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Im a planning a workshop in a transdisciplinary format where the goal is to define future activities and a strategy. Any suggestions?
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Thank you Juan, I will look into it!
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I am looking for case studies that provide lessons learned or successful outcomes (in conservation/environment) that have used interdisciplinary/transdisciplinary approaches.
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Amazon trees conservation
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We are working on the design of a study on challenges that companies face within the innovation process related to the collaboration between different functions and disciplines - including related methodologies that help to overcome these challenges.
I would like to start this discussion to collect previous activities on this topic area as well as your experiences collected in collaboration with companies (setting the academic world apart - even if there are similar challenges existing...)
Three questions to start the discussion:
  1. What are the challenges that you have seen or worked upon with or within firms?
  2. Did you find any insights on system interdependencies or patterns?
  3. What methodologies would you recommend to overcome these challenges and why?
Looking forward to your input and the discussion!
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I suggest Klaus Fichter 's innovation community construct - based on Witte's promotor theory - which helps to analyse cross-functionional and cross-organisational (multi-level) innovation processes. We further developed the theory in the context of circular economy (and broader sustainability) innovation here by adding specific collaboration mechanisms: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/344281476.
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I accept suggestions for readings of publications on veterinary or biological conservation both related to philosophy or if you have this paper:
Fox MW. Towards a philosophy of veterinary medicine.Vet Rec. 1984 Jul 7;115(1):12-3.
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Dear Julio San Martín Órdenes, would you please read on Niche Theory on Species interaction? I think it would be valuable to your demand.
Brotherly!
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I had argued with my supervisor last week. I intend to refer the 《 New Production of Knowledge》 and Concept of mode 2 to be the background of transdisciplinary research in Taiwanese new institution.
My opinion is that"Kuhnian science study is too much internal discussion in Physics(or natural science)" and Latour's ANT is too much deconstruction(Anything can be part of programme in science action) I used Mode 2 to harmonize the Kuhnian and Latour, for building a contemporary science study(science with transdisciplinarity and accountability).
My supervisor response with that "Latour's ANT could deal with any programme that you want through adjust the scale of your method and object. Why you insist to adopt conecpt of Mode 2"
According my supervisor's idea, Mode 2 can be a subsystem of Latour's ANT. I don't agree with him but haven't a good point to response. Maybe my reading is too less to hold my position.
Can two concepts put in one category to compare?
Thank you if you read my question.
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Thank you, Dr. Jochen Glaser
Your explanation is very helpful and patient.
I agree wtih you and Dr. Peter Weingart. The five characteristics which define the difference between Mode 2 and Mode 1 are not innovative. In addition, there are not many empirical analysis to point out that Mode 2 would replace Mode 1. But in Helga Nowotny, Peter Scott and Michael Gibbons(2003), their purpose was as much to address the need to invent a new language of research. That's why both 《The New Production of Knowledge》 and 《Re-Thinking Science》 were written as reflective essays rather than as empirical studies. So I have tried to view every single research in action with frame of Mode 2 and Mode 1. (Actually I still adopt Latour's spirit to do my research, His ANT method is attractive to a naive graduated student like me.)
In my research context, I try to give an answer to avoid the flaw in 5 methods of Alvin Goldman's " Expert: Which Ones Should You Trust?"(Goldman. 2001). Also, I wish that my research can do pre-work for Harry Collins's "The Third Wave of Science Studies".
If the Department of Science and technology( in Taiwan context) could analysis every single research with 5 characteristics(Context of application, heterogenous, transdiciplinary, accountability, quality control) and make the analysis public. When scientific or technological controversy shows up, policymaker or laypeople would easier to put their credence on experts and empower people to question experts.
Respectfully, thank you again.
Goldman. Alvin. (2001). Experts: Which Ones Should You: Philosophy and Phenomenological Research: 85-110.
Harry Collins, Robert Evans. (2007). Rethinking Expertise: The University of Chicago Press.
Helga Nowotny, Peter Scott and Michael Gibbons. (2003). Introduction: `Mode 2' Revisited: The New Production of Knowledge. Minerva: 179–194.
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For instance what roles does emergence play in inorganic chemistry, in the earth sciences, in organic chemistry, the molecular biology of the cell, physiology, psychology, sociology, in ecology, economics, or in astrophysics?
I am studying the development of emergence up through the levels of the hierarchic organization of material reality, from elementary particles to the emergence of galactic clusters.
Another goal is to reveal the isomorphic aspects of the stages of emergence as they occur throughout that development.
I am interested in the following:
1. What are the initial components of the process of emergence in cases of emergence in your field of research?
2. What are the major stages of the process of emergence in those cases?
3. How does the list of components change with the changing stages of your processes of emergence?
4. What then are the components that constitute the final emergent product, whether it be a quality, an object, or a pattern-of-organization of material structure or process?
An Emergence Primer
Ø In its simplest form, emergence is the coming into existence of newly occurring patterns-of-organization of material structure and process due to the motion of units of matter.
Ø Emergence is a creative process, and is the source of the organized complexity of the material universe.
Ø There are two basic stages of emergence—first there is the process of emergence, and second there is the event of emergence that occurs as the consequence of the prior process.
Ø Emergence develops. It occurs in simple forms in simple situations in which few other factors are playing roles, and in progressively more complex forms in progressively more complex situations where increasing numbers of other factors are playing roles.
Ø Emergence is isomorphic because the simplest form of emergence also occurs within the core of all developed forms, giving them their intrinsic-identity as cases of emergence. An isomorphy is a pattern-of-material-organization that occurs in two to many different situations or systems. What is known about an isomorphy and the role it plays in one situation can be used to enhance the understanding of a different situation in which that isomorphy also occurs and plays a role. Thus what is known about emergence and its role in one situation can be used to enhance the understanding of a different situation where emergence also occurs and plays a role.
The Intrinsic Nature of Emergence—With Illustrations.
Vesterby, Vincent. 2011. The Intrinsic Nature of Emergence—With Illustrations. Proceedings of the 55th Annual Meeting of the ISSS, Hull, U.K.
Emergence Is an Isomorphy
Vesterby, Vincent. 2017. Emergence Is an Isomorphy.
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Vincent said:
"HOW WOULD AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE PROCESS OF EMERGENCE ENHANCE THE ABILITY AND ACCURACY OF PREDICTION IN YOUR FIELD OF RESEARCH? For instance, what roles does emergence play in inorganic chemistry, in the earth sciences, in organic chemistry, the molecular biology of the cell, physiology, psychology, sociology, in ecology, economics, or in astrophysics?"
Dear Vincent ...
Before answering this question I need to provide my understanding of emergence, because it seems nobody agree what emergence means.
As we know, the emergence was first introduced by early British emergentists at the end of 19th century. That time it was assumed to be a the mystical, almost Devine phenomenon that cannot be in principle explained by science. The chemical reactions were the best examples they come up in support of this theory.
In beginning of the 20th century after booming successes in physics and chemistry provided a satisfactory explanation for those chemical reactions, emergentism was rejected by most philosophers as the theory without any scientific foundations and as the idea that discounts the progress in sciences and obstructs the scientific quest to deeper knowledge. Since then emergentism has been sitting in the background, often ridiculed for its mysticism.
At the end of 20th century the expectations for the traditional reductive approaches failing short of expectations that led to the rise of interest to holistic philosophy, emergence concept started gradually creeping into the mainstream because of its claim that reductive methodology cannot explain the complex systems in terms of underlying natural laws. Emergence always strives on inability to explain phenomena to its roots. In the past, this thesis was nourished by lock of understanding of chemistry, but it was fell apart when chemistry was explained in terms of physical laws. These days emergence learned its lesson and now it is aligned not with mysterious divine-like forces, but united with the cutting-edge science of complexity and computational methods. Within complexity sciences emergence means an inability to provide accurate prediction due to limitation of computational methods. This limitation believed is fundamental because required unlimited computational ability to predict dynamic behavior of non-linear systems. We need to remember that this limitation is based on the notion of digital computer which concept, known as Turing machine, was invented in the 1935.
Based on this understanding of emergence I believe it is purely epistemological concepts that designate our inability to understand some phenomena. Now lets me to answer your question:
“HOW WOULD AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE PROCESS OF EMERGENCE ENHANCE THE ABILITY AND ACCURACY OF PREDICTION IN YOUR FIELD OF RESEARCH?”
My answer is: NONE
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This may be a very weird question but,
Could you try to explain how C and N cycles are coupled in soils ? ⛓️🔬🤔❓
How do C and N are "metabolically intricated" ?
I guess it is a bit of a dumb question, but I am trying to summarize the concept myself. So let's say it a bit of an intellectual challenge. How would you explain the extent of this relation, and it's relevance for a farming perspective.
We always present biogeochemical cycles as separated, even if in nature, they are intimately interconnected.
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Hey Thomas:
Thanks for clarifying your question and make it more specific. Both Michal and Paul's response are great. I am just adding a little on their insight.
Michal pinpoints the C/N ratio relates to Stoichiometry and nutrient balance, which is exactly the right direction to understand this question. Decomposer (or microbes, either fungi or bacterial) tends to have very high nitrogen and phosphate contents which means they need high concentration of those elements. This is why low C/N ratio (high N proportionally) being picked up first by microbes. Simply, they need it and they like it. 
If you want to gain an more comprehensive understanding, here is a good paper.  “Patterns in decomposition rates among photosynthetic organisms: the importance of detritus C: N :P content. “written by Susana Enríquez and other researcher in 1993. DOI: 10.1007/BF00566960
Paul put a great efforts on explaining the factors affecting soil organic matter process. In addition to soil water content, temperature is also important for mineralization. Both mineralization and immobilization affect the fate of N in soil. 
Again, this is a complex process, and I would suggest you look at from a system view and try to understand the process. For example, what are the sources of soil organic matter, how these are being processed in soil? How long might it take for different substrates? etc. 
Regards
Qiang
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In 1999, at the World Conference on Science it was acknowledged that the social contract for science had been broken. That people do not consider that science breakthroughs or developments  will always mean good things for them.
National Science and Technology Systems have taken notice because this "contract breach" means that people "want more for their money". In order to protect national science budgets, people must be able to link easily science achievements to their well being and the solution of societal problems. Transdisciplinary research, translational medicine and postnormal science are some of the most known efforts to bridge the gap. And new forms of collaboration (citizen science, crowfunding, participatory research) that provide increased access to resources and knowledge have emerged.
But the problem is that the new forms of collaboration mean developing new skills and capacities- on both sides. So scientists must devote increasing portions of their time just to get funding and resources, at a time when policy changes may imply the "death" or downturn of big and small lines of research. And it takes time to learn how to engage (and train)  non scientists to collaborate with researchers (as in citizen science, crowfunding and participatory research), just when you may need it the most.
Society has developed ways to manage risk of losses, by distributing the risk among many. This form of risk management is called insurance and it helps people cover losses that they can´t afford on their own. 
 Is there a way that we scientists can collaborate with each other in order to prepare non scientists to collaborate with us to provide access to resources and funding in time of need (that, is to manage the risk of decreasing research budgets and positions)?
If there is a way, it probably involves social networks and sharing our resources (knowledge) with non scientists so that they decide to share theirs with us. 
Do you think that a Social Insurance for Scientists is possible? Why? What would it take to make it happen? Do you think it would be worth to invest in it valuable researchers´ time? Please share your views on this proposal. 
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Maria,
I can get what you are saying. The following literature may be of your interest.
L
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Hello. Good day!
I wanted to ask you what is the minimum basis for the course and what things will be taught. I was a student of physical engineering at the University of Santiago de Chile, USACH. I am currently doing my masters degree at the University of Chile in cyber-physical systems on wind energy. If you have useful information about what they will discuss the topics you tell me and I will let you know.
Thanks.
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Dear Espinosa, it depends on the educational/instructional objectives of a course through which the policy makers/educators/state aims to observe in a person's behaviors, abilities etc. As such, these objectives act as the prerequisites for a course content that serves as a comprehensive knowledge and or skill basis for those who want to become, for example, an engineer, medical doctor etc. However, within a larger picture of any formal education program, the content of, for example, an engineering program is not without its objectives, content (or knowledge domains; courses that serve as a proxy for the domain knowledge etc.), teaching-learning processes, and assessment and evaluation. I strongly suggest that you should read relevant books to learn more things regarding these issıes (e.g., curriculum development books). 
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I am reviewing the concept transdisciplinarity by doing an intellectual history.  I am only familiar with Foucault's work - a history of the present.  Are there any other contemporary methodologies worth exploring?
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Hi Jane,
One work that I think is going to make us rethink and rework the history of ideas is Robert Stam & Ella Shohat's "Unthinking Eurocentrism: Multiculturalism and the Media" (Routledge, 1994). It makes us realise that an awareness of the intellectually debilitating effects of the Eurocentric legacy is indispensable for comprehending not only contemporary media represntations but even contemporary subjectivities. An earlier work on the same lines was Edward Said's 'Orientalism" that shows, among other things, how Eurocentrism is naturalised as "common sense" often through an opposition with "other" cultures that are positioned as "inferior". We have to challenge the notion that the West constitutes the world's center of gravity and once you do that, entire histories demand to be rewritten. 
Best,
Indranil
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TD work as highlighted by Henry Giroux and Susan Searls-Giroux (2004 - Take Back Higher Education) is critical of hierarchical research elites, operates on the margins, and includes non-academic partners such as INGOs, NGOs, and Indigenous stakeholders.
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Interesting, and I have never heard of it!  Thanks for the information.  I could have utilized it in my dissertation.  But there is always more research to be done!
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I’m investigating the transdisciplinary processes. I am reading about it, but I am still with few information. I would like some advice about recommended authors. I’m really looking to find out if the method has proved to be good for social research.
Evelinda Santiago
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Great question. TD thinking starts with a critical evaluation of the current state of higher education - transdisciplinarity is in fact a global reform movement. There are a number of excellent authors - in the European context Romanian quantum physicist Basarab Nicolescu especially has delimited TD thinking, and in the American setting Patricia Leavy has a great little handbook. What I've noticed in my review of literature over a decade is that in formerly colonized settings such as Australia (see Albrecht, Freeman and Higginbotham; Arabena; Douglas Christie), the US, and South America (Apgar, Argumedo and Allen), many authors have included Indigenous epistemologies and holistic frameworks to their analyses of how to apply transdisciplinarity in actual research contexts while European researchers and authors have not.
Finally, a trilogy of review papers from Choi and Pak (starting in 06). These Canadian health scientists have taken a huge swath of TD literature and find that many researchers are claiming TD but are actually doing variations on multi- and interdisciplinary.  
Before becoming academics, my frequent co-author S.A. Moore and I came from decades of professional and clinical practice in Canada with children, young people and their caregivers many of whom are often engaged with professionals in multiple disciplines - teaching, mental health, criminal justice, and child protection - and frequently all at once. This has allowed us to identify numerous inclusive 'transdisciplinary tools' (Giroux and Searls-Giroux, 2004, p. 102) that can be understood and applied across these contexts particularly to avoid abuses of power.
We've also found it difficult to argue for transdisciplinarity in an academic setting due to tenure and promotion being evaluated by folks who see higher education and research solely through uni-disciplinary lenses. We've discovered the competitive chasing after grant monies also undermines the true egalitarian nature of TD partnerships (partners outside the academy who are often marginalized) and understanding of the goals of such research are not to pad one's CV but to set about solving the myriad problems humanity faces. Best of luck with your endeavors.
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Transdisiciplinarity requires elements such as collective thinking, integration, collaboration, cooperation and participation of actors or scientists for knowledge generation and management that can solve real life and complex problems. What will be the ideal theory that this can be based on? Social capital theory? sociology of scientific knowledge? Actor network theory? Communication theory?
It might all be relevant to the study, but which can be the best fit.
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There are various approaches of social capital in sociology (Bourdieu, Coleman) or Political Science (Putnam): depending on its structure, Social Capital is not always a positive factor for collective action.Quantitative  Network analysis is a good tool to approach this as it is shared by various disciplines.
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Thanks for responding - will check this out. I became involved in a number of climate change projects from a human rights perspective. Also spent 3 years helping  establish a UNESCO Chair in Community Sustainability here on our campus. Many of my more traditionally-oriented scientific colleagues considered my interest in cultural issues simply as 'social work' - hence my inquiry.
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There is a book "Infinit in all directions" by Freeman John Dyson which is well worth reading, in my opinion.
Now, what we see, measure, hear etc. goes only through our brain.
Isn’t there an option that just because of that, we miss a lot of information which might exist in our environment, the universe?
Would we register a wavelength of e.g. 1 million km?
Looking forward to your ideas.
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Dear Frank, sometimes our brains find missed things, because of synthesizing as already known patterns.
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In the discussion of consciousness and subjectivity why is it important to consider the social processes?
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The cultural assets, the skills are working in parallel with technology, to finer issues of processes, their limits and certain guidelines "conditions" and their breakups.