduce the States' responsibility for land use planning. Statutory development control is delegated to local government in all States, with the State governments retaining various reserve powers.
3. You should consider the "vertical fiscal imbalance", meaning that the Commonwealth collects most of the taxes but the States are responsible for most of the services. This is one reason for a general trend in the past 30 years for functions to drift towards the Commonwealth. Example: the planning of major transport infrastructure.
4. You should also consider the neoliberal policy agenda introduced progressively since 1983, with its pressure for economic efficiency, greater central control and greater involvement of commercial firms. Example: once, the Commonwealth simply paid money to the States as a contribution to major national highways. Now it has established a new entity Infrastructure Australia with a commercial board sitting outside the public service and promoting major transport construction projects. A Research Report I wrote recently (see link) explains the damage this is doing to planning.
5. You need to consider the different attitudes towards planning by Coalition (conservative) and Labor (centre-left) governments. Labor governments tend to establish new planning and city renewal programs and conservative governments tend to abolish them. The Council of Australian Governments (COAG) is the main intra-jurisdictional forum for negotiating division of responsibilities between the States and the Commonwealth, and new programs.
6.You should consider the groundbreaking role played by the Whitlam governments (1972-1975) in land use planning such as its regional growth centres program and the Department of Urban and Regional Development.
7. You should give some thought to theoretical arguments for and against centralisation. On the one hand, there are economies of scale by centralising; on the other hand there are diseconomies of scale caused by separation of strategic planners from on-ground functionaries with in-depth knowledge of local problems. You should also consider the significance of coordination. Coordination is a central function of government and becomes more difficult as the geographic scope of the activity widens and as the number of other arms of government widen.
Hope these suggestions help.
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I am a WASH and urban development specialist living and working in East Africa. I am attempting to scope out “temporary” solutions to sanitation and waste challenges in large unplanned settlements in Dar es Salaam and Nairobi and am looking to receive feedback/critique/advice. I understand these solutions do not sound politically/technologically correct, but with local resource limitations, I seek to identify low-cost, non-motorised and intuitive methods that can be implemented quickly on the ground.
I am interested in what role EM-1/Bokashi could play, purely as a waste management solution in respect of both organic (market waste) and liquid waste (faecal sludge). The purpose is NOT to produce compost, but to mitigate odour, pests and the transmission of disease.
1. Could EM-1/Bokashi bran be added to large municipal containers (e.g. skips) to mitigate odour, pests, disease transmission? 2.mCould EM-1/Bokashi bran be dropped into pit latrines to mitigate odour, pests, disease transmission?
2. Could EM-1/Bokashi bran be dropped into pit latrines to mitigate odour, pests, disease transmission?
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EFFECTIVE MICROORGANISMS (EM)
EM is a brown colour liquid concentrate containing a consortium of beneficial microbes and acts as soil conditioner as well as a microbial inoculant. It is produced from cultivation of over 80 strains of beneficial microorganisms, which are collected from the natural environment. Over 90 countries are using this technology successfully today.
EM stock solution mainly consists of lactobacillus, photosynthetic bacteria, yeast and ray fungi. The microorganisms are not imported or genetically engineered. EM includes both aerobic and anaerobic species of microorganisms which co-exist in an environment of around 3.5 pH. EM is used in agriculture, animal husbandry, aquaculture, waste water & solid waste management to increase the quantity and to improve the quality of products and the treating of certain poluting ellements.  It has been observed that increasing the dosage of EM to make compost also increased the nutrient level.
EM Bokashi
Bokashi is rich a fermented compost, which can be made as ‘aerobic’ (allowing air contact) or ‘anaerobic’ (without air contact), depending on the process used. Bokashi is a strong organic manure with beneficial effects towards the soil. Aerobic Bokashi can be made on a large scale. As the temperature will rise (up to 40 – 50 °C) during the process of composting it has to be controlled (e.a. by aeriation) to maintain energy.
Anaerobic Bokashi: The process is a bit more demanding but it is superior to aerobic Bokashi as it has more nutrients. It is important to note the quantitys beeing applied of this Bokashi are much lower.
Ingredients for making Bokashi
Organic Material: Rice, corn or wheat bran, maize flour, rice or bean husk, rice, wheat or corn straw, any oil seed cake, cotton seed cake, press mud, chopped crop residue or weeds, saw dust, dried sea weed, coconut fiber and husk, post harvest residue etc. Animal Residues: Fish or bone meal, animal dung, crab shell, waste from meat-industry.
It is best to have a balance between plant and animal material in the ratio of 2:1 and to have a mix of many different types of organic ingredient. A typical Bokashi contains the following: Rice Bran: Oil cake: Fish/ Bone Meal: Water: Molasses: EM in the ratio of 2.5kg: 2.5kg: 2.5kg: 150 ml: 150 ml: 150ml by volume. The quantity of water can be altered depending on the moisture content of the ingredients used. The material should be moist without drainage. It is recommended that at least 10-15% rice bran should be present in all Bokashi recipes.
EM in action
Current research indicates that EM cultures can suppress soil-borne pathogens, accelerate the decomposition of organic wastes, increase the availability of mineral nutrients and useful organic compounds to plants, enhance the activities of beneficial micro-organisms, e.g., mycorrhizae, nitrogen fixing bacteria, and reduce the need for chemical fertilisers and pesticides. EM helps to increase beneficial soil micro-organisms and supression of harmful ones.
As a compost application
Apply to the compost heap to reduce troublesome odours and flies as well as improving the compost process and quality. Preferably spray on with a hand sprayer to prevent over wetting the compost heap and apply at each addition of fresh material if possible.
How to produce Anaerobic Bokashi?
Mix rice-bran, oil cake and fish/bone meal thoroughly. Dissolve molasses in water (1:100) and add EM to the solution. Pour this mixture on the dry ingredients and mix well. Please ensure that no lumps are left after mixing. Place this mixture in a polythene bag or airtight container and make it airtight. Release all air from the bag, place the packed bag in another polythene bag and again make it airtight. Store in a dark place. Bokashi is ready in 4 - 5 days in summer and 7 - 8 days in winter under tropical conditions (in other regions store at 24 – 26 °C). It will smell sweet and fermented when ready. Anaerobic Bokashi should be used soon after preparation. For storage, spread it on soil and dry it in the shadow. When dry, it can be stored in polythene bags. Keep the Bokashi save from rodents and other pests.
How to produce Aerobic Bokashi:
The ingredients and method of mixing is similar to anaerobic Bokashi. Spread the mix on soil and cover it with gunny (jute) bags, straw, mat or similar matter to keep it from rain. The temperature rises rapidly but is controlled at 25°-35° C by turning the mix upside down. This may have to be done 3 or 4 times. Bokashi is ready in 4 - 5 days. Store like anaerobic Bokashi. Application of any kind of Bokashi: Broadcast Bokashi on the soil at 600 kg per acre or 250 gms/ m2 till or plough the soil so that the Bokashi is covered with 5-8 cms of soil. Use mulch to cover the soil thereafter Caution: No seed or sapling to be sown or planted for 5-10 days after application of Bokashi. (The more you give - the longer you wait)
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While there are so many books and papers on the concept of "whiteness," I have trouble finding scholars who wrote specifically on whiteness (its preservation or destabilization) and (urban) space. How does (urban) space contribute (or not) to the preservation of whiteness and white privilege? To what extent has the protection/defense of white space contributed to the formation of the American character (I'm thinking about rural farmers and vigilante groups protecting their land against menacing, often radicalized "others" in the Republic's early years). I have already read Cheryl Harris's excellent essay Whiteness as Property. I now need to read a book/paper that addresses specifically whiteness and space (private property, land, urban space if possible).
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I am a WASH and urban development specialist living and working in East Africa. I am attempting to scope out “temporary” solutions to sanitation and waste challenges in large unplanned settlements in Dar es Salaam and Nairobi and am looking to receive feedback/critique/advice. I understand these solutions do not sound politically/technologically correct, but with local resource limitations, I seek to identify low-cost, non-motorised and intuitive methods that can be implemented quickly on the ground.
I am interested in what role a mix of powder soap, sand and ash could play in enabling schools to supply affordable options to their pupils to wash their hands. This is already a common practice in East Africa, but it is unclear what the optimal mix/composition of these three items should be. Does anyone else have recommendations on the optimal composition or an alternative item, that is free/locally sourced that could be mixed?  
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Dear Joshua,
A mixture of ash and soap may not produce the lather that is required to clean hands whereas a mixture of sand and soap may act well in removing dirt and probably germs...it has been used in Kenya for cleaning of hands among the mechanics/those who repair motor vehicles specifically to remove oil and grease from their hands. i am not sure about the scientific benefit of the same but you may test its efficacy. Soapy water ( a mixture of powdered soap+ water) is very common in Kenya and has been promoted as an alternative to sustaining soap provision in schools. you can read the following article for more information;
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Is there are wards or UC in slums of Islamabad and can anyone share the exact list of all (total) slum areas of Islamabad issued by CDA
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According to official statistics eight Kacchi Abadeis including, French Colony, Paris colony, 100 quarters, 66 quarters, Hansa Colony, Charles Colony, Siad Purr Model Village and I-9 Christine colony were set up by the CDA and have a legal status. Whereas, illegal Kacchi Abadeis in G-7, G-8, F-6, F-7, I-11, and Banni Gala
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There are elements of urban resilience inherent in the historic cities of kathmandu valley (for eg). Some of  these elements are, its social structure, values, etc. How can these elements be strengthened and new elements introduced effectively within the reconstruction process/planning?
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thank you so much !
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In landuse planning for future urban development in an area divided into regions, how can I decide the inter and intra zonal ratio of different land-uses in the same region and in different regions?
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Have you considered shift-share analysis?
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Hi everyone,
I think the approaches of policy mobilities and policy translation help us to understand the contextspecific assembling processes of "creative cities". In order to critically analyse "creative cities" and to develop progressive "creative cities" new perspectives and methods are needed.
What is your research on "creative cities" about in particular? What informs your research? I'm looking forward to discussing our perspectives! 
Regards,
Moritz
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1- Adam,Robert .2008. globalization and architecture, 
2- Eldemery, Ibrahim Mostafa.2009.GLOBALIZATION CHALLENGES IN ARCHITECTURE.
3-andour,Alaa .2013.Contemporary Architecture of Islamic Societies between Globalization and Traditions.
4-Bicer,Ramazan .2013.Globalization in the Context of Islamic Theology.
5- Impacts Of Globalization Islamic Architecture Cultural Studies Essay
Published: 23, March 2015.
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My answer to the question is "Yes", there is definitely a relationship between "Globalization" and "Architecture", regardless of the types of culture. From my point of view, rapid urbanization and technological advances have resulted in more and more standardization of built environments, depriving human habitats of cultural and regional identity, in which the trend of standardization is becoming an international malaise as the same building methods, materials, and styles are applied.
For some, globalization entails the Westernization of the world. Some see globalization as generating increasing homogeneity, while others see it producing diversity and heterogeneity through increased hybridization.
Two tensions caused by globalization on architecture: one seeks to safeguard and promulgate established indigenous architectural traditions, forms, decorative motifs, and technologies, while the other promotes invention and dissemination of new forms using new technologies and materials in response to changing functional needs and sensibilities. It places a premium on systemization, flexibility, and interchangeability. I think this happens in any where, any place, and to any culture. 
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Would like to seek for your opinion on the above question. As observed apparently, prefabrication construction in residential housing only takes place, successfully, in those developed countries; while traditional cast in-site construction is still prevalent in those developing countries. Does it mean that prefabrication construction is viable in a country only when that country achieved certain degree of development?   
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In the US, movement toward the use of prefabrication has been stymied by building codes that are really intended to protect the employment of certain trades (e.g., electricians and plumbers).
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Istanbul as a mega city has very complex city dynamics. Its population has been dramatically increasing during the last decades. I am interested in the major public characteristics and urban context factors having impacts on the population increase and urban sprawl.
Can you please share your ideas and contributions on the topics of population growth and key topics pertinent such as; migration issue, inner-city re-urbanization strategies and policies, impact of building new infrastructure on population growth, etc.?
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Regarding the population growth Chee hung Foo resumed it quite well.
Regarding urban sprawl, there are multiple factors that vary according to each context. Nevertheless, according to researchers the main and most common drivers are economic and population growth, increase of income and lack of spatial planning or failure to apply it.
These are a bit generic and of course there other factors, such transportation infrastructures or cultural factors, however these are more dependent of the context (time and space) of the case study. For instance, the initial modern sprawled areas (mostly in the USA in the 19th century) were structured around railway stations. Nowadays, most of it are structured around road infrastructures and private car.
In attach follows some publications that will help you to understand all the dynamic of urban sprawl. Special attention to the works of Ewing and the report of the EEA.
Hope I could be helpful 
Cheers
Marcos Correia
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I require some reliable information
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In addition to the above, you could contact Local Authorities for housing need and allocation studies for Housing Market Areas/
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in the context of the just started European H2020 project MOBILITY4EU, I would like to know how many cities in Europe and also elsewhere have developed SUMPs. Is there a dynamic there, do many more cities develop such strategies that European institution want to see more and more developed?
It seems a big issue to find a source for the monitoring of this, crawling in the jungle of European projects.
I found elements in the Eltis project, but does it exist other sources?
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At least few Lithuanian municipalities (Klaipeda, Kaunas, Palanga and other) working now on SUMPs and they will be ready in about 4-5 months.
Some other municipalities have new SUMPs: for example Utena
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Pace of urbanization and thus forming really wide public spaces is very different from historic as well as geographical point of view. In any case this process means that a number of people whose cognitive and communicative habits are adopted to the close milieus where one is personally acquainted with everyone (or with the majority of those people) one has to deal with - have to accommodate oneselves to the milieus where lots of "the others" are to be looked at as abstracted agents. The pace of this accommodation - in both personal and generational perspectives - supposes different strategies both on the side of those passing through this process as well as those already urbanized ones who have to deal with the newcomers. Thus the question.
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The answer to the first question: There is never downshifting because I believe that we take the kampung spirit with us when we migrate to the city. Malaysians are very attached to their roots. I must tell you about our 'balik kampung' phenomenon whereby our capital city is literally deserted during major festivals such as Eid, Chinese New Year and Deepavali and school holidays. During these holidays, everyone 'balik kampung' i.e. leave the city to go back to their kampungs for a few days. If you can imagine, Extreme Christmas at least 4 times a year (we have 2 Eids). So, there is never a question of downshifting because kampung is deeply entrenched in our psyches.
The answer to the second question: If I'm allowed to generalise, my answer would be "yes". Especially if the newcomers bring their 'kampung' attitude to the city. For instance, kampungfolks are not used to living in high rise buildings, and some will do things like throwing rubbish from their balcony or put excessive plant pots in the corridor (kampung folks like to garden). However, I think town people are becoming more receptive to kampung folks these days, especially when we have an influx of foreign immigrants/workers who bring their own 'kampung' culture to Malaysia! :)
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Often looking for a job or better prosperity, people move to cities. Despite recent advances in wellbeing and technology on society, the overpopulation of big cities (greater than 10 million people) it is expected to be one of the biggest future challenges of mankind. In 2007, for the first time, the population of urban areas exceeded that of rural ones and currently, about 55% of the total population live in cities. According to estimates of the United Nations, two out of three of the total population will live in growing conurbations in 2050.
This scenario depicts a not too distant future with differences between cities and rural regions and also with predicted expectations in global sustainability at different levels disregarding the development of countries: from an individual/social impact (i.e., economic policies, relocation and change in cities design, lifestyle) to a more wider repercussion (i.e. depletion of natural resources, environmental degradation, wars, unemployment, poverty).
To deal with that, different global reports have proposed some solutions, such as:
  • promote economic development and job creation, 
  • involve local community in local government, 
  • reduce air pollution by upgrading energy use and alternative transport systems,
  • create private-public partnerships to provide services such as waste disposal and housing,
  • plant trees and incorporate the care of city green spaces as a key element in urban planning: sustainable urbanization,
  • implement educational policies reflecting social change: tax exemptions for limited children, sex education.
Can you suggest any other scientific approach to alleviate this issue? I would like to emphasize the role of both science and technology.
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Agglomeration in cities are aggravating the problems of sane food production, safe health services and meaningful education for kids. We currently have the tools to provide decent education for rural kids and to pay proper prices for agricultural production, which are the main reasons rural folks seek to migrate.
But as long as we simply keep 'counting heads' in elections, the politicians have no incentive to put breaks in migration to cities, because it costs more to seek votes in rural areas. Unless we establish area-wise proportional representation in elections, giving more weight to rural voters, we won't see an end to over crowding in cities.
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tropical cities need to have tree lined streets for have social and environmental benefits. Social benefits like creating walk ability which would result in neighborliness and security. environmental like lessening of pollution like sound,air and also cut the glare. 
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Revathi
1. Before answering your question, it is really necessary to know what land use you wish to promote at each particular site; and what are the environmental conditions there. The trees should be chosen from a list of those that will naturally do well in that location without excessive degrees of maintenance such as watering or fertilising or shelter from winds.
2. A guide published by the Royal Australian Institute of Architects in 2000 (with amendments in a 2005 update) is attached. This explains the overriding importance of deciding what land use is to be served.
3. In the 1980s the United Nations published a very good book identifying a number of trees suitable for the dry tropics. Your library may be able to track it down.
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I'm interest to know what the strategic to build the city. The city is a capital city, center of the region, but the city hasn't a node of transportation. Development of nodes a transportation instead around the city. Fortunately , the city has turned tourist attraction for the city. Nodes of transportation consists of a airport , a port and a station.
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From a theoretical point of view, I would look at the Johann von Thunen (Thunen ring model - early 1800's) as a starting point. Nobel prize winner Paul Krugman also wrote about this (sorry, don’t know of the name of the book – mid 90’s I think) and how transit stations create mini-Thunen rings around these nodes. Thus the transit station inevitability creates gentrification based on proximity to the transport node. 
Cheers,
DC
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I'm interested in the indicators of the development of megacities or the development of sub-urbs which can contribute more to economic growth.
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Begin from Environmental baseline data through population growth and it's characteristics to determine requirements and adequate zoning 
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Various grey water treatment plants have been proposed in the past and are in use. However, more research is needed to develop a compact plant for use by individual building or housing society in urban area for water saving and optimum use.
So, I am interested to know some information about any such compact plant.
Hope researchers in this area or any user of such system would share info about the cited question.
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Hello, 
Here are two articles: 
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There are a lot of papers which compare environmental conditions within urban wetlands to those within their rural counterparts. However I have yet to find a researh paper that monitored a natural wetland prior to urban development (baseline) and then continuted to monitor it  post-development. Any suggestions as to where I might find such research?
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 Bruce A Friesen-Pankratz ,
You can follow the study on East Kolkata Wetlands (one of the recognized Ramsar sites).
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Currently I'm doing research on the priority factors in the provision of clean water infrastructure in the Bandung metropolitan area (indonesia), more specific to low-income communities.
I will use Analytical Network Process (ANP) method to seek factor priorities that will determined by the government through the planning agency and the local water company.
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few factors include cost and accessibility to user. Distance travelled to access the water
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This new research builds upon my 2011 paper with Luke Stein.  A copy of this paper can be found on my page.
Thank you in advance.
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Hullo Matthew
I'm not sure whether I can give an answer that will convey any information of which you are not already fully aware. However, I have browsed through your paper with Stein and will offer a few tangential thoughts.
First, as a biophysical scientist I don't have much patience for extracting meaning from postmodern deconstructionist waffle which seems disconnected from biophysical reality and the day-to-day lives of people affected.
Second, I would recommend that you read Richard Sanders' article explaining the fundamental problem at the core of economics which renders it blind to the biophysical limits to development and economic activity. Sanders also explains convincingly why the contemporary definition of sustainability as a condition achieved through balance of the economic, social and environmental limbs is conceptually incoherent and therefore un-implement.
Economics and markets are socio-economic constructs that are superimposed upon the biophysical fabric. They are highly dependent on the values of the key decision-makers involved: there is nothing normative about them. The discourse in economics about markets as if they were independent, autonomous, self-managing entities in which governments "interfere" at our mutual peril is total nonsense as markets don't even exist without a range of government utilities. In an industrial society, markets are a creature of governments. The strength of markets is that they coordinate between buyers and sellers within the statutory framework that governments have created. When the statutory framework changes, the markets can adjust without the need for central bureaucratic coordination. That strength is undisputed, but in much economic writing the bounds are commonly invisible or arose spontaneously.
The biophysical world of natural resources and energy also constrain markets but because the statutory restrictions on extraction of resources and discharge of pollutants back into the biosphere are weak and misaligned with biophysical reality, markets do not operate within the biophysical limits. The disconnect is now large enough to threaten human existence.
The other comment I would make is that it can be misleading to look for economic logic in the economic constraints applied to urban decision-making. Follow the power trail! Your paper recognises power as a factor. Economic theory is somewhat weak in its explanation of power and how power distorts decision-making regardless of likely economic outcomes. Power is difficult to slot into general equilibrium modelling .
Sanders and I share a scepticism about free trade which is relevant to your exploration of international and national competitive marketing. Free trade is a race to the bottom and marketing Adelaide in competition with other cities has some major defects. First, within a single national economy, the competition is likely to be a zero-sum game. Second, competition with other cities especially overseas ones but also within Australia, is resource hungry. Transporting people such as tourists across the planet consumes irreplaceable fossil fuels and has a short-term future. When the world finally wakes up to the seriousness of the climate change crisis, international travel will become rare.
I have touched on the dis-benefits of trade in the attached magazine article (non-peer-reviewed and copyrighted). It doesn't deal directly with your question but does explain why cities should aim to become self-sufficient and not depend upon cannibalising other cities at the expense of fossil fuels.
I'm happy to have another go at a response if I have missed the target or to converse via my Griffith email address if you wish.
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I am intersected in doing a research in Urban simulation using Urban Canvas software. But I didn't find any link to download this software. Can anyone help me in downloading Urban Canvas software and  using it for urban simulation
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SynthiCity is the former owner of Urban Canvas. It is built over UrbanSIM plataform, and opensource project. However, Urban Canvas is not opensource and the company was acquired by Autodesk.
There are still no disclosed information how Autodesk is going to license Urban Canvas and there is no information on how to get academic licenses.
I have been contacting Autodesk staff to get updates on that.
I will keep you posted.
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