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Spatial Cognition - Science topic

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I am interested in understanding the interplay of cognition and computational methods in terms of understanding spatial language.
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Anirban Sarkar, I am including the following book, for your review.
Madl, T. (2016). Bayesian mechanisms in spatial cognition: Towards real-world capable computational cognitive models of spatial memory. The University of Manchester (United Kingdom). https://www.escholar.manchester.ac.uk/jrul/item/?pid=uk-ac-man-scw:300652
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One of my reviewers suggested that I should use such a test in order to rule out the possibility that general intelligence is accounting for the relationships I am finding in the area of spatial imagery.
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I just came across this strand of discussion that seems to have started in 2014.
I agree with Penny Holding that using Ravens Matrices in populations that make little use of paper is very unwise. Not only will it generate very low scores with little variance (a so-called "floor effect"). But are strong grounds for doubting whether the scores will reflect a cognitive or personality attribute that is understood and valued in the same way in that society as the construct for which the test was developed and validated in the industrialised Western world. See Wicherts et al (2010) for an informative review of Ravens test research findings in Africa, and many conceptual analyses about the uses and abuses of standardised Western intelligence tests outside the Western world, eg Greenfield (1997), Serpell & Haynes ( 2004).
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Hi all,
I'm currently looking for a question corpus to have a plausible number of spatial events queries. I found MS MARCO dataset in which I could extract a reasonable number of geographical events there. However, I'm curious to know whether there is (are) any other question corpus to have such particular queries.
In parallel, I'm quite interested to know that is (are) there any dashboards for the COVID19 crisis in which users ask their spatial queries about this incident and hopefully being downloadable for further analysis?
Regards,
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I recommend you to search for it here: https://datasetsearch.research.google.com/
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Given the two following patterns: the left or the right, which one is more beautiful than another?
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Left.
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Major details about their interrelations, their major uses and functions.
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See this article, It may help you.
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According to Christopher Alexander, beauty arises out of the wholeness, which is defined mathematically as a recursive structure, and exists in space and matter physically, and reflects in minds and cognition psychologically.
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Beauty is deep in structure rather than on the surface. Do you agree upon?
Yes, because what is visible is temporary (i.e. if will fade away when time passes by) & what can't be seen on the surface is more long lasting & valuable.
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I have aquired the coordinates (X and Y) of the placement of objects (cubes) in a defined space (a tray) made by different individuals. I know when the first object has been disposed, the second one etc. and I can create a trajectory starting from the first object disposed to the last one (I attach a figure to be more specific). I am very new to this type of data and I was wondering how can I analyze coordinates and trajectories (I have 50 trajectories) comparing them to each other? Mainly I would like to find similarities between the spatio-temporal pattern of placement of the subjectcs, and check for common placement strategies. What kind of analysis shoud I run and what software I should use?
Thank you in advance!
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Dear Pedro, and remaining question followers, please correct me if I’m wrong but, as far as I understand Procrustes analysis as well as convolution 2D approaches do not take into consideration the kinetic nature (or order) of the points defining a shape (or trajectory). Take, for instance, the following two scenarios consisting of 4 points each (all the 4 points have the exact same coordinates but in a different order, see attached figure):
Scenario 1: A(x=0, y=0), B(x=0, y=1) , C(x=1, y=1) , D(x=1, y=0)
Scenario 2: A(x=0, y=0), B(x=1, y=1) , C(x=1, y=0) , D(x=0, y=1)
The fact that the shape defined by the 4 points is exactly the same (actually a square), the trajectory (defined as the time dependent location/positioning in the 2D plane) or the placement of objects (as in the question of Antonio) are quite dissimilar, as there is no geometric transformation able to convert one scenario into the other. Please share your thoughts/feedback on the topic.
Best regards, Luis
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Hi, I am working on a project about spatial ability. Could you please help me get access to this test: Mental rotation test by Vandenberg and Kuse (1978), or the 24-item MRT by Peters et al, (1995).
Thank you for your help in advance.
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We will provide the test and the necessary instructions to researchers (graduate students and faculty only) without charge. Please note that the test is copyrighted and that individuals and institutions who provide the test (cf. reference by Solange Cailet) violate copyright agreements.
My e-mail is mpeters@uoguelph.ca
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Could the structure/spatial folding of the hippocampus lead to closed field activity that cannot be recorded on the scalp surface? Or might the location of the structure in general be too deep to get a reliable signal?
I know only of a very few studies (EEG/MEG) that claim to have recorded hippocampal activity and most of these have used beamforming or other reconstruction approaches with strong model assumptions.
I am happy to learn from researchers using EEG/MEG to analyze hippocampal activity in humans.
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recently published: Non-invasive Investigation of Human Hippocampal Rhythms Using Magnetoencephalography: A Review
Yi Pu • Douglas O. Cheyne • Brian R. Cornwell • Blake W. Johnson
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Hi,
I would be thankful for any piece of literature introducing short, accessible and uncomputerised psychological tests for executive functioning and visual-motor processing. I am most interested in assessment of spatial and hierarchical planning.
Thank you
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Stephen, thank you for the reply. I didn't correctly express myself and have now corrected the question. I am not interested in one test which would merge all the functions but in all the tests available which cover the mentioned (not all in one test).
I am familiar with the Tower of Hanoi and I saw that the set can be bought online for a reasonable price, but was still hoping that other planning assessment tasks would be available.
Thank you for suggesting the Porteus Maze test, I will look into it.
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I intend to carry out Spatial Navigation evaluations in the elderly with low level of education.
Thank you!
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Dear Jhonnatan,
If you assess spatial navigation you have to take into account the kind of strategy used by participants. So be sure that methods used demanded the same kind of strategies and you'll be sure that they're measuring the same "thing". I.e. we applied two different virtual reality based task to the same sample. Both tasks showed the same results, but very different from classical neuropsychological test. Thus, spatial navigations tasks revealed memory impairments whereas the other tasks did not disclose any difference between groups.
Cheers,
Cimadevilla
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I know there are a lot of studies about the use of VR in medicine or psychology, what I can't find is something more related to Architecture and Architecture visualization.
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Hi Marco, did you already have a look at this publication (full paper attached)?
Franz G, Von Der Heyde M, Bülthoff HH. An empirical approach to the experience of architectural space in virtual reality-exploring relations between features and affective appraisals of rectangular indoor spaces Automation in Construction. 14: 165-172. DOI: 10.1016/j.autcon.2004.07.009 
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The general data we found range between 10 - 20 min in young and healthy individuals, but the more accurate data relative to this tasks (visual attention) will be great.      
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A related control issue is sleep quantity, quality and circadian timing preceding the experiment.  We instructed subjects to sleep eight hours per night for the three nights preceding an experimental session, retiring and arising at the same times of night/day.  Also, we always tested at the same time(s) of day/night.
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Dear researchers,
can someone recommend publications concerning that issue ?
Is proprioception involved in shaping the egocentric reference direction within spatial perception or does the reference direction solely depend on the field of view ?
Thanks alot.
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Your query reminded me of an excellent article I read some time ago: Previc's "The Neuropsychology of 3D Space" I found a copy & am attaching it. This will at least help you to frame your thinking.
I'm no expert in this area, but it seems like the literature on left hemi-inattention contains much that is relevant.
Jorg Lewald of Ruhr University has done some work on exactly what you're asking about; he is on ResearchGate, so maybe you should contact him directly? The same is true of Elisabetta Ladavas of the U. of Boulogne.
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I made a study with two types of targets (3 shematic faces or 3 schematic houses). The task where participants had to detect the 3 schematic houses and ignore distractors (photo of houses or faces) seems to be more difficult (reaction time bigger, more false alarms) than the task where participants had to detect the 3 shematic faces.
As the heterogeneity of the 3 schematic houses is more pronounced than the heterogeneity of the 3 schematic faces, i wanted to know if some studies have investigated the impact of the heterogeneity of the target on attentional capture by distractors ?
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We are practically hardwired to pay attention to faces, which makes sense from the perspective of evolution.  Houses are recent in our history.  It would thus be easier to resist distractors when looking at pictures of faces than when looking  to pictures of houses.  That might account for your results perhaps more than heterogeneity.
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I want to start to study and get some information about spatial cognition, especially focusing on Individual Differences. Can anybody help me with some references like books, chapters or available articles so that I can have and get starting info?
Thanks in advance,
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Hi. I have the following sources and even more. I can send them to you.
1. Language, Culture and the Embodiment of Spatial Cognition.pdf"
2. Models of Visuospatial Cognition.pdf"
3. Spatial Cognition II. Integrating Abstract Theories, Empirical Studies, Formal Methods, and Practical Applications. v. 2 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science 1849).pdf"
4. Spatial Cognition III. Routes and Navigation, Human Memory and Learning, Spatial Representation and Spatial Learning (Lecture Notes in Computer ... Notes in Artificial Intelligence) (v. 3).pdf"
5. Spatial Cognition IV, Reasoning, Action, Interaction. International Spatial Cognition 2004, Frauenchiemsee, Germany, October 11-13, 2004, Revised (Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence 3343).pdf"
6. Spatial Cognition V. Reasoning, Action, Interaction, International Conference Spatial Cognition 2006 Bremen, Germany, September 24-28, 2006 Revised Selected Papers.pdf"
7. Spatial Cognition VI. Learning, Reasoning, and Talking about Space. International Conference Spatial Cognition 2008 Freiburg, Germany, September 15-19, 2008 Proceedings.pdf"
8. Spatial cognition VII. International Conference Spatial Cognition 2010, Mt. Hood-Portland, OR, USA, August 15-19, 2010. proceedings.pdf"
9. Spatial Cognition VIII. International Conference, Spatial Cognition 2012, Kloster Seeon, Germany, August 31 - September 3, 2012. Proceedings.pdf"
10. Spatial Cognition. An Interdisciplinary Approach to Representing and Processing Spatial Knowledge.pdf"
11. Spatial Cognition. Foundations and Applications. Selected Papers from Mind III, Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society of Ireland, 1998 (Advances in Consciousness Research).pdf"
12. Spatial Language. Cognitive and Computational Perspectives.pdf"
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I know it is unusual, but I am wondering if there are any collaborative Virtual reality projects you know of in Edmonton, Canada. My main area of interest is spatial awareness and human material interaction. I appreciate your help. 
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By mid 2015 there will be a special flights based data gathering for virtual reality examination / simulation around bridge design.
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One of my research areas is development and measurement of visuospatial thinking. I have some appropriate tests and tasks for it but this process takes place in human's brain. I am interested in suitable methods by which these processes would be traceable in the brain while the student solve a visuospatial stimulus (e.g. mental rotation). What kind of method is appropriate for it?
Look at this site, which gives some examples for stimuli.
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You might also consider TVPS-nm-R (Test of Visual Perceptual Skills-nonmotor-Revised).
I would prefer tests without time limit in order to prevent confounding factors.
Best wishes,
Kirsten
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We plan to do some behaviour experiments such as putting the SD rats into a multiple T mazes and record the path and latency of the subjects to analyze the behavior performance. Some questions:
Is there any latest protocols published in the literatures can be referenced? Wish the experiments can be conducted as the standard protocols and finished smoothly.
How many types of spatial learning are there in the above experiments according to the cognitive psychological theory?
Given that the rat can be delivered with real time reward to its motor actions during running in the maze. What is difference between the group of rats with real-time reward and the rats with the final reward only at the goal position?
Your comments and suggestions are really appreciated. 
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Testing spatial memory means the animal will get rewarded if responding based on spatial location as defined by allocentric, rather than egocentric cues. That is, the animal has respond based on the information provided by multiple cues located around the maze - rater than within the maze; or based on body turns. Thus, you have to be careful to surround the maze with a number of cues, none of which should be placed in close proximity to the location where the animal has to respond.
This paper may be of help. It contains all the references you need.
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Hi,
My question is about the head deflections / nose pokes of the mouse toward a given hole.
Many times, especially the first trials, mice visit a hole, and then explore around it, above the maze, even below the table, and finally make another head deflection or nose poke to the same hole, without moving its body location.
In this case, should I count 1 or 2 errors ? Is it the same methodology for the trials and the probe test ?
In addition: do you think that 100 s in average is a normal primary latency for control mice in their 1st trial (after familiarization) ? According to published papers, it seems very low...
Many thanks for your answers.
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Hi Ali,
"Multiple consecutive head-dips into a single hole were counted as a
single error." (from O'Leary and Brown, 2011).
Thank you very much, I knew the paper but I have missed this information...
Have a good day.
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We know, for example, that some action games and mathematics can be capable of developing these skills. What other activities can?
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I would say navigation, either on urban or non-urban environments, that can add some changes to the daily activity that routes us from house to work/school to shopping: walking, cycling, driving or sailing, out of / expanding the daily routine surrounding environment. And perhaps also using external imagery like maps in paper or smart devices with LBS (Location Based Services) and possibly AR (Augmented Reality), that can reference or inform the place and the corresponding bodily experience, spatial cognition and the mental imagery of the surrounding environment. If all this can be reproduced in a complete VR (Virtual Reality) environment, is an issue that is being study by Neurosciences and Design, and maybe there is not a definite answer ... 
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I am doing a research in Spatial Location Memory in children.  If anyone knows of previous research performed in the subjuct could you please help? 
Thank you
Antonio
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There is a US Science of Learning Center (Spatial Intelligence and Learning Center) in which most of the investigators study some aspect of spatial processing in children: http://sites.temple.edu/risc/projects/navigation/.
Also, Lynn Nadel and colleagues did a series of spatial learning and memory studies in children that were analogous to the sorts of studies done in rodents. Many of these were done in the 1990's.
Good luck with your work!
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Given the repeated data that mental rotation and other spatial measures correlates positively with the Spatial scale of the OSIVQ and negatively with the Object scale, should we consider there's always a tradeoff between those cognitive capacities? And what is the role of the Verbal scale in that tradeoff?
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In response to Pablo C De Juan Bernabéu's questions, the literature on the coordination of speech and gestures discuss the associations of construct of understanding, spatial thinking and integration into language. Articles  by Alibali (2005); Hostetter & Alibali (2007) Chu & Kita (2008); Chu & Kita (2011), and Chu et al (2014) discuss this connection between elements of spatial thinking and gesture/language.  
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I'm looking for a valid and reliable spatial strategies questionnaire to investigate gender differences in holistic and analytic mental rotation strategies. I'm currently using Schultz (1991), but looking for other interesting options.
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I can´t tell you a good questionnaire, but maybe I can help you where to find it.
Have you taken into account the studies about cognitive styles? Maybe they can, even indirectly, show you some ways to go when they discuss, for example Field dependence X Field Independence; Adaptation X Inovation; or the Object-Spatial-Verbal Cognitive Style Model.
If you judge interesting and want to get into the topic I recommend you the paper of Kozhevnikov (2007): Cognitive Styles in the Context of Modern psychology.
Hope it helps!
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I remember an old computer game (called Tetris) by a Russian programmer, where the player had to rotate and move objects with straight edges (squares, rectangles, and more complex ones) that were falling down to build a solid row at the bottom of the box. That helped in two-dimensional thinking, I suppose.
With the capability of spatial reasoning we can create and manipulate virtual images in our mind in 3D. This is an indispensible prerequisite for medical professionals, engineers and physicists, to mention a few.
How can we teach spatial reasoning? What are your experiences and thoughts?
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Sheryl Sorby has done some of the best work on this and she has a text book and software to teach spatial reasoning to engineering students, although I have used some of the easier exercises with kindergarteners. The text is called Introduction to 3D Spatial Visualization and she has published some good articles.
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Perception of different visualization (aerial photo vs. sketch map vs. thematic map). Does it have any differences to non expert GIS users to estimate distance or location from these different visualization?
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My dear Gvantsa,
Please first note that a sketch is a sketch not a map. The distinction between sketch and map is simply that latter is constructed with a (distance) scale for the purpose of standardisation, while latter is without scale. Please again give some thought to the phrase, " for the purpose of standardisation", this qualification is meant to emphasise the point that no map is true to the scale. Even, the so called equidistant maps are true to scale along certain parallels or meridians or a few of both. Since on a map error of scale can be measured therefore a scale is an essential ingredient of of a map as in its absence, it is difficult to map as error may be infinite and distortion could not be manageable. As all know that in mapping of an area of 10 km dimensions, the Earth surface is presumed to be flat, as the extent of area increases curvature of the Earth is taken into account, so Earth is modelled to an ellipsoid of convenience at the global or regional level. Thus, a sketch is out of discussion. In the case of aerial photographs, after making orthophotographs and accounting for geometric and other corrections, after interpretation and Photogrammetric processing, a photograph may be converted into mapped visualization by selecting an appropriate projection to the purpose using longitudes and latitudes of control points. Distances and locations on such a map will be in tolerance limit and precise location and distance can be processed with reference to mp projection used.
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Based on the “Object-Spatial-Verbal Cognitive Style Model” from Kozhevnikov, Kosslyn and Shephard (2005), Are there any available instruments to measure the visuospatial dimensions (Object imagery – ability to mentally represent object details like form, color, etc; and Spatial Imagery – ability to mentally represent and manipulate spatial relations between objects and its parts) separately?
Any tips will be welcome, thank you!
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Tiago, the MARMI and the MASMI are in Research Gate. I am sending you the MASMI and a article. If you need more information, please tell me it.
Bye
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I'm testing a new spatial task and I want to control "mouse handling ability".
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Hi Daniel,
The software used is not available on the Internet. The interface and the commands of the application are in Greek. Another problem is the function of the synchronization parameters. I will talk with the Prof. Panagiotakopoulos that developed the application to see if there is an executable version that works today.
Best regards
Menelaos
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Often, navigation tasks can be solved using either egocentric or allocentric strategies. I am looking for a reliable self report measure that predicts strategy prefererences in paradigms that allow for both egocentric and allocentric strategies (e.g., the star maze paradigm: Igloi et al., PNAS, 2010).
Of course, there is the SBSOD which is more highly correlated with measures that depend on configurational or survey knowledge. I guess that means that people scoring high on the SBSOD are more likely to perform well on navigation tasks that require allocentric processing, but that is only half of the story.
I would very much appreciate your thoughts on this.
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The Questionnaire on Spatial Representation (QSR) from Pazzaglia and colleagues offers one possibility. It has some odd questions, but it is surprisingly reliable and corresponds pretty nicely to some of the paradigms we use to assess global knowledge versus specific routes. Generally, you can assess how much people prefer survey/global strategies, route-based strategies, and landmark-based strategies. These may not map precisely onto your ideas about egocentric and allocentric, but they do offer some characterization. As with any self-report measure, it does not capture any implicit tendencies.