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Sociology of Education - Science topic

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Different aspects of education such as educational psychology, sociology, philosophy, technology... etc plays a key role in teacher training programs for teachers up to the stage of higher secondary (XII) level and are considered compulsory in addition to qualification in their concern subjects.
Is there any such compulsory program in case of higher education?
Thank you
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Often in the UK people use Fellowship (Fellow /Senior Fellow /Principal Fellow) of the Higher Education Academy as a measurable qualification for teaching in higher education. Sometimes this is combined with a Post Graduate Certificate (PGCertTLHE or similar).
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There are researches which point out that social group diifferences affect school participation of children. However, it is important to understand, how these factors affect school participation.
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Read the making of the English Working Class (EP Thompson) and Bourdieu for a view on why the dominant education system often reproduces the same class system.
From experience and and a wide range of research id suggest looking at: quantity and quality of language in early years (lower socio-economic groups usually have a lot less words by age 4) and stress. If home is cold, scary, has no books or you haven’t had breakfast, you come to school tired, angry and not in a good place to learn. Lots and lots of research on that. EPPE studies are helpful. Good luck!
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We are at a time when non-formal education is gaining greater importance in learning (MOOC) However I would like to know your opinion on what are the future key points of education.
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I would call non-formal education itself a key point. Also education is getting more personal, individual, intelligent. We now return from the classroom system brought about by the industrialisation back to the Plato's Academy. Although the teacher is a platform, that interacts with the learner as an active participant of the educational process. There's a concept of three-agent or three-subject educational platforms:
Full data analysis, AI, Learning Analytics and Psychometry - are all the key points behind the concept, and the future of education.
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I have conceptualised an alternative educational pathway as a subfield of formal education (a structured space for students to interrelate) and as such the homology of field theoretically affords members an alternative pathway to accumulate capitals valued in formal education. However, my analysis suggests a struggle exists between homology of field and homology of position, creating division and contestation over the legitimacy of accumulation pathways. Can anyone suggest further reading or other research in this area that I can clarify my thinking.
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I am not sure but my publication that deals with the artists studio and the art classroom might interest you. It is among my papers on Researchgate. Let me know if this was of any help.
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Research indicates a high drop out rate.  One explanation points to the Cognitive Dissonance Theory due to students' expectations for what they will encounter in college, academically and socially, not being what they actually experience.  For example, high school grade inflation, misaligned curriculum, or other factors in ones secondary education experience may cause over confidence in academic ability.  Once the misled student enters college, the Cognitive Dissonance Theory may apply and explain why students dropout to avoid the feeling of failure or other unpleasant feelings.  Also, is there a recommended treatment for such theories?  My research involves differing perception of college readiness between secondary education teachers and college instructors.  I wish to outline how secondary teachers unknowingly set students up for failure by not providing rigor inside and outside the classroom.     
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You could also look into undermatch (Smith, Pender, & Howell, 2013) as a possible explanation.  Also, consider Brofenbrenner's ecological model to consider differences in context  to account for the likelihood that there are a multitude of structural factors at play here in addition to high school preparation.
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I'm interested in understanding proven practices that encourage increased collaboration between district office departments (business, education, HR) to better support schools.    
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Dear Micaela Ochoa,
Indubitably, collaboration between district offices in the educational circle has always played a pivotal role along with the evaluation factor. In point of fact, collaboration is a working process in which the educational objectives are coordinated for the purpose of uniformity and standardization. Unless DOs operate within a standardized schedule, the goals defined at the macro-level go awry and the created inconsistency creates havoc. Consequently,  as you have rightly observed, thorough collaboration DO departments can materialize the supportive role much needed for increasing the quality of services required for various schools operating under the wings of such districts.
Best regards,
R. Biria
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If we take the field of formal education and drill down to the sub fields of mainstream and alternative education and we move a student from mainstream into alternative education, homology of field suggests this could allow that student an alternative pathway to accumulate capitals valued in the mainstream field.  Doesn't this rely of a level of autonomy? And can this be reached?
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Steven,
I'm still trying to answer your questions with Bourdieu's point of view (as much as i know / understand it).
I think a sub field must have all fields criterias, and so you must be right. and i think your example is good. In fact, a field is always in a field. and so, as long as you can define a sub field, it will have field properties. And so it will be autonomous.
For example, in the martial arts world. "martial art" is a field. but "judo" is also a field. and my capital in judo is not based exactly on the same capacities as my "martial art capital". My capital will grow quicker in Judo by practicing this sport, when it will grow quicker by doing different martial arts in the "martial art" field. In the same time, Judo is still an autonomous field, and martial art another one.
Finally I think you are right, and you will be able to show that autonomy. maybe you just shouldn't use the "sub field" term, and just use the term field even if one is inside the other. And thank you for that interesting question.
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I am preparing my concept paper. We have had many after school tutoring programs producing minimal results. Please share your methods used for low socio-economic students in an urban setting.
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Janice:
In my research I have found that relating what you are teaching to the students' diverse cultural background can help to make the content more relevant for them, even it means dealing with the social issues in their immediate program. They are more likely to motivated to participate when learning becomes relevant in their own context. The attached article help to elaborate on this point further that I hope would be helpful to your research.
many thanks,
Debra
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I am doing a research proposal paper on technology, fatalism and false consciousness and can't find anything linking the three together. I think technology has had a lot to do with the increase in the two ideologies but can't find any prior research, and am wondering if higher or lower levels of education is a factor.
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Human consciousness can of course be  'false'  when it is  contradicted by verifiable observations generated by systematic empirical enquiry.  Have a look at Karl Popper's epistemological theories.  However, in social science the concept 'False Consciousness'   has  typically been used by sectarian political  or religious ideologues in need of an explanation for why the world is not moving in the direction which their ideology says it is bound to move.  In extreme cases, the use of 'false consciousness' as a concept goes hand in hand with intolerance and denial of human rights for  those whose views and actions the actor strongly disagrees.
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The pilot of the Race Equality Charter Mark in British universities has resulted in only 8 of the original 30 higher education institutions which applied being awarded a Bronze or Silver Award. Despite government led initiatives such as 'Widening Participation' being promoted in post 1992 universities, there is no shortage of examples of marginalisation and discrimination of university staff and students. E.g. even where ethnic minorities are represented proportionally in the student population, this is often not reflected in a proportionately diverse staff . Moreover, disproportionately low numbers of university staff are in senior academic and administrative positions; and curricula are not reflective of equality and diversity.
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Yes, non perfomativity of equality and diversity policies in universities contribute to social inequality.
Equity based Diversity is essential for eclectic ideas, balanced development, creativity and innovation.
Please see leading study of India on Diversity through attachment.
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If we differentiate between the concept of ‘resistance’ and the behaviours labelled as ‘acts of resistance’ with ‘resistance’ being the conceptual lens alloowing us to examine the interactions, struggles and victories and the nuances of relationships that give rise to what is traditionally seen as oppositional behaviour that inevitably lead to a lack of educational success and the physical ‘acts of resistance’ pertaining to the 'forms of practice', the manifestations of these interactions and relationships.  Then these forms of practice could therefore exist on a continuum inclusive of a range of observable behaviours, everyday resistance, conformist resistance, covert and overt self-defeating and, potentially, transformative yet all be resistance.  Wouldnt this give rise to the possibility of a single pathway that generates both acts of conformity and resistant acts? and if so,  in the same individual actor?  Your thoughts?
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This is a fascinating discussion. It seems to me that resistance must exist alongside conformity because every type of conformity implies resistance to other values and actions. Take the evangelical Christian...perception of what is conformity and what resistance in their lifestyle choices depends whether you are an evangelical insider or outsider.
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The idea of a ‘model school’ is quite common in Ethiopia, and I’m interested if this kind of model is used elsewhere in the world. For example, model schools, model classrooms, model teachers, model students. I’m interested in the function these models serve, and the processes of identification, as well as the political and micropolitical uses of models.
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Dear Rafael,
I guess most of the countries, at least the ones that are active in improving their education system through reforms propose model schools with model curriculum, model methods, model teachers and so on. Model are often fine tuned in experimental settings before being introduced to the other schools; hence chances of their success is high.
Although models might be useful, still a thorough understanding of the context should be made and necessary adjustments to suit the context should be carried out to ensure its success.
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The study i am going to perform is about the differences in marks and grades between university students. I wanted to compare two groups of students: those who have children and those who do not have this responsibility (yet). My problem is that i am afraid i will not be able to gather a reasonable number of students for my research and need to find a way of solving this issue as this is what interests me very much and i don't want to change the topic.
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try also use FB, many groups use it for connecting
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I am interested to do a prospective analysis about the e-Learning
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I think, more and more, the dialectical or middle-ground solution may be taking over. Perhaps Blended (Hybrid) Learning will become the most popular? Despite the online technology available, in other areas of life for example, people still go to movie theaters, concerts, and go shopping in physical stores and shopping centers. I feel many students would still ideally prefer traditional education if they did not have to worry about costs, transportation, living expenses, etc. There are published articles and surveys, where students have responded slightly in favor of face-to-face learning and still regard face-to-face education as better in some ways (example link below). The human nature is to try to get the best of both worlds if we can. Online education and educational technology are here to stay. But due to the social nature of people and some of the ways we learn, I guess blended learning will be the popular middle ground. Blended is the way many traditional universities and schools have been moving in the last few decades. Finally, the answer may also depend on the subject being studied or taught. Thanks for the thought-provoking question! 
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I love action research (specifically in human relations/education). I have always observed, read, thought, then felt compelled to test by putting the ideas into action and making more observations, analyses etc. As a scientist (chemist) originally, this process in education where I now work seems to me to be akin to the scientific method. Am I right/wrong or is it just different, yielding different outcomes from so called 'pure' research.
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Action research is for teachers like us to improve our practice, to teach more effectively (the plus).  It's still research because it's a deliberate and honest attempt to improve our teaching.  The minuses are due to the fact that we who carry it out are interested parties in the research and this has led to criticisms of the validity of the research process, 'with accusations of inevitable researcher bias in data gathering and analysis'.  There are journals that publish action research like (Canadian J of action research) in this link, but I don't know of such journals in my country.  So, Mark, you can publish action research.
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Emancipation in the 1970s, quality in the 1990s, inclusion in the 2000s? I guess there are a lot more candidates for such values, especially from an international perspective. However, I think it is highly relevant which normative idea pedagogy adopts as its self-description. For example the standardization and output-orientation of the 1990s would not have been possible without the (economical) Trojan Horse of "quality". 
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Hello Franz,
I think this has been historically cumulative, as you rightly said in your introduction, which does not mean that everything is reconciled satisfactorily. I fully agree with you about the need for a self-description of the process and it will take into account.
For what I believe pedagogy as the core elements that I would include in a concept of education: the reflective process (philosophy), freedom of thought, diversity, inclusion, dialogue (well in the critical sense given by Paulo Freire) interaction, use of new technologies , literacy, self-learning, knowledge building, participation of students (as well as our colleague reminded Švaříček Roman).
Let the quality of the educational process and academic quality (like separate the two) and finally the evaluation, because the basis of these two processes should be the principles and values that explicitei before.
In Brazil, the state public education is primarily (at least 85% of it in elementary school - from kindergarten to 3rd year high school here it is at around 17 years old), so, as a public officer that quality should be assessed for purposes of transparency and public reporting of quality of service offered.
Regards,
S.
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I am conducting collaborative research on teacher candidate reflections in journals during intense short-term field experiences in classrooms.  We are examining aspects of teacher attitudes and beliefs, elements of growth in confidence and teacher persona, and teacher candidate fears, concerns, worries.
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Here are three articles, attached, that might of interest to you, Robert. They all deal with pre-service teachers' reflections. Hope they help!
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The notion of 'personal best' drives most athletes to keep training despite the knowledge that they may never be first or best in their field. In other words, they actually maintain their effort by seeking personal improvement and thus competing with themselves. In education the description of success is nearly always in terms of comparison with others. My contention is that this view of success is counterproductive for all but the top half of the cohort and we would be better off if we described success as 'improvement through persistent effort' as an athlete does. I also contend that teachers would benefit from this paradigm shift because it better describes what we should be doing, collaborating with each individual to maximise their potential and that the current paradigm of success confuses the role by positioning us to see lower performing students as having a deficit to be repaired.
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Hi Mark,
Have you read "How Children Fail" by John Holt (American Educator)?
Very interesting record of observations and interpretation of student behavior within and without the classroom.
 One concept that stood out for me was that teaching != learning.    
The learner learns what he needs when he needs to as he can fit things onto the scaffolding he has built since birth (real learning).  The teacher's role is to facilitate and provide a wide range of experiences and exposure to...LIFE.
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Foe years we have come out with wonderful performances of our students, with flying colors. Indeed, the rat race competition helped our children to outperform their best.
Yet, many researches reveal the negative impact of our schools, and no actions have been taken. Students find themselves struggling in an unknown war, consequently, missing their childhood and innocence at early ages.
Are we destroying our species?
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I think besides all the things said above, one quite important role of schools is to condition children to function in society. They learn to be more or less disciplined, sit w/o moving, concentrate and listen for 45/60/90 min. depending on the system they are in. For example, I find it always very interesting to realize how conditioned my students are when we engage in a discussion in the seminars and a situation comes up where a student wants to say something and no one else talks. They still raise their hands to "ask for speaking permission", even though there is no need for it at all. In the end, it is not that surprising given the long time they have undergone schooling.
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'Lesson studies' had been developed in Japan about 40 years ago. It is done to improve student performance in Math, Science, Language and other academic subjects. Does anyone have research results to share on how your students were able to improve academically?
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I looked up examples of lesson studies and it seems to constitute what I would describe as a good 'normal' lesson in Australia, in that the focus is on concept development and personal development. I say good normal lesson because it doesn't happen as it should all the time. There are some benefits to the study lesson explicit design process. Teachers have to focus on concepts. Teachers have to focus on personal development. Teachers have to collaborate. Teachers have to reflect on a lesson. Teachers have to support each other. Teachers have to consider student personal differences. It appears to me that this would be used as an adjunct to a more didactic 'normal' lesson style.
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Which are the main arguments for and against this report as a effective way to measure the performance in education systems? So different systems as S Korea and Finland, how can they be ranked in similar positions? What are we actually measuring? How could we better measure educational performance?
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Dear Luis
Do you have a link for this communication?
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Student Instructional Reports (SIRs) are the means by which students evaluate a course at the end of the term. At my university the results of these SIRs are the main criteria for giving Teaching Awards to teachers. There is some correlation between being an easy grader and receiving glowing SIRs although this is not always the case since some students evaluate a course on its instructional content and not on the basis of the grade they anticipate receiving. Hence, since entering academia a few years ago, I have comforted myself by realizing that SIRs say more about the student filling out the form than about the quality of teaching that has taken place. Nevertheless, adjunct faculty are highly dependent upon receiving SIRs that rate them as "good teachers" in order for their contracts to be renewed. Therefore, adjuncts seeking contract renewals, tenure-track teachers seeking tenure, tenured faculty seeking "Best Teacher" awards all have incentives to be easy graders. At the same time, people who keep score (like U.S. NEWS) rank universities as "party schools," "easiest colleges to graduate from," etc. Needless to say, universities do not want to be on those types of lists as it demeans the quality of education they are offering. So, would it be smart for a university that constantly shows up on the "easiest colleges to graduate from" list to discontinue using SIRs, especially if I am on the right track in rationalizing that these instructional surveys say more about the students than they say about the quality of teaching that is going on?
Gwen
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Student feedback is a valid and important way of hearing the student voice and it shouldn't be undervalued. But nor should it be over-valued and used as a tool to bash staff. Gwen, you speak about a correlation between being an easy grader and getting good feedback but there is little research data to support this assertion and Patrick (2011) found that the correlation between grades and student evaluations is zero. Further, Kotze and Du Plessis (2003) found that student satisfaction is a measure of teaching effectiveness and Richardson, Slater and Wilson (2007) found that such satisfaction is increased in line with the support that lecturers offer and students’ perceptions of apparent teaching skills. Whilst some may question the subjective nature of such feedback, if we hope to assess the learning situation it only seems right to hear the learners’ perspective. It is also worth noting that ‘when students learn more, both grades and their opinion of the course/teacher will be higher’ (Patrick, 2011: 248). And, not surprisingly, Richardson, Slater and Wilson (2007) found that teaching skills and teacher support showed the highest correlation with overall satisfaction. The core of the debate in the field of student evaluation has now accepted the validity of SIRs and moved on to how lecturer's might use such feedback.
Kotze, T.G. & Du Plessis, P.J. (2003). Students as co producers of education: A proposed model of students’ socialization and participation at tertiary institutions. Quality Assurance in Education 27(1), 27-52.
Patrick, C.L. (2011) Student evaluations of teaching: effects of the Big Five personality traits, grades and the validity hypothesis. Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education 36, no. 2: 239-249.
Richardson, J., J. Slater, and J. Wilson. (2007). The national student survey: development, findings and implications. Studies in Higher Education 32, no. 5: 557-580.
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Why has persisted since the Industrial Revolution one third of the population with school problems, who can not alleged training necessary and desirable, through different national contexts?
Who, in what circumstances and specifics, are responsible for school failure: students, families, social settings, the school, teachers, school organization, curriculum, instruction and assessment, management and administration of the education, social policy, the economic context of the country?
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I agree with you, Mark.
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An individuals habitus and the field/s they operate/d in generate social capital; and habitus can influence field and field can influence habitus so therefore could we potentially offer educational programs that generate social capital and if so what would the essential elements of such programs be?
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I find the idea intriguing and exciting. Given my background I have not considered arts education. My view has been largely centred around things like civic duty, sports, adventure education.
I would be very keen if you were able to point me towards the studies you allude to.
Great idea, thank you for your thoughts.
Steve
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Institutional responsiveness to sexual harassment policies.
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Institutional responsiveness should ensure change in mind set and engender attitude to respect every human being.