Science topics: Travel
Science topic

Travel - Science topic

Aspects of health and disease related to travel. It includes the physiologic and psychologic beneficial or adverse effects of travel in general or with regard to specific diseases.
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Hello everyone,
I would like to measure the total distance of this wavy path if a person travels through the wavy channel instead of the straight path. Please help me to measure this distance.
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No data is missing. I solved the problem using the above approach.
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In 1944, a previously unknown phenomenon of sound propagation over ultra-long distances was recorded. They write about 5 thousand kilometers. In accordance with calculations using empirical formulas, the maximum range of sound propagation is no more than 150 km. In accordance with the theory of propagation of infrasound, 200 km is obtained. What could be the explanation for propagation over such large distances?
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Dear Anders Buen.
Now about the main thing.
Comment #2.
My colleague Boris Kapochkin has already written that sound can travel several thousand kilometers underwater when theory says that 200 km is the maximum.
I calculated that for cylindrical sound propagation with a frequency of 2 Hz at a distance of 200 km, the transmission loss is 67 dB (the power of sound energy decreases by about 200 thousand times), and at a distance of 5000 km, the transmission loss is 53 dB (the sound power decreases by more than 5 million once). This is fully confirmed by the results of calculations by my colleagues from the Odesa Department of Hydroacoustics of the Academy of Sciences of Ukraine 3A%2F%2Fhydromech.org.ua%2Fcontent%2Fpdf%2Fcons%2Fcons2005_084-089.pdf&usg=AOvVaw0vDKOK1EACZ2j4ciY0u2iB).
In order to travel 5000 km, an acoustic wave must continuously, at each cycle of compression and extension, receive energy from the aquatic environment. Otherwise, only 200 km. I need to voice a few postulates.
First postulate. Water has structure. I have attached several diagrams in one picture.
Second postulate. When breaking and restoring one broken intermolecular bond, 400 kJ/kg is absorbed and released for every 10 water molecules. That is, during compression, the structure of water is destroyed, and the speed of sound in such a medium increases. The measure of the kinetic energy of the medium must increase (the process of wave propagation is non-adiabatic).
Third postulate. For infrasound, the process of wave propagation is adiabatic.
Fourth postulate. The destruction of the structure of water requires disproportionately less time than its restoration.
In this way, the aquatic environment, in the process of exposure to infrasound, releases energy and reduces the total mass of associated molecules. As a result, positive feedback occurs, which is very rare in non-biological phenomena, and is aimed at reducing entropy.
It's about like this somewhere.
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Hello!
I want to ask for some input.
I am currently working on a feasibility study regarding the best kind of transport that I should take when traveling either by land or water from one place to another.
I have the following data:
1. Transportation Vehicle type
2. Travel time
3. Travel cost
4. Routes
5. Travel type (land or water)
Question: What statistical tool should I use for me to make a decision as to which is more preferable for travel (by land or water)? Do you have other suggestions as to how I can better relay information from the data I have gathered?
Your advice or suggestions will be greatly appreciated!
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There are several possibilities, my suggestion would be correlation and regression analysis.
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In other words, can someone who is unable to have an embodied experience in remote wild geographies form ample pictures about them in his/her academic papers and thesis? Or, is traveling to those places a must?
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You don't need to have experienced things to have an informed opinion about them through reading. So yes, you can write about anything you like. Einstein wrote about relativity, but never experienced it for himself, so :)
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Hi all - I'm interested in IDing microbes present in various samples (water sources + used mentrual products) whilst travelling in remote communities in Nepal. I can't guarantee a stable cold chain whilst travelling so was wondering whether there was a good way to either 1) store samples for later analysis upon return to the UK or 2) sequence in situ with a minION (though I'm unsure what the storage requirements are like for the reagents). My background is infecton control/public health so would really appreciate some tips from those with more experience in this area. Thanks.
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I don't have hands on experience with such work, but the go to way of storage at "room temperature" is lyophilization.
I don't know what will be your conditions, and what exactly you want to do with your samples afterwards (should be microbes viable?), but you could simply put your sample on filter paper and let it dry. You could get air-tight container with plenty of silicagel (with part "labelled" with MnCl2, which changes colour depending on water content - better to have few silicagel with high concentration of MnCl2, than everything with small concentration). You can easily dry silicagel using heat, whenever you'll see it's turning pink.
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Richard Feynman showed that antimatter goes backward in time. Special Relativity shows that some travelers go forward in time more quickly than others.
Time travel appears to have possibilities, but with rules and restrictions.
What Rules Govern Time Travel?
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Dear Sergey Shevchenko
Thanks a lot of. I deleted two.
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Hi, I have written a code for solving the Helmholtz-Maxwell electromagnetic equation using finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. There is not much material available online for this equation. All the algorithms available online or offline are based on Yee's leap frog method.
I have followed the book Computational electrodynamics by Taflov and a PDF by Prof. John S that is available online. Now when I follow Yee's grid then TFSF work very well but when I try to implement it on my code then it doesn't work at all. I'm following the same method to suppress the leftward traveling wave as discussed in these sources albeit with slight modification.
If someone has done it before and can help me on this then it would be of great help.
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I'm using the waves u(ct-x) and u(ct+x) travelling towards right hand side and left hand side respectively. Ideally only u(ct-x) come out of the source at TFSF.
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Many U.S universities offer short-term opportunities doctoral degree holders to pursue further research. They may also allow visiting fellows to audit graduate-level courses and to have access to academic facilities for personal research. To explore these opportunities, how should we contact university faculty or academic departments directly for exchange programs or access laboratory facilities in offline mode. I know someone will be travelling to the USA on their own and would like to access the laboratory to get some certifications or knowledge for the 10 days or 15 days time duration. Is it possible to identify which universities and programs can support a researcher so that he can earn a few credit points and also learn during the time period.
If you know kindly suggest as travel expenses may be covered by the researcher during the visit.
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Please I am interested.
Share the details and knowledge with me please
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There are news on COVID-19 outbreak on ship, no matter cruise or military one.
And few aircraft carriers are also involved.
What is special about the ship arrangement that facilitated all these?
Nature 580, 18 (2020)
Limiting spread of COVID-19 from cruise ships - lessons to be learnt from Japan,
QJM: An International Journal of Medicine, , hcaa092,
COVID-19 outbreak on the Diamond Princess cruise ship: estimating the epidemic potential and effectiveness of public health countermeasures,
Journal of Travel Medicine, , taaa030,
Public Health Responses to COVID-19 Outbreaks on Cruise Ships — Worldwide, February–March 2020. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2020;69:347-352. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6912e3
Estimating the asymptomatic proportion of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) cases on board the Diamond Princess cruise ship, Yokohama, Japan, 2020.
Euro Surveill. 2020;25(10):pii=2000180.
Chest CT Findings in Cases from the Cruise Ship “Diamond Princess” with Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)
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Have a look at this useful RG link for insights.
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I will get the assumption that the travel behavior of a person does not change over a few years.
Is this assumption fair enough to use or please kindly suggest your opinions on this?
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No, the difference in time is too big.
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Yes. Proof given in pages : 83 , 84 of my Theory. The link to the theory :
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Muhsin Aljaf , we used to think that gravitational waves travel at the speed of light, but the new research by my Theory of Universality shows that they actually travel at the speed of dark energy which 9.887x10^12m/s.
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Does anyone know of any theoretical work or empirical evidence that magnons can travel any appreciable distance in the vacuum of free space???
spin waves more specifically are a colloquial term for transfer in feromagnetic media, but it seems the magnon hypothesis nearly 75 years old has only been investigated with a pseudo form of quantum computing.
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Magnons and spin waves don't travel in vacuum-they're excitations of a medium...
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Hello,
I'm curious to learn about resources (i.e., standard practices) regarding the creation of a survey instrument and/or analysis of micro-mobility travel mode decisions and travel behaviors (route preferences) in a university environment? Thanks and I look forward to any and all comments!
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I would love to see your findings. Please keep me posted!
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Hi all,
I am modeling a high-velocity (200 m/s) flow of water vertically entering the air. The water is supposed to hit the wall after traveling a 0.5 mm distance. The flow is highly turbulent, and I am using the k-omega phase-field approach for modeling.
The problem is that once the jet approaches the wall, the problem stops converging (Error: maximum number of segregated iterations reached). Any idea what is the root of the problem and how to solve it?
Thank you for your time in advance,
Majid
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it may be caused by grid.
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I am analysing the length of a fish has on the total distance travelled to see if there is a relationship. To make it more complex I included 2015 and 2018 which is a before and after a Weir was removed from a river. I want to do a test to see if length of fish or the year (removal of the Weir) has a greater impact on the total distance travelled. Which one would I use?
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Regression analysis with R square value can be a good approach
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Risk factors for COVID-19 appear to include:
  • Recent travel from or residence in an area with ongoing community spread of COVID-19 as determined by CDC or WHO
  • Close contact (within 6 feet, or 2 meters) with someone who has COVID-19 for more than 5 minutes or being coughed or sneezed on by an infected person
  • Please suggest if anything more....
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Obesity is also a risk factor COVID-19.
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1. Bose-Einstein condensation: How do we rigorously prove the existence of Bose-Einstein condensates for general interacting systems? (Schlein, Benjamin. "Graduate Seminar on Partial Differential Equations in the Sciences – Energy, and Dynamics of Boson Systems". Hausdorff Center for Mathematics. Retrieved 23 April 2012.)
2. Scharnhorst effect: Can light signals travel slightly faster than c between two closely spaced conducting plates, exploiting the Casimir effect?(Barton, G.; Scharnhorst, K. (1993). "QED between parallel mirrors: light signals faster than c, or amplified by the vacuum". Journal of Physics A. 26 (8): 2037.)
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Regarding the first problem, there are many examples. For instance, the paper by O. Penrose, ``Bose-Einstein condensation in an exactly soluble system of interacting particles'', esearchportal.hw.ac.uk/en/publications/bose-einstein-condensation-in-an-exactly-soluble-system-of-intera
Cf. also, the paper by E. Lieb and R. Seiringer, ``Proof of Bose-Einstein Condensation for Dilute Trapped Gases'',
Regarding the second problem, the boundary conditions break Lorentz invariance. That's why the question isn't well-posed, whether in the classical limit or when quantum effects must be taken into account. In a finite volume it requires care to define the propagation velocity properly, since the equilibrium field configurations describe standing waves.
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I have been accepted for conference presentation in Japan, but they dont cover my travel and staying expenses. Can you advise me on how to get my expenses cover?
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You can try DAAD funding, it will be helpful for you.
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Hi there - I'm currently in the process of writing my research proposal for my MBA Finance dissertation. My area of focus is online travel booking platforms (e.g. AirBnb, Booking.com, Expedia), and I would like to research the impact changing buyer behaviour (caused by Covid) has had on these organisations.
I'm having trouble narrowing down the financial aspect of this topic, with the information that I would have publicly available on the companies, and would love some guidance. Would it be sufficient to look at impact on share price? Or would overall organisational risk be better?
Any guidance would be much appreciated - Thanks!
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Dear Kat Collins, you chose a great topic and the right industry, because in times of a pandemic, the tourism industry has been exposed to many risks, in particular the global risk of business suspension and temporary closure of access to various markets attractive to tourists, but unfortunately heavily infected or exposed to an increase in covid infections. Many markets have become heavily infected or exposed to an increase in covid infections due to the high population flow in the tourist destinations for exemple Italy, France, Spain. You can make multiple risk analyzes. For information on how to identify them and what methods to test, please see my lecture on risk in business. It is in the Polish version, but I can translate for you the parts of the lecture that would interest you the most. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/357689642_Ryzyko_i_niepewnosc_w_dzialalnosci_gospodarczej_Risk_and_uncertainty_in_business_activities
My most general tips:
1. As a research sample, consider companies whose financial statements and stock exchange quotes are available without major problems.
2. Analyze at least two different tourism markets and the leading tourism companies in them in 2020-2021
3. Use generally recognized risk measures, i.e. variance and standard deviation in the case of analyzing the time series related to share prices of listed companies, 4. When analyzing changes in the rates of return of selected companies, compare them to the rates of return on market indices (ideally if you had at your disposal the rates of return on the tourism index in a given country for the years 2020-2021) on a given market from which you download data on a listed company.
5. When analyzing the risk indicators for travel companies, carefully put the results on the timeline and accurately relate it to the change of government restrictions in the given countries at the moment regarding displacement and sanitary requirements for travelers, then the results of the statistical indicators will become more understandable and clear to interpret.
So many general comments :) Dariusz
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Does anyone know where I can find publicly available travel surveys from low and middle income countries and cities?
Travel surveys such as travel diaries (with trip purpose, mode, time, possibly distance) - and also user intercept surveys.
Thank you!
Christian
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Search through scholar
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How do sound waves travel through a barrier? A sound wave is the result of compression and rarefaction of gases. This pressure difference makes the air molecules oscillate. [Fig 1]
When sound waves hit the plane wall they reflect. I am considering the same thing for the pressure difference. But when the wave hits the barriers like as shown below image. How will be the pressure distribution? Will it follow the same compression and refraction pattern? Or it will be a high-pressure region at the corner? [fig 2]
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Dear Prerna,
When considering a barrier large compared to the molecular mean free path (in air this is 1E-8 m=0.01 micrometer), the behaviour of the air can be described by means of a continuum model which ignores the behaviour of individual molecules. Furthermore when the pressure variation p' associated with the wave is in the typical audio range (p'<20 Pa), one can use a linear approximation of the equations describing the momentum exchange between fluid "particles"(elements of fluids small compared to the acoustic wave-length and large compared to the mean free path). Combining this with the assumption of thermodynamic equilibrium and the assumption that mass is conserved (non-relativistic model) one can derive the so-called scalar wave equation stating that the second derivative of p' by the time derived by the second derivative of the spatial derivative of p' is equal to the square of the speed of sound c. This speed of sound is in air at room conditions c=343 m/s. Assuming that the barrier is impermeable, one will see from the solution of these equation that the pressure in the corner between the barrier and the "floor" (or ceiling) will indeed increase and reflected waves will be generated. At the central opening in the barrier the wave will be simply transmitted. Due to its "wave" character it will however also be diffracted, which means that some wave energy will spread around the direct path through the barrier (lines through the hole in the direction of propagation of the incoming wave). This phenomenon depends strongly on the ratio of the acoustic wave-length (distance between pressure maxima in the incoming wave or speed of sound c divided by the oscillation frequency) and the size of the opening b. See earlier answer of Weerawut Thanhikam. In principle only a mathematical solution of the problem can provide an accurate answer. However a global idea of the answer can be obtained once the ratio c/(b f) is known.
Reards
Mico
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Every year, millions of people make New Year’s resolutions, hoping to spark positive change. The recurring themes each year include a more active approach to health and fitness, improved finances, and learning new things for personal and professional development. Chances are, more than a couple of the most common resolutions will look familiar to you:
* Exercise more
* Lose weight
* Get organized
* Learn a new skill or hobby
* Live life to the fullest
* Save more money / spend less money
* Quit smoking
* Spend more time with family and friends
* Travel more
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To become a better person. Continue studying and sharing knowledge worldwide.
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We're trying to conduct a study on the effects of charcoal ash contaminated soil on the plant growth using Chinese cabbage as samples. Since we're in the middle of a pandemic, the conduction of the experiment is restricted to households and no laboratories are available. Any suggestions on what areas we should study that wouldn't require to travel to other places? Thank you.
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See this pdf
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Hi, I am an anthropology PhD student, with a background of media sociology. Based on the concept of "site of memory" by Pierre Nora, I am currently trying to develop a method to analyze memory politics, by defining "memory" as a flow traveling among the place (I mean a heritage site), the media, and the people.
I am looing for references, especially from the field of heritage studies, memory studies and media studies, outlining the relation of site-media-people. Does anyone have suggestion?
By now, I have read literatures by Astrid Erll, Nick Couldry, Anna Reading, Ann Rigney, and James Wertsch.
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I am analyzing the effect of micro-influencers (those that have YouTube and no YouTube) on intention to travel. I have weather as a covariate and one moderator and mediator. I did a survey about this and used Likert scale in the answers so how do I analyze this in R? I want to show that micro-influencers with YouTube have a higher effect on intention to travel. Should I also do a SEM analysis to see what factors the questions load in? Please help!
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Maybe the R script in attachment could be useful. It tests for the homogeneity of slopes (an essential assumption for an ANCOVA) and for the normality of residuals; it calculates adjusted means
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As we know Higgs field gives mass to subatomic particles fermions like electrons, quarks etc. Even Higgs boson has mass because it interect with Higgs field. My question is like photons why do Neutrinos do not interect with Higgs field? Its mass is zero like photons if that so can Neutrinos travels like that of speed of light?
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Neutrinos are the only elementary particles that don't interact with the Higgs field. The process by which they acquire mass is different.
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For instance, the effect of accessibility Inequity (measured in terms of time) on travel characteristics of social groups (frequency of travel, mode of choice, purpose of journey etc.)
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Julius Oluwafunminiyi Ajayi -
I think this means there is another consideration here. There isn't the same independent variable (access time) for different dependent variables, such as mode of transport (as in multivariate regression as opposed to multiple regression - though one could have multivariate multiple regression which did not seem applicable here, besides the possible need for logistic regression).
I mean, the access time is different for each mode of transportation, because the transit stops are different. Further, what if multiple modes are used, one to get to another? This might need to be looked at in several pieces. Definitely there isn't just one access time. It depends on the mode already chosen, because of comparative access times to different transit mode stops, or perhaps initial transit mode stops.
One could find that inequality of access means mode of transportation is socially defined to an extent. That is, social group and mode may have a link where the comfort of a mode and upkeep for a mode which makes one more desirable than another also defines which mode a given social group is more likely to frequent. A contingency table might be interesting, but please do not look at a p-value without exploring effect size. A lone p-value is meaningless in a practical sense. If you can do some graphical comparisons, they may be informative. Confidence and prediction intervals could be interpretable as well. You may have to investigate several different questions rather than keep everything in one question.
Hopefully someone has heard of a similar study which might be helpful.
Cheers - Jim
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If you know any short course in Research ethics and Methods, I will like to attend. I do not want online courses but would prefer onsite. I am able to travel to any part of the world.
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Vous pouvez voir le site de l’Université Paris-Saclay "Conseil pour l’éthique de la recherche et l’intégrité scientifique"
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I am researching about the effect of covid-19 and influence of Social Media on the travel planning process. It would be really helpful if you could answer this questionnaire.
I will be more than happy to help you as well by answering your questionaires.
Thank you in advance.
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Unclear, how to answer. E.g.
Given the current situation, I prefer to avoid traveling to large cities * Is 1 agreement or is the highest number agreement??
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I am working on writing a grant proposal to travel to ASCME. The following criteria is required for writing a competitive grant application. I've attached a copy of my proposal. I would appreciate any feedback on my work. Thank you.
  1. SUMMARY
  2. PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES
  3. INTELLECTUAL MERIT/SIGNIFICANCE
  4. PROCEDURES/METHODS (**research proposals only**)
  5. SCHEDULE IN TABLE FORMAT– including link to conference schedule, if applicable/available
  1. SUMMARY
“Provide a summary of your research project or travel. Include all pertinent background information to properly introduce the travel event or research topic. Reminder: Your audience comes from a diverse group of graduate students, please write accordingly.”
2. PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES
“Provide the goal(s) of the proposed research or travel, personal goals, hypotheses (if presenting or conducting research), and your expectations of the research or travel when applicable. If you are presenting during your travel, please give a brief description of your presentation.”
Your personal goals for attending the conference or conducting the research should be included to strengthen the application.
3. INTELLECTUAL MERIT/SIGNIFICANCE
“State why this research or travel is important to the greater community and how it contributes a deeper understanding of the proposed subject matter.”
4. PROCEDURES/METHODS
*For Research proposals only*
“Briefly outline the methodology and/or techniques that will be used to successfully conduct your research.”
5. SCHEDULE
“Include a schedule in table format outlining key components of your research or travel.”
Research: Include expected landmark dates, time frames, and goals.
Travel: Include a link to the entire conference itinerary and a personal schedule of events to be attended. If no schedule is presently available, state that one is not available and include your departure and return dates in table format (If a schedule is not available, please specify in your narrative that it is not available).
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Most funding agencies provide a template for writing a research proposal, which should only be used when applying for a grant. The sections of a research proposal should be developed according to the agency's format to make it neat and legible. The following could render rich relevant inputs.
Attard, N. (2018). WASP (Write a Scientific Paper): Writing an academic research proposal. Early Human Development, 123, 39–41. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.earlhumdev.2018.04.011
Boyle, E. M. (2020). Writing a good research grant proposal. Paediatrics and Child Health, 30(2), 52–56. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.paed.2019.11.003
Thomas, C. G. (2021). Planning and writing a research proposal. In C. G. Thomas, Research Methodology and Scientific Writing (pp. 169–198). Springer International Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-64865-7_7
Good luck,
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Other than the electron mobility, where the carriers in NMOS travel twice as fast as holes, what are the additional specific reason for the faster operation of NMOS than a PMOS.
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Dear Shekhar,
NMOS is fster than PMOS because the electrons have HIGHER drift mobility (and hence higher conductivity and channel conductance) than holes.
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Hello,
I am carrying out a study looking at similarity in distance travelled across groups of repeat missing children with differing numbers of incidents (i.e. 2-5, 5-10, 10-15)
In the simplest of terms, I wish to see:
1. If there is a significant difference between groups with differing number of missing incidents on their similarity scores (measured using Jaccard's coefficient)
2. If the number of incidents (IV) can predict consistency in distance travelled (DV - there are 6 different similarity scores for each distance interval included in the analysis and an overall similarity score across all intervals)
My data are not normally distributed, hence why I am not sure what test best fits the purpose of the analysis (I am using SPSS).
Anticipated thanks to anyone taking the time to read this.
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Hello,
I need some help in figuring out the best way to analyse a set of data for my research project.
The project that aims to investigate consistency of distance travelled in repeat missing children. My IV is the number of missing incidents in a series (i.e. 2 incidents, 3 incidents, 5 incidents and so on; I have these as intervals i.e. 4-10 incidents, 11-20 incidents and so on, as well as a string variable i.e. number of missing incidents rather than intervals of numbers) and my DVs are six distance intervals for which I have computed similarity scores using Jaccard's coefficient. The question I am looking at is whether consistency in distance travelled increases or decreases as the number of incidents in the series increases (one way to think about it is whether someone with 3 missing incidents is more or less likely to travel within the same distance interval than is someone with 15 missing incidents? OR is there a difference between the mean distance similarity score of someone with 3 missing incidents and someone with 15 missing incidents?).
For each case in a series I have coded the distance travelled as 1(yes) or 0(no) for each distance interval (i.e. if during an incident an individual travelled between 0-5 miles, this variable is coded with one, and the value is 0 for all other intervals). I then calculated the Jaccard's coefficient for that case for each of the distance intervals, as well as a mean Jaccard across all distance intervals. I have also calculated the mean Jaccard's coefficient for all cases in a series per each of the different distance intervals.
One option for analysis is MANOVA. However, about 4.6% of my data (700 series of missing incidents) are outliers (as shown by the Mahalanobis distance test). I am aware MANOVA is sensitive to outliers, however I would not want to exclude these all together from the analysis. Should I run the analysis with both the outliers and without them, and report both? Or what is the best way to work around this? Is it absolutely necessary that I delete the outliers?
Also, my data seems to best fit an exponential distribution, how may this effect the results of the MANOVA?
Do people have any suggestions about other tests that may be appropriate for investigating this relationship between number of missing incidents and consistency in distance travelled?
Anticipated thanks to anyone who takes time to read this.
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One short advice: never, never, never delete « outliers » just because the statistical model cannot handle them.
I'm not quite clear about your model and question, but it seems strange to use MANOVA for 0-1 coded variables or class variables...
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I think 128 or 256 channels is necessary. The Bio Semi, Brain Products and Geodesic systems looks good, what are you advices please ?
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We used a 128-ch EGI system for studying traveling waves in sleep, results were very robust:
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The travel time results for one of the travel time measurements I am using in VISSIM results in zero average travel time. The travel route includes a link where there is heavy congestion, but I am not sure if that is what is causing the zero average travel time.
Any suggestions on why this might be happening are much appreciated.
Thank you!
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Hi Harish, try to decrease the traffic volume on that link and then see if this makes any difference.
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I am observing non-physical phenomena in my FDTD simulations when using a permittivity of less than 1 but greater than 0 (plasma). What I observe are wave fronts traveling at the phase velocity. My waves are traveling distances greater than what is possible at light speed.
Do I need to use a modified form of Maxwell's equations and then apply them to a Yee grid to correctly model electromagnetic propagation? How can I treat this?
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I realise that I was wrong, and if Nathan Zechar actually has er less than 1 the pulse (and all frequencies) will travel faster than light. Actual artificial dielectrics with er less than 1 "lose" part of the wave inside the fine detail of the material, so that the wave looks like it has moved 30 deg but actually has moved 390 deg (and took 390 deg worth of time). Your large-scale results may be realistic, but local detailed fields that actually happen in a metamaterial won't be there, and the time for a time domain signal to travel through the material will not be realistic (for a metamaterial). A similar thing happens with travelling wave tube (or magnetron or backward wave oscillator or gyrotron etc) slow wave structures which were early 1D metamaterials. Interaction is calculated using the apparent wave traveling slowly, or backwards, not the actual wave that is travelling at lightspeed but in a convoluted path. Some apparent waves may travel faster than lightspeed (in the upper branch of the dispersion diagram).
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Hi, I am examining whether it is possible to predict distance travelled when a person goes missing (levels - eg 0-5km, 6-10km, 11-20km etc) from a categorical IV (risk assessment - high, medium, low, or no apparent risk). Using an ordinal regression, I have a significant model but none of the beta values for high, medium, low compared with no apparent risk are significant. Does anyone know how to interpret this? I've been asked to further explain what this means by a reviewer but other than 'the model is a significant fit but...' I don't know what else to say.
Thanks in advance.
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I'm assuming that the model with risk assessment added is superior to that for an intercept only model e.g., by a likelihood ratio test. If so then I think the issue is that the predictor is ordinal but you are adding it as three unordered dummies. This isn't wrong but it is an inefficient test of the hypothesis that increasing risk is associated with greater distance. You get the same issue with ANOVA and linear contrasts.
1) If you have continuous risk scores then use those as 1 df predictor (potentially also. I'd also use a model with actual distance rather than categorised distance if possible.
2) Treat the ordered risk variable as continuous by coding it 0,1,2,3. This will be be more efficient and is effectively fitting a linear contrast.
3) Treat the risk category as a monotonic predictor (though I don't know software other than brms in R that supports this). See https://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/brms/vignettes/brms_monotonic.html. I think is a more principled approach than 2) as it doesn't fix the intervals.
If you have only one predictor I'd also suggest just running an appropriate ordinal correlation such as the gamma correlation or Kendall's tau. The ordinal logistic regression doesn't add much unless you are looking at the model predictions (e.g., plotting them) or there are other predictors.
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In "Values of travel time in Europe: Review and meta-analysis" Wardman, Chintakayala and de Jong (2016) distinguish between mode used and mode valued. Some thoughts/questions on this.
As the authors write: "Mode used here relates to the characteristics of the travellers, with income being a key differentiator, and mode valued relates to the intrinsic features of the mode itself. " This distinction seems highly relevant to me.
For instance, "due to self-selection relating in part to income differences, car users have higher values than train users who in turn have higher values than bus users”. But, as far as I see it, this does not imply much about a given person's prior evaluation of the value of time in different modes. A person with a high income will have a higher VOT of transport than a person with a low income whatever the modal choice.
Now, you may argue (but even that seems disputable to me) that for cost-benefit analysis, it is the ex post value that matters. But what if your objective is to model mode choice? Ex ante, the sorting of the mode choice according to income has not yet taken place. Can we then use the value of time taken from surveys that estimate the VOT from the trade-offs people make within a mode? Shouldn't we use the "mode valued" to model mode choice?
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Laurent, I understand the Wardman et al. argument that people value travel time according to the mode they choose and/or can afford.
Now, I find your formulation of the question in 4th paragraph a bit confusing. Care to rephrase?
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During Replication, helicase, primase, DNA polymerase and ligase proteins travel from wherever they are in the nucleus to a specific region of the whole DNA. Why and how do the proteins reach till the 5 prime end?
During transcription, RNA polymerase travels towards the promoter region. How does this movement happen?
During translation, ribosomes travel towards mRNA and tRNA travels towards ribosomes. How?
Is the movement of protein/ chains random? or is it precise?
If it is precise how does the polymease/tRNA know where the DNA/ribosome is and how does it move in that direction?
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Maybe add the concept of turnover of proteins and the concept of time. When proteins are made, it is taken in vesicles to RE and very occasionally, to other sides of the cell. This happens as it is made. There are proteins which guide the machinery with more proteins to the position indicated by a stimulus. This means the proteins stable the region and start to replicate. This stimulus ( and the replication means mitosis and not a temporal protein) signalling ( and normally CA+2) means this region of the DNa opens and starts the replication. These signals come from the membrane (kinases). The nucleus membrane have holes. The replication of the DNA means nucleus disappears. This promoter have enhancers of replication. There are guides to the zone and part of the answer is epigenome.
Another form of guidance is the peptide signal. Not all mRNA is the coding protein. This means some of the protein does not translate. Maybe this could be exons or Exon shuffling. Why do different exons give different genes. It is not a question in the genome,but the combination of genes which turn to coding areas or ORF (Open reading frame). This means we could cover from virus or jumping DNA. tRNA converts the section of DNA to amino acids but animals need these amino acids whilst plants make them. From the ribosomes the proteins are taken to the RE normally. A very specific protein must be for not to be taken to RER ( and then into vesicles). The glycosylation starts and then turns into a specific protein. It may be random but it must be specific to this place. There are diseases of autophagy. The peptide signals takes it to the ribosomes. The proteins can be taken by the cytoskeleton in chains by miosin and actin. (Some of the proteins although we can say most of them). The u uracyl is specific to the ribosomes. They match together at the same time (or almost at the same time). tRNA match the amino acids with the triplet of the genetic code.
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Hello,
I'm trying to figure out how to add/ adjust models in a multinomial logistic regression using SPSS.
I've already conducted multinomial logistic regressions for IVs (demographics, travel cost, travel time, comfort, accessibility, and environmental awareness) and DV (travel modes). But I have no idea how to add the multi-categorical moderator?
The DV is also multi-categorical, so I can't use PROCESS. For IVs, they are continuous and multi-categorical variables.
Any references or tutorial videos would be highly appreciated.
Kind Regards,
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greeting dear
the materials you are in need is under
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Gravity has been attributed to the mass of an object. We now know do to the discovery of the Higgs boson that the Higgs field exists. The Higgs field being a three dimensional field which particles interact with when traveling that causes them to slow down according to how the particle interacts with the field. Which mass being the variable related to the gravity of an object and by which if one changes the other does as well if the volume of the object is constant. And in the manner of mass being related to gravity does that mean there is a relationship between space-time and the Higgs field such that one would reveal the other? And if so how would this relationship work?
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I've been told:
“As measured by proper time, a radially falling traveler quickly reaches and crosses the critical radius of a black hole. The reality that the traveler quickly reaches the critical radius appears to the distant observer to take an infinite amount of time because of the propagation of light.”
But let’s test this with a thought experiment:
Put a reflector on the back of the traveler as he freefalls towards the event horizon of a black hole. Have a distant observer periodically shine a light beam at the traveler. Use the Schwarzschild metric to calculate the radial location at which the faster moving light beam will overtake the slower moving traveler and reflect back to indicate the location of the traveler to the distant observer. No matter how much of a head start the traveler has before the light is turned on, according to the Schwarzschild metric the light will always overtake the traveler before the event horizon is reached. Let the distant observer continue to shine light beams at the traveler until the distant observer observes that the black hole evaporates because of Hawking radiation. Granted, this will take a long time. But the entire time, the reflected light will continue to reflect back from the traveler showing that the traveler fails to reach the event horizon before the black hole evaporates.
How can this be?
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Richard: Given that the universe is 300 billion years old, let's do the same thought experiment, starting 300 billion years ago. After 300 billion years of traveling, the traveler has not yet reached the event horizon. This indicates that never, since the beginning of the universe, has anyone or anything crossed the event horizon of a black hole.
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Hi everyone, I have recently thawed HL60 cells that had traveled in dry ice overseas and did not melt during the travel. When I first opened them they seemed to be okay and proliferating. After a while when I split them as they will be 500,000cells/ml, they started dying and I have no idea why. I have worked with this cell line before and have not experienced this situation before.
I spin down the cells, remove the medium containing dead cells but spinning does not help to remove them all, also, I am assuming that dead cells are affecting living cells stimulating their death. As the days are passing the dead cell to live cell ratio increases and I may lose them all.
What can I do at this point to save my cells from dying? Has anyone experienced a situation like this before? Thank you very much for your input.
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Dear Fatma Basak Turan sorry to see that your very interesting technical question has not yet received any answers from experts in the filed. As an inorganic chemist I'm certainly not a proven expert in this area, but I noticed that a closely related question has been asked earlier on RG. Perhaps some of the answers are useful for you:
Why do my HL-60 cells die in culture?
(26 answers)
Another related RG question received only one answer:
How long do HL60 neutrophil-like cells survive after differentiation?
Good luck with your work and best wishes!
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Dear RG Academics who Travel,
This is an important topic because many academics relish going to desirable places for conferences. My husband and I used to travel to scientific conferences but so much red tape is involved he and I are glad to attend mostly on video conferencing technologies (yes, like Zoom and others whose names I don't know. No intent to favor one or the other technology company)
It is good to remember that social bragging rights do not equal additions to knowledge (i.e., what exotic place one has traveled lately.). Yet, local economies are helped by all kinds of conferences and the money that they bring.
There are costs and benefits either way, so please share your ideas about continuing in-person conferences when there is little we cannot do via remote presentation, informal conferring and virtual "hallway" chatter.
Look look forward to your ideas.
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Good question related to all of academicians! Its true there is lot of codal formalities to get funding and visa processing time etc. I think face to face attending is better than online mode. As we can make new connections, friends, links in the field, visit different places, understand the work of other and many more. I was lucky to have chances to visit different places in the world. Currently lockdown stations shifted most of the academic activities as online mode. I hope situation will be better soon and we again have a chance.
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Hello Dear Researcher,
My name is Sudhanshu and I'm an entrepreneur. I have my own startup and an engineering job but that's just not enough for me because when I see how my people back in my state Bihar is doing, it makes me sad.
We contribute to the nation's economy as manpower but back at our homes, people struggle for basic necessities like good roads, education, clean water, good food, etc.
More than that, be it engineers, or the laborers from Bihar, we have to leave our homes and travel to others states to find jobs. I want to create jobs in Bihar. I want to establish industries here.
Join me in figuring out the ways of doing this.
Looking forward to working with you to make a great change. Thank you.
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Dear Sudhanshu Kumar,
Please specify the scope of scientific cooperation. Would the cooperation concern joint, team-based research project and joint publication of articles and / or monographs? If so, I'm interested.
Thank you, Greetings,
Dariusz Prokopowicz
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Was wondering if anyone has done any research on cross-border transmission of Malaria between the Shortland Islands (Solomon Islands) and Bougainville (PNG). The two countries are very close to one another at these two points and people travel by sea between these islands. I have not been able to locate any articles.
Kind regards,
Kerre Ann Willsher, PhD,
Rotarians Against Malaria,
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Are there any articles on cross-border transmission of Malaria between West Timor and Timor Leste?
Kind regards,
Kerre Ann Willsher, PhD,
Rotarians Against Malaria,
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Electromagnetic propulsion is hindered by low efficiency, meaning small thrust for large power. Speed of light is the cause of inefficiency, where EM energy moves at light speed. Thrust F is described ( F = P / c ) for power P. Better technology is available, but also with strong limitations in star travel.
In other threads curl free generators were discussed with suggestions of how fields with zero EM components might improve the power efficiency. The light speed c must be replaced by some other velocity v, in ways that do not violate conservation of momentum or some other physical law.
Discussed in other threads is the possibility that kinetic energy travels in a stress energy wave of space in and around a moving object, giving the possibility of a velocity v in the wave nearly equal to velocity of the associated accelerating vehicle.
To make a break through propulsion then in one representation it is suggested to couple a curl free field generator with the kinetic wave and push the kinetic wave backward (F = P/v) where this v is the small difference between speed of the accelerated vehicle and the speed of the kinetic wave. Conservation is not violated.
A major problem is to choose the correct geometry of the generated field for coupling with the kinetic wave. In other threads it was discussed that there are several geometries to choose from, and possibly other geometries that were not identified.
A second problem is how to compensate when the kinetic wave carries little energy as at low speed and small acceleration. It brings again the need for choice of a zero velocity reference frame, and suggests again the choice of isotropic CMB as a zero reference velocity available everywhere. Also some auxiliary thrust system might be needed at start or end of a journey in special cases.
Can A Curl Free Field Generator Lead To Break Through Propulsion In Star Travel?
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When the kinetic wave has insufficient momentum to couple with a field generator, the curl free generator may operate with low efficiency (F = P/c) or the generator might be reconfigured to weakly couple with a gravity field using different forward looking geometry. Also the possibility of adding a curl to the generator may exist when a suitable magnetic field is available for coupling.
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Parameters as below
Base Metal P91
Filler EB2R (1cr low alloy steel )
Current 400 to 450 AMP
VOLTAGE 26 TO 30 v
Travel speed 400 mm/min
Wire feed 3000mm/min
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Hardness test for H.A.Z could be usefull.The ultrasonic test to measure of penetration may give discussing results.
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What are they and how will it work?
What effect will it have on day-to-day shopping, travelling/holiday, socialising, working, economy, etc.?
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I dont think that vaccine passport is coming.
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We obtained some exact traveling wave solution from the nonlinear partial differential equations. We drawn some graphs namely as kink shape, bell shape, compacton shape, periodic shape, singular shape and so on. I want to know, if i got huge singular shape figures, it is possible to published a article in good journal!
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Yes, I think you can publish if obtained results have scientific value and contribute to something new in the field from the existing one.
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I want to conduct a study on the prevalence of something in a strata of faculty teaching online. l sent out survey using Google form and can only do online due to travel restrictions. I wonder if 50 samples are enough
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Dear Mr. Miranda!
You raised an important issue. I searched for YOU studies (cases) that might be of help:
1) Banik, R., Rahman, M., Sikder, M.T. et al. Knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to the COVID-19 pandemic among Bangladeshi youth: a web-based cross-sectional analysis. J Public Health (Berl.) (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10389-020-01432-7 Free access:
2) Wang, S., Zhang, Y., Guan, Y. et al. A nationwide evaluation of the prevalence of and risk factors associated with anxiety, depression and insomnia symptoms during the return-to-work period of coronavirus disease 2019 in China. Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00127-021-02046-4 Free access:
3) Ladiwala, Z.F.R., Dhillon, R.A., Zahid, I. et al. Knowledge, attitude and perception of Pakistanis towards COVID-19; a large cross-sectional survey. BMC Public Health 21, 21 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-020-10083-y Free access:
4) Oyeyemi, O.T., Oladoyin, V.O., Okunlola, O.A. et al. COVID-19 pandemic: an online-based survey of knowledge, perception, and adherence to preventive measures among educated Nigerian adults. J Public Health (Berl.) (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10389-020-01455-0 Free access:
5) Neill, R.D., Blair, C., Best, P. et al. Media consumption and mental health during COVID-19 lockdown: a UK cross-sectional study across England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. J Public Health (Berl.) (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10389-021-01506-0 Open access:
Yours sincerely, Bulcsu Szekely
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My research is about evaluating challenges of attracting target customer to Sabba Travel and Tours after the worldwide pandemic
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Y considerando una investigación mixta puede utilizar métodos cuantitativos y cualitativos y puede lograr demostrar con mayor facilidad los cambios y transformaciones observadas. En su variable dependiente.
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Memorable Tourism Experience Scales (MTEs) can be considered generic instruments measuring tourists' experiences in destinations. Any problems with the idea of adapting such a scale to measure experiences in any specific travel segment only? Ex. gastronomy, local food experiences.
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Good idea. Could be tested.
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I'd like to apply the Theory of Planned behaviour to that of opting to use a travel agent to plan international travel during the pandemic. I'd like to incorporate the constructs of perceived risk and perceived uncertainty into the model.
My question is, can I measure the perceived risk in terms of travelling during the pandemic, yet my behaviour that I am attempting to predict is the use of a travel agent to plan the trip.
So, Perceived risk and uncertainty of travelling during the pandemic and how this influences attitudes, subjective norms and perceived behavioural control of using a travel agent to book the trip.
My aim is to determine if people are more inclined, due to the pandemic, to use a travel agent to book trips. perhaps they are becoming more relevant despite technological advancements due to the uncertainties that exist around travelling during this unprecedented time.
any help or advice would be massively appreciated! thank you in advance.
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Your planned research will indeed yield significant scientific results. I suggest that you explore all potential aspects in changing tourist habits.
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While performing the tensile test, if we have only one known parameters i.e. cross head travel speed. On the basis of the cross head travel speed, how one can get the strain rate?
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Dear Sir,
Thank you very much for your answer, it will certainly helpfull for me...
Thanking You
Raghavendra..
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In terms of meeting length my impression is that if one travels several hours or more to a conference site, then 3 or 4 days is good since the length justifies the travel time. For zoom conferences, it seems harder to me to stay focused after 3 hours on zoom per day. So multiple days of 3-4 hours virtual talks seem useful. What are your experiences and preferences?
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Dear Prof. Tainer!
This is an excellent question. I think it depends on the people involved and the topic discussed. Still 2-3 days online conferences are nice with 30-40 minute sessions and brakes (5 - 10 minutes) between them. May I argue that a conference each day should leave some free time for t he rest of the day: 3-5 contact hours per day is okay. I have attended recently an Elsevier online conference and they implemented the event in this manner:
"International Diamond Open Access Journals Conference" 13-15 April 2021:
A found also an article related to this issue, a case-study:
Maria Haji‐Georg et al. (2021). Academic conferencing in 2020: A virtual conference model, Human Behavior and Emerging Technologies, Volume 3, Issue 1, January 2021, Open access:
Yours sincerely, Bulcsu Szekely
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Parker solar probe observed switchbacks — traveling disturbances in the solar wind that caused the magnetic field to bend back on itself. I want to add some validate references in my paper, I need your suggestion.
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The scientific document proposed by the researcher Hassan Nasser is very timely. I mean the post titled: "Magnetic field kinks and folds in the solar wind".
Abstract
Parker Solar Probe (PSP) observations during its first encounter at 35.7 R⊙ have shown the presence of magnetic field lines that are strongly perturbed to the point that they produce local inversions of the radial magnetic field, known as switchbacks. Their counterparts in the solar wind velocity field are local enhancements in the radial speed, or jets, displaying (in all components) the velocity–magnetic field correlation typical of large amplitude Alfvén waves propagating away from the Sun. Switchbacks and radial jets have previously been observed over a wide range of heliocentric distances by Helios, Wind, and Ulysses, although they were prevalent in significantly faster streams than seen at PSP. Here we study via numerical magnetohydrodynamics simulations the evolution of such large amplitude Alfvénic fluctuations by including, in agreement with observations, both a radial magnetic field inversion and an initially constant total magnetic pressure. Despite the extremely large excursion of magnetic and velocity fields, switchbacks are seen to persist for up to hundreds of Alfvén crossing times before eventually decaying due to the parametric decay instability. Our results suggest that such switchback/jet configurations might indeed originate in the lower corona and survive out to PSP distances, provided the background solar wind is sufficiently calm, in the sense of not being pervaded by strong density fluctuations or other gradients, such as stream or magnetic field shears, that might destabilize or destroy them over shorter timescales.
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US issued a travel advisory against Kenya. Put Kenya on the red . Any implications towards the diplomatic relationship between the two states?
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Hi Rachael,
Here is my advice.
Try to see similar cases with other countries and see how this was handled by the different parties involved.
You have to gather evidence on the response given By Kenya on this, e.g., Press release, official statement.
Get some statistics on US travelers pre and post the travel warning.
Good luck.
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Hi, I need to segment a sample of local tourist (Huila, Colombia) according their tourism preferences (nature, cultural, health...). Which scale/questionnaire should I use?
Thanks.
Key words: tourism research, tourism consumption, tourism segmentation, consumer, Tourism Management
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Length Contraction is normally explained by Einstein's Special Relativity. However, only until the traveling speed is close to the light speed, length contraction can not be recognized by the traveler.
On the other hand, when a human observer travels along a linear object from one end Point A (the closer end of the object) at an angle α and speed V1. Due to human visual memory (1/30 seconds), observer can see simultaneously the photon from adjacent Point A (in memory) and the photon from the far end of the object Point B (both are stationary to the reference point on the object). Therefore, a length of the object L1 (= Ct1) can be observed by the traveler which is smaller than the length of the object L (= Ct) measured on ground in the area (L1 < L).
As a result, for the same angle (α), traveler with higher speed (V1 > V2) can find larger length contraction and smaller length of object (Ct1 < Ct2). Even more, for the same speed (V2), traveler with smaller angle (β < α) can also find larger length contraction and smaller length of object (Ct3 < Ct2). However, for a very low speed (V→ 0), the length of the object observed by the traveler is about the same as that observed on ground (Ct = L). Furthermore, for any V/30 and Ct combination outside the Ct = L circle, the length of the object observed by the traveler is bigger than the length L observed on ground. In other words, Length Expansion can also be found by the observer traveling with a large angle and speed away from the object.
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Dear Eric:
Thank you for your suggestions. I did read some basic concepts of Length Contraction based on SR and GR. However, since I don't agree with SR and GR in some fundamental concepts such as Constant Light Speed, Time Dilation and Relativism, all these sophisticated theories make no sense to me, even including Lorentz Transformation (which is also based on constant light speed).
Also, length contraction is described by physics as a common experience observed by a high speed traveler (nowhere close to light speed), therefore, I assume it is caused by Human's Visual Memory Effect rather than SR and GR.
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I want to sample virtual community members in a city for an academic research in travel behaviour. What sampling technique works? I want to use a questionnaire and a travel diary to collect data. Are there experiences I can learn from? Thanks
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You can just sample people here at research gate by using survey tool online.
Hello Toyin, How is your study going on.
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Dear All, within our new European project SYN+AIR related with the air transport we are executing an online survey which aims at identifing the mobility choices related to and from the airport. We are glad to invite you fill in the survey https://ec.europa.eu/eusurvey/runner/SYN_AIR_Traveller_Survey_2021 The questionnaire is available in 5 languages (English, Greek, Spanish, Italian, Serbian) and lasts approximately 10 minutes. All adults that travel or used to travel by plane (before the Covid-19 pandemics) can answer this survey. You may find information related to the project at http://syn-air.eu/
Please, feel free to share/disseminate this request. Thanks a lot for your attention and contribution. #SESAR #H2020 #SYN+AIR
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Dear Prof. Ottomanelli!
I have filled in the survey, you posted. It was a nice experience. May I kindly recommend you a B2B - platform - the registration is for free, and there are many free of charge webinars, etc. resources you might benefit from:
3) A recent webinar: Patrick Keliher, Regional FAE Manager (RTI) and Maxx Becker, Field Application Engineer (RTI) (2021). On the High Speed Data Line: Accelerating the Evolution of Rail Transportation, March18 2021, Please see further details at: https://www.brighttalk.com/webcast/18279/473029?utm_source=brighttalk-portal&utm_medium=web&utm_content=transportation%20&utm_term=search-result-2&utm_campaign=webcasts-search-results-feed
Yours sincerely, Bulcsu Szekely
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Goal: I would like to make a plate of wood of equal acoustic path length (transversely).
Question: Is there any simply way to measure the acoustic path length (something similar to optical path length).
In optics, because light travel in various speed, we have optical length.
How about acoustics? Is there any acoustic path length?
Is there any convenient method to measure it?
I want to measure the acoustic path length within a wood. Because every place within a wood structure may have different density. I want to make a wood plate of equal acoustic path length every (therefore the physical thickness may differ). Is it possible?
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I think the following research work related to the acoustical studies on wood can be of some use to you to figure out the answer to your question.
Acoustic Studies on Wood - University of Canterbury
ir.canterbury.ac.nz › handle › thesis_fulltext
PDF
by HJ Hansen · 2006 · Cited by 13 — structural timber in housing, wood-based panels and pulp and paper. Wood shows ... thought that the acoustic waves find their fastest path within a distance of.
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Hello Everyone,
I am trying to formulate Unified Equilibrium Transport Model and Bus Operator Model combined as a Bi-level Optimization Problem. Both of these models include Users' traveling costs as input variables. However, In Bus Operator Model, Users' cost is a decision variable (means optimization depends upon one of the parameters in the cost function), while in Unified Equilibrium Transport Model, it is not.
My question is; Is it necessary that both of these models must have same cost function to solve this problem as Bi-level optimization? Any leads will be much appreciated. Any specific references would be great as well.
Thank you!
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Well, no one knows when the coronavirus pandemic will end, no one knows when authorities will lift travel bans, and while you can plan all the trips you want now but unfortunately, no one knows if or when you'll actually be able to take them.
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I am starting a new project concerning marketing and tourism and I would like to analyze travellers comments on Facebook. I know about Netnography and NVivo software but I am not sure if there are easier /more reliable methods ?
If anyone has experience in UGC analysis on Facebook and interested in joining as co-author ,please write me.
Thank you,
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Hi,
If you are intending to use a considerably large sample frame then data-mining software will make the task easier. If you will be using a small sample and aiming for very detailed qualitative analysis then manual coding, pen and paper might suffice.
There are numerous text-mining tools available (General Sentiment, Lexalytics, Radian6, Text Stat and so on) but it is best to choose one that suits your budget and technical ability and more importantly, the best tool for what you want to achieve / find out through your research.
The golden rule is the use of any analytic tool is best guided not by the capabilities of the software but by the aims and objectives of the research project and the interpretive requirements of the researcher.
If you can get a copy, try Halfpenny, P. & Procter, R. Innovations in Digital Research Methods. Sage.
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I am trying to set up a new experiment where I am simultaneously utilizing reverse dialysis (antibody) through a microdialysis probe and a Miniscope for one-photon calcium imaging. Both pieces of equipment are quite large and it is difficult to get the lens relatively close to the probe. I need to determine how far the antibody is travelling from the probe to determine if the antibody will affect the neurons near the lens. I know our lab has a (680XL) fluorophore antibody tag. I was thinking of trying to use that then potentially sectioning the brain and seeing if it can be detected. This is completely out of my realm of expertise and any advice would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks for your time :)
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i am not expert on that matter but reviewing all and got something about plasma amplification s2 cell through some theory.
Hope it will be reviewed within few days but good which you have followed.
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Suppose I am observing a person from space from a distance equal to light travels in a day (1 light day)... means I am getting information delayed by 1 day... Now I am travelling towards that person with speed of light and it will take a day to reach there... During this, that person must accelerate 2 times in time so that I will meet him at same point in space... scientist saying universe is accelerating... Are we heading towards same point in space? Or big crunch happening? Do they posses any analogy?
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Measurements indicate that it is the other way round. We are all travelling away from the same point. This is what the big bang is. We think nearly everything is traveling away from us because its light is red shifted, and shifted by more the further it is from us. If you don't understand red-shift look up red-shift and Doppler. There is overwhelming evidence that the same chemicals exist throughout the universe and the unmistakable pattern of the frequencies each emits and absorbs can be recognised even if every frequency is reduced slightly, or a lot, because they are moving away from us slowly or quickly (or for some near objects, increased because they are moving towards us).
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We are starting the project CultSense - Sensitizing Young Travellers for Local Cultures (www.cultsense.com). The project seeks to find a new approach to increase understanding and valorization of local cultures by the people that visit these places. We are in first instance thinking of young people.
  • What is for you the most important challenge in making this bridge of understanding between (young) tourists and the local cultures they visit?
  • Any ideas of how to communicate ways to tackle this challenge?
Thank you for sharing your views and the challenges of the places you live and visit!
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Great project! Congratulation to the whole group!
I would approach such an issue starting from the actors that create foster and communicate tourism in the first place. What makes the (young) tourists decide where to go and what to do there? What strategies are in place that aims to attract tourists?
I think about the infamous Amsterdam case, we have now a generation of people who have been to the Netherlands so many times in their life without trespassing the Coffee Shop quarter.
Also, what is the role of the "new" media in tourists' decision making? My hunch is that Instagram and influencers in general play a paramount role in developing tastes and hence tourists' behaviours.
Another level of attention could be one of the local businesses. Do shops and entrepreneurs play a role in that? Jane Jacobs would say YES, and others such as Gehl architects say that retail plays a crucial role in the experience of a city/public space.
Let's talk more!
All the best,
Valeria
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According to Einstein's Special Relativity (ER) we can travel to the future if we move at the speed of light, or at speeds very close to it. But traveling to the past is more complicated or unworkable.
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Yes,İt is possible, but this issue should be looked at comprehensively
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Hello,
I have a dataset of around 4000 responses. In the dataset, respondents revealed their primary travel mode to work. The distribution of the travel modes is as follows:
Private vehicle: 2951
Transit: 835
Walk: 170
Bike: 44
Can I develop an MNL model using the four modes? Or
Should I eliminate the "bike" mode due to the low number of choices?
What is the minimum number of choices per alternative to be included in a model?
Thanks in advance for your help,
Gamal
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I also think two choices would be ok
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A monocular camera is to be calibrated, which is located in the area of the vehicle and looks in front of the direction of travel. During the calibration, the extrinsic parameters (position and rotation between the camera coordinate system and the origin of the vehicle coordinate system: Center of the rear axle of the vehicle) should be calculated. The camera parameters are calculated online, i.e. while the camera is taking pictures. The algorithm should automatically calculate the extrinsic parameters from driving scene images while driving.
I am looking forward to your feedback !
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you can take a video stream on a straight line and then use motion vectors
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