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How do you think business research, educational research, psychological studies could be a part of Thai studies?
When researchers conduct business, education, or healthcare research among Thai people, do you think these studies could be a part of Thai Studies? Or Thai studies could be integration research between Business Research, Educational Research and Psychological Studies?
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Great collaborations in this posting, professors, good to read. Thank you.
Kind Regards,
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A magazine printed a survey in its monthly issue and asked readers to complete
it and send it back. Over 1000 readers did so.What is the type of thais sampling?
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Dear Mohanad Kamaleldin Mahmoud Ibrahim, where is this magazine survey link? My Regards
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The research question: What is the basis for popular aspirations of medical doctor to be altruistic, self-sacrifying and professionally competent at the same time? In particular, what is happening in post-communist societies with realizing that the medical service is increasingly expansive and believing that the "good doctor" has to have empathy to the patient to the point thay have to help after workingg hours or/and for free?
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The ideology of communist and socialist countries differs from the one prevailing in the capitalist ideology, for every ideology is completely reflected not only on the economic system but also on the cultural system as a whole, including the moral aspect. Lawyer, education, are noble professions, and that those in charge of them have a special respect, but they also have to stand with the poor segments of society, in contrast to the capitalist ideology that views these professions as means of collecting money.
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Good morning,
Where can I find a list of crop coefficient (Kc) for Thai crops ?
Thanks
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Have a look at this article (https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compag.2020.105368). You can estimate the precise values of crop coefficients for your study regions.
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Hello,
I am working on a cluster location pattern of business registration in the intra-city scale.
The data is extracted from the business registration and financial database which include an address (narrative form). Since the Thai address system cannot achieve precisely location geocoding due to the house number database has not been public digitalization. The geocoding process cannot perform directly from the database to the spatial analysis program. Thus, I perform the geocoding process includes 3 main processes.
1) Creating Reference Point of mid-point of street and municipality boundaries. Then I create X,Y coordinate values
2) Using VLOOKUP function is to retrieve x-coordinate and y-coordinate values and match based on a street name in particular sub-district boundaries
3) Aggregating firm points to hexagon bin, using spatial join tool
Then I perform hotspot analysis the Getis-ord Gi* statistic using spatial join polygon and join count value. The result could reflect the location quite well. However, the result doesn't show a cold spot.
I am wondering that I am using the right tool for my analysis? Or I miss any step of data preparation?
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Kulacha Sirikhan this is a very interesting spatial analysis question that certainly would be impacted by the aggregation size of hexagonal units. Additionally, determining your search radius (kernel size) would also have an impact on your LISA results. These are both relatively subjective so do support these two aforementioned issues with as much support as possible. My two cents-
Best of luck-
R.
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The IAVI vegetation index introduces by (Zhang, Rao, & Lio, 1996)
Thay claims it is better than NDVI for Atmospheric correction.
I didnt find any paper for yield estimation by this vegetation index?
Is there any peaple who could some propose me?
thanks regards
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Dear Mostafa and Colleagues,
Did you find the paper (Zhang, Rao, & Lio, 1996)? Is it in Chinese?
I wonder whether the formula for IAVI in [1] is correct: it is very similar to ARVI and [1] does not contain sufficient details about the IAVI formula.
[1]
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Hi !
Does anyone know where to access reference crop evapotranspiration for Thailand? Any map ? Historical Statistical Averages ?
Thanks
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check this link maybe help you
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In a regression with a database with N=1200, I have an independent dummy variable that measures if the surveyed is unemployed or employed. The variable has the following characteristics:
Unemployment = 0 - Frecuency: 1196
Unemployment = 1 - Frecuency : 4
The regression gives me a significant coefficient, but, also, very counter intuitive (especifically, thay Life Satisfaction has a possitve association with unemployment). I think, however, that it's wrong to obtain a valid conclusion from just 4 cases in Unemployment=1. I also have other dummy variables where the situation is even less clear. For example:
Dummy = 0 - Frecuency: 1170
Dummy = 1 - Frecuency: 30
Or even more:
Categorical option A = 0 - Frecuency: 1150
Categorical option B = 1 - Frecuency: 30
Categorical option C = 2 - Frecuency: 12
Cateogorical optio D = 3 - Frecuency: 8
Can I obtain valid conlcusions from this? And, in more general terms, is there a minimun number of observations needed per category of response in each independent variable so the conslusions that arise from it are pertinent/correct? If that's the case, how can I calculate this number?
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I sm sgree with Paul
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The leaves are tasty and maybe nutritious, so thay are usually eaten in salads, They grow very well, permiting to get the leaves. (Las hojas son sabrosas y parecen nutritivas, de modo que las incluyen habitualmente en ensaladas. Y crece muy bien, permitiendo cosechar hojas todo el tiempo )
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This plant is Basella alba L. of family Basellaceae.
Thanks!
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Hello everyone,
I'm currently trying to make the statistical analysis of my experiment and i'm facing some troubles.
My experiment is a 2x2 repeated design in wich i'm looking to the frequency of ocular movement while subjects mentaly time travel in the past or in the future. The distance in which they can travel can either close or remote.
To looking at it i've ran a multiple linear regression with the frequency of ocular movements as my dependant variable and the Temporality(past / future)*Distance(close / remote) as my predictive variables.
Now i would like to look a this interaction in regard to the score of a third variable that is a score of executive functions. More precisely, i would like to look how this interaction behave for subjetcs who have a low score in EF and for those who have a high score in EF.
An intuitive way to to this could be to split the subject in two groups with a groupe in which subjects have a score below the median of EF score and another one in which thay have a score above the median. However, this method seems to have a lot of inconvenients (like the loss of subject who have a median score)
Someone told me to enter the EF score in my regression model and to try something like this :
Temporality + Distance*EFscore.
However, i'm not sure if this equation resolve my problem, and if it resolved it, i don't understand how.
As you can see, i'm a little bit lost, so could you help me? Do you think this last model is correct? Otherwise, could help me to find the correct solution?
Thank you very much,
Sylvain
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Hi Sylvain,
to interpret the output, it would be helpful to know the package used, the design coding (dummy coding or contrast or...). It looks like dummy coding, because you have an output for TemporalitePasse which might be one of the two levels of Temporalite.
And if this is dummy coding, you can not interpret the output as it is, but you need to reconstruct the marginal means of the model.
Because you see, with dummy coding, (and the formula ~ temporalite*distance) the cell means are estimated like:
estimate_cellmean_future&distant <- intercept
estimate_cellmean_future&near <- intercept + DistanceProche
estimate_cellmean_past&distant <- intercept + TemporalitePasse
estimate_cellmean_past&near <- intercept + TemporalitePasse + DistanceProche + TemporalitePasse:DistanceProche
And as you can see, the effect of TemporalitePasse:DistanceProche is basically not very informative on its own. So you have to reconstruct the cell estimates.
Usually, the outputs of the Bayesian or mixed models in R that I am familiar with (brm and lme4, afex) can be passed to 'emmeans' (estimated marginal means), which does exactly this, and also provide HDIs (for brm-outputs). After doing this, you can interpret your effects. However, looking at these outputs you provide, does not allow telling whether an overall effect is 'significant' or not, because this would require a model comparison, between the full model, and a model in which you remove the fixed effect that should be tested. This however is tricky in Bayesian models (if not impossible) because the change in the priors (do not ask me were I got this from :)) but the suggestions to solve this, are provided by the brm-package as well (e.g. LOO procedure, check it out).
Best, René
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based on observation of my (young) dog I'm starting to think that thay are capable of conceptual metaphoric thought.
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Hi! Take a look at this:
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Hello Thai friends! I would like to know how Thailand regulate electronic device radiation both for ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. The following information will be much appreciated:
1. How does the government of Thailand regulate or control electronic product radiation (ionizing and non-ionizing)?
2. What offices/agencies are responsible for such regulations?
3. What are the basis for radiation regulation? (Laws, Acts, etc.)
4. What is the scope of regulation? (Manufacturing? Export/Import? Possession? Use?)
5. What kind/type of devices does the government of Thailand regulate?
4. Are inspection or monitoring activities done as part of regulation? How is this implemented?
Thank you very much!
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very good
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Why add H2O2 in wet digestion? solution is change color transparent.
What the reaction chemistry, I'm study project about Quality assessment of trace Cd and Pb contaminants in Thai herbal medicines
Ps. I'm sorry, I am not good at English.
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Dharmendra Arya Thank you very much
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1.I want to know how to get Thai character numbers(0-9) dataset and train them and which deep learning algorithm is more efficient.
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Hi,
you can CNN it's a powerful Depp Neural Network also RBM, DBN can be used.
Best
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I am going to perform back translation and cross-cultural adaptation of a survey tool in Thai context. This is the first time in Thailand to perform both back translation and cross-cultural adaptation of this tool. I am thinking about confirmatory factor analysis of this tool. Should I perform CFA? If I cannot perform CFA, whether this affects my study? Please give me an advice.
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You have to perform a Confirmatory Factor Analysis first and then to validate the instrument.
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Hello
If the reference molecule that you used like Vitamin-E or Vitamin-C are as effective, or even superior to your extract of plants, how shall you convince drug-industry/herbal marketing firms of adopting your outcomes for a possibly promising pharmaceutical product ?
Thank you
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Nephron Clin Pract. 2009;113(3):c125-31. doi: 10.1159/000232592. Epub 2009 Aug 12.
Drug development: from concept to marketing!
Tamimi NA1, Ellis P.
Author information
Abstract
Drug development is an expensive, long and high-risk business taking 10-15 years and is associated with a high attrition rate. It is driven by medical need, disease prevalence and the likelihood of success. Drug candidate selection is an iterative process between chemistry and biology, refining the molecular properties until a compound suitable for advancing to man is found. Typically, about one in a thousand synthesised compounds is ever selected for progression to the clinic. Prior to administration to humans, the pharmacology and biochemistry of the drug is established using an extensive range of in vitro and in vivo test procedures. It is also a regulatory requirement that the drug is administered to animals to assess its safety. Later-stage animal testing is also required to assess carcinogenicity and effects on the reproductive system. Clinical phases of drug development include phase I in healthy volunteers to assess primarily pharmacokinetics, safety and toleration, phase II in a cohort of patients with the target disease to establish efficacy and dose-response relationship and large-scale phase III studies to confirm safety and efficacy. Experience tells us that approximately only 1 in 10 drugs that start the clinical phase will make it to the market. Each drug must demonstrate safety and efficacy in the intended patient population and its benefits must outweigh its risks before it will be approved by the regulatory agencies. Strict regulatory standards govern the conduct of pre-clinical and clinical trials as well as the manufacturing of pharmaceutical products. The assessment of the new medicinal product's safety continues beyond the initial drug approval through post-marketing monitoring of adverse events.
PMID: 19729922 DOI: 10.1159/000232592[Indexed for MEDLINE] Free full text
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I doubt whether it's appropriate to distinguish languages as alphabetic and non-alphabetic. Like Kanji and Kana, Chinese, English, Thai, and etc. Can anyone provide a clear category and briefly explain why?
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languages can be categorized based on any characteristic the researcher opts for such as tonal non tonal , prodrop non-pro drop, agglutinating,  inflectional derivational; ,,,,
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I want to do research about lexical similarities between two languages- thai and indonesian language.
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Dear Robertus:
For the study of Mesoamerican languages, the standard technique was developed by Morris Swadesh in the mid-20th century. It is a lexicostatistical method based on a list of 100 lexical items considered to be basic and thus relatively stable. The percentage of cognates found in two related languages yields a quantity of years that indicate the approximate number of minimum centuries elapsed since these languages began to diverge.
The main criticism of this method is that it is not accurate, and it would be naive to use these glottochronological dates as if they represented real time rather than lexical similarity. Swadesh thought a reasonable margin of error was 10%, but I think he was overly optimistic about the accuracy of his method. In my ethnohistorical work I am more cautious, using a margin of error of 25% when comparing glottochronological dates with archaeological or historical evidence.
Recently an international team of linguists created an automated system to compute the similarity between two languages based on Levenshtein distances, mentioned by Bettina on this thread yesterday.
I compared the dates computed with this new method and the old glottochronological dates for languages in the Yutonahuan and Otopamean families of North and Central America, and found that with one exception all of the new dates fall within the range of glottochronological dates, considering a margin of error of 25%. To do this I had to dig into the online database, because there wasn't enough information in the published article (Holman, 2011) to understand exactly which languages had been compared within each family.
Here are some references:
The Automated Similarity Judgment Program (http://email.eva.mpg.de/~wichmann/ASJPHomePage.htm, access: March 18, 2013).
“Earlier versions of the ASJP database,” in The Automated Similarity Judgment Program (http://email.eva.mpg.de/~wichmann/EarlierWorldTree.htm, access: March 18, 2013).
Holman, Eric W.; Brown, Cecil H.; Wichmann, Søren; Müller, André; Velupillai, Viveka; Hammarström, Harald; Sauppe, Sebastian; Jung, Hagen; Bakker, Dik; Brown, Pamela; Belyaev, Oleg; Urban, Matthias; Mailhammer, Robert; List, Johann-Mattis; Egorov, Dmitry, “Automated dating of the world’s language families based on lexical similarity,” in Current Anthropology (University of Chicago Press), vol. 52, no. 6, December 2011, pp. 841-875 (a preliminary version is available on ResearchGate: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/202321178_Automated_Dating_of_the_Worlds_Language_Families_Based_on_Lexical_Similarity, access: March 18, 2013).
Levenshtein, Vladimir I., “Binary codes capable of correcting deletions, insertions, and reversals,” in Soviet Physics–Doklady, vol. 10, no. 8, February 1966, pp. 707-710 (http://profs.sci.univr.it/~liptak/ALBioinfo/files/levenshtein66.pdf, access: June 24, 2014).