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I think it can be done through development courses
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Hi Researchers Community!!
I am initiating a very relevant and useful discussion aiming at generating focused ideas and knowledge of how a teacher handles or should handle gifted and brilliant students in a normal class having varied differences. As it is an established fact that 21st century learners are more creative, innovative and smart comparably, reason being their having easy and granted access to technology since their early age. They are more techno-friendly in comparison to older generation teachers. Today's classes have maximum diversity that existed never. Mostly it happens in case when a teacher faces bright and gifted learners in his normal class, they are overlooked and their special educational demands are hardly met. This problem has severed in modern time, and we can no longer treat creative students with unjust. The teacher should organise well thought strategies and approches to deal and handle exceptionally good students. How do you carry out this task in your class? You need to share your experience and knowledge here for the enlightenment of other fellow researcher. Your all sort of views are most welcomed in advance. Thank you in very much anticipation.
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We need technology to help and
Reinforcement Teaching skills. Should we really direct our students in the right direction?
  And what is the effective and sound way to use technology in education in order to prepare students to face society and the world around them?
 
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Dear Mr. Aqeel
According to my point of view, I found that E-Learning experience in my country is very useful especially for MA & Ph.D. Students.
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I read a lot of experience of application programs to learn, but I think maybe you better work every day on the subjects in class
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We live in a time when our understanding of the role of the teacher and the power of Values Education are coalescing. No longer is Values.
Education on the periphery of the central roles to be played by the teacher and the school in our society. It is at the very heart of these roles. Unlike the assumptions that seem to underpin so many of our concerns around structures, curriculum, and resources, Values Education is more clearly than anything I could point to in
contemporary education premised on the power of the teacher to make a difference.
While the artifacts of structure, curriculum, and resources are not denied, the focus is, appropriate to the insights of the day, on what we describe as “ … the greatest source of variance that can make a difference.” In the case of Values Education, the belief is around the teacher’s capacity to make a difference by
engaging students in the sophisticated and life-shaping learning of personal moral development.
I suggest that the nature, shape, and intent of Values Education has the potential to refocus the attention of teachers and their systems on the fundamental item of all effective teaching, namely the teacher her or himself, the quality of the teacher’s knowledge, content, and pedagogy, and above all on the teacher’s capacity to form the kinds of relationships with students which convey their commitment and care and which become the basis of forming personal character and tomorrow’s citizenry. I know it is a challenging thought for many who, rightly or wrongly, we're trained to think differently about the role of the teacher and the social agency of the school.
However, Values Education or no Values Education, we live in a society that is shouting out a new charter to us. Values Education is one powerful means by which we might realize this charter.
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The objectives of the present study are :
 To study master model for teacher educators on the basis of identified teaching skills needed for effective teaching.
 To determine the importance of identified teaching skills of effective teacher educators.
 To study teacher effectiveness of teacher educators for effective teaching.
The following null hypotheses are framed to study the problem meaningfully, and also to achieve the aforesaid objectives:
 There is no significant difference between the master model for teacher educators& teaching skills of effective teaching.
 There is no significant difference between the importance, essential & moderately teaching skill of effective teacher educators.
 There is no significant difference the verbal &non verbal infraction between pupil teacher and teacher educators for effective teaching.
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Test one hypothesis at a time.
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I have been considering the idea of history as a core component in secondary education. Is it necessary any longer? Children have access to the worlds knowledge at their fingertips, yet are overwhelmed with the content and with what to do with it. Does the learning of history doom it to be repeated; as opposed to the fable that those who do not learn it will repeat it? Would time be better spent on teaching skills, communication, and problem solving?
For the record, I read history every day. I teach other social sciences, and incorporate the past into everything we explore.
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I Agree With Orna Farrell
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i need more specific information and details about the site-based TPD, please.
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Following
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Designing a summer school program is challenging since we always need to ensure the quality and making learning easier & fun. Let's discuss the different teaching methods can be used for a Summer School program at Bachelor Level.
Example: One of the teaching methods is 'Assigning group projects to the participants based on lessons taught in a Summer School'
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Profile first the learning abilities/capabilties of your students and then design differentiated instruction/strategies as well as differentiated assessment methodologies.
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Hello everyone, I would really like to get your expert input on this inquiry I am exploring. Please give your feedback. I am a grade three teacher with a student whose reading and comprehension  skills are way below his grade level. He however has access to a tablet and is really into this bit of technology. My question therefore is how can I use technology such as a tablet to help improve the reading level and comprehension skill of a student who is below grade level? 
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I agree with answer of Dr. Marie Dontfraid .
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Side by side I am working on it so if one have please share with me
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Thank you! Following! Best regards: Julia Doncheva
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Students are evaluated for their knowledge. They are forced to leave the institution after repeated failure.
But such failure may be due to their teachers also, who may have insufficient knowledge level or teaching skills.
A teacher with some knowledge may be converted to an ordinary man or below to that level if do not study his/ her subject for a long time.
There may be arrangement of some written test for measuring the knowledge level of the teachers also at every three years or like that to force the teachers to remain updated in their subjects.
What is your opinion?
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Dear Dr. Ranjan,
I know many teachers of colleges/ universities who may feel it very difficult to get even the pass marks (35%) in the subject they 'teach' their students if they are forced to sit in the examination with their students.
The condition is so grave!
How long we will pretend as blind?
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School districts make public claims and governmental contracts regarding essential English Language Arts Speaking skills, however transparency and accountability is lacking about implementation. Indications are that effective teaching of these skills is widely neglected https://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2018/09/26/speaking-skills-top-employer-wish-lists-but.html?cmp=eml-enl-cco-news2-rm&M=58649690&U=3023072&UUID= f3cc1aa60d834ba1aac7322a2745e89f
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It's an interesting view. Although teachers need to have developed the competence of communication, too little the education system focuses on it. I consider the competence of communication to be the most important in the 21st century. You can be a good specialist but if the competition is great and the specialist can not express his opinion or can not present the project, etc. is a failure instead of success.
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Hi,
How can I measure the effectiveness of teacher provided scaffolding instruction in classroom by using educational games to enhance math learning quantitatively or via mixed methods? What are the recommended theoretical frameworks that should I consider? Any recommendations?
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What age are the kids and that is key in the method you use and how you could scaffold them, it also depends on the platform(game) you would be using, does it have scaffolding in-built into the teaching. If it does there should be a teacher dashboard where you could see where the students are struggling as it an individual level you would have to asses your effectiveness, if your using generic games on an ipad with no formal scaffolding in the game, its the totally different method but it would depend on the age and the kind of game, many math games are barely teaching anything other than drilling students with a point carrot system.
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There are a lot of schemes for rewarding teaching skills in higher education, also in terms of excellence - either through rewarding individuals or recognizing environments. As this has been going on for a while, there ought to be empirical evaluations of the effects. I am particularly interested in effects on student learning and on the extent to which this makes teachers in higher education strive to improve their teaching and also if teachers rewarded as 'excellent' are sharing their knowledge to positive effect? A related question is if these teachers also improve student learning or only student satisfaction... Thanks in advance for any input!
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The research I am reading now would suggest.. NO.. (Deci, Koestner & Ryan, 2001)... and (Kohn, 2010)... Even though the research I am reading relates to control of disruptive behavior in the classroom, from my own work history it seems the there is transference. 'Tokens' earned during the week in 7th grade could be exchanged for items that the students specifically asked for as their 'favorite' motivators. It was a popular system for a time shortly after implementation, but there really wasn't the desire on the student's part to control themselves, even though they repeatedly expressed a specific desire for a motivator. Some researchers say that 'rewards' seem to have less and less value over time and that more must be given, often at a lesser performance level to spur the same effort on the student's part. I saw that exact phenomenon in my program. I think we see a parallel in work schemes. I am not still familiar with the various industry 'rewards', but working offshore used to yield no less than a 10% bonus (we called it hazard) pay to provide sufficient incentive for white collar folks to take jobs in other countries. In my personal experience, there was a 30% attrition even with the bonus system. So I am reading this research material because I'd like to step away from rewards / punishment systems and move to what is called the 'restorative' system. Showing students that you care about them as individuals, but also teaching them the consequences of their actions and giving them the opportunity to make amends. I think that does what we all want to do.. teach and give learning an opportunity to occur. Save rewards for 'just because' situations.
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Any Questionnaire or test for teacher teaching skills, Presentation computing, communication, skills.
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Thank you so much Dear Angel Torres-Toukoumidis
I will download and read all this paper, thanks a lot for your help.
Oubibi.
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teaching skills
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Not intentionally. I agree with Wondwosen, we all make mistakes. When we do we should admit it, correct them and go on.
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The traditional classroom teaching learning process is slowly being replaced by digital web based systems.Though this offers flexibility in terms of resources and infrastructure it cannot completely rule out classroom teaching However,an integrated approach may resolve the conflict.what is the optimum between these two approaches.
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Dear Colleagues
Web based learning with traditional classroom learning may be an efficient method for learning. We all suffer from the departure of students for studying and orientation towards the net. So use the web education can attract students to study again.
Regards
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Professionals, such as medical doctors are not evaluated in order to practice medicine. Why should experienced teachers, who are also professionals, be evaluated? Today, apparently, many are evaluated according to how their students score on standardized tests. 
In the medical profession, doctors have an optional evaluation called "Board Certified." Ostensibly this is to indicate that if they are Board Certified, they are not only competent, but up-to-date on the latest in medical science and technology.
However, there is wholesale cheating in which many doctors who just took the test are duty-bound to record all the questions and answers and report these so that the next crop of test-takers can review such notes to help them pass the tests - So much for standardized testing, even in the medical profession!
The results of good teaching may not manifest themselves for many years in the real-world achievements and happiness of the former students. This is much like the results of good medical services which may not manifest themselves for a long time. 
In the medical domain, there is the recourse of malpractice law suits. In teaching, there are no malpractice suits.
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All of the answers so far have addressed the issue of evaluation of teaching from an external perspective to the teacher. Teaching is an extremely complex profession with many confounding variables determining the outcome of a lesson. Even from the experienced teacher's own standpoint receiving constructive evaluation within a positive ethos based on the purposes of the lesson and the impact of the compounding variables triangulates and adds to their own evaluation of the lesson thus helping them to improve the outcomes of future lessons. Teachers probably have a 40 year career. Our world is constantly changing, as is the pace of technological change so what was good teaching 20 years ago may not be the best range of approaches to use today.
The impact of evidence from neuroscience is resolving some of the long time dichotomies of what good teaching is. For example Bruner's idea that child development is continuous has been shown to be wrong. Or, our understanding of working memory and it's impact on classroom practice. Also psychological research is also providing guidance for teachers. For example Carol Dweck's work on the the teacher's understanding of intelligence. Finally an experienced teacher (an ex-colleague Head of Department) may be someone who has taught the same way for 20 years and fails to understand why lessons are not so effective today, so blames the learners.
So teacher evaluation that target's professional development is an essential part of the teaching profession. How it is carried out and for what purpose are the main issues for discussion.
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Dear Colleagues,
This question aims to find out what communication protocols are commonly applied for students - teachers?
How do they set up the communication? How different do they communicate not in the classroom and in the classroom?
What means of communication do they usually use if it is indirect (not one-to-one or face-to-face)?
Does the teacher have a somehow higher position or as a friend to talk with students? Are they communicate as peers in other contexts?
Please check your contexts and share with me !
Thank you very much!
Khang
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I think that teachers should be colleagues and mentors for their students in the learning process.  Therefore, there should not be formal barriers between them. 
They are not exactly peers, but colleagues. 
For example, I am on a first name basis with all of my students.
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Dear Colleagues,
For this question, I would not want to have a look at literature now. I ask this question from the fact that languages in Vietnam are commonly taught by the means of Vietnamese. As long as I remembered, if I used more percentage of English in the classroom, the observers would question me about this action of using "more" target language than Vietnamese in an L2 class would prevent students from understanding. I did not agree with this perception but had to accept the fact until now although more relevant literature support my side. Currently, the national media recognizes the problem.
Could you please share your perspectives only?
Do you speak the target language in your classroom with students?
Why should and shouldn't we use the target language in the class?
Thanks a lot!
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This is a complex question.  Using the L2 in class SHOULD help the students improve their proficiency. 
But I think that Stephen Krashen's i + 1 framework also applies.  Students should be continually challenged with just a small amount of difficulty more than their current proficiency level.  One level above.
So while using the L2 in the classroom is arguably good, if the vocabulary, grammar, etc, are too far beyond the student's current proficiency they will not understand and will become demotivated.
So, the more proficient the students, the more L2 should be used, I think, but always with careful attention to the difficulty level.
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As I am currently experimenting with a "flipped classroom" scenario, I'd be interested to learn more about the practical experience of colleagues with this format. The idea is to present the core content of the lecture via electronic media (audio, video, and what not) and ask students to prepare the content in a way that allows deep learning and complex activities during classtime.
In prinicple, the idea works well. I get to discuss original studies with my students, we do transfer exercises, develop plans for critical analysis and many other valuable activities for which there used to be no or little time when I had to squeeze in the lecturing part.
So, as a teacher I enjoy teaching more than ever, I get to know the students through the small group work which is now fully integrated in a large lecture class, the students get involved in the subject from day one. Totally surprising and useful. The drawback: Only about 50 out of 350 students actively use this scenario. Class  attendance is voluntary and I assume that there are 300 individuals out there who count on listening to the material no earlier than  a week before the final.
a. is it ethical to support 50 out 350 with high quality learning and teaching?
b. is it a common experience that learning environments which require a high standard in self-regulation  has this drawback that too many students cannot handle it?
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Margarete, you described my problem with flipped classes exactly. I would love to implement this approach but unfortunately I found that many of my students do very little preparation before coming to class, so my strategy has been to introduce just a couple of weeks and assigned the 'out of class' component as a group project. This worked well and gave students an intro into what flipped classes are about, without a long term commitment. 
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Based on the use of student feedback on lecturer performance it appears that student can ask for what they actually want.  While students are getting the experience they want based on the influence of their feedback to quality assurance my experience is that the questions (such as perception of workload) are not aligned with what they actually need.  Any solutions to addressing the mismatch between wants and need in this context? 
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No. The students are only one of the stakeholders. There are others: There is the professional practice, the alumni, the accrediting body, the university and the paying parent.
Student evaluation of the lecturer is only one input, which must always be taken with a bag of salt. Good faculty members recognise this and do not take it too seriously. For example, the standard form asks the student: Was the pace of the lectures OK? YES/NO. Now, how can the student answer that the first lectures were OK, but the pace of the later ones was too fast?
The standard form asks the student: Were the lectures hard? (The right answer to get promotion is YES”!)
Do not pander to your student's own perceived needs. Provide what you know is good for them!
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I have discovered that I am one of very few prepared to offer students individual feedback on their exam performance/script answers.  Students that use this specific feedback approach claim it is valuable but it is time consuming and I have no evidence it actually changes performance - but does provide students reassurance and clarifies details of their performance.  Could I make better use of my time by providing generic exam performance feedback to a class?
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Divide the lecture period into 2 parts. In the first tenth, deal with generic problems. In the remaining time, deal with individual problems. Let students go if they achieved 100% or have had their difficulties resolved. Try not to coach to the exam, as you may need similar questions for your next exam.  If done early enough, before submission of the marks to the faculty, it can be useful to catch mark totalling errors or unmarked questions. The whole procedure is necessary to reassure the students that the exam process is fair. However, do not let it degenerate into a grade grubbing session.
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I am planning to conduct a research entitled "How Teachers in Middle Schools Design Technology Integration Activities". The purpose of the study is to explore factors influencing middle schools’ teachers design technology integration activities and how they design the activities as well as to explore the challenges that teachers faced while designing the materials for technology integration activities. The researchers will focus on one-to-one technology environment in middle schools. The study will focus on the teacher as a designer of technology activities. I am confused about  the framework. Should it be from Human-Computer interaction or from instructional technology field?
Any thoughts
Thank you
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You can look at the revised Technology Integration Model (TIP) by Roblyer that combines both the TPACK and TIP models for meeting the needs of teachers as designers. I hope you find it useful.
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We are investigating different methods to facilitate learning and fun to make. Can we use for training young people's interest in computer games? We are investigating. Could you give information about the different applications and programs on this subject?
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No, but, as far as I know, the use of computer games in skills training is an interesting and helpful learning method, e.g. in simulation processes and training of persons with disabilities.
Regards
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I have used few videos in class rooms and students found them interesting and the classroom session went off well. But I felt that using such things also lessen the importance of teacher as a speaker. As a teacher should we enhance use of videos available online, while teaching in classroom?
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we should use video based learning in classrooms for enhance the teaching skill.
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I am looking for an Instrument to use to judge if Pre-service teachers' have changed the way they think mathematics should be taught after experiences in classroom teaching.
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Have you read Deborah Ball and Maria Teresa Tatto? University of Michigan SoE. Both have good research on preparing Math teachers. 
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For several years, I have tried to include problems of Technology Assessment to the mainstream program of study at the Faculty of Organization and Management, Silesian University of Technology (Poland). Students are generally very interested in and willing to own activity (especially if you attempt to assess the social impacts of a product or service is in accordance with their hobby), but I feel the need to make the methodology of these lectures better (more effective). I am really interested in possibility of using your experience and thoughts in this matter so thank you in advance for answering this question :-)
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could please verify to me what is that for ? what type of technologies that students interested in?
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It is known that positive emotions can improve effectiveness of learning. Do you know about any research on emotions in the fields of distance learning or webdev?
First things, connected to emotions, which come to mind are:
1. Gamification
2. Socialisation
3. Award system
4. Contests
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On a micro-level, J.M. Keller's ARCS Motivational Learning Theory comes to mind. He was one of the first authors to recognize importance of human emotions in distance learning (1987). Keller's theory is simple - learning should be designed and delivered in such way that evokes learners' attention, shows relevance of the learning material to the learners' goals, builds confidence and affords final satisfaction. Moreover, lack of those elements may actually impede knowledge attrition and retention. Naturally, Keller goes further and talks about specific design approaches that support each of the elements of his theory.
Keller, J. M. (2009). Motivational design for learning and performance: The ARCS model approach.
Storytelling, gamification (which include contests and award system on a social level), enticing interactivies all play a role in bringing emotional aspect to learning.
I am in total agreement with Yaacov Katz when he talk about the motivational aspects of learning and its delivery.
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At my school, we have had some unexpected summer faculty changes.  
When students return to campus, they will find different teachers than they expected in some classes.  In some cases, the expertise of the new teacher may be lower, or at least considerably different than the students were expecting from the old faculty member.
What qualities do students most value, particularly in a "new" faculty member?  As a result, what things may the teacher do to gain the acceptance of the students?
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From years of teaching evaluations, it comes down to four things: enthusiasm for the subject matter, organized material, clarity of expectations, and reasonable accommodations.  If a faculty is excited and enthusiastic as they teach, students respond positively. If the students feel as though the material is laid out in an orderly fashion that makes sense to them, they respond positively. If the faculty spell out clearly "how to get an A" (i.e. have a grading rubric) then the students feel as though they are fair. Finally, if a student needs an accommodation ("a break"), and the faculty can give it to them while remaining fair to the other students, then the students feel as though they are being treated as human.  
New or established, I believe these same rules work equally for all faculty. 
I have to believe that there's a literature on this, though I can't seem to find it. Hopefully another respondent will do so.
Thanks for posing the question!  I've often thought these things, but never really written them down in this form. 
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I am in my first research class in my master's program. I am interested in learning more about how teaching methodologies are changing due to students being in the digital age of learning. Any recommendations on academic journals or peer-reviewed articles would be greatly appreciated!
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Dear Hanna,
I have conducted quite a bit of research on teaching methodologies that relevant in today's digital age. This is in relation to the Multiliteracies theory. Please check out my articles on Research Gate. Multiliteracies is a theory that supplements students learning and it has the potential to engage students in their learning process.
Rgds
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Corporate Finance course is a practical course but it is sometimes presented to students as a theoretical course. Could that explain why some undergraduate students struggle to understand this course?                         
It appears that students with practical knowledge of the Corporate Finance course understand the theoretical aspect of the course better. If that is the case, the MBA and Master’s students (with relevant industry experience) may better understand the theoretical aspects of the Corporate Finance course than other students.
Probably, there are alternative method(s) to teach this course ( especially to undergraduate students) which is unknown to instructors. Your contribution is welcome.
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I specifically ask students to value a listed company and calculate the probability that the company trades below intrinsic value.  This forces them to understand discounted cash flow and that risk is measured by the standard deviation.  Then they can assume a normal distribution (even if it should be a lognormal) and get the probability.
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As part of my dissertation research, I am interested in reviewing the many ways grade inflation contributes to the lack of college readiness. For example, grade inflation creates hider GPA but not ACT scores.  I'm interested in why teachers inflate grades as a solution to college readiness. Any help is appreciated .   
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Thank you
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I am currently conducting a research study on the development and validation of an instructional module. Also, we need to Validate the module that we will be developing. Thanks!
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You may read a book we published with Lap Lambert Academic Publishing (OmniScriptum GmbH&Co.KG),"Measurement of attitude to agricultural science: development, validation, standardization and utilization of semantic differential scales".
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plz help me to findout tools ,formaulas ,methods ,charts to measure motivation levels of school teachers
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Dear Noureen,
The following publications cover the answer to your question:
1-The Work Tasks Motivation Scale for Teachers (WTMST)
Claude Fernet 
Caroline Senécal
Frédéric Guay
Herbert Marsh
Martin Dowson
2-A Measure of English Teacher Motivation: Scale Development and Preliminary Validation
Sunhee Choi1
3-A STUDY TO ASSESS THE RELATIONSHIPS AMONG STUDENT
ACHIEVEMENT, TEACHER MOTIVATION, AND INCENTIVE PAY
Pamela A. McKinney
5- Procedia - Social and Behavioral Sciences
Volume 171, 16 January 2015, Pages 1388–1394
5th ICEEPSY International Conference on Education & Educational Psychology
Open Access
 
Developing Self-efficacy and Motivation to be a Teacher Scale, Thai Version ☆
Natthapol Jaengaksorn, ,
Auyporn Ruengtrakul,
Chayut Piromsombat
  Show more
doi:10.1016/j.sbspro.2015.01.258
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Under a Creative Commons license
 
 Abstract
The measurement model of self-efficacy and motivation to be a teacher were developed for student teachers as an instrument to measure such variables as appropriate to Thai context. The validation of scales of self-efficacy and motivation to be a teacher for Thai student teachers are robust and showed excellent measurement properties. The purposes of this study were to validate the developed measurement model of self-efficacy and motivation to be a teacher. The sample consisted of 78 student teachers who studying in the last academic year in university. The research instruments were questionnaire related to self- efficacy and motivation to be a teacher. Data were analyzed by using SPSS to detect reliability and other psychometric properties, as well as LISREL program version 8.72 to validate the measurement model. Major research results were as follows: 1) the developed measurement model of self-efficacy consisted of 3 indicators: efficacy in student engagement, efficacy in instructional strategies, and efficacy in classroom management according to the empirical data (x2 = 0.02, df = 1, p = 0.08), and 2) the developed measurement model of motivation to be a teacher consisted of 2 indicators: intrinsic motivation, and extrinsic motivation according to the empirical data (x2 = 2.23, df = 1, p = 0.13)
6- J Sports Sci Med. 2012 Mar; 11(1): 123–130.
Published online 2012 Mar 1.
PMCID: PMC3737859
The Relationship Between Teaching Styles and Motivation to Teach Among Physical Education Teachers
Vello Hein,1,✉* Francis Ries,2,* Francisco Pires,2,* Agnese Caune,1,* Judit Heszteráné Ekler,4,* Arunas Emeljanovas,3,*and Irena Valantiniene3,*
Author information ► Article notes ► Copyright and License information ►
 
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Abstract
This study aims to investigate how teachers' motivation to teach is related to different teaching styles. A hundred and seventy six physical education teachers from five European countries participated in the study. Teachers' motivation was measured using an instrument developed by Roth et al., 2007 based on the Self-Determination Theory (Deci and Ryan, 1985) which was tested for suitability for use with physical education teachers. The use of teaching styles was assessed through teachers' self-reported data according to the description of teaching styles presented by Curtner-Smith et al., 2001. The revised confirmatory factor model of the teachers' motivation instrument, with three factors, met the criteria for satisfactory fit indices. The results showed that teachers were more intrinsically motivated to teach than externally. Cross-cultural comparison indicated that the Spanish teachers were more intrinsically motivated whilst Lithuanian teachers were more externally motivated than teachers from the other four countries. Teachers from all five countries reported a more frequent use of reproductive styles than productive styles. The results of the present study confirmed the hypotheses that teachers' autonomous motivation is related to the student-centered or productive teaching styles whilst non-autonomously motivated teachers adopt more teacher-centered or reproductive teaching styles. Intrinsic and introjected motivation was significantly higher among teachers who more frequently employed productive teaching styles than teachers who used them less frequently. Intrinsically motivated teachers using more productive teaching styles can contribute more to the promotion physical activity among students.
Key points
PE teachers were more intrinsically motivated to teach than externally.
Spanish PE teachers were more intrinsically motivated, whereas Lithuanian PE teachers were more externally motivated.
Teachers from all five countries reported a more frequent use of reproductive styles than productive styles.
Teachers' autonomous motivation is related to student-centered teaching styles and not autonomously motivated teachers adopt more teacher-centered teaching styles.
Intrinsic and introjected motivations were significantly higher among PE teachers using frequently productive teaching styles.
Hoping this will be helpful,
Rafik
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Most children especially in the foundation phase struggles to convert the learnt strategies of solving practical fractional problems to the abstract fractional problems given in either words or numbers. These learners understand sharing, but seem to struggle to understand that sharing leads to fractions, and most can understand that 1/2 = 4/8 but when given 3/4 they struggle to understand its equal to 6/8.
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This recent paper might be useful for you:
Lortie-Forgues, H., Tian, J., & Siegler, R. S. (2015). Why is learning fraction and decimal arithmetic so difficult? Developmental Review, 38, 201-221.
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We are working on a proposal for PhD that deals with teaching stress and intonation.
Should they be taught at an early or late stage of education/schooling?
Should they be taught separately or integrated with other skills?
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At an intermediate stage and integrate with other skills such as listening and speaking. When learners are at an intermediate level, they may be able to understand stress and intonation in context. I learned about stress and intonation when I was in the MA program. My MA was in TESOL and currently getting my EdD. While studying English as a second language, I don’t recall having a lesson on stress or intonation in any of my ESL classes. Finally, out of curiosity, what are the methods used to collect data? What is the purpose of the study? And what is the theoretical or conceptual framework of the study? What do you hope to find?
Excellent topic and good luck on your proposal defense.
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While there has been much research done by Deborah Ball and her colleagues at the University of Michigan concerning their TeacherWorks (teachingworks.org) program, I am curious what successes and failures other universities have had in implementing high-leverage practices (teachingworks.org/work-of-teaching/high-leverage-practices) into their programs. 
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Three studies on HLTPs in K-12 teacher preparation in foreign languages have been published in the past few years:
Davin, K. J., & Troyan, F. J. (2015). The implementation of high-leverage teaching practices: From the university classroom to the field site. Foreign Language Annals, 48(1), 124-142.
Kearney, E. (2015). A high-leverage language teaching practice: Leading an open-ended group discussion. Foreign Language Annals, 48(1), 100-123.
Troyan, F. J., Davin, K. J., & Donato, R. (2013). Exploring a practice-based approach to foreign language teacher preparation: A work in progress. The Canadian Modern Language Review/La revue canadienne des lungs vivantes, 69, 154-180.
Some of this research has been funded by Phase II of ACTFL's Research Priorities Project. Some grant recipients for Phase III of the project are also investigating HLTPs, so there should be more research published in this area soon: http://www.actfl.org/news/press-releases/2015-16-research-priorities-project-recipients
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i am looking for innovative and memorable ways to teach labor laws. Presently I am using case and news analysis through which the students are asked to connect legal implications / provisions and the news / case for discussions. for Factories Act I am using story telling as a strategy to make students understand the flow of [provisions as it is in the law with specific sections. Is there any other way of doing it? At PG level of HR Management what is to be learnt as to know the basic and essential applications and enforcement aspects of labor laws is my objective. Please would you share some views with innovative teaching methods for teaching labor laws especially in classroom structure, not as field study?
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Review of articles on labour laws - presented by students to the class. The articles should be selected carefully to different aspects of the labour laws looked at from different perspectives.
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I'm doing a thesis on learning and technology. It is my hypothesis that the level of which an individual can apply mathematics to a situation is merely a product of the way they've been taught math rather than influenced by any predisposed ability caused by some genetic advantage.
A recent report of Danish high school student revealed that 20% fail mathematics even they only needed 30% correct answers to pass. To me, this indicates that the way we teach mathematics has failed. But I often hear the argument, that not all a disposed to learn math or take a high school exam. 
Could anybody please guide me to research in this area?
NOTE! I understand that there are extreme outliers, such as brain damage that hinder people from learning mathematics.
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Dear Tommy
your question is very very difficult but, fortunately, it is an old one. Therefore it could be possible to review the old answers to this question (let's say the ones from the 20th century): predisposed ability, intelligence, social context, family context, teaching method, motivation, metacognitiion, etc. As far as I know, all these answers failed to provide a good and simple explanation of academic achievement in math. I think that there is the following consensus, from the psychology of expertise: a simple and general answer is the time spent learning mathematics. But this one does not answer why: why some people spend time learning mathematics? To answer this second question we need motivation, teaching method, education system organisation, etc. The other problem with this simple and consensual answer, is that two different students who spend the same time learning mathematics will not perform at the same level! We then need prior knowledge, metacognition, and, maybe, with very young pupils, predisposed ability. After few years in school, the domain specific knowledge they learnt in mathematics is much more predictive of their performance than any other predictive factors.
Best regards, Andre 
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Hi there,
I'm wondering, which aspects of validity (e.g. Messick, 1995) I covered, when I was investigating on differences in evaluation of textbook quality.
I therefore asked experts (of education) and students to rate this textbook and found some differences...
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Hi Daniel,
that depends on what you actually asked the students and experts. Expert ratings are a means to evaluate various aspects of validity, among them content validity. Did you ask them e.g. to rate whether or not all contents of school science are covered in the books or if the content of a test inventory is represented in a book? If you did so, you might have investigated content validity. Did you ask them to rate the quality of textbooks? If you did so, this could be an aspect of criterion validity (or convergent validity, it depends on the terminology you use). But it is only criterion validity if you are sure that you measured the same with different methods. To understand the differences in their answers you have to get aware of their different understandings of quality (or whatever you asked them). Maybe the students value other aspects than your experts (teachers?). To understand those differences you have to conduct interviews. However, if you think that students and experts answer differently because they actually evaluated different things, you did not research validity at all - you researched the differences in students' and teachers' judgments. That is because you measured different things with different methods in that case
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Given large class sizes, it becomes difficult for teachers to know, whether or not, every student participated in responding to a group assignment. Experience shows that, when students are given a group assignment,  students who are most active are the ones who do the assignments. 
How can I best know which student participated and which did not participate?
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I have had a sheet where each students ranks the participation of all participants and then they get an average of all scores to count towards participation.  That way everyone feels involved and has a stake in the responsibility.
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What is the best teaching methodology for teaching skill to physical therapy students?
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Shakil:
I think skills training requires a lot of demonstration and practice. Usually competency-based assessments are used in the latter scenario in which the student is assessed once and then again. If the assessor has any doubt that the student has fully demonstrated the skill to be deemed competent, then the student can be assessed a third time. If after the latter there is doubt, then the student has failed to be competent and would need to retake the module or course. I have attached a link of relevant studies here in RG.
Many thanks,
Debra
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Following the "teaching the subject or teaching students" thread, I want to ask how strictly one should follow a syllabus in order to communicate with student's needs. It's easy to say: let's teach students, not subjects, but when it comes to practical problems in the middle of a semester, what do you do? Stick with the plan or start to improvise?
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Personally, I don’t think having a syllabus and improvising are at odds. As I see it, the syllabus specifies the topics to be covered, lists articles and books that students should read and describes assignments, grading standards and the like. But this doesn’t prevent other activities from being inserted where appropriate. I’ll give several examples for courses I taught this fall. One topic on my syllabus dealt with the Brown vs Board of Education. Students read several articles about segregated southern schools before the passage of Brown. One of the articles mentioned Rosenwald Schools. I found several articles about Rosenwald, who was one of the men who owned Sears stores and a philanthropist who donated funds to all-black segregated schools to build better school houses. I also found pictures of Rosenwald Schools from the past and Rosenwald School structures that are currently being used for other purposes. I showed this material in class. We also discussed the role of philanthropists in public schools as both a historic and a contemporary phenomenon. And one of the questions on the mid-term asked students to discuss Rosenwald Schools, describe how they came to be, and then compare the role of the Rosenwald, as philanthropist and contemporary philanthropists.
In another class the dealt with linguistics, I was trying to illustrate the role that language prejudice plays in US life. Except for the most stigmatized varieties of American
English, many US students aren’t as aware of the role that various accents have on their everyday judgements of people even though this is a topic on the syllabus. One of the best sources to help students become aware of this prejudice are television commercials that illustrate how advertisers exploit language prejudice to sell particular products. Two of the commercials— one for Grey Poupon, the other for Polaner All Fruit— both available on YouTube are masterful a illustrating this point. Even though this was not not on the syllabus, I showed both of these commercials in class and we discussed why they worked, that is what attitudes they conveyed, and how advertising people may know more about us than we know about ourselves.
I could provide other examples of improvisation, things that I decided to do spontaneously that weren’t on the syllabus that were appropriate at the moment and that rather than detracting from the topic at hand, expanded on it and helped elucidate some point. I am always looking for ways to enrich the material we are scheduled to cover in class and this requires improvising.
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Teacher identity and classroom environment. How can teacher identity affect the classroom environment?
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In determining an appropriate answer to the question, the first question to address is, “Is the teacher aware of her/his identity?”
In the mainstream educational system, the teacher is likely a member of the majority and as such sees the world normalized through their everyday experiences. They may perceive that their identity/experiences are shared by all and approach the classroom from what may be considered an acultural position. This, in turn, separates them from the experiences of their non-majority students. While they may be well-intentioned, compassionate and caring, they may not appreciate or understand the diverse situations that their students come from. Students, in turn, may perceive that the teacher does not understand or care about their situation; ethnoculturally, socioeconomically, geopolitically or spiritually. The teacher, in an effort to address the needs of all students, may end up addressing the needs of none as they continue to teach from a dominant social position.
If the teacher is not of the majority, then other situations may arise. Is the teacher attempting to present the mainstream position or are they addressing the individualistic needs of their students. Are they aware of their own unique identity to the point that they are comfortable in their own skin or do they view their identity as something to overcome in order to be successful, are they or have they assimilated to the mainstream at the expense of their individuality?
Other considerations to your question are ethnocultural identity, socioeconomic status identity, geographic identity (this may also be related to urban or rural differences), religious/spiritual identity.
However, as important as identity factors are, the relationships that the teacher forms with her or his students are far more important. If an authentic atmosphere of acceptance and care is established, the diversity of identities of the individuals in the classroom can strengthen the classroom community for the benefit of all.
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Teacher identity and students' engagement in tasks.
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Rahimi:
If students identify the teacher as one who is not inclusive, and he/she demonstrates evidence of this attribute in teaching such as choosing teaching materials and methods that do not accommodate for the diverse backgrounds of students, then students may feel isolated in the class and not be engaged in their learning. Please see my linked paper that helps to illuminate my point.
Best regards,
Debra
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Many states have adopted the use of value added measures in measuring teacher quality and effectiveness. This assessment-based rating considers the scores of students in evaluating whether teachers are effective or ineffective. Some scholars disagree; they argue that student scores alone do not determine teacher effectiveness. Yet some states have already adopted the measure and have began firing teachers based on the result of student test scores. 
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It's been widely disproven that VAD reflects a teacher's effectiveness. The only reason states use this measure is because it was a requirement of Race to the Top applications and NCLB waivers (in addition to Teacher Incentive Fund money, I believe). This is part of my research area, and I will address this topic in an upcoming article  on teacher evaluation. In short,  VAD reflects socio-economic status of student population, not teacher effectiveness.
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It is needed to gauge the performance of a teaching faculty.
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Life satisfaction, the cognitive component of subjective well-being, reflects contentment with one’s current life situation. Measures of dispositional positive affect predict work performance across a range of professions. Life satisfaction, which is related to and highly correlated with positive affect, has not been as extensively studied as a predictor of achievement, but at least one large, prospective longitudinal study has established its predictive validity for income. 
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I need an article for a response paper on: Differentiation in teaching for middle school students. Can you help?
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ASCD has a lot of practitioner articles on differentiation - often they reference research articles so that might be a good place to start.  I have a practitioner article in NSTA's Science Scope on "Differentiating Inquiry" but I'm not sure if that's what you're looking for in your search.  
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In Australia, a recent report Action Now: Classroom Ready report reflects a shift from mapping how initial teacher education (preservice teacher education) programs develop professional knowledge, professional practice and professional engagement, using the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers as the framework for program accreditation, to measuring how all graduate teachers will impact upon improving student learning.
How can this be measured? Are there examples where measurement is being conducted effectively?
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This is an interesting question which sits within the broader context of an increasing focus on the effectiveness of public services, target and data driven performativity measures and the metrics of ‘accountability’. Hospitals, schools and many other areas linked with public service are increasingly subject to ‘output measurement’, by means credible or otherwise, as a consequence of policy levers based on ‘league tables’ and ‘naming and shaming’.
Whilst it is reasonable for public services, and the training and supply of those who will work in them, to be subject to scrutiny the real issue is the credibility of the mechanisms by which scrutiny takes place. At the moment this seems rather driven by a ‘one-size-fits-all’ approach of constructing ‘competency’ and ‘levelling’ frameworks which are configured in such a way as to produce ‘comparative data’ which can be processed and used to form ‘rankings’. In the UK this process has been in operation for a number of years and the internal inconsistencies and ‘unintended consequences’ of such performance metrics are beginning to lead to growing scepticism as to its value and reliability. Where agencies charged with making ‘consistent’ judgements about training quality have been subject to multiple and rapid waves of political change the very foundations of credibility are beginning to crumble. The sometimes bizarre consequences of the ‘change storm’ has left us, like Alice, inhabiting a strange world which defies both logic and language. The grading of provision as “satisfactory” no longer  means that it is satisfactory, “outstanding” is expected to be the norm and the definition of “inadequate” is “not good”!!
Comparison between providers of training is made using graded outcomes of student teachers teaching ……… but there are no national criteria for these grades and providers are expected to use their own. Where clarification is sought the phrase “it’s best fit” is offered which, of course, is a weak answer and not one which addresses the concerns of the asker!
The byzantine nature of the system in use is not the result of a clearly thought out system which is a necessary response to the complexity of the task of measuring quality of training but a by product of uncoordinated reform and revision where ideology and political rhetoric has trumped reason, coherence and clarity of purpose.
Inevitably, the shift from measurement of process to the metrics of output has meant that in the case of the initial training of teachers the ‘logical’ and ‘common sense’ approach is to assume a direct and causal narrative linking training -> teaching -> learning. If taken to its logical conclusion ‘the dictatorship of the measurable’ would look towards the grade outcomes of pupils as an indicator of the quality of teaching which in turn is directly related to the quality of training. Of course, such a crude equation does not stand up to the most cursory degree of reason or evidence. We know that teacher MS X will teach a class for a year in school A with one ‘grade outcome’ and then move to another school and achieve a much higher outcome. Sadly, in the UK, this grade-output measure of teacher quality is at the core of ‘performance related pay’. The response to the obvious concerns over this crude approach has been to seek to add further to the metric-madness by factoring ‘value added’ into the equation as some form of ‘statistical fig leaf’.  
I think the UK experience raises some very serious concerns over the feasibility of the construction of a metric for the measurement of ‘training quality’.
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Are there research works about reflection as a way to improve teaching practices?Selfreflection
teacher development
Autoetnography
Journals
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Isabelia:
There is a lot of research on your topic as refelction is one of the frequently used ways to improve teaching practice:
Best regards,
Debra
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My primary objective is to categorize teachers with different levels of effectiveness in teaching (who make their students understand what they are teaching) across teachers (n=60) of all subjects employed in a higher secondary school based on standard performance indicators.   It is in its conceptual stage. First I am planning to have the literatures reviewed to understand the current practice being followed, methodology adopted and indicators used. I request for any relevant inputs.
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Most of the States are using the Danielson Framework as the model for teacher effectiveness.  Here are two resources that may help in regards to criteria and performance levels for categorizing different levels of teacher effectiveness.  Teacher effectiveness with this model is measured using various sources of data so this information may also provide you with ideas for data collection (e.g., observation, Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs), portfolio artifacts, student achievement and student growth).  When I was a school administrator, I utilized this framework and found it to be helpful for observations and having conversations with teachers about teaching and learning.  Of course, it is not perfect.
PA's Model
Danielson Framework
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One of the essential traits of a good teacher is the ability to motivate students.  Yet good portions of teacher evaluation systems center on communicating knowledge in various manners that encourage learning.  I have met teachers that have the pedagogical component mastered, yet do not seem to be effective teachers.  I have also met individuals who are proficient in their pedagogical component and are highly effective teachers.  
The difference has been described as an intangible quality that the exceptional teacher possesses.  I am wondering if that intangible quality is related to leadership.
The follow-up question then would be which components of leadership enhance teacher effectiveness?
 Is there such a construct as authentic teaching, that follows in line with the literature on authentic leadership? (Servant teaching, transformative teaching, moral teaching, etc.)  Does distributive leadership offer insight into learner-centered teaching practices?  The idea of leadership pedagogy 
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 I recently posted a question that I think might hold a few interesting insights into your request and research. The relationship is not directly obvious, but I do believe it has great merit in the discussion. My colleagues and I are working on a pedagogy toolkit for our Business College Program. I spent over 30 years in the military. I taught and learned a lot about leaders and leadership. My Doctorate is in Education, Leadership, Policy, and Law. My Dissertation was on “An Examination of Leadership Styles, Values, and Attributes” Although, I have published that document I am still working it because something is missing. I thinking the missing piece is “Mentoring” Leadership is not just in the leader’s ability to lead, but it is much more a function of how the leader is perceived by those who follow. Mentoring helps tremendously with that perception. So much that it just might be the multiplier in this complex web of leadership success. I do apologize for not filling in all the gaps, but it would take much more time and space to discuss adequately this input. But I do hope this helps with adding to your body of knowledge for such an important topic…Leadership
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I am doing a research study, which concerns lecturer using technology and innovative teaching and the role of Professional Development Programs (CPD) on helping them to promote it
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hope you find this link helpful.  Good luck on your research study.
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In our team we found in several studies that teachers and paraeducators do not cooperate in an efficient way. We found that children benefit from the work that is done by paraeducators, but that very probably the effect of their work would be even larger if the teacher-paraeducator communication was improved.
My question is if colleagues could direct me to research which looks into cooperative structures in schools and into the question how communication and cooperation could be fostered.
Thank you.
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There is very much research by Michael Giangreco and colleagues and Blatchford, Webster and colleagues. They also have a project-site. See link below.
Best regards, Conny
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I am now working on power and teacher education. How can I conceptualize power in post-modern sense to helping me construct an analytic framework and further some models? Can anyone having the similar experiences help me?  
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Thank you all guys for your invaluable suggestions and interpretations of the topic I put forward. All your understandings virtually enriched my sense of power. What I am going to work, actually, centers more on the implicit and explicit forms of power, the constraining and enabling forces of power, teachers' professional identity and power, etc. Through the case study, I want to tap into the complexity of power relations mediating agency and structure in a localized community of practice (Lave & Wenger) or field (Bourdieu). I also think Bourdieu's "capital" concept can help me conceptualize the various resources which teachers can make use of, either in positive or negative way.
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Command over different teaching skills is an important work for pre-service teachers. I am interested to know the different training tasks/techniques for which we can train pre-service teachers in various teaching skills. 
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Hi Noushad,
There are various ways one can learn how to teach, as you probably know. One thing which researchers and practitioners now seem to focus on in the 'enactment of teaching'. This focuses on linking the practical work student teachers are going to do, to the work at campus. You can find a nice overview of this in the in press book chapter by Karen Hammerness and Kirsti Klette: Hammerness, K., & Klette, K. (in press). Indicators of quality in teacher education: Looking at features of teacher education from an international perspective. To appear in G. K. LeTendre & A. W. Wiseman (Eds.), Promoting and sustaining a quality teaching workforce (Emerald Press).
You can also look for the article by Kennedy on the problem of enactment: Kennedy, M. M. (1999). The role of preservice teacher education. In Darling-Hammond, L. and Sykes, G. Teaching as the Learning Profession: Handbook of Teaching and Policy (pages 54-86). San Francisco: Jossey Bass. You can find the article here: https://msu.edu/~mkennedy/publications/docs/Teacher%20Ed/RoleofTE-LDH/Kennedy99%20Role%20of%20TE.pdf
Good luck!
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Many students lose concentration after about 20 mins from the start of a teaching session. I think that some digression may contribute to students' keeping focused. What do you think? And are there any studies about that? 
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Saudi:
I agree that digression can contribute to keeping students on task, taking into consideration all that has been shared and just to add that the cultural/societal context can help in this regard. Social commentary energizes some cultures, especially those in the West, so I would suggest that the digression can take into consideration the topical issue of the day that may relate to the lesson topic and allow students to share their views on the topic. In most instances, students would be eager to digress and simultaneously stay focus as the topic relates to a societal issue.
Many thanks,
Debra
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I have been looking for a questionnaire that examines ESP teachers' beliefs, but have not found any so far. Therefore, I would like to design one but I need to have some basic knowledge about their qualities and beliefs. Hope that someone here can help me. Thank you.
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More important than knowing which their beliefs are is to ask what it is really that affects their decision making. And it is not only what they think about teaching and learning, there are action are also action and value schemes that affect them, which teachers are not conscious about. See Scheur and Pozo, Zeichener, Schon, Mevorach and Strauss (concept of mental models is quite interesting)   
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In Brazil the majority of pre-service teachers are from low income families, have illiterate parents and the average of age is a little elevated (30,2 years to be more exactly).
How is in your country? do you have any dataset about this issue?
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Legatt wrote about the professional status of teaching in the 1980s. His classical work on the characteristics of teachers as an occupational group compares the situation in Britain to that of the United States of America with figures provided. Interestingly, this author concludes that teaching draws its recruits from the children of the working class, which according to him makes it not so glamorous and attractive. You can look for latter studies on the sociology of the teaching "profession", and later studies that cite Legatt to see if the picture has now changed. 
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Hello! If you have experience in teaching or learning in active methods, especially Design Based Methods, can you tell me something about it?
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I would recommend that you check out the work of David Reinking and Barbara Bradley, who do design-based research in language and literacy education (K-12). Their book, On Formative and Design Experiments, published by Teachers College Press (TCP) in 2008, is well known in the field of literacy teacher education. I served as one of the co-editors on the TCP series in which Reinking and Bradley published. 
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I'm reviewing the literature on this topic and have located several relevant studies. I would be interested in reading other articles I might have missed. 
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In a mathematics education context, these are concerned with the relationship of lesson planning and teacher change: 
Zazkis, R., Liljedahl, P., & Sinclair, N. (2009). Lesson plays: Planning teaching versus teaching planning. For the Learning of Mathematics, 40-47
Zazkis, R., Sinclair, N., & Liljedahl, P. (2009). Lesson Play–A vehicle for multiple shifts of attention in teaching. Mathematical Action & Structures Of Noticing: Studies inspired by John Mason, 165-178. Available from http://www.peterliljedahl.com/wp-content/uploads/BC-Mason.pdf
The first includes some historical context to the prescription and development of lesson planning in school mathematics.  
Highly recommended, hope they're of interest. 
m.
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My students have a teaching experience, hard working, intelligent - but edTPA is interrupting their progress through the program. It's not that we have difficulty with learning how to plan, teach and asses, but rather the high stakes aspect and seemingly linear approach to curriculum and pedagogy interrupts the learning and their teaching in the classroom. Does anyone have any strategies for bridging this gap?
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Thanks for these suggestions Stacie and will look out for published proceedings from AACTE this year. We are doing some embedding too - I do think it is helpful in terms of introducing edTPA language and vocabulary in particular (I am not a fan of the language used in the visual arts edTPA.)
One of my concerns is that the students are interpreting the edTPA process as THE way to teach. What do I mean by that? It seems that conceptually, it's difficult for them to separate or parse out an assessment experience -  learning segment (vs unit planning for example) that is video taped, (and capturing multiple criteria from rubrics in 20 minutes of video) from teaching and learning outside of this one assessment.  It's like another layer of technical learning/test taking that takes a lot of time to navigate and negotiate while doing their first student teaching experience. I do like the circular model presented of planning, teaching, assessing - but the format lends itself to a linear interpretation. I'll be interested to hear more from edTPA and AACTE about this.
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Research refer to the role of the prevalent learning cultures within educational institutions in influencing the ways through which people learn. Accordingly, recognizing the features of the learning cultures that Facilitate effective learning seems helpful to improve the quality of learning.
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Hi,
Great discussion - a core problem of education of future which has to turn the current spiral of devolution of culture because of non-effective education of many institutions. Luckily, I am in an innovative institution.
It was written above: There are 4 features that improve quality of learning: engaged learners, great teaching, vibrant community, and successful outcomes.
Response: 1. Quality of learning depends first of all on what we learn. Even the greatest teacher (as a performer) may reproduce devolution (typically the teachers in the dictatorship countries who are good performers to communicate ideology instead quality knowledge). 2. Engaged learner is a good criterion but in many cases the learners is not engaged - he/she may hate what learns but needs it for the success. I would say responsible leaner instead engaged. 3. Great teaching is buried past. I am online education. The role of the teacher is in some cases less than 10%, but because the program is great, we succeed. So, I would replace great teaching with great academic program. 4. Vibrant community. This sounds very non-academic. I even cannot make a comment. Probably it can be replaced by community of a strong common interest. 5. Successful outcomes. These successful outcomes may contribute to devolution if they have been embedded in a corrupted system. I would replace this term is with embedded humanity values. Now many feel that the Renaissance has been nit completely finished and this trouble the world a lot. Quality of learning depends on the embedded values in the learners.
I have responded to this discussion because it helps in reconceptualization of academic mobility (please see my question). I would say the academic mobility improves the quality of learning.
Thanks,
Lolita
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My work is in the public schools and as a director of teaching and learning. The research could be connected to teacher training, as opposed to policy, as it relates to institutional racism (which is a separate area of interest).
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Hi Laura,
Great question! This is certainly an area that I is essential to my scholarship.  I have found that teachers must do some self identity work---in order to help them understand who they are as raced, cultured, gendered, etc.. beings and how this identity positions them in American society. Simultaneously, teachers must begin to unearth the culture embedded in American public schools and interrogate the extent to which this culture advantages some, while disadvantaging others and why. Yet, teachers also must reconsider the purposes of education and the pivotal role teachers can and should play in social transformation---their teaching practice is their most effective weapon of resistance against race-based educational inequity.  They must examine educators who consistently promote educational excellence for all children, particularly children of color, and unearth the fundamental tenets of their practice in ways that allow them to develop a sense of agency and belief in their ability to teach for change.   This is only scratching the surface and is a lot easier said then done--but our k-12 children are well worth it!  Hope this is helpful
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Teachers'qualification is measured by formal education,  certification/licensing,  infield preparation,  pedagogical knowledge,  duration of preparation,  years of experience and professional development activities.  Conducting a research on exploring the relationship between  teachers'qualifications  and student' academic performance in Physics therefore must be be supported with teaching theories.
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Dear Kola,
To the best of my knowledge very few studies, if any, have found a relationsdhip between pupils' academic performance and teachers' formal qualifications. It's teachers' beliefs, perceptions, teaching style, instruction strategies  etc etc that impact pupils' achievements. You may want to read, as an example,  the following paper :
Linking Student Achievement Growth to Professional Development Participation and Changes in Instruction: A Longitudinal Study of Elementary Students and Teachers in Title I Schools.
by Laura Desimone, Thomas M. Smith & Kristie J.R. Phillips — 2013
Teachers College Record Volume 115 Number 5, 2013, p. 1-46
http://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 16963, Date Accessed: 1/21/2015 1:49:10 AM
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We administered a self-efficacy belief scale for teaching skills to GTAs. However, our sample is quite mixed: international students, PHd and master studetns and both social and natural sciences. We thought of controlling factors like previous teaching experiences and assistanship, but what other things to consider?
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This study: Visser-Wijnveen, G. J., Stes, A., & Van Petegem, P. (2012). Development and validation of a questionnaire measuring teachers' motivation for teaching in higher education. Higher Education, 64(3), 421-436. doi:10.1007/s10734-011-9502-3 validated a such an instrument for teachers in higher education, but does not discuss any control variables for demographic factors.  The article is well-written and includes the validated instrument.  They looked at efficacy as composed of three subscales: personal, teaching and outcome.  Interest/Enjoyment and Importance/Effort were treated as separate scales.  You might consider adopting this instrument within your own instrument.  I have not fully explored the underlying studies referenced to determine whether they discuss demographic variables.  I have been working on designing such a study that includes prior background or training in educational theories and methods and professional culture items as controls of interest.  I had not thought of controlling for gender, but find that of interest.
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I am in the process of gathering information on how effective our Diploma TESL is to primary schools.
If the schools are satisfied with our practicum teachers, does it mean our curriculum is effective?
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An approach that was used for some time by Griffith is the scheduling of regular breakfast meetings with the mentors / practicum coordinators of our local schools. As an ex-deputy of one of the supervising schools I found these very useful for a number of reasons. Firstly, to build community with other schools supervising students. Secondly, to provide feedback from the university. Thirdly, to listen to new developments in the area of teacher education. Whilst more time consuming and costly than surveys, the positive outcomes from these meetings made them very worthwhile.  Cheers, Kevin.
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We need information about relationship between instructional design models and teaching communication skills.
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Thank you very much. I will try to do your suggestions.We reviewed the published literature and  selected ADDIE model for our study. ADDIE is  a dynamic, flexible model that includes training and performance support tools.
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Want to know the best method to carry out research on scientific reasoning
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Thanks a lot Eugene Okorie
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How do you mitigate differences in language when it comes to making the delivery of your lessons effective?  
In what way can you reconcile opposing views in religion and beliefs among students?  What would be a good alternative solution to a conflict of opinions and highly-prejudiced cultural preferences?
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If you are teaching mathematics or physics, perhaps the problem will be only related to the simplicity with which the teacher must deliver his sessions. More problems will be there in teaching social sciences and management. The teacher needs to develop extreme tolerance to diversity of views. His  job should be to thrash out and help articulate the issues, rather than being judgmental in such cases so that everyone has the courage to speak up. this will help contribute to better learning. That is what I do when I teach HRM in Denmark, where students are from about 8 to 10 different cultures. .
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Teachers have to make decisions about the procedures in their classroom, e.g., how to offer support to learners with differing prior knowledge and different learning style preferences. Teachers do this (and other things) every day. The question is how much is this competence based on research and how much is it based on subjective experience? Would instruction delivered by teachers become more efficient if it was research based? What do we know about the question whether it is worth while to teach research methods in teacher training programs?
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If teacher = lecturer? If "yes": as many as possible. Each lecture should be prepared besed on up-to the-date knowledge, sometimes even non-published. Lecturer, who is imultanously a researcher and writes valuable scientific papers and books is the best evidence. His/her curiosity may significantly influence students.
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In German teacher training programs, it is typical that students go out to do internships at schools. Internships comprise a time period of anything from three to six weeks. In many cases, students do not receive specific instructions to prepare for the school experience nor are they supported to reflect on their experience after the fact. They are expected to observe and explore the field, to get to know the full job description of a teacher etc. They have to turn in a report which is not graded but which needs to be sufficient to "pass." Now, we find ourselves in the middle of a discussion which looks at open questions on the one hand (e.g., "What kind of rituals and rules did teacher use in the classes and what do you think is their purpose?") and more structured observational tasks, on the other hand, which come out of a lecture class on developing learners (e.g., "What learning strategies can you identify across different grades?" - Select from or add to a list ... and describe how teachers model and use these in their instruction.).
What is your experience and what would be your prediction: Which scenario is more likely to support competence development? Open vs. Structured?
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In Greece -in some universirties-we apply the Learning by Design approach to allow teachers to engage in action research design activities. Teachers design their curriculum and then apply it in real class context. They design-reflect-apply-evaluate and redesign their curriculum... WE considered teachers as being reflective practitioners and designers,, See more at http://neamathisi.com
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Research/Investigation opportunity using data-loggers and impact on secondary learning.
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I recognize that ICT's have been a real incentive for the process of data generation see increased construction of scientific method and therefore applied research . However and in turn, each day becomes more specific and tends to complicate the questions and rebut some results precisely by the fact that many of those implementing ICT's in their research , know only the operation and do not understand what they are making . A clear example is applied statistics in SPSS , which as a statistical tool is very powerful, but if the knowledge is not included correctly in the long run statistical models include often do not know what it is used or only made by "repetition" of another investigation .
In itself, must take advantage of ICT's in the research process , but in turn you have to understand , analyze and infer the possible outcomes that these same tools can help us justify later.
regards
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In professional teacher development, challenges seem to come in complex packages rather than in textbook chapters. Therefore, we were thinking about methods to consider this complexity in the teacher training. One idea we were thinking of were role play scenarios. Would this be a suitable approach?
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The use of a dramatic approach to address some of the complex challenges in teacher education is an area that I deal with primarily in my work with training drama teachers. The use of role play and Forum Theatre are both excellent processes to use as they enable those in role and watching to enter into a structured space for dialogue.
Should you require any further help with this area please ask.
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As public schools differentiate instruction and pharmacology is developed, more diverse students are completing high school successfully. These students are moving on to college and university. Are their professors educated on the best ways to teach for success?
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