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Traditional Medicine - Science topic

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Questions related to Traditional Medicine
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Dears
How can we make the integral use of herbal or traditional medicines with conventional medicines to enhance the efficacy of the existing healthcare delivering systems?
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One helpful book in this field is PDR which has stated some herbal-drug interactions.
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The Siddhar kalimbu(traditional medicine, Tamil nadu, India) has been successfully demonstrated to heal chronic diabetic ulcers. We would like to try its efficacy in healing chronic
leporosy wounds.Any one who has access to BSL2 facility and working with Mycobactrium Leprae is required for pre clinical study.
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Yes i am working in similar area please
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In our traditional medicine some plants are used to cure Gastrointestinal disease. do some one know about some plants or phytochemical to cure IBD?
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Many synthetic drugs are currently in use to treat IBD such as 5-aminosalicylic acid corticosteroids. However, they all have some drawbacks as long-term use result in many complications. These problems encourage us to look out for alternative medicine. Numerous in vitro and in vivo experiments showed that the plant-derived secondary metabolites including phenolic compounds, glucosinolates, alkaloids, terpenoids, oligosaccharides, and quinones could reduce permeability, ameliorate-related dysfunctions with promising results. In addition, many of them could modulate enzymatic activity, suppress the inflammatory transcriptional factors, ease oxidative stress, and reduce pro-inflammatory cytokines secretion.
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What are the tradeoffs of using traditional medicines? Would traditional medicines have a bright features in light of the increasingly drug resistance encountered conventional medicines?
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The problem of antibacterial resistance to frequently
used antibiotics has led to a search for newer and
alternative compounds for the treatment of drugresistant
infections[1]. Although pharmaceutical
companies have designed a number of new antibiotics
in the last three decades, resistance against these drugs
by microorganisms has also been observed. Drug
resistant bacterial infections are causing immense
mortality and morbidity worldwide. For example, in
2005, in the United States, 19 000 out of 95 000 patients
affected from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus
aureus (MRSA) have died. Number of death was
higher than number of deaths combined from HIV/
AIDS, Parkinson’s disease, emphysema, and homicides
combined[2]. As many branches of treatments like postsurgical
care, neonatal care, transplantation medicine,
cancer chemotherapy, and care of the critically ill
patients need effective antibiotic treatment, failure
of conventional antibiotic treatment to combat multidrug
resistant (MDR) pathogens, caused high rate
of mortality. With this background, World Health
Organization (WHO) identified MDR bacteria as one
of the top three high priority threats to human health.
Infectious Disease Society of America has addressed
the biomedical community to declare a war against the
MDR bacterial threat. Along with intensifying research
on understanding the resistance pattern of MDR
infection, they have stressed that the ultimate goal of
scientist would be to identify appropriate and efficient
antimicrobial drugs to the patients.
As for a long period of time, plants have been a
valuable source of natural products for maintaining
human health, certain plant extracts can be a cure
for infections caused by MDR. Along with different
herbs, seaweeds and higher plants, many workers have
suggested the usefulness of mangroves in traditional
medicines. Mangroves have been used as a source of
timber, food, fuel, fodder, medicines and fish poison in
tropical coastal zones. Recently scientists have found
evidence that mangroves have medicinal properties that
can cure many diseases like asthma, diabetes, cancer,
ulcer, wounds and AIDS.
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Dear Abhijit Mitra . See Kindly the following useful RG link:
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Is ethical approval mandatory to collect data from the local people about traditional medicinal animals (ethnozoological study)?
Anyone who give me updated information
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This is a question like reporting child abuse. If you think child abuse MIGHT exist, you do not have a legal right to investigate, you're required to report and let the authorities decide. Research works the same way. You don't get to make the decision, an IRB decides if you need ethical approval. Many times they'll see research and give the green light with no action or review.
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Mandragora species have a long use in traditional medicine, I looking to use in my research.
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Kindly see the following useful RG link.
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WHO issued the guidelines for research methodology for traditional interventions of herbal origin in 2000. but the guidelines for evaluation of safety and efficacy of mineral and animal origin drugs are still to be in place for the researchers. I would like to know any such guidelines are in force anywhere in the globe.
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I think these three guidelines (in attached), in which, two of them were established by World Health Organization, may actually help you in your research.
Best wishes,
Sabri
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In traditional medicine, some material, such as proper mineral can bleach teeth and some are consumed to darken hair. we need some organic composition( name of material/ plant) for changing skin color and evaluation of mechanism. do you know any? thanks a lot
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We are compiling comprehensive details for traditional medicines and their marketing approval in a particular country. For now, we are reviewing Kampo Medicines of Japan. But somehow we are not able to get suitable guideline documents (original from Japanese Regulatory Agency's Website). Can anyone guide us? From where we can find guidelines for marketing approval of Kampo medicine in Japan?
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Corona Pandemic: Proper randomised controlled studies can take many years to complete. So evidence based guidance for treatment will be scanty in the beginning of the Pandemic.
What is the next best approach to a defendable therapeutic regime?
1] Expedited trials and early approval ?
2] Basic Science Hypotheses?
3] Anecdotal/ Small case series?
4] Home remedies.....
5] Consensus groups?
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There are several standardized and effective protocols.
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Where is the position of electric element ? Nervous system is one of the very important element too in our body. The presence of Kation and Anion also indicate that Yin and Yang concept exist. Is it possible that the receptor in the skin as acupoint acts as "electric" meridian for our body to connect it with our 'qi' ?
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Thank you for your information Gaurav Soni, Ljubomir Jaci'c
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It has been observed that a single arm study is designed to validate a pharmacopoeial formulation for its effectiveness. As such there is no guideline available in India for acceptance of the level of evidence required to support validation of a traditional medicinal product.
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I dont think so
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The contribution of natural products (NPs) to modern drug discovery can not be denied. More interestingly, the application of in silico (computer-based approaches) has even given more success to the search of NP-based starting molecules in the search for novel, potent and cheaper drug candidates. However, these in silico based methods also face some challenges. Obviously, most of the challenges are usually not discussed in scientific publications; in several cases rendering the use of in silico based approaches to investigate NPs (even in combination with experimental validation techniques) difficult to identify and propose new NP drug-base molecules. In this discussion, I would be happy if we can highlight some of these challenges. The idea is to give newcomers in this area of research an idea of what they can come across or should be expecting.
Peace
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See this article:
Applications of Virtual Screening in Bioprospecting: Facts, Shifts, and Perspectives to Explore the Chemo-Structural Diversity of Natural Products
10.3389/fchem.2021.662688
Here, we discuss some biases and limitations of computational methods applied in the screening of natural products.
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It would be great if we get information regarding this from all around the world. Like we have Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) in Ayurveda, Indian system of Medicine.
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Interesting discussion to follow
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We have a Traditional Medicinal Product which has robust evidence of immune boosting capability. We have identified 2 novel compounds isolated, elucidated and characterized and they are derivatives of 3-deoxyanthocyanidins .
We are trying to assess whether this product would have potential for treating the corona-virus disease.
We attach a few of the peer-reviewed articles on this product and would be grateful for any advise on how we can go further.
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If the natural product inhibits the ACE receptors and other receptors that by allowing the Corona virus to enter the lung cells, then an important treatment is important.
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We all know the effects of traditional medicine and alternative medicine on health outcomes.
Music therapy, green therapy have shown beneficial effects on treatment outcomes in patients with cancer or psychological health problems.
Color exists in everything in life. Shall we use that in healthcare, disease prevention, and health promotion?
Your novel ideas are highly appreciated.
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Dear Tuyen, the following current papers may help you:
Elliot AJ. Color and psychological functioning: a review of theoretical and empirical work. Front Psychol 2015;6:368. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4383146/pdf/fpsyg-06-00368.pdf
Jonauskaite D, Tremea I, Bürki L, et al. To see or not to see: Importance of color perception to color therapy. Color Research & Application 2020;45(3):450-464. https://serval.unil.ch/resource/serval:BIB_A3C7052C22D4.P001/REF.pdf
Gupta R. Color Therapy in Mental Health and Well Being. International Journal of All Research Education and Scientific Methods 2021;9(2):1068-1076. http://www.ijaresm.com/uploaded_files/document_file/Dr._Rakesh_Gupta_YLin.pdf
Hajra B, Saleem T. The Use of Islamic Patterned Art Therapy: Healing of Psychological Problems Among University Students. J Relig Health 2021 Apr 15:1-26. doi: 10.1007/s10943-021-01240-7. Epub ahead of print. https://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007/s10943-021-01240-7.pdf
Best wishes from Germany, Martin
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What's your view on effect and role of traditional medicine in low fatality rate of Covid-19 in India as many States/UTs has distributed prophylactic medicine in large scale and Ministry of AYUSH has issued various advisories n guidelines time to time for wellbeing of general population.
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This is an interesting review and is useful.
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What is the solution of traditional medicine and herbal medicine to treat and reduce the complications of tension and chronic headaches?
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Bovine chamomile has long been used to treat fever, stomach pain, toothache, insect bites, infertility, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, allergies, asthma, tinnitus, dizziness, nausea, tension headaches, and migraines.
I say its analgesic properties to be because of a biochemical called parthenolide. This chemical compound prevents the blood vessels in the head from constricting, which can cause severe headaches. Studies have shown that bovine chamomile has an impressive effect on reducing the severity, duration, and frequency of headaches, especially migraines.
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Hello, I'm very interested in mapping and managing the conservation of the Philippine traditional medicinal plants, in which I think is very helpful in the field of medicine for further analysis and development of medicine/drug. Using the applications of Remote Sensing and GIS, can someone tell me if its possible to model and map the availability of medicinal plants within our locality, if so what and where should I get the needed data? Or should I be more specific as to what medicinal plant will I make use of? This topic is really interesting for me, this would be my thesis proposal this sem. If anyone can suggest/recommend or give me an insight about this, I would be really glad. Thank you.
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Dear Jeila Marie Jagna There is different modeling techniques in combination with Remote Sensing and GIS for plants and animals. The choice of a specific technique depends on the researcher and the knowledge of using the technique. To date, I have used MaxEnt (Maximum Entropy), Spatial Multicriteria Evaluation (Analytic Hierarchy Process), etc. using ILWIS and ArcGIS software for plants like Taxus baccata, Rubia cordifolia, Malus domestica, and Camellia sinensis. Further, I have submitted a manuscript on the modeling of Bos frontalis using MaxEnt for possible publication. It is good to learn that you are interested in mapping the available medicinal plants in your locality by applying Remote sensing and GIS. So, you can go through my publications and if you need further assistance then let me know.
Best wishes,
Dr. Gibji Nimasow
Itanagar, India
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Hello, I'm very interested in mapping and managing the conservation of the Philippine traditional medicinal plants, in which I think is very helpful in the field of medicine for further analysis and development of medicine/drug. Using the applications of Remote Sensing and GIS, can someone tell me if its possible to model and map the availability of medicinal plants within our locality, if so what and where should I get the needed data? Or should I be more specific as to what medicinal plant will I make use of? This topic is really interesting for me, this would be my thesis proposal this sem. If anyone can suggest/recommend or give me an insight about this, I would be really glad. Thank you.
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Hi jeila
From your explanation, i think that the best approach for your study is to use suitability modeling or species distribution modelling aporoach. It's more apropriate and need you to collect some sampling data
You can find a lot of litterature and tutorial on how to use it or implement it using software like R on Google
Hope it'll help
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While going through some publications on Polyherbal formulation for the management of diabetes, I encountered a publication where goat pancreas is used as one of the ingredients in addition to plants and calcified mussel cells. Can anyone tell me the relevance of goat pancreas and also how it can be called a polyherbal formulation?
Here is the link for the paper
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Formulations restrain 2 or more than 2 herbs are called polyherbal formulation. Drug formulation in Ayurveda is based on 2 principles: Use as a single drug and use of more than one drug. The last is known as polyherbal formulation. The idea of polyherbalism is peculiar to Ayurveda even though it is tricky to explain in term of modern parameters.
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A traditional medicine (e.g. Unani System of Medicine) has its own philosophy of treatment of a disease. Nowadays, there is emerging demand to validate the effectiveness of an intervention (a plant medicine or traditional procedure) in terms of science and evidence set as standard. there is a little focus on the philosophy applied for the therapeutic purpose.
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Traditional medicine is the ancient and culture–bound medical practice which existed in human societies before the application of modern science to health. The practice of traditional medicine varies widely, in keeping with the societal and cultural heritage of different countries. Every human community responds to the challenge of maintaining health and treating diseases by developing a medical system. Thus, traditional medicine has been practised to some degree in all cultures.
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Traditional medicine has been recognized by the country in which it is practiced. WHO has also recognized most of the traditional system of medicines. but some of them have been globalized. In this regard, the efforts of WHO should have been highlighted.
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In the paper, there are many, but in the practical field, this is perhaps ZERO. I fail to get any response to the sent emails at any time. WHO CARES???
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It allmost 10 months since 1 case of Covid-19 was detected. Countries across the globe are conducting clinical trials related to vaccines, diagnostic procedures, antiviral therapy, plasma therapy n through traditional medicine. Are we going in right direction?
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A different type of approach:
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DNA fingerprinting/barcoding is emerging as technique to identify raw drugs of biological origin. It has been employed as test for authenticity in Pharmacopoeias. Some authors have proved utility of the technique to identify biological drugs from polyherbal formulations as well. Is the technology reliable and cost effective to be included as test for every plant based traditional medicines?
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DNA fingerprinting/bar coding is a validated tool for biological identification of plant medicine. but its application is not frequent in the laboratories dealing with traditional medicines prevalent in India. proper identification of a plant medicine described in the classical literature is itself difficult. DNA fingerprinting could be used for isolation of adulterants generally available in the open market.
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What is the recommendation to treat anemia in traditional medicine?
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Beetroot - Apple extract:
Apples are rich in iron and beets have folic acid, fiber, and potassium. The nutrient-rich part is under the skin, so you can cook it in the microwave or just grill it on the stove with the skin on. After it is cooked, peel the beets and eat them. While you can eat one or two apples a day when apples are combined with beets, the chances of fighting anemia also increase.
- 1 cup of apple juice
Beet juice - 1 cup
1/2 teaspoon honey :
Do this:
Mix apple juice with beetroot, add honey, and mix well. Drink this twice a day.
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In some ischemic stroke Leeches in face region has prophylactic effect in traditional medicine.
Can anyone present some documents related to this matter?
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The leech saliva is effective in CVDs and other ischemic disorders as it contains specific thrombin inhibitors, hirudin, isolated from H. medicinalis. Different species of leeches have been identified for different thrombin inhibitors Hirudin is most important as it has also been approved by FDA.
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It's matter of big discussion that traditional medicine may play key role in management of Covid-19. Recently, in India, Ayurveda and Yoga has been included in National management protocol for asymptomatic n mild cases of Covid-19.
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Holistic management is a key concept in management of any ailment. Even WHO acknowledges the varied spectrum and dimensions of health. Aurvedic medicines have been accepted even by the Westerners and stood the test of times. In addition allopathy has borrowed much from traditional medicines. Yoga is also a great supplement to other therapies as it focusses on physical fitness as well as breathing exercises which further improve our respiratory system. Moreover allopathy has not provided yet any concrete evidence of management and are recommending only hit & trial therapies or symptomatic/supportive management. Therefore it's a great initiative to include such alternative system of therapies for the management so that we can enrich our arsenal for the fight against this pandemic.
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In India, it is observed that large number of population is using traditional medicine for prophylaxis of Covid-19. Will there be increase in acceptance and impact of AYUSH systems in general population?
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Probably, yes.
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traditional medicine; quality control
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Ekor, M. (2014). The growing use of herbal medicines: issues relating to adverse reactions and challenges in monitoring safety. Frontiers in pharmacology, 4, 177.
In general, the use of traditional medicines has increased tremendously over the past few decades and a large portion of world population rely on them for primary healthcare. Although therapies involving these agents have shown promising potential with the efficacy of a good number of herbal products clearly established, many of them remain untested and their use are either poorly monitored or not even monitored at all. The consequence of this is an inadequate knowledge of their mode of action, potential adverse reactions, contraindications, and interactions with existing orthodox pharmaceuticals and functional foods to promote both safe and rational use of these agents. Since safety continues to be a major issue with the use of herbal remedies, it becomes imperative, therefore, that relevant regulatory authorities put in place appropriate measures to protect public health by ensuring that all herbal medicines are safe and of suitable quality.
The global acceptance and use of herbal medicines and related products continue to assume exponential increase. Issues relating to adverse reactions in recent times are also becoming more vivid, increasing in prevalence and no longer debatable because of previous misconception of regarding or categorizing herbal medicinal products as “safe” because they are derived from “natural” source. The reality is that “safety” and “natural” are not synonymous. Therefore, regulatory policies on herbal medicines need to be standardized and strengthened on a global scale. Relevant regulatory authorities in different countries of the world need to be proactive and continue to put in place appropriate measures to protect public health by ensuring that all herbal medicines approved for sale are safe and of suitable quality.
Providers of medicines, such as physicians, nurses, and pharmacists, often have little training in and understanding of how herbal medicines affect the health of their patients. Many of them are also poorly informed about these products and how they are being used. Adequate training is now very essential since most patients are almost often on other types of prescription or non-prescription medicines. In spite of the fact that the active involvement of orthodox healthcare professionals is continuously solicited and huge responsibility lies with them in terms of their valuable contributions to safety monitoring of medicinal products, it is also very important that all providers of herbal medicines are sufficiently empowered to play a role in monitoring safety of herbal medicines. This, however, should be in collaboration with the orthodox healthcare professionals. For this to be effective, it would be essential to create an atmosphere of trust to facilitate adequate sharing of knowledge about the use and safety of herbal medicines. In fact, the education of healthcare professionals, providers of herbal medicines, and patients/consumers is vital for the prevention of potentially serious risks from misuse of herbal medicines.
Of crucial importance also is an appropriate knowledge base relevant to diagnostic and treatment decision-making. Furthermore, individual healthcare provider should also show sufficient commitment toward understanding the use of herbal medicines. This can be by asking relevant questions about the use of these herbal remedies among others whenever they encounter patients who are taking these medications. Health professionals who work in poisons centers and health information services also need to be informed about herbal medicines. Finally, as with other medicines for human use, it has become mandatory that herbal medicines are covered in every country of the world by a drug regulatory framework to ensure that they conform with required standards of safety, quality, and efficacy.
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Traditional knowledge of plant based drugs are very important in the remedy of diseases.
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I agree with above comments.
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Q and A are parameters used for standardization and safety of drugs in pharmacology. Quality assurance is an integral part of traditional medicine, which certifies that it delivers the required quantity of quality drug. The standardization parameters are authentication, foreign matters, organoleptic evaluation, microscopy, volatile matters, extractive values, ash values, radioactive contaminants, microorganisms, pesticide residue, refractive index, chromatographic profiles and marker components.
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Q and A are parameters used for standardization and safety of drugs in pharmacology. Quality assurance is an integral part of traditional medicine, which certifies that it delivers the required quantity of quality drug. The standardization parameters are authentication, foreign matters, organoleptic evaluation, microscopy, volatile matters, extractive values, ash values, radioactive contaminants, microorganisms, pesticide residue, refractive index, chromatographic profiles and marker components.
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The scope of validation of classical formulations in traditional medicine for their effectiveness should be enhanced. the outcome generated through such studies may be utilized for new drug development. the ultimate aim of drug research is the development of the new drugs.
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Yes validation is must
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Sri Lankan Indigenous Medicine is an assert to Sri Lankan health sector. In addition to its healing effect, SLIM has social and cultural values which are worth studying, researching and surveying. SLIM has remedies for most of the current burning issues in health field such as cancer and other NCDs.
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I agree with Arvind Singh
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how can i stop following this project?
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unfollow
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What is the exact human dose of ghrita and medicated ghrita? Is it 12 gm according to AFI or 48 gm according to classical text.
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Vinamra Sharma Sir, the paper just mentions 'The human dose of Ghrita as practiced traditionally is approximately 10 g per person', without reference. Is there a classical reference for this dose?
Apurva Priyadarshi Sir, can you help me find the classical reference for this? (In Abhyantar snehan karma it varies from 1 tola (12 gm) to even more than one Pala (70-80 gm).)
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Herbs are medicinal plants. they are used for the treatment of different diseases in traditional system of medicine. So if anyone knows the medicinal plants used to purify blood inside the body, then provide the list and methods of use.
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It is said that kabasura kudineer a product of Indian traditional medicine siddha/ayurveda has some beneficial effects against covid 19 infection. I would like to know more about this.
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The World Health Organization (WHO) defines traditional medicine as "the sum total of the knowledge, skills, and practices based on the theories, beliefs, and experiences indigenous to different cultures, whether explicable or not, used in the maintenance of health as well as in the prevention, diagnosis, improvement or treatment of physical and mental illness". But some people believe traditional medicine is contrasted with scientific medicine.
What is your opinion? Can we use traditional medicine for treatment of COVID19? If your answer is yes, how do you want to do it?
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Please take a look at the following RG link.
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Vanadium is essential for many purposes, nadium salts are transition elements that proves to be useful to treat diabetics, and Research Page 184 Available online at www.globalresearchonline.net of insulin by initial entry into the portal system. This mini review summarized the latest advancements in this field, considering the vanadium compounds effective in organic or inorganic forms. The major concern related to the use of vanadium salts is the safety profile. Vanadate has insulin-like effects on the metabolism of glucose both in vivo and in vitro in various tissues. Vanadium salts such as Na 3 VO 4, NaVO 3, VOSO 4, VO (acac)2, and VO (Et-acac) 2 mimic several of the metabolic and growth-promoting effects of insulin. Some traditional medicines from a number of plants and plant products with antidiabetic activity also show great promise. Some studies have suggested that vanadium compounds help to normalize blood glucose levels in people with both type I and type II diabetes. Vanadium, atomic number 23, atomic weight 50.94, is a first-row transition metal that shows a wide range of oxidation states in monomeric, oligomeric, and polymeric species in solution. It exists in oxidation states of −I, 0, +II, +III, +IV, and +V; the latter two are stable solution structures at physiological pH: vanadyl (+IV) and vanadate (+V). The oral administrations of inorganic vanadium (IV, V) salts have shown anti-diabetic activity2,3,4. Vanadium compounds show insulin-like effects in vivo and in vitro. Several clinical studies have shown the efficacy of vanadium compounds in type 2 diabetic subjects. Orally administrated sodium vanadate has been reported to improve DM in human diabetes before the discovery of insulin and its clinical use to treat DM has been previously demonstrated. Vanadium compounds have been shown to be effective in animal models such as spontaneously diabetic (BB) rats and insulin-resistant Zucker fa/fa rats and recently in human trials5 . An overview on vanadium salts Vanadium salts being used as a metallotherapeutic appeared in 18996 . Early interest in vanadium as a metallotherapeutic waned, even as the exploration of vanadium's biological effects in plants and animals continued. The discovery that vanadium (V), as vanadate, was an extremely potent enzymatic inhibitor was completely unanticipated. A number of laboratories world-wide had noticed that a particular commercial preparation of ATP (from Sigma Chemical Co.) gave anomalously low catalytic rates in a standard ATPase assay 7 . But safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and bioavailability of escalating doses of a vanadium complex for therapeutic use in diabetic mellitus were assessed in 20038 . But, later vanadium-based hypoglycaemic agents appeared in the market as vitamin and mineral supplements. Since 1922, after the discovery of insulin9 , various observations have been made on vanadium's ubiquitous nature and pharmacological effect that led to a series of clinical trials in humans which proved its role as a potential cholesterol-lowering pharmaceutical agent. Vanadium is an essential trace element of unknown function in cellular regulation and an indigenous constituent of most mammalian .so how vanadium is used?
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Several marine cultures have been used marine algae as a source of drugs with it is local names
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Medicinal Uses - It may be used to Cure Tuberculosis , arthrities etc .
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I research plant use, and indigenous medicine, especially related to Ireland. Irish indigenous medicine was influenced by Greek medicine between the 14- 16th centuries as the European herbals were transcribed into Irish for use in Irish medical schools during this period. After the collapse of the Gaelic order in the early 17th century some of this knowledge seems to have blended with the Gaelic oral tradition, remnants of which we still have today.
Regards
Rosari Kingston PhD, MSc (Herbal medicine)
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Thank you
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The modern world is returning back to the nature! Organic/ Natural/ Unprocessed/ Wholemeal foods for good health, longevity - have become a craze now. But in case of treatment and prophylaxis - why do everyone opts for allopathic (the science based modern) medicine? Why not first the traditionals: Ayurveda/ Homeopathy/ Oriental/ Herbal/ Naturopathy/ Acupuncture/ Massage/ Yoga/ Dietary etc?
Aren't these scientific enough? Are they developing in appropriate pace with allopathy?
Why do modern clinicians still neglect/tease some of theses modes of therapies?
Why the new generation not getting solid confidence on these natural treatments?
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In rural and semi-urban India, traditional medicines are still the first option for treatment of diseases. People of all generations understand the importance of traditional medicines, that's why they are gradually shifting towards natural and plant based medicines as stated by Professor Amit Baran Sharangi Sir in his post.
Thanks!
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This is for general knowledge.
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Absolutely yes
Best Regards Dejene Tadesse Banjaw
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You may include what you know, think, no matter this is for general knowledge.
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Traditional medicine includes knowledge that has evolved across generations in different societies before the modern medical age
Best Regards Dejene Tadesse Banjaw
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Nowadays, adulteration of Traditional Medicine with sexual stimulant and steroids are very common and devastating problem for many countries. Those medicines are available in different dosage forms like, Tablet, Ca[psule, Liquids, Powder.
Is there any validated method to identify those stimulants and steroids e.g., Sildenafil Citrate and Dexamethasone specifically) in those different dosage form?
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Kindly find link, and pdf may be helpful for you:
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Traditional medicine advancement can support the nation in cost effectiveness and advancement of clinical research across the developing nation. It can reduce the cost of drug by assuring the integration to modern medicine. In collaboration with advanced clinical research centers, Bahirdar University can design new approach to advance the traditional medicine in to modern pharmaceutical and clinical experiments.
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What a brilliantly pertinent question. I believe that it is achieved by using all the branches of sciences to explain the pharmacodynamics and mechanisms of actions of herbs. Then by using our up to date and full knowledge of the pathophysiology of a condition or disease process that we can then explain and justify their traditional use. I use this approach myself in my writing, research and dealing with my patients. I’ve written a paper and co-authored a study that should be published this year using these principles. I shall post it on researchgate with the agreement of my co-authors.
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In India, separate Ministry of AYUSH has established for their own progress and development,
AYUSH system comprises of Ayurveda, Unani, Sidha and Homeopathy. My question is today, we have "modern Allopathy literature (Anat, Physio, Pharmac, Medicine, etc)" as a science for understanding of Health, however even AYUSH system of medicine also fallows the science but always these system may not fit in line with the modern medical sciences. so there may be problem for integration of AYUSH and Allopathy at Internal Medicine level.
However, as recently WHO has published a report on "Traditional Medicine" and also "Self health practices", indicating importance of these intervention for achieving the overall health and acceptance of health at the ground level and reaching towards "Universal Health Coverage"
I personally believe that many of the OPD and IPD, diseases, illness, symptoms, etc. there are scope of these alternative medical sciences particularly in rising burden of NCDs. These alternative medical sciences may be preventive, promotive and curative in nature.
i also believe that, these science need more "Operational research" at the community level and so in area of "Public Health" Today, there is need for documentaion and research and scientific support for these types of sciences.
In View of the same, what are the best practices, national policies and public health intervention available at present all over the world which supports and help in redevelopment of alternative medical sciences??
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Thanks a lot,
In India Yoga and Ayush have been a source of treatment and has build in culture of India. Hence even if todays modern science may not be able to explain the various positive effect (so called placebo) of these indigenous treatment i believe that one day science is mature enough or developed enough to justify these knowledge. I also believe that each region of the World has such health science which inbuilted in their societies and culture and so i also believe without integrating these sciences achieving "Wellness and Holistic Health" would be like water on ducks back.
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Nuclear medicine is the use of the latest scans and facilities, such as magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography scans and positron emission tomography. Sometimes nuclear medicine showed cancerous cells growth in many patients, so which is safe, nuclear medicine or traditional medicine?
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Nuclear medicines are effective and their benefits normally outweigh the risks. Traditional medicines on the other hand side are safe, but they act slow and are sometimes ineffective.
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India is going to become or has become the world capital for diabetes. A country which has a high value for traditional medicine and the seat for Yoga has suddenly seen itself as the world capital of Diabetes and heart disease.
Most blame it on life style but even a short look back into the lives of Indians in the past the Family values were high and had a joint family.
But today the nuclear family itself is unable to withstand the stress of family and as a result has seen more conflicts within the family.
Very easy to say Im a diabetic but its also sad to see families after families succumbing to the gene of diabetes.
who will end the chain?
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Physical inactivity, dietary alterations, obesity, stress and stronger genetic factors in Indians are some of the reasons behind high incidence of diabetes in India.
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Mustard oil is used in different types of food products. Is it has some medicinal properties?
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Mustard oil contains a high amount of selenium and magnesium, which gives it anti- inflammatory properties. It helps in stimulation of sweat glands and lowers the body temperature. In traditional medicines, mustard oil is used to relieve the pain associated with arthritis, muscle sprains and strains.
Thanks!
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What are the common method applied for analysis of the traditional medicine manuscripts?
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Following
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Ayurveda, the ancient Indian System of Medicine based on the philosophy of total health and wellness is a science of life with a holistic approach considering physical, psychological, philosophical, ethical, and spiritual aspects of healthcare. Ayurveda is a very logical science based on basic scientific principles. The ancient wisdom of Ayurveda is based on time-tested theories proven by observation, trial and error and experimentation. Like most traditional medicine systems, it was developed and refined over thousands of years, using observation and experience. Ayurvedic therapies have been practiced for thousands of years much before the development of placebo controlled experiments. The science of Ayurveda does not only depend upon the symptoms but believes in a thorough examination to discover the root cause of the ailment and instead of suppressing the symptoms, Ayurvedic therapy focuses on finding the reasons for the underlying symptoms. Despite lack of much clinical research on Ayurveda, many of the system’s principles and practices are now recognized and used in conventional medical settings. Herbs used in Ayurvedic medicine, such as tumeric, ginger, and neem, are now recognized as beneficial for heart health and as antioxidant-boosters. There are many evidences, which support Ayurveda performances better than Western medicine, mainly in case of chronic diseases. In retrospection of these facts, do Ayurvedic medicines need modern scientific scrutiny and validation?
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No, there is no need to test ayurvedic medicines scientifically as Ayurveda is a 5,000 year old science.
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The pics (1) The tree (2) Mature leaves (3) Fresh leaves (4) The root colour.
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It looks Morinda lucida of family Rubiaceae.
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Choongan Caralluma
Caralluma Tuberculata
Urdu: Chongan
English: Bitter Cress
Pushto: Pamankay
It is a wild plant used as a food. Its taste is bitter.
It is found in Africa, Saudi Arabia, India, Pakistan, Afghanistan and Southern Europe.
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Choongan Caralluma is a medicinal plant, used in Ayurveda traditional medicine. This plant has purgative action, anti-inflammatory and protein digestive action-proteolytic action of latex. The medicated thread Ksharsutra is prepared by coating the thread with latex along with turmeric and alkali of acyranthes aspera plant. Such thread is used in Hemorrhoids and mainly in Fistulous tract for slow cutting action, this Technic is now more or less universal as minimum invasive para surgical method.
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The traditional systems of medicine were integrated in the year 372 AD at Madrassa JundiShapur. Is anyone having any kind of knowledge about it?
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I have a piece of information were presented at "Third International Conference on Holly Prophet Mohammad's Tradition (sireye Nabavi) in Medicine" but unfortunately its farsi (persian). I may translate it for you if necessray. In addition if you need any information about JundiShapur, I may be collect information for you.
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Indigenous medicine has records of treating dental problems as a part of general heath care. Oral cavity being an inherent part of the body and being a mirror to various systemic disease shouldn't it be a specialty in Medicine as ENT, Ophthal etc.. Why and when did dentistry separate itself from medicine as a separate entity?
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Dentistry separate itself, perhaps gives more importance to the imp. subject in disguise. As more time is spend over the subject in the entire course curriculum
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Traditional medicine , medicinal chemistry,
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I am not just interested but I recommend it to all. It is more efficient and less costly. However, we must seek the assistance of qualified herbal doctors. My father's brain herrmohage stroke seemed hopeless with orthodox medicine. Thanks to traditional medicine, my father's recovery process has been speedily! Indeed, nature is the greatest healer!
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We are working on analysis of those medical records in traditional medicine. But we are lacking those medical records in traditional medicine. Is there any place in which I can find the open data of those records?
Those records may include narrative texts with tradition medicine terminology.
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Its base on country. For Example for New Zealand ( NZULM ) For Australia MIMS etc..
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Nigella sativa
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Solvent extraction.
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R & D in traditional medicine is very important , because it will help poor persons to get cheap medicine/treatment for their illnesses. 
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While I do agree that R&D in traditional medicine is important as it may reveal unexplored opportunities, I am not sure I agree with the statement that "poor people will get cheap treatment for their illness". It is possible that by integration of traditional medicine with modern medicine we may be able to provide more of a whole body approach, individualised medicine. Otherwise, based on your statement, we would only create a deeper gap in the quality of care the patients receive.
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Some medicinal plants are known and used locally by women to prevent pregnancy. Which methods will i use to validate this folkloric claims using animal models?
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To design either an in vitro or in vivo model for your study, you need to know the targets for your herbal preparation and the possible mechanisms of action to exert contraceptive effect.
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We are investigating the development of traditional medicine in some countries online, however, we do not know the websites that contain those data released by governments. Any suggestion?
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If you think any answer is helpful to you, then recommend such answer/s.
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Drug development
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Ministry of AYUSH is funding research for Traditional Medicine through its various research councils.
There are five research councils namely Central Council for Research in Ayurvedic Sciences, Central Council for Research in Unani Medicine, Central Council for Research in Yoga and Naturopathy, Central Council for Research in Siddha and Central Council for research in Homoeopathy are funded by Ministry of AYUSH for doing research in the respective systems.
All these councils are funding research for individuals, private research institutes, Pharmaceutical companies through their 'Extra Mural Research' (EMR) Scheme.
Routinely, See the respective council's website and Ministry of AYUSH website for their call for research proposal for funding through EMR Scheme.
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I am interested in works written in any european language (from the first arrival of europeans to America up to the 19th century), which can be useful as valuable primary historical sources for an intercultural History of Psychopharmacological Botany and Hallucinogens. 
Examples: 
-Nicolás Monardes (1508-1588) y su obra: Primera y segunda y tercera partes de la historia medicinal de las cosas que se traen de nuestras Indias Occidentales, que sirven en Medicina (1574, Sevilla: Alonso Escribano)
-Hernández, Francisco. 1651. Nova Plantarum, Animalium et Mineralium Mexicanorum Hístoria... Roma: Deuersini y Z. Masotti. Historia de las plantas de la Nueva España. Editorial Ochoterena. México, D. F. 3 vols.
- Ruiz de Alarcón, Hernando. 1629/1892. “Tratado de las supersticiones y costumbres gentílicas que hoy viven entre los indios naturales desta Nueva España.” In: Francisco del Paso y Troncoso, ed. Anales del Museo Nacional de México, ep. 1, VI, pp. 123-223. México, D. F. Imprenta del Museo Nacional;
-Spruce, R. (1873). On some remarkable narcotics of the Amazon Valley and Orinoco. Ocean Highways. Geographical Magazine, 1, 184-193.
etc... ....
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If you are interested in North America, Robert Beverly in The History and Present State of Virginia (originally published 1705)  describes accidental datura consumption by English militia stationed at Jamestown, Virginia and use of datura root infusion in the Algonquian coming of age ceremony, the wysoccan. A new addition of this book was recently published by University of North Carolina Press.
Not a primary source, but interesting nonetheless, theobromine, caffeine and ursolic acid biomarkers of Illex have been identified in residues from Mississippian Period beakers (ca AD1100-1200) from the site of Cahokia in western Illinois: P Crown, T Emerson, J Gu, WJ Hurst, T Pauketat, and T Ward, 2012. Ritual Black Drink Consumption at Cahokia. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 109(35):13944-13949.
I am interested in the use use of psychoactive plants (other than tobacco) in pre Columbian  Eastern North America. Was not aware oft he Cotton Mather reference. Thank you for calling it to my attention.
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I would like to optimise some newly developed techniques to study human B cell maturation and differentiation. The only problem is quit a lot of blood is needed to isolate B cells from PBMCs. I hope to find an alternative for this
Thanks
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Great thank you!!
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I the developing countries in particular, where the financial support is a major problem, you could not be a distinguished researcher unless you join to a research group or make a research co-operation with others. 
I am interested in evaluating the antimicrobial compounds prescribed in  the traditional medicine, in order to find a new antimicrobial drugs. Any one or a group may welcome research-co-operation?
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Thanks Dear Dr. Emad M. Abdallah, we are your counterpart from Pakistan, we can have mutual projects funded by international agencies, just fetch them out and let me know.
 Stay blessed   
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Climate change is causing new types of diseases.
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Homeopathy is a specific training in which the underlying principle is that "like treats like".  The practice utilizes dilutions of herbs and minerals singly or in combination to treat anything form illnesses to mood disorders.  It is profound yet subtle treatment.  Homeopathy was the leading discpline in medicine in this country a hundred years ago and is still widely practiced in Europe where there are entire hospitals that use only Homeopathic medicines.  Hahneman Medical School in Philadelphia was originally a school of homeopathy.  (It has since been bought by a big hospital chain and had its name changed.)  You can buy certain homeopathic remedies in your local health food store, but there are practitioners who specialize in this area and can create individually designed remedies for a specific patient.  To promote oneself as a "Homeopath" requires no specific training, certification or licensure.  Caveat emptor.
Naturopathy is a field of medical care which utilizes foods and supplements as medicine.  The degree of ND is conferred in a school of naturopathy of which there are several in this country, mostly in Washington and Oregon.
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 How can Indic perspective be integrated in End of Life Care?
Any SUGGESTIONS OR NARRATIVES OR DISCOURSES OR INFORMATION OF any such model of care based on traditional medicine tested anywhere in India/overseas is solicited please. Thank you.
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I would think that you would look to the question and find your answer in that,end of life care is that care which brings comfort and quality of life.  Does it matter where we get that if it brings a happy or adjusted end?  I think not. Traditional medicine as well as holistic or homeopathic medicine can be just as effective in many cases.  I am not a medical doctor but support my clients in whatever way possible.  Some choose to forgo medicine and that is their choice. Medical doctors don't always have all the answers. Thought provoking question!
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I'm including everything from decorative use of teeth, use of leather for shields etc., through ritual and medicinal uses. I've uploaded a summary table of what I have already - added to researchgate as unpublished research.
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Hi Simon, 
I hope your research is going on well. Let me just say this
1- many cultural groups use crocodile parts but very few document any of these, you may get more talking to traditional healers, hunters and bush meat traders because oral tradition is still a practice here as far those practices are concerned.
2- Among the bamilekes of west Cameroon, the crocodile skin is used as an ornamental on the walls of houses. I still remember one covering a side of our house wall when I grew up. wild animals are killed and eaten but the skin is kept as a reminder of the dexterity of the hunter because crocodiles are not commonly found in that hilly part of the country.
3- Yes Sandals, purses, hand bags, waist belts, hand fans, bangles are produced with crocodile skin among the Bamoun in West Cameroon and the Fulani and other arts craft men in Northern Cameroon.
A visit to the arts shop in Dscahng, Foumban, Maroua, Garoua, Ngoundere may help.There should be  some information from the recently visited Fon Palace in North west that may be useful
Thank you for immortalizing cultural anthropology
Best wishes
Aline
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How rational is to use/refer the non-native and non-indigenous plants interchangeably?
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This all depends in timelines. In Europe for example plants introduced from wherever prior to 1492 are often regarded as native, although they are technically pre-Columbian introductions, many of which have however been naturalized. Overall I would prefer "non-indigenous" species, simply for language reasons. Not all introductions are  invasive however. Also, an important aspect are local varieties - lots of crop plants have been introduced in many parts of the world, and have then been bred in distinct, local varieties. These are technically "non-native", but they are - as varieties - indigenous.
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For researchers who have more experience in this area
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hi
Standardization of herbal medicines is the process of prescribing a set of standards or inherent characteristics, constant parameters, definitive qualitative and quantitative values that carry an assurance of quality, efficacy, safety and reproducibility. It is the process of developing and agreeing upon technical standards. Specific standards are worked out by experimentation
and observations, which would lead to the process of
prescribing a set of characteristics exhibited by the
particular herbal medicine. Hence standardization is a
tool in the quality control process.  you might find these article of interest for you
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In Traditional Persian Medicine, venesection, enema, nasal application of aroma and some herbal medicines such as Zataria multiflora are recommended by Avicenna in Canon of medicine.
Related article:
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There is some evidence for Ginkgo biloba extract. Refer to 2005 Cochrane review CD003691 by Zeng, Liu, Yang et al. 
Also some early trials found benefit in recent stroke victims. References can be found in Principles and Practice of Phytotherapy, 2013 by Bone and Mills p605
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Thymoquinone,(phytochemical) the active substance in blackseeds has been studied in tumour models of rats, mice and in tumour cell lines. Pre clinical research results demonstrate its role in anti-cancer effects by promoting apoptosis or inhibiting survival. It has been used in traditional medicine from old times with less/no side effects.
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Thank you so much for your answers and refs. they will be helpful. I wanted to clarify, thymoquinone is the most active substance in black seeds (nigella sativa) that's what  you studied. Because some people also use the fennel seed (feoniculum vulgare) which is also medicinal. Which specific cancer did you study?
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We know that tiger parts are used for the traditional chinese medicines. Apart from that is there any literature on the use of tiger parts (bones, meat, claw, tooth) by the local people (who are living in and around the tiger habitat) in the tiger range countries?
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"Tiger bone is used for jaundice by the Nyishi, but according to members of the Mompa tribe dried tiger bone powder is said to ease rheumatic pains [27], while tiger flesh and fats are used for treatments of leprosy by tribal people of Tamil Nadu [61]. "
in Vertebrates used for medicinal purposes by members of the Nyishi and Galo tribes in Arunachal Pradesh (North-East India)
[27]
Solanki GS, Chutia P: Ethnozoological and socio- cultural aspects of Mompas of Arunachal Pradesh.
J Human Ecol 2004, 15(4):251-254.
[61]
Slovan A, Paulmurugan R, Wilsand V, Ranjith Sing AJA: Traditional therapeutic uses of animals among tribal population of Tamil Nadu.
Ind J Trad Knowledge 2004, 3:206-207.
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I want apply different statistical tools (methods) to analyse my ethnomedicinal and ethnobotanical data and information.
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cross-cultural differences,  chi-square, Fishers test, RRI,etc.
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No doubt vernacular names are useful in identifying the plant scientifically but it is not always possible since a single vernacular name may refer to different plants in different area. Moreover a single plant is variously named by different community/tribes.
Please provide your valuable suggestions.
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No, simply linking a vernacular name to a scientific name without a voucher is not possible. While vernacular names are often as, or sometimes more, exact as scientific names when considering e.g. one indigenous people, there are often various vernacular names for the same species, or one vernacular for various species when looking at larger regions, simply because ethnotaxonomy follows often other species concepts than Western taxonomy. In our own research, the vernacular “Corpus Huay” referred to Gentianella chamuchui (Reimers) Fabris, Gentianella bicolor (Wedd.) Pringle, Gentianella graminea (H.B.K.) Fabris, Gentianella thyrsoidea (Hook.) Fabris. and three unidentified species of Gentianella (all Gentianaceae). All these species were sold, and used by the local population as treatment for diabetes, and at least Gentianella thyrsoidea is known to have serious toxic effects. Moreover, all these species are interchangeably called Hercampuri, Genciana, Chinchimali, Hornamo, Sumaran, Anga Macha, Amargon, and a variety of other vernacular names. Hornamo however also refers to species of Senecio, Werneria nubigena Kunth (both Asteraceae) as well as Valeriana (Valerianaceae), each of which is used traditionally for completely different applications. The term “Valeriana” might refer to different species of Valeriana (Valerianaceae), but also to Geum peruvianum (Rosaceae) and species of Ranunculus (Ranunculaceae), all of which can be either used for the same purpose (calmative) or for completely different applications. Again, without careful vouchering it would never be possible to identify the correct species and adulterations in trade. This has serious implications on efficacy and toxicity too. Annona