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Special Needs Education - Science topic

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If you work in primary education or with primary aged pupils either who have or do not have SEN.
Then would you consider filling out my questionnaire as part of my dissertation into professionals perspectives and definitions of inclusion.
If you could follow the link below that would be greatly appreciated. Thank you!!
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No I don't
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Hi Researchers Community!!
I am initiating a very relevant and useful discussion aiming at generating focused ideas and knowledge of how a teacher handles or should handle gifted and brilliant students in a normal class having varied differences. As it is an established fact that 21st century learners are more creative, innovative and smart comparably, reason being their having easy and granted access to technology since their early age. They are more techno-friendly in comparison to older generation teachers. Today's classes have maximum diversity that existed never. Mostly it happens in case when a teacher faces bright and gifted learners in his normal class, they are overlooked and their special educational demands are hardly met. This problem has severed in modern time, and we can no longer treat creative students with unjust. The teacher should organise well thought strategies and approches to deal and handle exceptionally good students. How do you carry out this task in your class? You need to share your experience and knowledge here for the enlightenment of other fellow researcher. Your all sort of views are most welcomed in advance. Thank you in very much anticipation.
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I am conducting a study with the following variables:
Dependent variables:
Need for referral (10cm analogue scale) - continuous data
Yes or No question about child's development - nominal data
Independent variables:
Ethnicity of child
Gender of child
Gender of teacher
General Self-efficacy (GSE) score of teacher
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The hypotheses are:
Hypothesis 1: Male vignettes will be scored a higher need for referral compared to female vignettes
Hypothesis 2: The need for referral will be lower for White British children’s vignettes compared to other ethnicities vignettes
Hypothesis 3: Recognition of atypical development will be lower for White British children’s vignettes compared to other ethnicities vignettes
Hypothesis 4: Female teachers will rate a higher need for referral compared to male teachers
Hypothesis 5: Teachers with high self-efficacy will recognise atypical development more accurately than teachers with low self-efficacy
Hypothesis 6: Teachers with low self-efficacy will rate higher need for referral than teachers with high self-efficacy
I am hoping to find out the ability of Early Years educators to recognise and refer children with SLCN.
I am struggling to decide which analysis method I should use. I would really appreciate some guidance. Thank you.
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Seeking information about universities and colleges that offer a full or partial scholarship in any of these areas: (coursework/research -- graduate programs) in Education, Social Work, Sociology, Special Education, Psychology, Counselling, Educational Technology and Mental Health.
Thank you for reading!
Your comments mean
a lot to me.
Please share it🙏
You can also reach out to me
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@Samy Azer thank you very much the information. I will be on the search.
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I'm working with people on the autistic spectrum and this is an area which I need to find out about. Does anyone know of anything?
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What is your idea about this?
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I think that in the area of ​​social policies - financial provision, social counseling for families, problems are better resolved.
Education policy remains the most difficult, despite some positive results. One of the reasons is the variety of clinical symptoms (basic and additional) that are not always well known by the trainers. Another important reason is the difficulty in developing adequate training methods tailored to the individual needs of the students. Of course, in recent years, we have been working very actively in this direction.
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Hello everyone,
I am currently writing my thesis on parental denial of students with special needs. It's primary audience is parents and counselors and what factors contribute to their initial denial and rejection of their child's needs. It focuses on the parent's needs throughout the process of going through denial and their emotional state. Can anyone recommend any survey or questionnaire I can use?
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Mool Raj: Caroline Chioquetta Lorenset gave a good suggestion. I did a narrative study on the blind or visually impaired. It is an up hill battle for people with any form of disability. Both for parent, child and adult.
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Severe Intellectual Disabilities
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Presented at an awesome conference on Inclusion in January in Mumbai, organized by The Centre for Disability Studies and Action (CDSA), School of Social Work of TISS Mumbai, and Brotherhood, Delhi. The proceedings are about to be published in book format. Look out for it. The dialogues (mostly Indian scholars and practitioners) were extraordinarily rich, diverse, resourceful and forward thinking. I find that the emerging dialogue on Inclusion in India is perhaps more ambitious than it has become in Canada for example. We are still focusing here, three decades on, on retrofitting and accommodations rather than on genuine and proactive inclusion by design. India may well overtake us by focusing early on and more directly on things like UDL. I also loved the constant reminders by our Indian colleagues that inclusive solutions proposed needed to be sustainable and have the ability to be scaled up. Demographics are constantly on the forefront of inclusive practices in the Indian context and that is a good thing; we perhaps loose sight of this imperative in North America.
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We know global orientations concerning special needs, but each country apply inclusion and pedagogical support differently. I'd like to hear from countries as Switzerland and Germany. Many thanks!
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The majority of children with disabilities are enrolled in mainstream education in Croatia, while children with extensive, multiple disabilities are enrolled in special education institutions. The goal is to provide every child with the opportunity of learning in the natural environment and therefore there is a tendency of placing and supporting the children in mainstream education.
Educational inclusion is implemented according to two models of education, full and partial inclusion. Full inclusion implies the inclusion of students with disabilities in mainstream class in which they master the regular curriculum customized to individualized ways of learning or curricula adjusted to their capabilities. . Partial inclusion means that pupils with disabilities (mostly mild intellectual disability) part of education (math, language, science) acquire in a separate class with special education teacher, and the other part (arts and PE) in the mainstream class with regular teacher. Children with disabilities, their teachers and parents have professional support from special education needs consultant (SENCo).
Croatia followed international trends and made provisions in its national educational plans, strategies and legislation for the teacher assistant. The teacher assistant and mobile expert team support for children with disabilities, implemented in Croatia from 2007, is one of the models of support aimed at improving access to mainstream education.
In the past 35 years, the inclusive education of children with disabilities has been faced with many challenges, such as: negative attitudes of teachers, inadequate training for teachers, insufficient educational support to children, architectural barriers (Žic Ralić, 2012). Precisely the elimination of these barriers represents noticeable positive changes, but these changes are not equally implemented in all schools in Croatia.
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I am interested in looking at propensity score matching comparing children that receive and do not receive services.
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1. The effects of special education service on the self‐concept and school attitude of learning disabled/gifted students. By M.Elizabeth Nielsen and Susan Mortorff-Albert published by Taylor & Francis Online if your university has access to.
This study examined the effects of special education programming upon the self‐concepts and attitudes toward school of 76 learning disabled/gifted students. All students had been identified as learning disabled by their school and had an IQ score at or above 124. Eighty percent of the subjects had been labeled as learning disabled/gifted by the school system. The subjects were receiving a variety of special education services, self‐contained classes for learning disabled/gifted, a combination of learning disability resource room and pull‐out program gifted service, learning disability service only, or gifted programming only. These students generally expressed positive attitudes toward school.
The results suggested significant program effects: for general self‐concept, for self‐concept related to perceptions of intellectual ability, for self‐concept related to feelings of anxiety, and for attitudes toward the social aspects of school. Among the school‐labeled learning disabled/gifted, those students receiving either a combination of both gifted and learning disability service or only gifted programming reported higher self‐concepts than did those students receiving intense or exclusive learning disability service.
2. Also A Propensity Score Matching Analysis of the Effects of Special Education Services which you can also access if your college have access to ERIC Journals
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Does any one know of Neuro-linguistic program for use by individuals with dyslexia please?
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you can read this file
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I need articles about the orthography learning by dyslexics.
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Dear Biria,
I didn't found the links that you invite me. Could you help me?
Thanks a lot.
Luciana.
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teachers approaches to teaching personal hygiene to the deaf.
a research on teachers approaches in teaching personal hygiene.
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Unless the student has cognitive deficits, the instruction would be the same as hearing students.  A general health curriculum would cover instruction on personal hygiene.  Modification to the disbursement of instruction may include closed captioning in videos; provided any were given in the instruction.  If hearing is the only area of disability, that would be the only modification needed to enable the learner to engage in the typical classroom instruction.  
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I am looking for some studies explaining why some children, despite their normal vision, get enrolled in special schools for visually impaired, especially in developing countries. 
Thank you. 
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@Kannamah Mottan
Its the scenario (a). In my study, I found almost 7% of the children attending a primary school for the blind (exclusively for the visually impaired) had normal or near normal vision and were able to read print books and write. (Also seen in many other studies from blind schools)
The 'system' should have identified these children at the time of enrollment, so that they could attend mainstream schools. Lack of proper examination due to limited facilities and professional may have contributed. But what other factors might have caused this? I am thinking financial benefits, associated physical disability and dis figuration... any thing else?
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I am trying to formulate a research proposal for occupational therapy using the theoretical model of Occupational Adaptation and Vona du Toit Model of Creative Ability. I am trying to discover if one can determine a level of intrinsic motivation; and if through intervention, intrinsic motivation may be improved? Any suggestions, research designs or clarification on studies (outside of occupational therapy) that have addressed this before? 
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Thank you for your input Donna. I certainly appreciate it! Right now I am focused on discovering any correlations that may exist between the OA and the VdTMoCA. For this particular study I will use the Relative Mastery Measurement scale and the Creative Participation Assessment.
I like the idea of conducting further studies using additional measures in order to solidify validity and reliability.
Thank you again!
Joseph Noack, OTR
PhD Student, Texas Woman's University
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I'm writting an article that aims to describe the potencial of infographics on literacy development and children with special educational needs. Does any one knows any publication?
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Ive seen one journal Volume 19 issue 1 all about disability studies...http://www.ifets.info/ 
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We are also interested on families adaptation to Fragile X Syndrome
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I am currently seeing a boy diagnosed with Autism and Fragile X. We have found Applied Behavior Analysis to be very effective. In terms of family adjustment, this has been a challenge and dealing with the challenging behaviors has been difficult as well.
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Is there any researcher interested in agricultural vocational training for students with special needs ?
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Dear Richard Zigler, Thank you.
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I am working with a special needs teen who's mental age is many years younger. They are engaging in self-harm and seeking attention. I am looking to learn more about possible positive substitutions for this behaviour 
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I am currently completing my MEd. thesis on examination accommodation support for students with autism spectrum disorder. I am wondering does any body know of any recent studies in this area or if you could point me in the right direction for any literature relating to this? I am looking at current provision of reasonable accommodations in Ireland but any international or national information would be most welcome. Thank you. 
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- Appeal to the results of direct and indirect psychological of autistic assessments.
- Assessments of the potential emotions, feelings and affections of autistics.
- Assessments of the psycho-motor sensory and motor development,: psychomotor and sociability of the autistics.
- Effectuation of several case studies analysis and, after individual reviews, find common denominators of autism.
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bibliography
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Behavioral treatments for the core symptoms of autism in young children (up to 7 years of age) usually take longer time such as 10 to 20 hours per week.  But behavioral treatments for focused problem areas such as irritability in children ages 3 to 8 or anxiety in children ages 8 to 14 can be delivered as one-hour per week interventions over 4 to 6 months. 
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My PHD study topic is centered around the availability and use of ICTs for the visually impaired in public libraries. In doing literature searches I found very little recent information available (in the form of published papers) on the topic with specific reference to the US and UK respectively. A request is hereby made for anyone with such information to send to me.
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Thanks Siddhartha, appreciated
Regards
Maurice
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I have recently conducted research on post-secondary schools in every province of Canada  and have found that 70% of the institutions (serving over 43,000 students with disabilities) routinely provide ETTA of 150% of the standard time provided to students without disabilities. I have contacted the CPA, school psychologists, and experts in the field of accommodations, and no one can tell me where this practice originates. This is a troubling finding, as no research has been conducted that supports ETTA of 150% as a blanket accommodation. I am interested in explaining this finding, and your help in doing so it very appreciated.
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Hi Laura! Are you doing a comparative analysis? If you are then check these out! Regards!
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/11/07/education/edlife/07strategy-t.html Nov 7, 2010 ... Students with learning disabilities or A.D.H.D. now make up the bulk of disabled ... Extended time is the most requested accommodation.
http://www.dfeh.ca.gov/LSACFinalPanelReport.htm In light of the anticipated number of applications for testing accommodations, and the ... (with a rationale and objective basis for the testing accommodations requested). ... who have a learning disability and seek extra time as an accommodation. ..... accommodation requests that do not involve requests for extended time. Disabilities and Health-related Needs: Frequently Asked Questions https://www.ets.org/disabilities/test_takers/faq/ Why do I need to be reevaluated if my disability (such as a learning disability, ... If I want to bring snacks or a bottle of water into the test center to help me .... What is the purpose of Part III — the Certification of Eligibility: Accommodations History form? ... Test takers with LD and/or ADHD requesting 50 percent extended time ... The Politics of Learning Disabilities | LD Topics | LD OnLine http://www.ldonline.org/article/6106/ The field of learning disabilities (LD) is inherently political. .... Thus, with the loss of a scientific foundation to provide a logical and rational base, LD ... Disabilities Education Act), the LD population has increased by approximately 150%. ..... from the simple (and most common) such as extended time on tests to the complex, ... Developmental Education - Portland Community College https://www.pcc.edu/resources/academic/program-review/documents/DE2012ProgramReview.pdf Apr 1, 2012 ... Cascade campus Student Learning Center; and Tanya Batazhan for .... Appendix C: Summary of Rock Creek Experimental Courses .... 90 and RD 80, 90, and 115, and full-time faculty have been added at most ... with the COMPASS Reading and Writing Skills test to place students. ...... accommodations. A Review of Models for Computer-Based Testing - US Department of ... http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED562580.pdf Executive Summary . ..... Comparing Linear, Adaptive, and Mastery Test Models . ... sufficient time to complete the test, implementation of new item types, and ... and universities; temporary CBT testing facilities set up at auditoriums, hotels, or ... formats, constructed- or extended-response items, essays, technology- enhanced ... IPEDS Survey Material: Glossary - US Department of Education https://surveys.nces.ed.gov/ipeds/Downloads/Forms/IPEDSGlossary.pdf The score at or below which 25 percent of students submitting test scores to an ... with a college of education or veterinary and dental clinics if their primary purpose is to ... The period of time generally extending from September to June; usually .... University Audit Guide. Model. A financial reporting model defined by AICPA.
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Why is differentiation for children with SEBD effective and why is it not effective? What are the problems differentiation creates for children with SEBD, teachers and other children in the classroom? 
Relevant books and articles would be highly appreciated.
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Hello Nnenna:
Part of differentiation is accommodating for diverse cultural backgrounds among your students. The attached gives an idea of how this can be achieved. I hope this is helpful in answering your question.
Many thanks,
Debra
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Do we use assistive technologies to their full potential? What ways have we seen, in what ways do we use them? Are there any researchers out there living on the edge of inclusion, independently using assistive technologies?
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Assessment 
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Down Syndrome is a condition that straight away qualifies the child for funding, if the child is an Australian citizen or a permanent resident ( may be available for NZ residents, need to check, information is there on myGov social security). Down syndrome has an obvious genetic diagnostic criteria. There is an assumed understanding that children with down syndrome will require funding and support. Till 6 years one can access Betterstart funding (information is available on the web).  At a preschool level, the centre manager/ principal can apply for funding or the early intervention services can guide accordingly. There is a limit however if one chooses only to stay with early intervention till school transition or use in somewhere else, depends on policies of the centre/preschool. For a speech pathologist, we may have to assist by contributing to an IEP( individualised education plan) or IFSP( Individualised family service plan) along with the child's parents, teacher and other therapists involved. For a baseline function of expressive and receptive language I think one could use PLS-5. It will depend on IQ test results( done by other professionals), child's needs, family choice, which type of educational setting the child will be/can be included. Worthwhile attending NDIS seminar to see what's being changed! Hope that helps.
I have no scientific evidence or references for the above, it's from my own personal experience and knowledge. 
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I am very interested in the academic transition of students with disabilities
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Dear Nicholas and Enrico, thank you for your referencies.
Best reguasrds
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Children with autism have strengths with technology and visuals. They often have weaknesses with handwriting, spelling and both oral and written communication. No research could be found linking children with autism and picture to text software for writing. I was wondering if I missed something.
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Try this article:
Douglas, K. H., Ayres, K. M., Langone, J., & Bramlett, V. B. (2011). The effectiveness of electronic text and pictorial graphic organizers to improve comprehension related to functional skills. Journal of Special Education Technology, 26(1), 43-56. Retrieved from http://ezp.waldenulibrary.org/login?url=https://search.proquest.com/docview/863236728?accountid=14872
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I work on educational program right now.so, I need some information and studies about the teaching strategies that I can use with ADHD
What are  the changes that we can do with classroom environment to reduce such kind of disorder
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Please see the attached on why France has more success with addressing ADHD than the U.S.
Best regards,
Debra
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I would be interested in any studies that have looked at agreement between parent/caregiver rating and self report ratings of social or physical competence for participants with Intellectual Disability. Anything you know of with child or adult participants would be very helpful.
Thanks, Rosie
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Hi Rosie
This might be slightly off topic, but we recently conducted a study examining client, carer, and clinical psychologists' perceptions of barriers and facilitators to therapeutic change within an intellectual disability setting. Although our study did not look at quantitative consensus in relation to social competency, etc., the paper may be useful background reading for highlighting aspects of convergence and divergence between individuals with an ID, their carers, and the professionals involved with them.
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Currently, I am trying to find data about the use of ICT with SEN children in the schools contexts. I am a SEN teacher, but a student too, and I am investigating why it is so hard to find teachers that use these technologies with these children when the results are quite promising. There is a little evidence of this, and it is comes down to specific technologies to use with specific disabilities. That 's okey for my investigation but I need another information, focus on teachers and their concepts, aptitude and attitude towards the use of ICT with their special pupils. Because finally, they are gonna be the ones who use it and decide how to use it.
Thanks in advance.
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Hi Yolanda
Yes, I have done a lot of work in this area - although nearly all of it with adults with learning disabilities. I am attaching a reference list - let me know if you think any of them might be of interest (don't worry - I won't be offended if none of them are!) Suerte!
Pete
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Dear Sir/Madam's
My name is Jack Gilbert. I am a final year student at the University of Northampton studying BA Special Educational Needs and Inclusion. I am currently undertaking some research on whether dance/movement could be used as an intervention to support children with Autism. I am asking whether it would be possible to interview anybody who works within this field.
The interview would last approximately 30- 40 minutes and can be in a location that is virtually for you (whether face to face, telephone or virtually). 
Your confidentiality and anonymity will be remained throughout and the research will abide with the University of Northampton's ethical guidelines. The research will also be stored securely.  
I am very aware you must all be extremely busy so I would like to thank you in advance for reading this text. Any information would be useful. 
If you would like to take part within my research, or have any questions about the research, please contact myself 
Kind Regards,
Jack Gilbert 
BA SEN & Inclusion student at the University of Northampton 
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Jack, I have certainly heard of some children on the spectrum benefiting from karate or other more formalized movement disciplines. using dance for "therapy" to help improve in those areas  like dance and gymnastics, and karate helps so much in morale, especially when morale can be so difficult in other areas of life.  My own daughter, who didn't have autism, but had issues in motor skills when she was little, was in a gymnastics program at Easter Seals that took place in a regular gymnastics facility where other children were becoming athletes.  I think that setting became an important aspect to the success of that program.  Yes, there were children on the spectrum in her classes, but it was better for these classes to be conducted in a public facility rather than somewhere dedicated exclusively to children with special needs.  It gave them a way to feel proud of their accomplishments.
I also would be interested in seeing interdisciplinary approaches used to tie in issues in the biochemistry with any difficulties in movement.  I've dreamed of seeing some occupational and physical therapists formalizing evaluations in this sort of area...evaluating such things as stiffness, and vestibular function and even strength and muscle mass and speed.  I've seen what is possible at a gait clinic that deals mainly with people recovering from injuries or  from MS.  An autism center could develop formal standards  that later could be used to evaluate function for many adults with other developmental disorders.  But, for "treatment", the more normal setting (how people with no diagnosis build these skills), seems better overall.
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what I am interested in is the application of theoretical work in the development of research methods, I.e to operationalise the theory and show its cogent value.
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HI Fiona
Good to hear from you.  Well I would say rather that your definition of Ableism informed the research question and the interpretation of the findings of the thematic analysis.  We described our TA as Critical TA and the critical 'bit' was indeed informed by your work on Ableism.  Make sense?!  Cheers
Mark
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In terms of abilities- I am referring to children with EAL or physical or learning difficulties in state-funded primary schools   
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I think yes, this tests are very good and have a high grade of confiability and validity
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Focussing on strategies used compared to those used within a mainstream classroom, and benefits for children with SEBD. All research welcome. Thank You
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Dear Sarah,
I have some related research article.
Please find it as file attachment.
Hope it will be useful.
Happy researching...
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As advocates of inclusive education, we sometimes mean well in showing the full faces of children with disabilities (perhaps, well mean) in our promotional materials in an effort to draw attention to our promotional messages. But, should we be promoting how to make the learning environments more inclusive so that other educators can be informed on how to prepare for inclusive education? For example, showing how assistive technology tools can be used to make the learning environment more inclusive. What are your thoughts on this issue?
Many thanks,
Debra
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I think it is an interesting challenging question. But I do not have high experience in this issue, because I am a young lecturer. Thank you for sharing your question. Surely I will learn a lot form pursuing the responds of sophisticated RG members.
Regards,
Mehdi
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Paraprofessionals respective teacher assistants play an important part in learning of students with special needs in inclusive settings. Most of the available studies don't distinguish closely respectively the kind of special needs. In Germany the differentiation between various kinds of special needs is traditional high. So I'm searching specific finding for children with intellectual disabilities. Thank's for a hint!
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Read the work of Giangreco on teaching assistants - very illuminating. Such asBroer, S. M., Doyle, M. B., & Giangreco, M. F. (2005). Perspectives of students with intellectual disabilities about their experiences with paraprofessional support. Exceptional children, 71(4), 415.
Also there has been an huge evaluation of how teaching assistants have impacted student outcomes in the UK. Read some of their findings in the work of Blatchford and others e.g.Webster, R., Blatchford, P., Bassett, P., Brown, P., Martin, C., & Russell, A. (2010). Double standards and first principles: Framing teaching assistant support for pupils with special educational needs. European Journal of Special Needs Education, 25(4), 319-336.
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the title of my study is "Challenging Behaviors in Relation to Social Skills in Adolescents with Moderate Intellectual Disabilities"
I like your papers published in  this field but I need to know you point of view about this topic. Unfortunately, there are not enough resources about this topic in Egypt. I wonder if  you could help me by any means. If you have any scales and researches available about this topic, would you please tell me where I can find them?
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Dear Ali, i never used the scale, however, after reading somepapers i have get the impression that this is a psychometric sound instrument that is well defined and constructed and matches the current understanding of ID perfectly, so it could fit. Take into account that it is like the vabs an interview based procedure, probably a scale is easier to use in research context 
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The people with disabilities can become one of the most benefited sections of the society from the Internet technology. These people can be the blind, deaf, physically disabled, old age etc.
Are there any framework, model, guideline or laws that help towards the accessibility of the website on the Internet? If any, What are those?
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The US Department of Health & Human Services has developed a set of guidelines to address this.
Take a look at the link provided below.
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It would be useful to have a standard outcome measure to facilitate service audit. The difficulty is that whilst there are various outcome measures recommended for people with mild to moderate learning/intellectual disabilities, there seems to be a dearth of measures for people with more severe intellectual / learning disabilities. 
The ideal measure would be:
  • Quick to administer
  • Easy to understand
  • Applicable to people with as wide a range of intellectual disabilities as possible.
Any information / recommendations would be very much appreciated!
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Thanks, Charlie. A lot of work went into them. Hopefully they'll prove to be a useful addition to the world of mood assessment...
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These research based programs need to be applicable to special needs students ages 3 to 9 years old. They should be able assist me in my teaching practice in helping special needs student excel academically. 
And would also appreciate sources to locate additional secondary data to support the effectiveness.
Thanks
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Check out the What Works Clearinghouse of the IES:
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The link attached has an article where Erin, a student of mine had published about me.
Now my question here is, whether its the online or offline medium, what are the various teaching aids available for disabled students?
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The problem is not to find aids (as everyone knows there are endless catalogs of these materials for special education), but to make a proper assessment of the disabled person, that assessment must also be educational, especially if the person is aged evolutionary.
Use aids without an assessment is not effective. The assessment should include the levels of development of neuroimaging subject.
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I am using ICF as a conceptual framework in research of school to work transition for young people with disability. I am also using social inclusion theory for analysis and ICF to frame the questions and design research instruments but am struggling with how to use ICF framework as its implication is large. If you could please suggest sample of the question guide, it would be wonderful.
Thank you,
Huong
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How to "use" the ICF is akin to asking how to "use" a car.  There are technical aspects and then there are those left to your creativity and inventiveness.  Technical aspects include the use of the codes and qualifiers and the needed assessments to map onto them.  Clinicians and scholars alike are often frustrated by the ICF because it does not "tell" you how to do much of anything.  It as never intended to dictate but to provide a common framework for professionals to design effective real life programs to enable all people to reach their full potential.  What works ICF wise in country X for elderly patients with dementia does not have to be same as for country Y for children with cerebral palsy.  Home health care has different components than skilled nursing home care.  Specifically, in the ICF it states "As a classification, ICF does not model the “process” of functioning and disability. It can be used, however, to describe the process by providing the means to map the different constructs and domains. It provides a multiperspective approach to the classification of functioning and disability as an interactive and evolutionary process. It provides the building blocks for users who wish to create models and study different aspects of this process. In this sense, ICF can be seen as a language: the texts that can be created with it depend on the users, their creativity and their scientific orientation"  Which use, which measurements will ultimately prove the best?. That is what research is for and the ideas you come up with may be just as legitimate as those who have been studying disability for years.  In addition, research builds upon previous work. But someone has to start, someone has to be the first to try.  It may fail but that is of great value because then everyone knows not to go down that route again.  If there are any specific articles of mine you would like, I would be glad to share them.
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I want to do a longitudinal study on dyslexia and reading difficulties
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In Italia:
Criteri generali per la valutazione della lettura strumentale
(dalla Consensus Conference):
Rispetto al Disturbi Specifico di decodifica della lettura, oltre ai criteri generali relativi a tutta la categoria dei DSA, i punti generalmente condivisi riguardano:
1)la necessità di somministrare prove standardizzate di lettura a più livelli: lettere, parole, non-parole, brano;
2)la necessità di valutare congiuntamente i due parametri di rapidità/accuratezza nella performance;
3)la necessità di stabilire una distanza significativa dai valori medi attesi per la classe frequentata dal bambino [convenzionalmente fissata a -2ds dalla media per la velocità e al di sotto del 5° percentile per l’accuratezza], in uno o nell’altro dei due parametri menzionati.
Prove di Correttezza e Rapidità
1) Prove di Lettura MT per la Scuola Elementare - 2
  di Cesare Cornoldi e Giovanni Colpo 1998 – OS Editore
2) Nuove Prove di Lettura MT per la Scuola Media Inferiore
  di Cesare Cornoldi e Giovanni Colpo 1995 – OS Editore
Le prove:
 - I elementare: intermedia e finale
 - II elementare: ingresso intermedia e finale
 - III elementare: ingresso intermedia e finale
 - IV elementare: ingresso e finale
 - V elementare: ingresso e finale
 - I media: ingresso e finale
- II media: ingresso e finale
- III media: ingresso e finale
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we are a special developmental school and are submitting a grant application and need to add some peer reviewed research
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The only article  have passed by in this regard is this article from journal of intellectual disabilities last year.
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Raeff talks of independence being a social construct based on the value placed on aspects of independence in each society. I would like to draw a picture of the value in my own society. Have you done this in yours? What documents did you use to help define the value placed? I have looked at the requirements for assistance for disability as a starting point. Any thoughts?
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Roy mcConkey's work highlighted having a key to the front door
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Can anyone help me with finding journal articles relating to sensory play with SEN children?
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Hi Kerri,
I'm a pediatric occupational therapist and certified Sensory Integration and Praxis Therapist (SIPT) who specializes in impact of technology on children. Four critical factors for child development, learning and behavior are movement, touch, attachment, and nature. 
Movement stimulates the vestibular, proprioceptive, and cardiovascular systems, resulting in stable core, motor coordination, energy release/balance, and physical health and well being.  Touch and attachment activate the parasympathetic system to reduce adrenalin and cortisol, resulting in a calm, secure, and relaxed child. Nature play activates all sensory systems, resulting in a child who is optimally developed, and ins a school setting, can pay attention and learn.
The use of technology (TV, video games, tablets, cell phones etc) prevents engagement in movement, touch, attachment, and nature. Technology use by adults and children results in a child who is sedentary, overstimulated, isolated, and neglected.
Supporting research can be located on my Fact Sheet on www.zonein.ca. My email is crowan@zonein.ca.
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What research has been carried out on students with disabilities in Higher Education in Africa?
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Puede usted utilizar el estudio de caso o la generación de proyectos de intervención. 
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What is the best way to identify low achievers in the classroom? Is there an instrument for that? I mean low achievers not persons living with learning disabilities.
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To be direct and normative philosophy aside, it is all about students who obtain high marks and those who do not.
The meaning and implications of the tern "Low Achievers" depend on how you look at it.  What is for sure is that "Low Achievers" are allocated to the opposite side of the "high achievers" in the classroom grade Bell Curve (Normal curve) . The decision on exactly what percentage 'should be' considered as low achievers depends on the criterion you yourself  set to "Average achievers". Low achievers are on the left side of the curve.  Is this 'arbitrary', non-sense and even damaging? Yes, it is.
I think you mean to help those in the class who get lower grades. You might want to take a look at the meta-analysis works reported in the book " Visible Learning" by John Hattie. What I find interesting in this work is even in simple activities such as summer camp, high achievers get significantly more than  low achievers. (Hey, by the way, nobody likes tagging people with any kinds of low or high adjectives. I never do that, not even as a joke)
So, here, the Matthew effect (or accumulated advantage) "the rich get richer and the poor get poorer" that sociologists use as a descriptive tool actually happens.  What it suggests to me is the following. Not "learning disabilities" but  " learning difficulties" seem to be real. I think here (Zone of proximal development to use Vygotsky),  the mission of teachers should be.  Cheers
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Please suggest some teaching material.
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Good book written by Steve Chinn "The trouble with maths". Good guide for the assessment and intervention of students with mathematics difficulty. 
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I'm looking for a scale on friendship quality I could use with teenagers and adults with intellectual disabilities. I'll be grateful for any suggestions.
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This friendship assessment scale contains an example, and some good references at the end that include works on underprivileged groups. 
I suggest you also consult established scales on:
-- social anxiety
-- self-perception 
-- attachment styles
***
I think it would be interesting to find out if there's variation between individuals whether they are aware (at all) about their handicaps, and whether that self-perception affects their social confidence and ability to bond with others, and ultimately, how those affect the social experience / bonding they have with others. 
***
An example, Down Syndrome people are easy to recognized. It is not clear to laymen and general public if they are aware that they are physically (not to say mentally) different from "normal" people. 
Yet, in many societies, it is quite well recognized that Down Syndrome people, despite intellectual retardation, have kind and almost "angelic" hearts. They are favorably perceived in the media as innocent, blameless individuals. Therefore to look down upon them or treat them wrongfully, would be socially unacceptable. 
***
You may want to narrow down your subject types to make a more focused investigation. (Like a particular type of retardation, rather than any retardation). Autism, for example, presents very different cases: autistic individuals look physically normal, but their coldness and self-fixation could arouse unpleasant surprises. This is going to affect their social experience. 
Good luck on your study. 
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Usually children with hearing impairment face many problems after integration to normal school. I would like to know what may be probably the major challenges these children faces in integrated school setting.
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One of my students is doing a research with mothers of hard of hearing children and their children. We want to use collaborative story telling and dialogic reading
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The staff of the Shared Reading Project at Gallaudet should be able to provide useful information. https://www.gallaudet.edu/clerc-center/information-and-resources/training-and-technical-assistance/workshops-and-training-institutes/srp-workshop-details.htmlThere is a Shared Reading Project site in our area and the families rave about it (whether their children have auditory access or not).
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Does anyone know what the grade level is that public schools are required to teach up to for children with disabilities? For instance, children with disabilities can attend school until age 21 or they can drop out of school if they so desire regardless of grade level. For instance, intellectually challenged people could stay in school until age 21 but never reach the educational level of the 6th grade because it's not possible for them to go beyond the 6th grade. Is the 6th grade the cutoff for teaching children with exceptionalities? 
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It is not determined by grade level, but by individual goals and objectives as specified in the IEP.  Those students not achieving grade level standards will receive a 'Certificate' rather than a regular high school diploma.  
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I need some newly assessment tools in autism including Autism Spectrum Disorder- Comorbid for Children (ASD-CC), Autism Spectrum Disorder- Diagnostic for Children (ASD-DC), Autism Spectrum Disorder- Problem Behavior for Children (ASD-PBC), and Profile of Toileting Issues (POTI).
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I'm looking for any feedback as they are claiming to teach speech and reading skills to people with autism, Down syndrome and other special needs. 
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Down syndrome children have poor language skills due to reduced general intelligence from their abnormal genes, and because of their almost universal otitis media and hearing loss.  Once these are taken into account, I doubt that there is a specific speech or reading disorder, or need for specific teaching methods.
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From a legal perspective, children entitled to special education are entitled to an individualized plan.  Only so many approaches are likely to work, however, so I'm trying to locate research on the question of whether differentiated education is actually necessary in order to deliver special education services. 
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Suggest you read: Hattie, John (2008). Visible Learning: A Synthesis of Over 800 Meta-Analyses Relating to Achievement. NY: Routledge. p. 392. ISBN 978-0-415-47618-8. Whilst it could be argued that differentiated education is not actually necessary in order to deliver special education services or, indeed, any educational services, such education that lacks differentiation is not likely to deliver any worthwhile educational outcomes. In the UK, OfSTED inspectors and peer observers are not likely to endorse teaching practice that does not contain elements of differentiation as a matter of routine for all children. Differentiation is likely to be of particular importance for children with special educational needs.
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This is for my Thesis for my Master's in Elementary Education. Please note I am also doing my Master's in Special Education with an emphasis in Autism. I currently work in an alternative school setting with children with HFASD, but I need to find articles and research findings to support this question. Thanks you.
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Hi Breann,
That's a very interesting subject! You can find a lot of articles about the inclusion of HFASD children (dealing with both challenges and benefits). There is a inspiring department of education, working on inclusion for children with special needs (mainly ASD) in Manchester University: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/research/neil.humphrey/research (page of Dr. Humphrey).
Here are some of their research :
Hebron, J., Humphrey, N., & Oldfield, J. (2015). Vulnerability to bullying of children with autism spectrum conditions in mainstream education: a multi-informant qualitative exploration. Journal of Research in Special Educational Needs, n/a‑n/a. http://doi.org/10.1111/1471-3802.12108
Humphrey, N. (2008). Including pupils with autistic spectrum disorders in mainstream schools. Support for learning, 23(1), 41–47.
Humphrey, N., & Lewis, S. (2008a). Make me normal’The views and experiences of pupils on the autistic spectrum in mainstream secondary schools. Autism, 12(1), 23–46.
Humphrey, N., & Lewis, S. (2008b). What Does « Inclusion » Mean for Pupils on the Autistic Spectrum in Mainstream Secondary Schools? Journal of Research in Special Educational Needs, 8(3), 132‑140.
Humphrey, N., & Symes, W. (2013). Inclusive Education for Pupils with Autistic Spectrum Disorders in Secondary Mainstream Schools: Teacher Attitudes, Experience and Knowledge. International Journal of Inclusive Education, 17(1), 32‑46.
Symes, W., & Humphrey, N. (2011). School Factors that Facilitate or Hinder the Ability of Teaching Assistants to Effectively Support Pupils with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) in Mainstream Secondary Schools. Journal of Research in Special Educational Needs, 11(3), 153‑161.
Symes, W., & Humphrey, N. (2012). Including Pupils with Autistic Spectrum Disorders in the Classroom: The Role of Teaching Assistants. European Journal of Special Needs Education, 27(4), 517‑532.
I have all these papers: if you are interested, just ask me.
Moreover, there are some others papers that can help you, such as:
- De Schauwer, E., Van Hove, G., Mortier, K., & Loots, G. (2009). ‘I Need Help on Mondays, It’s Not My Day. The Other Days, I’m OK’.—Perspectives of Disabled Children on Inclusive Education. Children & Society, 23(2), 99-111 (it's not specifically about HFASD but it provides some insighful thinking about perceptions from the children).
- Moores-Abdool, W. (2010). Included Students with Autism and Access to General Curriculum: What Is Being Provided?. Issues in Teacher Education, 19(2), 153-169.
- Sansosti, J. M., & Sansosti, F. J. (2012). Inclusion for Students with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders: Definitions and Decision Making. Psychology In The Schools, 49(10), 917-931. doi:10.1002/pits.21652 (file attached)
- Morewood, G. D., Humphrey, N., & Symes, W. (2011). Mainstreaming autism: making it work. Good Autism Practice, 12(2), 62-68. (file attached)
This one may interest you too:
- Chandler‐Olcott, K., & Kluth, P. (2009). Why everyone benefits from including students with autism in literacy classrooms. The Reading Teacher, 62(7), 548-557 (I like the idea that including children with ASD benefits to everyone)
Enjoy your reading and your research!
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I'm looking to set up an Academic Resource Centre in a UK secondary school and would like to find out as much as possible about others that have been set up as possible.
Thanks
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At our school we use a double layered approach (or did, funding for the second layer disappeared this year)
Layer 1 is based on the positive behaviour framework, which treats behaviour as just another thing to learn, and at our school we take judgenent out of the equation as much as possible and treat dysfunctional behaviours as a problem to be solved in the social context of the classroom. Some teachrs fid this very difficult and others love it.
For those students who do not respond well to this for whatever reason, we have a withdrawn classroom, where an appropriate teacher Ispecific skill set) looks after 5 - 10 students who can' fit into the 'normal' classroom working on a self paced  semi individualised curriculum. This seems to allow these students to relax and some return to the mainstram after a year or 2 but others move on the external education or jobs. Depending on what you choose to measure, the success rate is small to moderate but acceptable.
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i would like to conduct the research regarding inclusive education for students with disabilities in the primary school. i am interested to look at the barriers and facilitating factors to participate into inclusive education from the eyes of parents, teachers and students with disabilities.
What kind of research questions is relevant to the ethnographic research?
May i ask:
What are the barriers to engage children with disabilities in inclusive education?
What are the facilitating factors to engage children with disabilities in inclusive education?
or i should ask questions sound in more sociological? i have no idea how all about the ethnographic research.. Much appreciate to get your guidelines.
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Hello Vimal
I have no expertise relating to researching children's needs, but in your quest for appropriate research methods, I wondered if it might help to read articles that offer comparison between the different options:
Goulding, C. (2005). Grounded theory, ethnography and phenomenology. European Journal of Marketing, 39(3/4), 294-308 - a ResearchGate member - downloadable from her publications page:
The paper below is also available from the publications section of a ResearchGate member, Professor Michael David Myers:
Myers, M. D., & Avison, D. (1997). Qualitative research in information systems. Management Information Systems Quarterly, 21, 241-242.
Fossey, E., Harvey, C., McDermott, F., & Davidson, L. (2002). Understanding and evaluating qualitative research. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 36, 717-732 - also available from ResearchGate:
Creswell, J. W. (2013). Research design: Qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods approaches. Sage publications - below is chapter one:
Thorne, S. (2000). Data analysis in qualitative research. Evidence Based Nursing, 3(3), 68-70.
Merriam, S. B. (2002). Introduction to qualitative research. Qualitative research in practice: Examples for discussion and analysis, 1, 1-17.
Best wishes
Mary
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I am currently assisting a chaplain at a special school to support parents and one parent has asked for specific information or tips to assist in prevention of uptake of substance use by a child. This Parent feels that the tips given to parents of mainstream children are not sufficient.
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Hi Michael,
Joanne VanderNagel invited me to respond to your question. I've studied an e-learning based prevention program for student with intellectual disabilities from special needs schools. Surprisingly most of these students drank more than once, with 15% drinking even before the age of 10!! These findings are  showed us that there is a absolute need to develop evidence-based prevention programs.
Adaptations of our program were: (1) frequent repetition of the tips; (2) Adapted way to inform the student by using easily understood materials (photos, drawings, short movies etc) and (3) the use of games. Other important adaptations are: (1) improving social skills and refusal skills by role playing, in vivo sessions or the use of video feedback and (2)and parental involvement is necessary. Keep in mind that not every adapted material, like videos or pictures, is suitable for every person!
I could send you a part of a reference list with quite a bit of literature on prevention in special educational settings.
Kind regards,
Marion Kiewik
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Any thoughts how to teach foreign language pronunciation especially IPA notation and transcription to students who are blind? 
For me IPA has an enormous value in learning foreign language pronunciation, what about my students who are blind how to adapt it? Do you have any ideas, did you come across blind student of linguistics who learnt IPA? Maybe you are a professional who encountered blind student and was wondering how to adapt IPA? Is IPA and transcription for the blind totally omitted and the topic marginalised. Share your ideas and reflections with me as the topic seems extremely interesting for me.
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We have a recent article in Teaching Linguistics that might be useful to you: A tactile IPA magnet board system: a tool for blind and visually-impaired students in phonetics and phonology classrooms.  
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I want to design a TLM for autistic children. Kindly guide me about different parameters we should consider when designing TLM for autistic children.
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The UK's National Institute for those who have them and their families, it is known that consists of three
parts:
1. Social Interaction
2. Social Communication
3. Imagination
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For a research paper
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I'm interested in PRT implementation in schools. I've been able to find 10 studies examining this, but wonder if there are more out there. Is anyone aware of any?  Is anyone doing any work in this area?  Thanks!
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Check out this EBI website.
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Does the tool provide for consistent longitudinal data collection and accountability for teachers? I am interested in what other tools are used within Australia to map progress of Students with Educational Needs or for Students who are achieving below the Australian Curriculum Foundation level. How do these tools marry up to the Australian Curriculum and if they provide for clear links to researched based teaching and assessment strategies for ease of Curriculum differentiation within mainstream schooling and education support settings. 
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There is of course NAPLAN data which is collected in years 3,5,7 and 9. Data is compared over the whole state. There is also PLAN data which looks closely at the literacy and numeracy clusters of individuals. Educators can track student performance here and look at student progress in terms of a continuum. Educational differentiated plans are normally made at school level with individualised eduation plans designed around the student and their specific needs. You can google both to get info about it.
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i want to know is there any special curriculum for autistic children? and if yes i want to know what points i should consider when framing curriculum for preschool autistic children. 
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At the preschool level, ASD-specific curriculum are often focused on the fundamentals of communication, basic social skills, task persistence, and developing functional independence. There are existing curricula available, but most have been for Western populations and may need to be tailored somewhat to be culturally appropriate for non-Western populations. That said, if it would be useful to you, I would be happy to suggest a couple of my favorites.
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I have planned for a comparative study of policies for disability rehabilitation particularly for children with intellectual disability using a Sequential Exploratory Design (Qualitative Part dominant). Any researcher interested in such collabrative study kindly drop a msg?
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Sounds interesting. My e-mail: agnieszkazyta@wp.p
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does anyone have an idea of how young people with PMLD are fully assessed and supported into adult transition in uk. Need help  to develop more on this for my dissertation pls . 
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In the UK the transition to adult services for PMLD usually involves education, health and social care professionals who assess the young person and plan for their adult provision.  We have recently had a new Children and Families Act (Sept 2014) that entitles disabled young people to an Education, Health and Care plan until they are 25 and then they would transfer to adult services.  You may find the work of Dr Jean Ware at Bangor helpful on this and, on a more practical level, the website 'Preparing for Adulthood' as it has lots of useful information and practical resources on transition planning: 
Good luck!
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I am working with a young, highly able child K/1st grader who is struggling in a regular classroom setting with writing. His emotional state is a definite impediment to learning as he is presenting patterns of very poor behavior which exacerbate the situation.  
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Thank you for your response Gordon ... I have looked at this source and, as you say, it is comprehensive and informative.  I have also shared it with his parents. Although there is a great deal of information about this condition,  I am always interested in learning more that may be helpful. When faced sometimes with disbelieving and untrained/prepared school faculty - especially when it concerns an otherwise highly able individual - I have found that the more perspectives I can offer the better. I tend to view situations from a holistic point of view (See: chandelierassessments.com).  An example - not with regard dysgraphia, but an issue supposedly associated with ASD.  
I had a young, highly able client (kindergartner reading at 3rd grade level, 140+ IQ) whose behavior and social interaction everyone in his school regarded as clearly indicative of some level of autism.  They were pushing for implementation of an individual educational plan for him based on their perceptions.  After some observations and research, I found he was hyperopic and this condition had only been detected during the later stages of development in the visual cortex - around three months. Although he received glasses at that time, it meant he was extremely far-sighted, had seen only very blurred images close-up and had not properly experienced his mother's facial expressions and body language. In other words the normal development of pragmatics  was compromised. Given other tests and measures used at the time of my evaluation suggested very high levels of ability, the alternative view led to the implementation of strategies based on his being a highly able, visually impaired individual and not autistic. (See for example:http://www.autisticvision.com/doctors.html)
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I need an instrument that measures visual, auditory, tactile and olfactory performances of preschool children with visual impairments.
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General point: early tests for visually impaired children often made use of items in existing tests of intelligence which did not require visual analysis. Consequently, they over-relied upon items in verbal scales and inventories, which, more often than not, required verbal reasoning. Clearly, relying upon skills developed with sighted children, rather than incorporating the sensory skills that visually impaired children develop to represent, understand and reason about their physical and cognitive environments, did not adequately assess the ability of visually impaired children.
Your intention to include auditory, tactile and olfactory assessments should avoid that problem. What levels of sophistication do you require in instruments you need to assess auditory and olfactory skills?
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I want to study on interiors of schools for autistic children so what should I consider while designing interiors for them.
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I would agree that sensory input and its impact on learning is important element to consider, but of course you have to think of this in terms of your cultural context. Children's ability to cope with sensory information does change based on exposure and maturation.
As suggested above principle of TEACCH such as reduced levels of distractions and making the environment visual and predictable can also help. There are a few journal articles which have explored this topic.
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This question aims to point out the difficulties that hearing impaired face in social life, in despite all the efforts made and different approaches taken to help them. Emphasizing the necessity of self-reliance of the hearing-impaired in social life and their substantial participation in the sustainable development of community, this question introduces.
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Description of normality is difficult item in all scientific branches. I like description of normal in geometry to explain "what normality concept means" to the students:
"In geometry, a normal is an object such as a line or vector that is perpendicular to a given object."
That means, first you need a "reference" to describe normal; that means it could be subjective according to your reference, or to put it other words, it may be "normal" according to only one view of angle. 
So I agree with Ms Garcia that, in human sciences, we have to completely avoid the word "normal", and also "the handicapped". 
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We have an interest in adult dyslexia as we were invited to train in and to diagnose adult dyslexia (funded by the local dyslexia association) and that included the BDA workplace needs assessor programme.  We have therefore developed an interest in reasonable adjustments, which are influencing our thinking within clinic.
This has led to the incidental observation that a signifciant number of our clinic patients would also attend the local dyslexia association and report being dyslexic (not necessarily diagnosed). Also, local evidence points out that those struggling to manage LBP have lower educational attainment (making us wonder whether that is actually an indication of a specific learning difficulty as opposed to general ability).
The project would (currently) hopefully do the following things:
- establish the prevalence of dyslexia in the local adult population (we have a vehicle similar to the household survey that we could access)
-  We would then like to work out whether there is a greater representation of adult dyslexics within our clinic population - compared with the general local adult population. As a long term goal this is of course to improve long term outcomes for chornic pain patients.
- As part of the process, we need to establish the best and feasible screening tool/measure
- we would also like to establish, if indeed, dyslexics are more greatly represented in our chornic pain population, whether they are those who struggle the most to take on board / learn taught/coached pain management skilss and - more importantly - how we would better coach, better teach and better assist them navigating both our department and, therefore, the potential for better navigating healthcare in general.
So far, there is a team of three of us (this is in the middle of clinical work, etc.) and we would be keen to make some links and consider collaborative working opportunities but, in the first instance, wondering whether you would be happy to arrange a time to discuss.
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I am working on the relationship between working memory and academic achievement among children with intellectual disabilities.
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