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Sustainable Consumption and Production - Science topic

Sustainable Development, Sustainable Design, Sustainability, Environmental
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Hello,
I want to apply an online survey of the attitude/perception for sustainable agricultural products, is it necessary to put a short explanation before the survey on what sustainable agricultural products are or could that generate a bias?
Thanks
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As Sustainable Agriculture is a little fuzzy subject, it is good start with an explanation of what your understanding is.
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I'm looking for research on factors that influence the public acceptability / acceptance / support and the political feasibility of regulatory ("command & control") policy instruments mainly addressing / affecting consumers (not producers) - mainly in the field of environmental policy, i.e. instruments regulating consumption choices and behaviour regarding, e.g. energy use, mobility, food, waste; but also related fields from which lessons might be drawn (e.g. anti-smoking policies).
I would like to know more on the importance of different influencing factors such as problem characteristics, distributional issues, actor constellations, discourses & narratives, windows of opportunity, or policy design issues (e.g. tightening rules over time, accompanying measures...).
I'm aware of the general (mostly political science) literature on policy processes, actors, power, etc., of literature dealing with instrument choice and pros & cons of different policy instrument types, and of literature dealing with acceptance of environmental policy in general and of eco/CO2-taxes in particular...
... but it looks as there is hardly any literature that systematically compares public acceptability and political feasibility - and the role of different influencing factors on them - for different policy instrument types in comparison (apart from the simple distinction between hard and soft/voluntary instruments) and for "command & control instruments" in particular !!??
I'm looking forward to your comments and suggestions!
Best regards,
Dirk Heyen
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Dirk Arne Heyen, I have gone through your stated illustrations. In my point of view, based on your topic, it would be better not to limit your search based on "consumer perspective". If it would be only about policy acceptability then you could focus on the only stakeholder (i.e., consumers). But in your case, you also wish to identify the factors affecting feasibility of regulatory environmental policies, which involves another stakeholder (i.e., the governmental setup). The feasibility might depend on several non-consumer factors, including institutional factors, political factors, and producer-related factors. Therefore, I alternatively suggest you to narrow down your topic or problem statement. And then, target the literature accordingly. I suggest the following steps: a) first narrow down your problem statement, b) next, try to find the most related single article, c) read that single article and go to the bibliography of the same article, d) find the related articles from its bibliography, download them, and read them. I think it will facilitate your search for related literature.
One more thing I would like to suggest is that, at one time, you should stick to policy instruments related to one dimension, such as food, energy, mobility, waste treatment, etc. In this way, you will be able to get good command over them, enabling yourself produce good research works.
Good Luck!
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We all are thinking for climate change, sea-level rise, Global warming, poverty etc. big issues. But, at the same time, we also triggering those issues by our unsustainable food consumption practices.
Every year, we are generating about 1.3 billion tons of food waste. This food waste accounting in greenhouse gas emissions (about 4.4 gigatons of GHGs ,annually) and environmental degradation. Developing and developed, both countries are wasting about 40% foods.
If we don't waste our foods, it will be enough to feed others 3 billion people annually. We have to be aware of proper consumption of our foods and proper management practices of food wastes globally.
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My colleagues discussed the topic well above, but I want to discuss it from another point of view: There are those who abuse the concept of "protecting the environment" so they sell you, for example, a phone for a large amount and does not give you the charger with the phone box, claiming that it preserves the environment even though it took a large amount from you and you will have to buy the charger So you will have two cans to throw in the trash.
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Assuming that non-durable goods last less than three years on average, which direction do you think the world businesses and consumers are moving considering the huge environmental impact of non-durable goods such as packaging and container, foods, clothing, cosmetics, cleaning products, plastics, etc. This is while the world population is hugely increasing as well as the need for non-durables.
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Dear Elmira Naghi Ganji sustainable production and consumption depend of how business will be engaged in this process, that is, how business will integrate in their activities the SDGs. Therefore, business become a partner in development when it looks beyond immediate short-term financial gain and towards building longer-term business and societal value instead.
Kind regards, Ernani
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The main goal of The 19th European Roundtable for Sustainable Consumption and Production" Circular Europe :Design Production and Consumption" is to encourage discussion amongst stakeholders involved in sustainable consumption and production: businesses, public institutions, universities, institutes and research centres, NGOs, SMEs, professional associations, decision-makers, etc.
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Its a good and useful discussion started and i hope it will be extended with answers. Production needs to be managed everywhere with the higher levels of migration but so needs consumption. Sufficient production to meet the needs of consumption is needed but even ways of supplying extra production to areas where such production is not available is important to keep thinking about. It may either be sold or given as charity in the form of humanitarian aid. To help others elsewhere is to reduce issues of the future in our areas.
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Its no new research that several studies have explored the use of alkali activated materials and geopolymer as a sustainable replacement to the conventional ordinary Portland cement. However, the sustainability of these materials is relative as it depends mainly on the availability of materials locally which eliminates the huge emission and cost associated with the transportation of both the raw materials and finished products. Therefore, the use of OPC might still be sustainable in some parts of the world compared to alkali activated materials and geopolymers
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The only real universal sustainable solution is not producing concrete.
In the comparison of binders, you have to look specifically to each location. Are you in a region where calcite and silicate minerals are abundant, but no producer of NaOH/Na-silicate or aluminosilicate can be found? In this case transport costs & footprint would shoot up for the alkali-activated material or geopolymer and might become less sustainable. In the situation of Belgium, which I know better, alkali-activated materials perform much better in comparison with Portland cement, because of the proximity of Na-silicate producers and the abundance of metallurgical residues.
Now, of course, there are other sustainable cements too, even OPC based systems, where the OPC is blended with high volume replacements of slag (blast furnace or others). In that case, comparing a 40%-60% blend (OPC-slag) with an alkali-activated material, the environmental gain is not that much anymore. Especially if you compare with geopolymer mixtures with metakaolin that you find in literature.
About the difference between geopolymers and alkali-activated materials, well, different definitions exist, which heat up discussions for some reason I never understand. So, just to be clear, the definition of alkali-activated material I used in this answer is "a material that becomes hard after mixing a powdered precursor and an alkali".
Cheerio,
Arne
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Dear respected colleagues,
Kindly help me dissect this postulation and submission below. Can this argument be correct ? "Energy production does not grow economy, but energy consumption does...". How possible is this assertion?
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I am very skeptical of such general statements. They sound very good and render those who make use of them look very good because of having put together the problems of the world in one slogan. You have better taken a look at the different societies, political systems etc. The current political turmoil in Venezuela one of the countries in the world well endowed with hydrocarbon deposits vindicate this statement, while the countries along the Trucial Coast would contradict this statement. In this case the political and social systems are very much different from each other and they have a much greater say than the energy resources. There are energy producing countries such as Norway which exert a rather perspective strategy and use the current production of energy to establish industries in new technologies. The quintessence is, you have to treat each country as a separate entity and take into consideration a wide range of aspects before you create a general statement like that. H.G.Dill
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Sure, the use of ERP systems helps to facilitate manufacturing operations, supply chain management and enterprise solutions in general. And sure, streamlining supply chains could reflect in environmental benefits.
But what about the continuous development of new technologies for electronic devices such as digital cameras, HD recorders, sound systems, etc., yielding increasingly bigger data files? Digitization requires a certain degree of ‘data mirroring’ to decrease the risk of data losses which, in turn, implies a higher storage capacity. Obviously, you don't want your life memories to get lost due to a HDD that crashes? For sure, it will happen, since it’s lifetime is smaller than yours. The business of storage capacity production (USB Drives, Hard Disks, Network Attached Storage, Data Servers, etc.) is highly influenced by the developments of new technologies for these electronic devices. You can make use of ‘Cloud Services’ (read: storage capacity somewhere else in a huge datacentre)… You can install your own home server…
I am just wondering how we will end up… Will we keep on building new power consuming datacentres with gigantic energy demanding cooling systems? Is this sustainable? The original idea of digitization from a sustainability point of view to save paper consumption in order to save biomass resources; is it relevant?
Any comment/remark/discussion is appreciated.
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With the rising climate change levels on Earth, some scientists are looking at alternative solutions to accommodate the increasing number of human inhabitants on the planet. One of which is terraforming, wherein a planet in the Solar System is made to simulate Earth-like conditions to ensure the survival of organisms. I’ve learned in our Ecology class that there are plans to terraform Mars in the future. However, it would take thousands of years and trillions of dollars to accomplish. Some concerns include the quality and stability of materials that would be used in this project and the technology available as of this moment. I would then like to ask, besides Mars, is there another planet/moon which is less costly, less risky, and less time-consuming to terraform? In other words, is/are there Earth-like planet/s that are somehow easier to colonise than Mars? I would also like to know if there is a possibility to see even a glimpse of this project come to fruition during our life time.
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Is it ethical? Say there are a few microbes native to Mars, and we terraform the planet thereby driving the microbes to extinction. We are simply moving our problems with conservation to a new scale.
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This Agenda is a plan of action for people, planet and prosperity. It also seeks to strengthen universal peace in larger freedom. We recognise that eradicating poverty in all its forms and dimensions, including extreme poverty, is the greatest global challenge and an indispensable requirement for sustainable development:
  • Goal 1. End poverty in all its forms everywhere
  • Goal 2. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture
  • Goal 3. Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages
  • Goal 4. Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all
  • Goal 5. Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls
  • Goal 6. Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all
  • Goal 7. Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all
  • Goal 8. Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all
  • Goal 9. Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and foster innovation
  • Goal 10. Reduce inequality within and among countries
  • Goal 11. Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable
  • Goal 12. Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns
  • Goal 13. Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts*
  • Goal 14. Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development
  • Goal 15. Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss
  • Goal 16. Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels
  • Goal 17. Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalize the global partnership for sustainable development
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Stronger policy efforts are needed for countries to reach the ambitious set of UN goals by 2030.
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The future of oil is in ambiguity. Developed countries seem to be replacing oil with other renewable energies. Please leave a comment? Thankful
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Many predictions are taking about the end of oil era in about 2040, by emphasizing on the great progresses in the field of electric and hybrid cars. However it should be noted that although electric and hybrid cars are growing rapidly, and they will be the future of transfer, there are several reasons that confirm the need for oil will be continued many years after 2040.
Transformation is only a limited part of oil needs and since the population of the world is growing and the need for energy as well as the production of petrochemicals (such as plastics) are rising, the need for oil will be rising for at least 20 years from now.
Personally I think the peak point in the rising need for oil in the world will be at least about 20-30 years in the future. and although the need for oil for transformation will be decreasing, the need for the petrochemicals will be rising.
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looking for people to contact for interviews (for the federal Belgian council on sustainable development)
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hi presently I am pursuing Ph.D. on topic 4-E(Energy-Emission-Environment-Economic) Analysis and optimization of Thermal-Hydro-Solar Power generation systems here the meaning of environment is a cost paid for health and environmental damages by emission. I request to all respected members please give some valuable suggestion and thoughts that will be very precious for me thanks.
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You may take optimization scheme/target function based on minimum greenhouse gas generation
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While reading an editorial expression in a news paper, I was thrilled to realize the innovative reality..that .. a diamond has an atomic sized imperfection known as nitrogen vacancy center. Deleting a carbon atom near the nitrogen leaves an empty space for stashing data. The storage capacity is being projected million times more than common DVD kind of storage. Eager to know and get educated for its prospects and potential with possible threats too.  
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thanks Kenneth
I accept that me not fully or even partially true . it is just I do not have much knowledge as it its away from my subject domain, but still i am thrilled to watch or come across it. your words in above answer or say reaction are too extremely vital to understand and realize ...thanks a lot for your words..sir.. 
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I´m recently conducting a meta-analysis on sustainable consumption (from the consumer´s perspective) and consumer´s perception of sustainability labels. For this, I need relevant and current (not older than 2010) studies regarding that topic. Could anyone help me out?
Thanks in advance!
Jannis
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Hi Jannis,
You may take a look at this special issue of the International Journal of Consumer Studies, starting with the editorial (it is from 2009 but you can still gain some insights): http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ijc.2009.33.issue-2/issuetoc 
Other suggestions:
Phipps, M., Ozanne, L. K., Luchs, M. G., Subrahmanyan, S., Kapitan, S., Catlin, J. R., ... & Weaver, T. (2013). Understanding the inherent complexity of sustainable consumption: A social cognitive framework. Journal of Business Research, 66(8), 1227-1234.
Hume, M. (2010). Compassion without action: Examining the young consumers consumption and attitude to sustainable consumption. Journal of world business, 45(4), 385-394.
Chen, T. B., & Chai, L. T. (2010). Attitude towards the environment and green products: consumers' perspective. Management science and engineering, 4(2), 27.
Markkula, A., & Moisander, J. (2012). Discursive confusion over sustainable consumption: a discursive perspective on the perplexity of marketplace knowledge. Journal of Consumer Policy, 35(1), 105-125.
Schrader, U., & Thøgersen, J. (2011). Putting sustainable consumption into practice. Journal of consumer policy, 34(1), 3-8.
Hanss, D., & Böhm, G. (2012). Sustainability seen from the perspective of consumers. International Journal of Consumer Studies, 36(6), 678-687.
Best,
Rodica
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Stratagic Value added management
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Hello. I consider that the following documents may help:
Best Regards
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I 'm looking for global or regional sustainability index for NGO or academic institutions ... for to do a benchmark!
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Yes, please refer to http://www.utm.my/sustainable/
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Governments worldwide choose their concrete developer friends over long-term, beneficial alternatives. How can we, as planners and scientists, approach this problem? What are some of the tools we have at our disposal? In effect - how can we battle such strong opponents? Please tell me your stories and thoughts. Thank you.
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I think we are missing a key tool.
Land Development, as it is done today (and really, this may apply to all forms of development), is a process where community wealth is converted to individual wealth.  We trust market forces to maximize the gain in individual wealth, and we trust good planning to minimize the loss in community wealth.  But there is no calculus (well, that I've heard of and I'm eager to be told I'm wrong) that can compare the two.
If we had a tool that could be used before the fact to show that the development leads to net wealth production (eg, change in individual wealth minus change in community wealth is positive), then we would know that 'growth can be good', even if it screws over a portion of the population.  Otherwise, it's a crap shoot, and any misguided or corrupt government (individual, agency, or the whole structure) can sell off community wealth to their friends and family for the promise of economic benefits, and be able to say with a straight face that they were doing it to create growth.  The masses are left with the debts, while the few are enjoying the profits.
Note that the 80 richest people on the planet control more wealth than the poorest 50%.  I suggest that even if it is just poorly thought out policies (rather than active corruption), it can still lead to poverty for the masses.
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When sustainable land use ideas were being discussed in 2001 I made the following comment for RIO + 10, for RIO +20 and now:
---------------------------------------------------
"March 10/2001/FAO-RIO10 Conference: commments on Draft Report/SARD Part I
From: "Lucio Munoz" <munoz1@sprint.ca>
To: "RIO10-Moderator" <RIO10-Moderator@fao.org>,
Subject: COMMENTS ON DRAFT REPORT/SARD PART I
Date: Sat, 10 Mar 2001 22:55:56 -0800
Dear Friends, my name is Lucio Munoz, I am an independent researcher based in Vancouver, Canada
II recall well, the problems at the time of Rio were, in general terms, increasing poverty and increasing environmental degradation.   The rio conference formally recognized these two aspects as the main issues to be addressed. A plan was made to address these two issues as soon as possible, but with long term objectives.
The content of the draft repor SARD Part I sent to me provides evidence that the policies originally followed to address poverty and environmental degradation led to increase poverty and increased environmental degradation.
Then globalization came to worsen the problem more by intenfying the poverty and environmental degradation problem of concern. Have we failed the goals of Rio so far?.
As things are right now, globalization forces will become more wild and poverty and environmental degradation appear to be moving to a critical stage. Eco-economic partnerships can not be the solution in the long term  as implied here if they leave out social concerns(the majority).
Over all, I see a systematic direct delinking of the goals(poverty and environmental degradation) that were set out 10 years a go and the instruments and processes chosen to achieve that.
This report indicates that while poverty increased and environmental degradation increased, production increased, standard of living in industrial/urban areas increased, awareness and NGO movements increased,
Goverment and international research networks increased, economic development over all increased, free trade increased, infrainstructure improvements have increased, vertical integration has increased, privatization has increased, and decentralization has increased.
It looks like the better we do in all the fronts above, the more poverty and environmental degradation we are generating. And the report suggest that the way out of this poverty and environmental cycle is to still improve still more those areas/tools/technologies that appear to be leading to the problem we are trying to address.
I would suggest that this issue should be looked a little bit closer.  Otherwise, we may find out during RIO-20 that poverty and environmental degradation are still worse.
My warm greetings to all. The views shared here with you are my personal views, I may be wrong. Your comments are welcome.
Sincerely yours;
Lucio Munoz
Vancouver, BC., Canada
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A new round of discussion is about to happen about "sustainable land use model" and the issues I raised are still valid, poverty and environmental issues are worse, is it not time to think in sustainability terms this time around? What do you think?
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Good day Luiz and Niels.  I think we should be able to have models of similar structure linked together from local, to provincial, to regional, to national, to blocks of countries, and one global, which can then be linked to global programs and banks and global institutions in a way that we create links of what it is needed globally with what it happening on the ground and be able to monitore it in real time yearly and ongoing...so each locality, province, region, block and the world know what they need to do based on sustainability land use planning and that others can see what they are doing....all from the deforested area/deforested area point of view...It can also help land users to connect directly with kyoto programs, global warming efforts....and so on.
I will bring together the ideas in the following papers:
Traditional Forestry, Sustainable Forestry, and Forestry Sustainability: Expressing Evolving Forestry Practices Using Qualitative Comparative Conjunctural Interactions
Beyond traditional sustainable development: Stating specific and general sustainability theory and sustainability indices using ideal present-absent qualitative comparative conditions
Linking Sustainable Development Indicators by Means of Present/Absent Sustainability Theory and Indices: The Case of Agenda 21
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Please kindly suggest the best method for economic assessment of certified product and possible sample of questionnares and interview method.
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For people or dificulties to store it, the fisch have also to be well 
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Is it well applicable to use the Contingent choice experiment to evaluate consumers preference?
What are the application procedure and benefit?
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Dear Elegbede,
Let me begin by thanking you for asking this question. Contingent Valuation Method (CV) is a stated preference method that asks a random sample of respondents for their Willingness to pay (WTP) or Willingness to Accept (WTA) Compensation for a clearly defined good. It basically involves the direct elicitation of how much an individual is willing to pay for a given good or service. 
Design of  CVM study
Before you design a CVM study,there are fundamental questions that you need to ask yourself such as:
1) What change in environmental quality should respondents be asked to value, and
how should this change be described to them?
2) What type of interview format should be used in the survey (i.e. face to face,
telephone, or mail)?
3) What type of questions (elicitation procedure) should be used to elicit
respondents’ valuation of the change in environmental quality?
4) Exactly how should respondents be told that they would have to pay for the
change in environmental quality?
5)  How can we increase our confidence that respondents in the contingent valuation survey are actually valuing the specific change in environmental quality describe and not some other environmental quality change, and furthermore, that the values found are correct?
Hypothetical market
Usually, respondents are presented with hypothetical markets. Such hypothetical market must have the following components:
1) The good or service itself
2) The institutional context in which the good/service will be provided
3) The financing of the bid vehicle.
Elicitation
In terms of elicitation, start by explicitly stating the purpose of the CVM in the survey tool. The context should the realistic as possible. You may start by eliciting the respondents attitude to general issues concerning the good followed by the good in question before presenting the hypothetical market and finally eliciting WTP. For more information, find the attached training manual developed by Mburu et al. 
I hope this helps a bit.
Regards,
Dennis O. Olila
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For its complexity and unavailability of required data (for each and every species in concern) MSY is a tough nut to crack.
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See the attached link to  "The efficacy of fisheries management strategies: A case study of the Gulf of Maine Redfish fishery" for some insights on maximum sustainable yield and fisheries management from a different perspective. 
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Hi all,
I am trying to implement Simapro 7.3 software to do the life cycle assessment of different hydrogen production methods. I need to consider all the inputs of the hydrogen production method, but I am a beginner for SimaPro and do not know a lot about it.
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Dear Carlo,
I would like to thanks for all your suggestions and answer. I saw your published paper and it helps me a lot to understand LCA. In hydrogen production, several methods are available such as electrolysis, thermochemical splitting, high temperature electrolysis, nuclear based hydrogen. But in all methods we need energy in terms of heat or electricity which might come from solar, wind, nuclear, geothermal and conventional fossil fuel.
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2015 -The MDGs end year is few miles away and propositions are on top gear for the SDGs. The challenge is that most of the promises latent in MDGs have not being achieved (up to the desired targets). The question now is: what can developing countries learn from the MDGs and how can they better equpped/aligned for the SDGs
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there is a lot that developing countries can learn from the experience of trying to achieve the MDGs but the most important lesson that can be taken out of the experience is that it takes a lot of political will to implement the necessary reforms required to lift millions out of poverty and sustain developmental progress. This fact was recognized at the inception of the MDGs but it's effect was wildly underestimated. whether the SDGs will be achieved or not will critically depend on the amount of political will and appetite for change that the governments of developing countries have.
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A sustainable manufacturing or production in general is viewed by many governments and industries in various countries as the basis or key for a sustainable life / future by maintaining the status quo or by further increasing the wealth of their society. The view is focusing to a large extent on a sustainable energy and material supply, but partially also on education in case of limited energy and material resources in a country. It didn't take long that, after the idea of sustainable production, the idea of energy efficiency was introduced. The major idea is to improve the usage of the available energy resources by reducing fossil and non-regenerative energy sources and take advantages of regenerative or alternative sources like wind power, photovoltaic energy a.s.o. - This whole discussion is intensively diving by energy Prices. At present the oil Prices are falling from a very high Level and new sources from oil / gas sand or shale oil / gas have been made available. Which is putting the rather expensive regenerative Technologies under pressure. The question here is: for how Long? - In manufacturing engineering energy efficiency seems to mean basically reducing the necessary energy for the manufacture of the product to be produced. Mostly electrical machinery and processes are designed in a way to use less energy for the same task as before. However a real shift of the intention related to a sustainable production or society I can only see in the regenerative energy sources and an even more intensive recycling of materials. Reducing wast energy and resources is good, but not really sufficient I think. The Impact of an seemingly everlasting paradigm of economical increase and gain seems to have a larger and more complex impact on out societies and our life than expected or considered so far. Keep on doing as we have been doing by producing more and more of the same products, but only reducing the amount of material and energy per unit will not reduce the environmental impact and hence will further increase the effect on our health and life in many places. Is there a better paradigm than the present? What will be the next shift ? What will be necessary for it to come about?
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To address limitations of the present sustainability discussion and "new" paradigms for sustainability, I advance here what I posted already elsewhere where I recall the classic work of Donella Meadows (1941 – 2001), late research fellow at MIT, on how do we change the structure of systems to produce more of what we want (sustainable) and less of that which is undesirable (unsustainable). Donella was a pioneering American environmental scientist, teacher and writer an best known as lead author of the influential book "The Limits to Growth", which made headlines around the world. She proposed a list of places (leverage points) to intervene in complex systems in increasing order of effectiveness. Here they are (from Meadows 2009):
• 12. Numbers: Constants and parameters such as subsidies, taxes, and standards
• 11. Buffers:The sizes of stabilizing stocks relative to their flows
• 10. Stock-and-Flow Structures: Physical systems and their nodes of intersection
• 9. Delays: The lengths of time relative to the rates of system changes
• 8. Balancing Feedback Loops: The strength of the feedbacks relative to the impacts they are trying to correct
• 7. Reinforcing Feedback Loops: The strength of the gain of driving loops
• 6. Information Flows:The structure of who does and does not have access to information
• 5. Rules: Incentives, punishments, constraints
• 4. Self-Organization: The power to add, change, or evolve system structure
• 3. Goals:The purpose or function of the system
• 2. Paradigms: The mindset out of which the system—its goals, structure, rules, delays, parameters—arises.
• 1. Transcending Paradigms
As you can see the most effective leverage points are paradigms and trascending paradigms, very difficult to change but the most effective for a really sustainable change. In the words of Donella "the shared ideas in the minds of society, the great big unstated assumptions, constitute that society’s paradigm, or deepest set of beliefs about how the world works. These beliefs are unstated because it is unnecessary to state them—everyone already knows them. Money measures something real and has real meaning; therefore, people who are paid less are literally worth less. Growth is good. One can “own” land. Those are just a few of the paradigmatic assumptions of our current culture, all of which have utterly dumbfounded other cultures, who thought them not the least bit obvious". Notice, however, that most of the current sustainability research, even the most advanced on complex systems, instead, is focused on the least effective leverage points like the economical aspects likely because decision makers and politicians believe that sustainability is mainly an economic problem even in the case of sustainability and energy efficiency discussion where technology takes the lead. So, "Numbers" like constants and parameters such as subsidies, taxes, and standards become the main focus. This happens for sustainability in environmental protection science too, related to manufacturing or production in general that is viewed by many governments and industries in various countries as the basis or key for a sustainable future by just providing numbers, standards, thresholds for pollutants that should not be trespassed. However this is a quite myopic viewpoint and I doubt that it can lead to sustainability ever. We have, in my opinion, to put in the right place the issues of our list of priorities if we want to foster a "sustainable" future.
Here is the link for Donella's work www.thesolutionsjournal.com/node/419
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Hi, the PROSUITE European FP7 Project suggested a 5 endpoints approach towards LCSA modelling, taking into account both Social Wellbeing and Prosperity in the endpoint assessment. An add-on Decision Tool through which the methodology can be used was developed for the OpenLCA software package.
You might find the following useful:
Best regards,
Wouter
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I am interested in the impact food and beverage multinationals could have, when sourcing raw materials, by adopting the 'Creating Shared Value' concept which was first introduced in a Harvard Business Review article in 2006 and has been fully adopted by Nestle amongst others.
Could this be a sustainable business approach which could also genuinely support development? I would be very interested to hear your comments. Many thanks.
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Dear Claudia, thank you very much for your reply. My current research is looking in to the sourcing of agricultural crops for the beverage industry but as you point out, FSC is widely used so their model of certification may well offer some useful parallels. I am also interested in your comment that it is the developed countries that drive demand - this is only the consumers in developed countries; farmers are frequently struggling to stay in business with poor prices paid for their produce and difficult working conditions. Many farmers, in the UK, have had to diversify to stay in business e.g. different crops or livestock, renewable energy, tourism, farm shops. I believe working on the land is a hard business to be in wherever you are in the world.
Thank you again for your comments and kind regards, Tilly