Science topics: GeoscienceAsiaChinaTibet
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Tibet - Science topic

An autonomous region located in central Asia, within China.
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I am working in Ecological Niche modelling and I am projecting my data to the future, i.e. 2050 and 2070. I want to know, out of 9 GCMs which is the CMIP6 which will be the best model to be used for the Himalayan mountains of Northeast and West India along with Tibet.
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Hi, you can search from the latest CMIP6 experiments to find out.
please see this file
Best Regards
Amir
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I am doing Love wave tomography for the region of India and Tibet. Curious to know is there any method or way to solve the smearing in the tomographic checkerboard test.
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Thabk you very much for your reply @HrvojeTkalcic
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For recently year, a new ore district is discovered in Tibet of China. In this ore field, one deposit is hosted in chlorite-carbonate ± epidote±sericite dominated alteration zone, which is <200 meters away to a large porphyry Cu deposit. I am studying on the two deposit, and I would like some other examples like this?
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I think, whether there is an 'example' of such a deposit is not the question you need to be asking. You should be thinking along the lines, of what tools you need to use to unravel how the deposit actually formed.
Theoretically, I imagine propylitic copper deposits due to nature of copper ligand complexes. Surely it usually all precipitates in the potassic core?
My understanding was always that delineating the propylitic zone can help vector you towards the potassic deposit.
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There is enough evidence of mantle earthquakes in Tibet and the Hindu-Kush region that suggest deep subduction of the Indian lithosphere to the asthenospheric level.
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The question is in reference to the India-Asia collision zone where the evidence of asthenosphere upwelling has been reported in the south Tibet. In the SE Karakoram and southern Tibet the He-isotopic evidence in geothermal springs suggest the source is of mantle origin (Hoke et al., 2000; Klemperer et al., 2013). Low velocity zone in the middle and lower crust in the Tibet and in the northern parts of the Karakoram Fault suggest the presence of partial melt.
My question is that can there be another cause of occurrence of partial melt at such depths apart from asthenospheric upwelling triggered by slab rollback and break-off?
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Thank you very much Sebastián Grande Sir. Your answer and thorough explanation helped me a lot.
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Good morning,
I was looking for some introductory works on ethnic differences during late Qing times. Especifically, I would like to find data about regional differences in language and religion in comparison to Han Chinese, especially for Mongolia, Xinjiang, Manchuria, and Tibet.
Thank you very much for your help.
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Thank you very much! I have already checked it out and it looks like what I was looking for.
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Dear scholars,
I focus on the relationship between lake variation and paleoclimate change in the southern Tibet Plateau. And I want to collect some high-resolution records, like stalagmite records and tree-ring records, to compare with my data. I have emailed several professors but received no response.
So, I am wondering if there are some open datasets to download or some professors who are willing to share. I promise that they will be used only for my research purposed.
Thanks a lot,
Can Wang.
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Hello, for free ring record the NOAA has a database available on their paleoclimate page. For speleothems in general, I suggest you go check the SISAL record. It is an amazing project that clearly suits your demand !
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Jiuzhaogou site was among the first group of natural bueaties in China that were designated as the World Heritage by UNESCO. Its natural wonders are really spectacular! It is a must-visit place of a life time for any human being! However,what is the mechanism of interplay and harmonization amongst the water,soil,vegetation and rocks? These questions become pressing especially becasue of the 7.0 degree earthquake that hit the site right in the middle and damaged some of its best lakes.References and discussions are welcome and your efforts will probably help to save the world heritage!
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Well, Hereinafter link good details
Presentation on theme: "Climate change impacts on water cycle in the Tibetan Plateau: A review Kun Yang Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research Chinese Academy of Sciences The fifth."— Presentation transcript:
Regards
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Dear Researcher,
Please share the websites from where I can download the GCMs data for Qingha Tibet Plateau China. I am using SDSM for temperatures and Precipitations downscaling.
Regards
Naveed.
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What are the Global or Regional teleconnections which are probably affecting the climate in Kashmir Himalayas.  
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Looking at the world's tallest mountain ranges (Himalayas ), those are themselves responsible for climate in Kashmir Himalayas given their elevation. Elevation or Altitude affects climate in that the higher up you get, the more the temperature drops. The temperature goes down roughly 4 degrees Fahrenheit for every 1,000 feet you climb. Altitude is the subject's distance from the sea. This is why a lot of high-up places such as mountaintops often get snow for most of the year when other places do not, no matter how low the temperature drops. For more, click on the link.....
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There are number of issue can be discussed, if you categorized in number of section –
a)      Flora & fauna
b)      Climate Change
c)       Energy
d)      Pharmaceutical
e)      Geological
f)       Climate change
g)      Geological development
h)      etc.
You need to focus on your expertise field and availability of resources.
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Chenopodium album is one of the more common Chenopods in Eurasia. It's considered as a weed in Europe but there are some studies that confirm its domestication in the Himalayas. This species, very diverse and unknown (2x, 4x and 6x), was cultivated in China, India, Nepal and Bhutan. But today it's very difficult to know the real superficie covered by C album as a crop. Where are the farmers, in which agroecological conditions, for what kind of uses (grains, leaves, etc.)?
One reason for the lack of documented information on chenopods is that many past reports misidentified Chenopodium album as a variety of Amaranth (Amaranthus anardana).
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I received also messages saying that there are breeders that are improving C album in India and Taiwan with white seeded domesticated types from the himalayas.
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Bivlaves occur as very thinned coquina blanket in the Mesozoic strata in southern Tibet (Tethyan Himalaya). Quite abundant by single taxon. What species or genus in what age? T, J, or K? or in epoch?
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The bivalves you figured look very much like Monotis, which are predominantly Norian (Late Triassic) in age.  Monotis, as well as other thin-shelled pectiniid "flat clams" often occur locally in profusion in beds such as those you have figured.
You will meed to examine carefully the hinge line and auricles of the shell to confirm whether the material in fact is referable toy Monotis, or belongs to some other genus.
For a start you may wish to check out:
1.) Norman Silberling, 1997. The Late Triassic bivalve Monotis in accreted terranes of Alaska: U. S. Geological Survey Bulletin 2151,
2.) Chris McRoberts, 2011, LATE TRIASSIC BIVALVIA (CHIEFLY HALOBIIDAE AND MONOTIDAE) FROM THE PARDONET FORMATION, WILLISTON LAKE AREA, NORTHEASTERN BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA. JOURNAL OF PALEONTOLOGY, 85 (4): 613 - 664, and
3.) Hisao Ando 1987. Paleobiological study of the Late Triassic bivalve Monotis from Japan.  Univ. Museum, Univ. of Tokyo, Bulletin 30.
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The latest satellite images have been utilized to update the inventories of glaciers and glacial lakes in the Pumqu river basin, Xizang (Tibet), in the study [Che et al. 2014]. Compared to the inventories of the 1970s, the areas of glaciers are reduced by 19.05% while the areas of glacial lakes are increased by 26.76%. The magnitudes of glacier retreat rates and glacial lake increase rates during the period of 2001–2013 are more significant than those of the period of the 1970s–2001. The accelerated changes in areas of the glaciers and glacial lakes, as well as the increasing temperature and rising variability of precipitation, have resulted in an increased risk of glacial lake outburst floods (GLOFs) in the Pumqu river basin.
Integrated criteria were established to identify potentially dangerous glacial lakes based on a bibliometric analysis method. It was found that in total, 19 glacial lakes were identified as dangerous. Such findings suggest that there is an immediate need to conduct field surveys, not only to validate the findings, but also to acquire information for further use in order to assure the welfare of humans.
Also, it is concluded that global warming is the main reason for glacier recession and glacial lake expansion in the region of Pumqu river basin.
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The changes of glaciers in Tibet noted in the first post are mirrored in changes elsewhere in the world - virtually all glacier-covered regions globally are experiencing losses at rates greater than at any previous time in the Holocene. Because of the widely scattered and poor observational coverage of glaciers globally (and there are ca. 200,000 of them with areas ≥ 2 km2), a global aggregate loss rate is quite difficult to establish. The best current assessment can be found in the paper by Gardner et al (2013), attached here.
The result is significant, in terms of sea level rise, where the contribution of the world's small glaciers is at present roughly equal to that of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets. Projections discussed in the IPCC/AR5 show that glaciers will continue to be major sea level contributors through 2100 as well. In addition to sea level rise, changes in glaciers have consequences for downstream oceanic ecosystems that may be affected by long-term changes in salinity, for water resources in certain parts of the world, and as noted in the first post, for populations living downstream from glacier dammed lakes and other structures destabilized by loss of ice and increased lake and groundwater levels.