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Science method

Sports Medicine - Science method

Sports medicine is a branch of medicine that deals with physical fitness, treatment and prevention of injuries related to sports and exercise.
Questions related to Sports Medicine
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As many studies identified of genetic variants linked to training responses and sport-related traits, we could hypothesize that the R allele was more common in sprint and power athletes and the X allele more common in endurance athletes. Other said, the Middle/Long distance runner (X allele) was would have less response to strength training and Sprinter (R allele) would have less response to endurance training. However, in fact Sprinter would need endurance training to improve aerobic capacity and specific endurance and MD/LD need strength training as well.
Due to the fact, that there are huge amounts of drops outs in athletes career for talented youth Sprinter/MD/LD runners, therefore have a couple of questions :
1. Is any biomarkers we could use to get proper limit of load (Intensity, reps, and recovery) for Sprinter (R allele) while doing endurance exercise or for MD/LD runners (X allele) while performing strength/speed training, so they can keep their genetic potential ?
2. How we could know the proper limit of load/intensity for strength, speed training for MD/LD runners or endurance training for sprinters ?
3. Is the quality of R allele (i.g. speed of muscle contraction) or X (i.g. O2 consumption) allele will reduce due to mismatched training ?
Thank in advance.
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Well Done!
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Does creatine supplementation increase insulin sensitivity?
What is your opinion?
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Evidence:
"Acute Cr supplementation (20 g.d(-1) for 5 d) followed by short-term Cr supplementation (3 g.d(-1) for 28 d) did not alter insulin action in healthy, active untrained men"
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These should be
- covered in SCOPUS (for sure)
- without publication charges (preferably)
- with short publication times (preferably)
Thanks!
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Check out these:
American Journal of Sports Medicine
Physician and Sportsmedicine
Medicine and Science in Sport and Exercise
Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research
In regards to a short publication time, as you know with any top-tiered journal, it will depend on how well the manuscript is written. Less revisions = faster time to publication.
Michael
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Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) is a method of quantifying disability in multiple sclerosis that is the most widely used measurement tool to describe disease progression in patients with MS.
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Resistant exercises can tire MS disease quickly. This is an undesirable situation in patients with MS.
I recommend more ROM exercises and short-term isometric exercises.
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What types of exercise and training variables (volume, intensity, repetitions, frequency, exercise selection, exercise order, and rest) are recommended for patients with Multiple sclerosis (MS)?
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The best MS exercises are aerobic exercises, stretching, and progressive strength training. Aerobic exercise is any activity that increases your heart rate, like walking, jogging, or swimming. You just don't want to overdo it—it should be done at a moderate level. https://www.pennmedicine.org/updates/blogs/neuroscience-blog/2017/may/multiple-sclerosis-and-exercise
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Chemicals added to swimming pools leach into the air above the surface of the water, with the result that regular lap swimmers must be inhaling them to a significantly greater degree than casual pool users. Have there been any studies on the long term health effects?
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Studies have revealed that pool chemicals and their by-products (some chemicals combine to form new chemicals) cause burning eyes, skin irritation, allergies, asthma and higher rates of cancer.
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I am looking for minimum dose of Nitrate that should be consumed to produce vasodilatation. I Have looked several papers on this issue and there were ones which gave different doses of Nitrate to produce vasodilatation. However, none of them or any other paper reported the ''minimum dose'' of Nitrate to achieve vasodilation.
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What is the current evidence regarding the relationship between telomere shortening and exercise??
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i  search some new topics about exercise and premenstrual syndrome...
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I'd recommend this review assessing the effectiveness of exercise-based interventions in reducing PMS in women.
Best regards, Michał Fułek.
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Dear colleagues,
pre-registration is a key element in open science practice. There are several options on the market for pre-registering an intended research project. I wonder if there is a tendency towards a specific pre-registration platform for exercise science research. For sports psychology it seems to be OSF, but I could not identify a preference for exercise science studies.
What do you think is the most used pre-registration platform for exercise science research and/or which one would you recommend for this field of science?
Cheers
Lutz
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Dear Colleague,
I just started to collect data on exactly this topic as part of a more comprehensive meta-research study regarding orthopedic and sports medicine literature.
I think right now, most studies with a medical background pre-register in classic registries for clinical trials like clinicaltrials.gov or the german equivalent DRKS. Regarding studies without medical background, I would say OSF pre-registration formats are more common and I expect that the proportion of registration and preprints in STORK will increase in future.
Best,
Robert
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Currently working on literature regarding the effects of cooling on MS patients.
Effects on physical performances, balance, cognitive impairments and patients' comfort.
I've already read the Meyer-Heim article ublished on 2007(Multiple Sclerosis, 2007; 13: 232-237), and Nilsagard's article (Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, September 2006; 1(4): 225 – 233).
I'm actually trying to find alternate references that could i) increase my understanding in physiological rationales of those enhancement; ii) lead my team research on a "ideal" cooling intervention (avoiding thermal discomfort while getting improvement)
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HI:
This is Leslie David Montgomery from San Jose, CA, USA.
I recently read your Research Gate profile and your interest in MS/cooling.
I worked at NASA Ames Research Center, CA for a number of years. One of our larger projects regarded body cooling for astronauts and the application of body cooling for MS patients.
You can find articles about our work on Research Gate Leslie David Montgomery. There are several papers there that might be of interest to you.
I have also worked in the field of biothermal modelling of divers and other types of sports participants.
Please let me know of your current work in this area.
I can best be reached at email: pmontgomery@telis.org.
Looking forward to possibly hearing from you.
les montgomery
I also sent this note to your hotmail account.
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The IPAQ scoring protocol defines the low, moderate and high categories of physical activity but does not clearly state how these were derived (not the actual cut-offs but the basis for the three categories). I noticed that the The American College of Sports Medicine and American Heart Association recommendations for minimal physical activity correspond to the moderate category of IPAQ-SF. But is there any reference that specifically states this?
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I have created a couple of tools to calculate the variables from IPAQ short and long version.
They are available in my profile:
Long version tool ->
Short version tool ->
I hope they are useful for you.
Best.
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Hello,
Many protein shake powder mixes contain digestive enzymes such as protease, lipase, and cellulase. However, the products do not detail from which organism the proteins are produced or which protein homolog is used. I would imagine that the enzymes are produced in yeast or fungi. I am am curious regarding which organisms are used. Also, is the native form of the protein harvested from these organisms, or are they made to produce a recombinant human version? In the case of cellulase, there is no human homolog, so it must be from another organism. Regardless, should not the host species be listed on the product? Additionally, if the protein is not naturally occurring in humans, is it ever a good idea to consume it in high quantities?
Thank you!
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Digestive enzymes are extracted from animals,plants and microorganisms. Pancreatic enzymes for digestion are extracted in the Middle East from Camel, Cattle and Cheeps.Also yeasts are an important sources in our country as a source of huge enzymes.Lactic acid bacteria are used as lactase source for treatment of lactose-intolerant people.
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Is it possible to publish exercises physiology research in sports medicine journals?
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Я считаю, что такие исследования очень необходимы именно в журналах по спортивной медицине
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Hello everyone. I was asked to submit our original research (pilot study) to Sports and Exercise Medicine Open Access Journal (SEMOJ)...we are in the process of rewrites and I was ask if the $1000 publication fee is the normal for the industry. I know that when we submitted to the Orthopedic Journal of Sports Medicine (OJSM) they also charged a similar fee. I was wandering if The Sports and Exercise Medicine Open Access Journal is legitimate? I don't mind paying the fee if it gets my work out there to the scientific community. Thanks.
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Excellent discussion.
Keep an eye out for the following:
1/ Generally, predatory journals will use overly flattering language to solicit you to submit a manuscript with the promise of "quick" publication. They usually do not mention fees in the initial soliciting message. The mention of fees also will not be easily found on their websites. Legitimate journals should (and typically) have their fees explicitly listed on the submissions page. Also check the contact information provided by whomever contacts you (see item 3 below).
2/ The editorial staff should be easy to find. Who are they? What institutions are they affiliated with? Whom exactly are you contacting when you have a question? You should be able to easily see this, along with their personal and institutional information should you want to do a simple Google search.
3/ Out of curiosity, I've gone as far as doing a Google search for the address of a publisher that raised a red flag, and it appeared to be a random dockside warehouse. If they do give contact information, make sure to check it.
4/Their websites may look dated, or may have other suspicious content. I have never seen a publisher's website with "pleased customer" comments on it(??). This is not lunch at a fish and chips joint.
Again, these may not be enough to blacklist any journal per se. When in doubt, ask your institution's library staff or a colleague to help you verify. This latter point is further emphasized if research counts toward upward movement in your institution, as the relevant committee may check the legitimacy of this journal and the publication may not count.
Cheers.
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To whom is concerned,
How is this jourmal, Orthopedics and Sports Medicine: open access journal (ISSN:2638-6003) ?
Is it a real SCI journal?
Thanks.
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Be careful with this one. The mentioned journal “Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Open Access Journal (OSMOAJ)” is published by “Lupine Publishers” and this publisher is mentioned in the update section of the Beall’s list of potential predatory publishers:
This is by itself not enough to say that it is not okay, see for discussions about how to estimate the value of the Beall’s list elsewhere here on RG:
Method Predatory journals and publishers: a menace to science and s...
There are however some additional red flags:
-Prominent fake impact factor (Cosmos Impact factor), see for more about fake metrics:
-No mentioning of indexing in Scopus or ESCI. Their indexing info includes numerous meaningless memberships.
-Without serious indexing, rather high fees
A journal like "Orthopedic Journal of Sports Medicine (OJSM)" from SAGE is a way safer choice (with a real impact factor and more) with a lower fee as well.
Hope this answers your question somewhat.
Best regards.
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Yoyo intermittent recovery tests
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There is definitely a lack of norms for the yo-yo tests. I have created some general guidelines which are not based on any research,
If you want to see a good summary of results (means, sd and ranges) from a large range of sports, see the recent study by Schmitz et al. (2018)
Schmitz B, Pfeifer C, Kreitz K, Borowski M, Faldum A, Brand SM. (2018) The Yo-Yo Intermittent Tests: A Systematic Review and Structured Compendium of Test Results. Front Physiol. Jul 5;9:87.
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The paper, "Rugby athletes and the prevention of injuries: asn asnalysis on judgement skills and decisions-made" European Journal of Sports Medicine. March 2016 by Broughton, H; Cromie, S;Trimble, T;Cummiskey, J; and Corri, D. highlighted the potential in rugby union that injuries can minimise injury eg at the scrum and tackle
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Prevention is better than cure, furthermore if observations are made on perturbation behaviour then agility based movements ought not give rise to injuries. The risks of injury in exercise and in sport can be perceived as both external (environment) and internal (the self) hence judgement knowledge applied to training offers better decision-making. The tackle in all codes of football becomes a matter of evaluating ones organisational skills, that is the player who controls the ball out plays his/her opponent (opposition rapport).@
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I am interested in doing a comparative study between the common football injuries in Sudan and England. I would appreciate any information on the injuries in Sudan, treatment methods and training practices.
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Dear Ahmed,
Subjects in this older study had to perform at least a maximum of aerobic power output (VO2 max) at a stationary bicycle ergometer:
el Karim MA, Collins KJ, Dore C. Energy expenditure of agricultural workers in an area of endemic schistosomiasis in the Sudan. Br J Ind Med 1987;44(1):64-7. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1007781/pdf/brjindmed00153-0072.pdf
All the best, Martin
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Exercise benefits for health are well known, but what if we're looking for the best way to fat loss, it's really exercise as important as most people think or is kinda overrated??
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Physical exercise is for the health care which by regular walking , swimming , & gyms for Yoga , & systematic breathing steps play an important part for our health care .
In case of person under a heavy weight or a person under a thin body & appearance may take the recourse for reducing over weight or an improvement in the weight for the thin body .
This is my personal opinion
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heat acclimatization can increase performance of athlete and occupational for physical activity in heat condition.
for this purpose we have to train for adaptation in heat condition regularly. but I have some question about chronic heat stress.
does living in heat climate can lead to chronic fatigue?
does hyperthermia and heat illness occur without any symptom chronically?
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Dear Seyyed,
Maybe the following papers will help you:
Qian S, Li M, Li G, Liu K, Li B, Jiang Q, Li L, Yang Z, Sun G. Environmental heat stress enhances mental fatigue during sustained attention task performing: evidence from an ASL perfusion study. Behav Brain Res 2015;280:6-15. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0166432814007724?via%3Dihub
PUSPITA N, KURNIAWIDJAJA M, HIKMAT RAMDHAN D. Health Effect Symptoms Due to Heat Stress Among Gong Factory Workers in Bogor, Indonesia. In The 2nd International Meeting of Public Health 2016 with theme “Public Health Perspective of Sustainable Development Goals: The Challenges and Opportunities in Asia-Pacific Region”. KnE Life Sciences 2018;469-475. https://www.knepublishing.com/index.php/Kne-Life/article/view/2308/5104
Vargas N, Marino F. Heat stress, gastrointestinal permeability and interleukin-6 signaling - Implications for exercise performance and fatigue. Temperature (Austin) 2016;3(2):240-251. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4964994/pdf/ktmp-03-02-1179380.pdf
Otani H, Kaya M, Tamaki A, Watson P. Separate and combined effects of exposure to heat stress and mental fatigue on endurance exercise capacity in the heat. Eur J Appl Physiol 2017;117(1):119-129. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00421-016-3504-x
Robertson CV, Marino FE. Cerebral responses to exercise and the influence of heat stress in human fatigue. J Therm Biol 2017;63:10-15. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0306456516301668?via%3Dihub
Best wishes from Germany,
Martin
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Genetics, stem cells research, artificial intelligence, nanotechnology, tissue engineering, sports medicine, mechanical devices, etc. may contribute to achieve functional immortality.
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Immortality ??? You gotta be kidding ! Look around ! There's no such thing in nature. Immortality, fountain of youth, super food, etc are all just examples of how superficial and greedy humans are. We want everything even though what we really need is not much at all. All we need is just simple common sense. How come nobody has ever done research or come up with something that will change our bad behavior towards one another ? Nobody has ever figured out or found the molecules of "love" or "hate" so we can make more "love" molecules and let the T cells eat up all the "hate" molecules. Wouldn't that be great? Then, we can live forever if we can get rid of hate. I welcome all of the medical achievements to make human suffering less, but "immortality" will not accomplish that.
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I was wondering about the morality of taking performance enhancing substances, during the time of sporting competitions, even if it helps a medical condition.
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Hi I have a longish paper on this coming out in the next few month in the Journal of the Philosophy of Sport: it's called:Therapeutic Use Exemptions and the Doctrine of Double Effect.  The anwer isn't nearly as simple as other answers suggest. it depends on the role of intentions in both the morality of, and the regualtion of doping.  There's a signiificant tension between Wada's approach to TUEs and the principle of strict liability.  The two are inconsistent.  I favour an approach which takes account of intentions - as is common in most moral theory and most jurisprudence.  
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I read a meta-analysis, and he wrote: “For resistance training, we coded for frequency, mean training intensity, volume (sets of strength training), and type of training split used. Intensity for resistance  was coded as the average percent of 1 repetition maximum (1RM) used .”  How to deal with this situation when the program just like the picture?
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The previous author already said ....
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Many physicians and physiotherapists advise their patients who have knee osteoarthritis whether in earlier stage or late and chronic stage to stop stair climbing and use lifts if available.
Is this logic suitable for all types of patients with knee osteoarthritis?
Is there any evidence or published article that discuss this issue?
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there is a mechanical association....
however it becomes relevant when there is a predisposing  factor like altered bio mechanics / .....
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interested in use of partial body weight supported exercise on treadmill using the unweighting systems
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Dear Terry,
Here are further studies on the subject:
Valentin-Gudiol M, Bagur-Calafat C, Girabent-Farrés M, Hadders-Algra M, Mattern-Baxter K, Angulo-Barroso R. Treadmill interventions with partial body weight support in children under six years of age at risk of neuromotor delay: a report of a Cochrane systematic review and meta-analysis. Eur J Phys Rehabil Med. 2013;49(1):67-91. http://www.minervamedica.it/en/journals/europa-medicophysica/article.php?cod=R33Y2013N01A0067
Ribeiro T, Britto H, Oliveira D, Silva E, Galvão E, Lindquist A. Effects of treadmill training with partial body weight support and the proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation method on hemiparetic gait: a randomized controlled study. Eur J Phys Rehabil Med. 2013;49(4):451-61. http://www.minervamedica.it/en/journals/europa-medicophysica/article.php?cod=R33Y2013N04A0451
Burnfield JM, Irons SL, Buster TW, Taylor AP, Hildner GA, Shu Y. Comparative analysis of speed's impact on muscle demands during partial body weight support motor-assisted elliptical training. Gait Posture. 2014;39(1):314-20. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S096663621300444X
Van Kammen K, Boonstra A, Reinders-Messelink H, den Otter R. The combined effects of body weight support and gait speed on gait related muscle activity: a comparison between walking in the Lokomat exoskeleton and regular treadmill walking. PLoS One. 2014;9(9):e107323. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4167325/pdf/pone.0107323.pdf
Brasileiro A, Gama G, Trigueiro L, Ribeiro T, Silva E, Galvão É, Lindquist A. Influence of visual and auditory biofeedback on partial body weight support treadmill training of individuals with chronic hemiparesis: a randomized controlled clinical trial. Eur J Phys Rehabil Med. 2015;51(1):49-58. http://www.minervamedica.it/en/journals/europa-medicophysica/article.php?cod=R33Y2015N01A0049
Ganesan M, Sathyaprabha TN, Pal PK, Gupta A. Partial Body Weight-Supported Treadmill Training in Patients With Parkinson Disease: Impact on Gait and Clinical Manifestation. Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2015;96(9):1557-65. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/277238525_Partial_Body_Weight-Supported_Treadmill_Training_in_Patients_With_Parkinson_Disease_Impact_on_Gait_and_Clinical_Manifestation
Swe NN, Sendhilnnathan S, van Den Berg M, Barr C. Over ground walking and body weight supported walking improve mobility equally in cerebral palsy: a randomised controlled trial. Clin Rehabil. 2015;29(11):1108-16. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/271648447_Over_ground_walking_and_body_weight_supported_walking_improve_mobility_equally_in_cerebral_palsy_A_randomised_controlled_trial
Best wishes from Germany,
Martin
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Patient is K3 and enjoys hiking and working out. His goals are that he would like to be able to squat at the gym and have greater stability on uneven ground when hiking. When he tries to squat his prosthetic foot lifts up and he would like it to stay level with the floor.
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The best one I have found for my patients with a symes amp is the flex symes prosthesis from Ossur.  Here is the info:
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Exercises on unstable surface are very useful on the rehabilitation of prorpioceptive impairments, but i want to know if we can concentrate the work on a specific part of the lower limb
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Proprioception of the ankle could be better targeted by applying specific unstable destabilisation. You'll maybe find some articles with R.TERRIER and N.Forestier as top author, and the links attached below. For other articulation like knee or hip i'am not sure ! It appears that destabilisation on unstable surface did not target ankle proprioception kiers-brumagne 2012
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I'm looking for experts in the topical absorption of menthol, particularly as it relates to topical analgesics. In particular, I would like to know if there is data on specific percentages of menthol absorbed through the skin and pharmacological action based on that percentage. 
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???????????????????????????
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I am looking at creating my own model using Visual3D, however I made the rookie mistake of not saving a copy of my labelled and gap-filled data without the model applied to the trials. If anyone knows a way to remove the model from the trial without going through having to re-label etc I would be forever grateful.
Thanks
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???
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patellar reflex movement dataset which has displacement data of leg and foot which recorded by motion capture or collected in other ways
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Interesting. Look at propioceptive aspects
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Hello! I was reading a Thermal Cycler User Manual and I found a function (extend) that allows progressive lengthening or shortening of
a temperature step hold each time a step is executed in a cycle. It said that it was usefull for accommodating an enzyme with diminishing activity. I have never heard this term. Can anyone tell me about this kind of enzymes.
Thank you
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no comment
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What are the reasons of knee cracking in young people who do not suffer from any symptoms? In particular, cracking that comes with normal activities.
Is this normal for such type of knee cracking? Should we treat this issue?
Any suggested article that explain this issue would be appreciated!
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Please let me know if this citation (and reference below) is useful to you.
“Why joints pop
Like nearly all the joints in your body, the knee joint is covered by a protective membrane containing synovial fluid. This fluid lubricates the joint, allowing it to move smoothly and easily.
Occasionally, tiny gas bubbles build up in this fluid. When the joint moves, the bubbles are released, causing the nearby ligaments to emit a snap or pop sound. The technical term for this phenomenon is crepitus, which also describes all grinding or crackling sounds and sensations in the body.
When to be concerned about joints popping
Most of the time, this popping and creaking of joints is harmless. However, crepitus is also a symptom of the joint degeneration that leads to osteoarthritis.
 You should worry about joint popping if:
•It's occurring frequently in one location
•It's accompanied by pain
•It's accompanied by joint swelling, tenderness, or stiffness
•You're also having pain as a result of prolonged joint movement, such as when walking
If you're experiencing pain when a joint pops or you have any other of the symptoms listed above, talk with your doctor. If your symptoms and test results indicate it, your doctor may diagnose osteoarthritis and start treatment. Treatments for osteoarthritis can ease pain, improve mobility, and slow disease progression—especially if it's caught early.”
Reference:
Dennis
Dennis Mazur
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Field of my interest is systemic physiological response to maximal cycling and running incremental test, comparison this results and practical application for functional diagnostic.
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Hi
what do you mean
other than
VO2, VE and respiratory exchange ratio (RER)
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Plano-valgus foot deformity, children, teenage, adults
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Evans procedure was modified 20 years ago by Mosca and we can compare this osteotomy with Salter osteotomy due at the hip joint. After the lengthening of the external ray the coverage of the talus head increase by correcting the abduction of the forefoot.  To be efficient is important to have enough bone that means that exist age limit. I think 9 years old is ok to start this osteotomy if we treat a child with spastic disease. For idiopathic planus valgus is better to use this osteotomy after 12 years old at girls and 13 years old at boys.
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If the number of reps changes through training sesions does the RPE too? Or is RPE kept between 8-9. What i mean is: i understand DUP programming; but a hypertophy set can be as high in RPE as a strenght one; that is why i'm asking.
Last question: wouldn't it be also interesting comparing RPE based training to % training; but instead of the classical approach using an encoder/accelerometer? (to have precise 1RM daily data)
thanks in advance
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@Benedikt Mitter  It's true that is not specified if it is either dynamic or static stretching, my bad i'm sorry i dont know why i suposed it. And about the velocity studies i mentioned i think is quite interesting the fact that such a non linear exercise as the pull up provides such similar results as the ones with the smith machine. However I'm really looking forward to see what results you guys get as I really hope that velocity based training  becomes to norm, provably due to my engeneering self wanting a physical magnitude to work with everyday.
Thank you for responding and i wish you the best luck with the participants and i hope noone drops :)
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I was wondering whether anyone could steer me in the direction of research that assessed changes in muscle activation during squats as the external load increases. 
For example, some individuals' technique unintentionally changes when external load surpasses >85% 1RM, resulting in a greater increase in hip-extensor activation in relation to knee-extensor activation. 
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dear friend
the fil  in the attachment can be a good help of you. If more help needed, let me know.
regards
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is it beneficial to train taller athletes (as in basketball) for better balance and stability? Maybe using neuromuscular training?  Do athletes with longer limbs exhibit poorer balance and limb control?  Maybe this could contribute to increased injury risk?  Also, what are the implications of training (weight training) the taller athlete and what measures must be taken to ensure safe and effective exercise?  Does anyone have any references that might answer some of these questions?
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It is usual for tall athletes to concentrate in some kind of sports when shorter to others. For example we will not see a weight lifter to be a tall person. All this is based on the biomechanics of the limbs and the moment arms that forces are applied on. Because of this different somatotypes are performing better in some sports than others. Despite this by working with every athlete as an individual someone can improve performances and eliminate weaknesses. From the literature point of view, there are few books on biomechanics of the musculosceletal and also the Kapanji's three books. Andrew Amis has studied the forces around the elbow that I am aware of and there are papers for this. About elbow forces again there is also an old report coming from the aviation (early '50s if I recall). There is a lot of work on knees as well as spine.
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does anyone have experience/references regarding exercise prescription/physical characteristics/ injury rate of long limbed athletes (basketball players in particular but not limited too)?  I'm interested in evidence of reduced balance, stability, core strength, body control, proprioception etc... 
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There is a high correlation between the legs to height. but there are other factors that also affect the balance of the body. Remember the principle of balance! muscle and ligament strength, density tulaang also influential. in this case the height (leg length also contributes to balance. So high it would be unstable (but check out, if a tall, thin or muscular?), when a tall, thin it will be more volatile and more increases the risk of injury, but if the height is great , muscles strong, broad pedestal base, it will be stable and less risk of injury.
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I am looking for un-published, grey (theses, conference papers) and in-press data comparing ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) to one of the following criterion measures, during resistance exercise (dynamic, eccentric and Isometric included): Workload, Heart Rate, Blood pressure, Blood lactate or EMG. 
This data is required for a meta-analysis looking at the validity of RPE as a measure of resistance exercise intensity.
You do not need to have completed statistical analysis comparing or correlated RPE to the criterion measure; If you have collected data for RPE and one of the criterion measures, I will just need sample sizes, means and SD's for each group/variable.
If you would be willing to share this data with me please let me know.
Regards
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have not done. in the near future I will try. thank you!
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Any information with regards to elastography of the shoulder
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The working capacity may be defined as the physical and mental ability to receive specific workload optimally. certainly influenced by the health and ability of workers themselves, as well as nutritional status, education and training. if this is not met then it is not likely to affect the decline in the quality and quantity of work, behavior, and worse is a medical disorder.
the ability to organize the resources of a person or a business entity, called capability. This also relates to the ability to support physiological and psychological health and safety of workers in an enterprise or organization.
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looking for Malay version of KOOS
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I have that. We worked out with quite a few OA patients of different age groups, and the Malay version was created accordingly for the benefit of those who can't communicate in English.
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I'm looking to see whether there has been a ramp test of this sort of protocol published in the literature, so I may find it and post a reference below, but if anyone knows of a paper where it is used then please let me know!
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Hi Ciaran, we used this protocol with T&F when I was a student at the AIS.  Maybe check some of Philo Saunder's papers on running economy. eg: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17149987
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Looking for a measure of indirect calorimetry, such as a metabolic cart (like would be used during a cardiac stress test) or metabolic hood.
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Hi Patrick. I believe there is this dataset avaliable, but not so easy. I have published a paper about that ( you can download it in my profiile). Besides this article published about resting metabolic rate in young men I have another data collected with elderly men with this subject (not published yet).
I hope I had helped you!
Raul
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I’m currently investigating changes of miRNAs expression due to an exercise intervention. I analyzed a total number of 187 different miRNAs. Now I have a problem with non detected samples and their statistical evaluation. Some of the selected miRNAs showed signals only in a smaller number of samples (patients) (e.g. 35 instead of 40). Some samples showed signals only at one time point but not in the other and therefore fold change calculations are not possible.
What would be the better option for such samples, to use only the detectable values for statistics or filling in anything for the missing values?
I would be very pleased if someone can give me suggestions, how to cope with this problem.
Kind regards
Barbara Mayr
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Dear Barbara,
It usually happens that same miRNA expressed at one time point but not at other time points. You may get upregulation at one time point and downregulation at different time point. You need not to worry about that and sometimes if endogenous level is very low then it is very difficult to do real time PCR. You just repeat your experiment to be sure about the results you are getting are OK.
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Looking for an article or a study that focuses on, or includes the effects of eccentric resistance training on flexibility.
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This question is addressed by Anis very well:
"The effects of eccentric training on lower limb flexibility: a systematic review. Br J Sports Med. 2012 Sep;46(12):838-45"
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Various techniques for measurement of body composition are commonly used in human performance laboratories. Some that are often seen are skinfold thickness measurements, BMI, bioelectrical impedance, DEXA, bod-pod etc.
What would be the best method/combination of methods for measuring body composition in athletes? Should there be a difference in methods used for high-intensity sports and low to moderate intensity sports and healthy non athletes?
What do you use in your lab and could you suggest some review on that topic or provide possible guidelines for that issue.
Thank you in advance,
Kind regards,
TinG
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All the answers are helpful, and I am agree with those. But you have to look to your available facilities and the available budget. Then based on it can choose the most accurate.
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Here is a second topic that I am researching. If anyone has any opinions and/or research they think could be beneficial to me in answering this research question, please do add it in an answer.
Thanks in advance,
Charlie Thomas
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Hi Charlie!
I have found some related articles to your question:
and attached files.
Best regards,
Tim.
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Is there investigations about the role of leg stiffness, and maybe also muscle flexibility (moreover quadriceps, amstrings and triceps surae) , on running economy or other parameters in (endurance) running (performance, injury risk,...) ? 
Thanks!
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Thanks for your help!
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Eccentric training adaptations include changes in muscle architecture. Are there any studies which showed different adaptations in men vs women?
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Very useful for me too! 
Thank you very much
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Tensyomiography
Neuromuscular
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Thanks everyone for you kindness...!
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Amount of daylight exposure is known to be a predictor for work-related stress and job satisfaction. However daylight exposure is not the same as 'time spending outside'. I am curious if there are studies around who investigated the relationship between time spending outside and e.g. stress, fatigue, mental health, etc. 
Or, what is the most suitable definition of 'time spending outside'?
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I am looking to see what factors influence strength performance as it relates to 1RM strength expression in back squat, bench press and deadlift. 
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A quite comprehensive summary of factors influencing muscle strength by Jonathan Folland: http://link.springer.com/article/10.2165/00007256-200737020-00004
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I'm mostly interested in whether X-ray or MRI was used, whether operated or contralateral knee was measured and which parameters were considered.
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Hi
Usually MRI images are considered for meniscus implant sizing for better precision. These articles may help you,
Thanks and regards,
Mamatha
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If somebody was to train at a high level of intensity for a shorter time and then somebody else was to go hiking, but for longer what would be an accurate formula to judge both these levels of activity?
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Hi Michael,
In sport performance research we face similar questions, although they are related to quantifying the workload/training load of an exercise. A cheap and easy to use approach is to calculate the workload by the session rating of perceived exertion (sRPE) method. It works as follows:
1. The individual rates the intensity of the exercise on a scale from 1-10 (see the attached research paper for the scale).
2. This score is then multiplied by the duration of the exercise.
Example:
The exercise is rated as heavy (score 5) and the duration is 45 minutes, yielding a workload score of: 5*45 = 225 arbitrary units. In this way you can compare different physical activities.
It is a subjective measure of the workload, but depending on what you want to use it for, it may be appropriate. It has been extensively validated against measures of internal load (e.g. heart rate, lactate) and external load (e.g. distance). If you have more questions, then please let me know!
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I would like to measure the impact of an initial physiotherapy assessment (oriented on prevention) on the percentage of desertion in gyms.
Thanks in advance.
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Hi Matias,
I think you should find some data in these articles.
I Hope this will help you.
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Hello.
is anybody familiar with morning exercises, to "connect mind and body".
- Breathing exercises to increase the oxygen level for example
- guided meditation
things into this direction.
thank you very much in advance!
Kindly Robert
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Hello, you can try any of these: 1. Diaphragmatic and thoracic respiration or breathing techniques; 2. Belly button or Narvel technique; dynamic stretching with relaxation music.
Thanks
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Recently, we had a case of 21yo woman with severe hallux valgus and flatfoot. We tried Lapidus procedure (TMT I arthrodesis and lateral release WITHOUT intermetatarsal stabilisation) and subcapital chevron derotational osteotomy for DMAA correction. Due to traction of the EHL effect was stil unsatisfactory. We decided to add the Akin procedure in the proximal phalanx as a "last hope" procedure. Cosmetic effect seems good. Do you have any experience with this method or do you do try anything different in such cases?
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I do chevron mostly, sometoimes with a very long plantar cut (similar to scarf);  akin just as needed. If the TMT1 is instable, I fuse it. Otherwise the foot biomechanic is altered and a stiff gait results, pushing arthrosis.
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With all the relatively recent developments in recovery protocol for athletes (post game stretching, active recovery, contrast therapy, cold water immersion, compression garments, massage etc.) have there been any studies that utilize qualitative methods such as an interview, cross sectional group discussions between sports.
An approach that may provide rich data to be interpreted using perhaps an intervention involving the sports science team and coaching staff, potentially leading to a more scientifically sound approach that is not merely using practices because they are beneficial but because they are beneficial for specific athletes, sports, circumstances-heavy session, rehabilitation session etc. 
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Hyperbaric chamber, Lactigo carnosine gel, tissue work
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I'm diving into tendinopathy research and started to wonder what nonsurgically repaired tendon looks like?  Does it look normal?  Is supposed to look tendinopathic.  With the rise of regenerative techniques, it seems like much of the  treatments are focused on causing a localized tissue response, bringing in exogenous growth factors, or eliminating vascular areas of the tendon.  
Assuming these techniques work, what does a successful repaired tendon look like?
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It depends on at what stage the tendinopathy was at before treatment, sometimes it returns to look ultrasonically normal; before that the gaps of hypoechogenicity first change to spots then stripes -like normal tendon (in a longitudinal view).  If it was degenerative tendinopathy then sometimes its just the volume of the hypoechogenicity which decreases
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Hello.
I hope that everybody knows about the curling sport. The literature search reveals there is an evidence that the curlers had severe knee pain in his/her sliding leg (deep flexed knee).
However, I could not found any information about what is the cause of that pain? where is the pain come from (for instance, from muscle or soft tissue overload) or where is the location? (anterior or posterolateral).
please advise to me, share your knowledge, and please refer related publication including unpublished study, useful websites, and injury survey.
thank you
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I think you would not find on curling. But nothing prevents you from seeking other similar work areas curling. As carleur who always work knee flexed. It will be in the occupational disease.
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I'm preparing the skin in accordance with SENIAM recommendations.
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I usually prepare the skin as follow:
- Shave the hair with a blade razor
- Abrasion with a dermic sand (smooth sand) to remove the dead cells from epidermis (Cornea)
- Clean with an alcohol wipe and let the skin dry
- Apply a pre-gelled Ag-Cl electrodes and wait about 3 to 5 minutes before collecting EMG data
And it works very well.
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I would like to know whether Increasing attentional demand by implementing a cognitive task concomitant with a unstable balance condition should have a greater influence on postural control, comparing two different groups non-athletes and athletes, both young male, 20 – 30 years old. 
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Marcelo,
My project for my Masters dealt with peroneus longus reflex response to sudden ankle inversion under 2 overlapping conditions of cognitive information, anticipation and cognitive loading. We are still waiting for the manuscript to be accepted, but if you send me a message, I would be happy to show you some of the data. I know this is a static task, and not really a dynamic or unstable surface in terms of maintaining stance balance, but hopefully my results can inform you.
I identified a trend suggesting that the later components of the stretch reflex, believed to have more cortical control, were more affected when a more difficult cognitive task was added. While not a strong trend, this may suggest that at minimum our protective strategies for balance recovery stay intact under a cognitive load, but your proposed study will hopefully add to this growing field. 
Additionally, this may help you, J Orthop Sports Phys Ther. 2010 Mar;40(3):180-7 - not healthy participants, but they utilized a biodex stability platform and manipulated surface stability.
Regards,
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Has the ACSM equation for measuring energy expenditure (Vo2max and Met equivalents) been validated in different ethinicties (including South Asians)?
Thanks
Saima
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Physical activity, ethnicity and cardio-metabolic health: Does one size fit all?
Jason M.R. Gilla, , , Carlos A. Celis-Moralesb, Nazim Ghouria
this article will help you, unfortunately we don't have data collectively for asian population
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I need a free software to simulate athletic movements, for example parallel movements in gymnastics. I will be appreciate that someone help me about this matter.
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Hi Bas
Thanks so much
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Ideally looking for a 7-day recall or usual self-report.  
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Dear Patrick,
However, as far as I am aware, validity of the previously mentioned questionnaires (GPAQ, IPAQ) has only been demonstrated for physical activity and not (extensively) for sedentary behaviour. For example, the IPAQ has only two questions addressing sitting time (none for overall sedentary behaviour), with one item asking for time spent sitting during the last seven days on a weekday and another asking for sitting time on a weekend day (each in hours and minutes). From my point of view, data from those questions are, at best, questionable.
Hence, I strongly agree with Dieter on the objective measurement of sedentary behaviour to take the risk of recall bias (and social desirability to a certain degree) out of the assessment. The papers attached might be of help in your decision which method may yield the appropriate data to answer your research question.
Bests,
Carsten
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Several studies suggest that when subjects mentally rehearse or execute a familiar action, they engage similar neural and cognitive operations. However,  some situations, among which the muscular fatigue can interfer directly in these mentally organization. In fact, there are, mainly physiological disorders that can also modifying the movement standard. I would like to receive recently papers which deal with this subject. 
Thanks!
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Several studies suggest that when subjects mentally rehearse or execute a familiar action, they engage similar neural and cognitive operations. Here, we examined whether muscle fatigue could influence mental movements. Participants mentally and actually performed a sequence of vertical arm movements (rotation around the shoulder joint) before and after a fatiguing exercise involving the right arm. We found similar durations for actual and mental movements before fatigue, but significant temporal discrepancies after fatigue. Specifically, mental simulation was accelerated immediately after fatigue, while the opposite was observed for actual execution. Furthermore, actual movements showed faster adaptation (i.e., return to prefatigue values) than mental movements. The EMG analysis showed that postfatigue participants programmed larger, compared to prefatigue, neural drives. Therefore, immediately after fatigue, the forward model received dramatically greater efferent copies and predicted faster, compared to prefatigue, arm movements. During actual movements, the discrepancy between estimated (forward model output) and actual state (sensory feedback) of the arm guided motor adaptation; i.e., durations returned rapidly to prefatigue values. Since during mental movements there is no sensory information and state estimation derives from the forward model alone, mental durations remained faster after fatigue and their adaptation was longer than those of actual movements. This effect was specific to the fatigued arm because actual and mental movements of the left nonfatigued arm were unaffected. The current results underline the interdependence of motor and cognitive states and suggest that mental actions integrate the current state of the motor system.
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Is one better than the other in improving hip ROM
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In my opinion exercises imrove blood supply and muscle strength actively, while heat packs do so in a passive way. So I prefer active exercises.
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Looking for details on measurement criteria, equipment and typical frequencies used.
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A recent paper in Medicine and Science in Sport and Exercise gave very good detail regarding the ultrasound settings as well as the calculations they performed including pennation angle.
Timmins, RG, Ruddy, JD, Presland, J, Maniar, N, Shield, AJ, Williams, MD, Opar, DA (2016) Architectural changes of the biceps femoris long head after concentric or eccentric training. Med Sci Sport Exer, 48(3): 499 - 508.
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Gut hormones could be used to meassure exercise induced anorexia, and grelin has some effect increasing hungry levels and energy intake, but there are many kinds of ghrelin (acilated ghrelin, non acylated ghrelin,total ghrelin, active ghrelin)
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Hi Victor,
Acylated ghrelin is the same as active ghrelin, yes! It was initially believed that only acylated ghrelin could cross the gut-brain barrier to communicate and thus play more of a role in feeding behaviour/appetite. However, recent research illustrates des acylated may also act to influence feeding behaviour/appetite. There are plenty of published research articles and reviews that can provide further information, especially related to exercise too. Take this one for example:
A word of caution. If you intend to measure AG, be sure to employ the correct methodological approach concerning sample handling and treatment. Again the most appropriate methods can be obtained throughout the literature. Briefly, your blood tubes require treatment (pre-blood sample), once spun you should spike the plasma with hydrochloric acid at a sufficient volume (if I remember rightly it is something like 100uL per 1mL of collected plasma) and subsequently respin prior to freezing.
I hope this helps. Regards,
Ben
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I want to look at various methods of monitoring fatigue of the somatic nervous system and how it relates to athletic performance and injury risk.
-Methods of measuring state of somatic nervous system
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The following references maybe help you.
Brasil-Neto, J. P., Pascual-Leone, A., Valls-Solé, J., Cammarota, A., Cohen, L. G., & Hallett, M. (1993). Postexercise depression of motor evoked potentials: a measure of central nervous system fatigue. Experimental Brain Research, 93(1), 181–184. http://doi.org/10.1007/BF00227794
Budiman, G. (2009). Somatic nervous system. Basic Neuroanatomical Pathway, 3–20. http://doi.org/10.4135/9781412972024.n2387
Chrousos, G. P., & Kino, T. (2009). Glucocorticoid signaling in the cell: Expanding clinical implications to complex human behavioral and somatic disorders. In Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences (Vol. 1179, pp. 153–166). http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1749-6632.2009.04988.x
Davis, J. M., Alderson, N. L., & Welsh, R. S. (2000). Serotonin and central nervous system fatigue: Nutritional considerations. In American Journal of Clinical Nutrition (Vol. 72). http://doi.org/10.1038/sj.npp.1301624
Davis, J. M., & Bailey, S. P. (1997). Possible mechanisms of central nervous system fatigue during exercise. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 29(1), 45–57. http://doi.org/10.1097/00005768-199701000-00008
Davis, J. M., Zhao, Z., Stock, H. S., Mehl, K. a, Buggy, J., & Hand, G. a. (2003). Central nervous system effects of caffeine and adenosine on fatigue. American Journal of Physiology. Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology, 284(2), 399–404. http://doi.org/10.1152/ajpregu.00386.2002
Enoka, R. M., & Stuart, D. G. (1992). Neurobiology of muscle fatigue. Journal of Applied Physiology (Bethesda, Md. : 1985), 72(5), 1631–1648. http://doi.org/0161-7567/92
Gandevia, S. C. (2001). Spinal and Supraspinal Factors in Human Muscle Fatigue. Physiol. Rev.,
Glass, J. M., Lyden, A. K., Petzke, F., Stein, P., Whalen, G., Ambrose, K., … Clauw, D. J. (2004). The effect of brief exercise cessation on pain, fatigue, and mood symptom development in healthy, fit individuals. Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 57(4), 391–398. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychores.2004.04.002
Irwin, M. R. (2011). Inflammation at the intersection of behavior and somatic symptoms. Psychiatric Clinics of North America. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.psc.2011.05.005
Kop, W. J. (2012). Somatic Depressive Symptoms, Vital Exhaustion, and Fatigue. Psychosomatic Medicine, 74(5), 442–445. http://doi.org/10.1097/PSY.0b013e31825f30c7
Noakes, T. D. (2012). Fatigue is a brain-derived emotion that regulates the exercise behavior to ensure the protection of whole body homeostasis. Frontiers in Physiology. http://doi.org/10.3389/fphys.2012.00082
Noakes, T. D., St Clair Gibson, A., & Lambert, E. V. (2005). From catastrophe to complexity: a novel model of integrative central neural regulation of effort and fatigue during exercise in humans: summary and conclusions. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 39(2), 120–4. http://doi.org/10.1136/bjsm.2003.010330
Pagani, M., & Lucini, D. (1999). Chronic fatigue syndrome: a hypothesis focusing on the autonomic nervous system. Clinical Science (London, England : 1979), 96, 117–125. http://doi.org/10.1042/CS19980139
Qiang, L., Inoue, K., & Abeliovich, A. (2014). Instant neurons: Directed somatic cell reprogramming models of central nervous system disorders. Biological Psychiatry. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsych.2013.10.027
Schon, E. A., DiMauro, S., & Hirano, M. (2012). Human mitochondrial DNA: roles of inherited and somatic mutations. Nat Rev Genet, 13(12), 878–890. http://doi.org/10.1038/nrg3275
Tanaka, M., Mizuno, K., Tajima, S., Sasabe, T., & Watanabe, Y. (2009). Central nervous system fatigue alters autonomic nerve activity. Life Sciences, 84(7-8), 235–239. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.lfs.2008.12.004
Tanaka, M., Shigihara, Y., Ishii, A., Funakura, M., Kanai, E., & Watanabe, Y. (2012). Effect of mental fatigue on the central nervous system: an electroencephalography study. Behavioral and Brain Functions, 8(1), 48. http://doi.org/10.1186/1744-9081-8-48
Zwarts, M. J., Bleijenberg, G., & van Engelen, B. G. M. (2008). Clinical neurophysiology of fatigue. Clinical Neurophysiology. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.clinph.2007.09.126
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Absolute change ( B -  F) and percentage change [(B -  F )/ B], where B and F are baseline and follow up values. I know, how to do this in excel, SPSS,  and base package of R, but I am looking for other options in R only. Thanks! 
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Hi Amit,
if you have a vector with data, you can use the function diff() to compute the absolute differences betewen B and F.
Example:
vector=c(1,2,4,4,3,1,8,32)
diff(vector)
[1] 1 2 0 -1 -2 7 24
The relative differences are computed using diff(vector) and the vector (except its last element):
diff(vector)/vector[-length(vector)]
[1] 1.0000000 1.0000000 0.0000000 -0.2500000
[5] -0.6666667 7.0000000 3.0000000
Well, these options are also within R base, but I can't think of a more elegant way ;o)
Cheers
Tobias
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white spot lesion
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thank you Dr Rafik Karaman
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Different studies to deal with this subject, however I would like to know, what's the real coordination between control of posture and movement?
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Marcelo,
pass me you email.
regards, A.
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Hello,
Sorry for the English, it is basic.
I studied some recommendations of exercises for people with McArdle's disease, and found no reference to water aerobics activities (discarding swimming). They could give me a guidance?
thank you
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Swimming or aquatic exercise may not be the best form of exercise for McArdle patients simply because it may challenge their balance and if they have to rapidly correct, it will cause a rapid muscle contraction which could lead to a contracture.
The advice for most patients with this condition would simply be to use walking in their everyday lives. Overload is useful for applying a stimulus; that will cause adaptation and, ultimately improve function. However, it is very important that all individuals with McArdle disease start exercise at a very low intensity. Even this can elicit pain and so the patient may need to slow down or stop until the pain has reduced or has gone. They should then start walking again or walk a little faster, this process should, continue until they reach a pace that they can walk at for around 10 minutes. Over 12-16weeks, it should be possible to increase the duration of walking until they are able to walk continuously with no, or only very mild, pain for 30 minutes. The ultimate plan is to build this up until patients are able to take 150 minutes of exercise per week. This is the recommended amount of exercise suggested by most guidelines as the minimum required to reduce risks to health. Of course, being a minimum, people should aim to do even more.....but one step at a time!