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Sociology of Technology - Science topic

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My research work is on "the influence of WhatsApp application on social relationships among students". I intend to combine, the uses and gratifications theory and media dependency theory. Is it appropriate to have a heading highlighting the two theories or do I have to come up with a new caption? If I do, what are the rules please? 
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Dear Ifeoma Odumodu,
Multiple theories can be used in research to support and develop the model according to epistemological perspective (Love, 2002) for exploring the philosophical underpinnings of research (Scotland, 2012).
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Assuming our action on the Web has purpose, we exchange some value to achieve it. What are the personal/cultural values that underpin/restrict our rational action on the Web? 
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One value could be time preference of information consumption- the preference for information obtained now rather than later. So the preference is for more accessible, comprehensible information now versus, later on in the search process (assuming that a large part of web-based activities are search-related problems).
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Diffusion of technology requires a certain critical mass of users to be establish, to ensure the sustainability of the process. How would you assess its magnitude?
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Critical mass would be defined as the threshold after which increasing returns take over. But critical mass itself is subjected to path dependence. Links on a paper that would perhaps be helpful? And Philip Ball's book on critical mass may provide leads to luminaries in the field.
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Okay, I am a trouble-maker; I admit it in advance.  But the issue of sentience has occupied a lot of society's attention recently, in books & movies especially, and it's not likely to get less interesting in the future, so let's dig in and thrash out some essentials. 
Is there any way one could define rational criteria for the sentience of a computer?  A nonhuman organic life form?  A human?   How do you know I am sentient?  How do I know you are?  Personally, I have my doubts about some individuals I have met; you probably do too. 
If Ray Kurzweil is right, this is not an issue we can afford to neglect until it is thrown before the courts.  Let the games begin! 
PS: it seems likely that an equivalent Question has been asked already in RG, but I have been unable to find a way to check.  If anyone knows of an existing thread on this topic, please let me know and I'll delete this one! 
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@William:  All good points. I particularly liked the idea that sentience (which I cannot define satisfactorily, but some others might attach to "self-awareness" as much as "intelligence") arises from having something to say and someone to say it to -- i.e. communication among peers.  This has implications for the Internet, I suspect....
I also like your "integration of perception into holisms of recognition" which I tend to think of as "generalizations" -- projections of complex and usually unique qualia onto abstract shadows that we give names for the sake of communication.  Sort of the reverse of Plato's ideal chair, which contains all possible chairs: the word "chair" is a mere shadow (projection) of our actual perceptions of chairs onto an abstraction simple enough to define.  And then of course there's the conundrum of how well the actual chair (assuming it exists) corresponds to our perceptual qualia that we project onto "chair".  
Here's some thoughts I wrote out on this subject some years ago:  http://jick.net/~jess/hr/skept/YinYang/
I have to confess I do not know what "B&BS" stands for, although some possibilities come to mind.  Can you expand the acronym for me? 
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In ancient times, people could remember days worth of someone's talk. Then writing was invented. Then, the information support has changed and as a consequence we remembered less because we relied on parchment to do that for us. Then came technology and the support for information changed again, and with it perhaps our capacity to remember has once again declined. This leads me to raise the following question: Has our capacity to remember been reduced as a result of technology usage?
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Memorization differs from remembering. Technology may decrease the need for memorization but that does not preclude the necessity to learn and understand. Some may attempt to substitute technology for original thought. This is nothing new, just easier an easier way to copy someone else's work.
Memory is exercised when we reason. Those who reason remember.
Memory is exercised we when use a computer or personal devices. Memory is exercised in sports, art, and music. 
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Current generations make extensive use of new technologies such as mobile phones, PCs, the internet and its associated tools, playstations, etc. These technologies were absent when the parents of these generations were growing up. Although a lot of parents try to adapt and provide those technologies for their kids, there seems to be a widening generational divide. The question that naturally emerges from this observation is: is technology responsible for that divide? Or are there other factors?
Parents have for many generations- to a certain extent - transmitted a legacy of thought and passion to their children, but a significant number seem to be failing at sustaining that transmission. So what are your precious views? Have you noticed that with your kids or those of your close relatives? Is this point perhaps exaggerated?
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Generation gaps have always existed though they tend to be wilder from culture to culture. It is my observation that the gaps tend to be wilder in countries with a higher degree of freedom where youth are free to form their views and set their values. While in closed societies parents try very hard to produce copies of themselves the result is almost no gap but no change at all, most importantly no progress and no innovation. Based on that I believe that a gap is needed it is a sign of renewal of society. Having said that I agree with Dr. Kamal the effect of the use of new technology varies in the same society from one group to the other depending on education, wealth, and many other factors.
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Accumulative. It is a product of reproduction of established practices, that is, institutionalized activities.
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-Acumulativo. (Accumulative)
-No adaptado a los ritmos del planeta. (Not adapted to planet rhythms)
-Genera una cultura reactiva. (Makes a reactive culture)
-Antropocentrada... (anthropo centered)
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Ideally aimed towards researchers who have been published both before and after 'Web 2.0', but open to everyone. I would love to gain an understanding into any major differences in research/publication practices that have come about as a result of the internet, as well as your opinion on how resources like ResearchGate have impacted on you as a researcher. Any personal accounts/anecdotes welcome!
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How would you measure/identify/define "impact"? But more interesting for me is why you want to address this question? However, to answer: for me the most significant impacts are more rapid and extensive access to research. On the positive side, I have been able to access key papers more quickly and it has encouraged a more multidisciplinary search. On the negative side, I'm swamped with a torrent of dogmatic pronouncements.