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Sociology of Development - Science topic

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I am looking for resources that can assist me in developing a course module on sociology of development for a bachelors program. It will be great if you can share with me book chapters, articles on theories of development, gender and development, social development, economic development, sustainable development, globalization and development, indicators of development and international development. I will also appreciate any course module outlines that cover any of these topics to help me develop an interesting module for the program
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There is loads of stuff on this if you start on Google
An old chapter of mine
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In the demographic population status, Mauritius is seen to have a large number of youth. Youth is defined by the age of 13-25 accordingly by the Ministry of Youth, leisure and Sports.
As known, youth is a critical period in any individual’s life. It is the age where the adolescent is on a continuous process for adulthood. Thus, it is considered primary to shape these youngsters’ for the betterment of the society. The government of Mauritius has put heart and soul into making this phase of life a successful one. Best educational access as well as sport and leisure are the ingredients for the future individuals’. However, a rise of social evils committed by youngsters has been noticed, such as smoking, drinking alcohol, and drug takings, among others. This has resulted in petty crimes, delinquencies, and poverty.
Sociologists have often argued that leisure is one of the compulsory assets to bring control in a youth’s crisis period. But to what extent are these activities really playing their role?
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agree with @Carlos Eduardo Maldonado
regards
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My thesis tries to highlight the links between cultural background and the development of creativity within the cities. 
The analysis goes through the Stockholm region and the innovative and entrepreneurial impulse in the music field (Spotify,Soundlcloud..) to investigate the causes and the effects of such creativity in developing an entrepreneurial approach. 
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Carlos: Nice work. I hope you be succesfull. I suggest to read the paper:
McAndrew, S., & Everett, M. (2015). Music as Collective Invention: A Social Network Analysis of Composers. Cultural Sociology, 9(1), 56–80. https://doi.org/10.1177/1749975514542486
Based on this, one of my students is doing his research studying the relacional structure of rock groups that have been playing yearly in Bogota.
Sincerely yours,
Jorge
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Is there are wards or UC in slums of Islamabad and can anyone share the exact list of all (total) slum areas of Islamabad issued by CDA
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According to official statistics eight Kacchi Abadeis including, French Colony, Paris colony, 100 quarters, 66 quarters, Hansa Colony, Charles Colony, Siad Purr Model Village and I-9 Christine colony were set up by the CDA and have a legal status. Whereas, illegal Kacchi Abadeis in G-7, G-8, F-6, F-7, I-11, and Banni Gala
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During a talk I gave recently on the question of diversity in English studies (which includes composition), I observed that the postmodern focus appears to have prevented the field from exploring issues beyond the sociological and that to move forward English studies needs not only to allow but to encourage intellectual diversity.  The audience response was uniformly negative, hence the above question.
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It's about 10 years old now, but if you haven't seen it yet, I recommend the book Theory's Empire: An Anthology of Dissent:
Here's Amazon's description:
Not too long ago, literary theorists were writing about the death of the novel and the death of the author; today many are talking about the death of Theory. Theory, as the many theoretical ism's (among them postcolonialism, postmodernism, and New Historicism) are now known, once seemed so exciting but has become ossified and insular. This iconoclastic collection is an excellent companion to current anthologies of literary theory, which have embraced an uncritical stance toward Theory and its practitioners. Written by nearly fifty prominent scholars, the essays in Theory's Empire question the ideas, catchphrases, and excesses that have let Theory congeal into a predictable orthodoxy. More than just a critique, however, this collection provides readers with effective tools to redeem the study of literature, restore reason to our intellectual life, and redefine the role and place of Theory in the academy. (emphases added)
I haven't read all the essays in the book, but many and maybe most of them are addressing what I think you mean by "stasis" and "lack of diversity."
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I am using Census data to objectively show the level of Quality of Life in certain towns. Is there a certain framework or guideline to rank each indicators according to the dimensions of QoL? Would like to rank each town according to their aggregate score in each dimension.
Please advise 
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Hello Avril
This paper has discussed your topic:
Ham, S. A., Levin, S., Zlot, A. I., Andrews, R. R., & Miles, R. (2004). Ranking of cities according to public health criteria: pitfalls and opportunities. American journal of public health, 94(4), 546-549.
This site might be of interest, but the QoL section does not use census data:
This does not use census data, but might be worth looking at:
McCann, E. J. (2004). 'Best places': Interurban competition, quality of life and popular media discourse. Urban Studies, 41(10), 1909-1929.
This paper is old, but might be of interest:
Kahn, M. E. (1995). A revealed preference approach to ranking city quality of life. Journal of Urban Economics, 38(2), 221-235.
This is also quite old, but might have some relevance. I have not found the full text:
Rogerson, R. J., Findlay, A. M., Morris, A. S., & Coombes, M. G. (1989). Indicators of quality of life: some methodological issues. Environment and Planning A, 21(12), 1655-1666.
Very best wishes,
Mary
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development is a basic need for our society. when we notify the projects in certain areas, why certain sections of our society are against these. why? many development projects have been started but due to certain protests they have not been notified. 
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I believe that development cannot be stopped because the motive behind development is to enhance human wellbeing. However, I do agree that development can be slowed down due to the reason that not all parties involved share the same benefit. Once the expected outcome of the development is against the interest of some parties, the advantages brought by the development will be greatly resisted. Thus, I am more concerned on the next question, which is how trade-off can be made in order to achieve the win-win situation.
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How society and through which lens society sees the role of female as a whole but particularly as an entrepreneur?
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I need some information on urban-rural interactions. The recent literature which is investigating this issue in Mega city regions. Since there are tons of articles and researches on formation of conurbations in polycentric urban regions, I need some specific researches done on the interactions of urban- rural.
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Dear Soroosh,
This is a good book about:
Urban Agriculture for Growing City Regions: Connecting Urban-Rural Spheres in Casablanca - Hardcover , 2015
by Undine Giseke et al.
Regards,
Vanessa
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There are some theories which indicate if the general literacy of a disenfranchised rural community will have positive impacts. What base line measures should be used?
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Without detracting from the seriousness of this question, Flann O'Brien does offer one (wonderfully cutting) example, when he describes the consequences of a campaign to increase the speaking of English in the terribly backward Corkadoragh in rural Ireland ('The Poor Mouth'). This campaign involved paying people a pound for every child that could demonstrate English capacity to a visitor going from home to home. This backfires predictably: Did it work? not at all (as a method for alleviating the misery of the indigenous population) but then everyone involved is satisfied. Developmental indicators including literacy rates and wellbeing measures have been refined and should be universal, allowing comparative, and over time, study. Likewise survey methods are strengthening in this area, and there is some literature - both statistical and evaluative - on this.
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One of our research is about the new practices using the banks of irrigation canals.
These canals are  the backdrop for rapidly developing urban uses and practices. For one, the water is increasingly used to irrigate private gardens, municipal green spaces and golf courses. On a recreational level, the canals have become a site for numerous practices in recent years: walking, jogging, cycling, horseback riding, fishing, as well as swimming and kayaking
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Thank you very much Sandra.
I hope we'll can work together in the future.
Sincerely
Chantal
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The critical theoretical perspectives in sociology of social movements with special reference to the new social movements, the Dalit and Tribal movements in India in the contemporary period. 
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Sadly, most contemporary social movement theories are rather reduced in their scope. There are still many people talking about collective identity or "framing". The most interesting recent theory seems to me that of transnational social movements, developed, among others, by Sydney Tarrow.
One thing concerning the disciplines: I have been working quite some time on social movements and it seems to me that this field of study is really interdisciplinary. Political studies, social psychology, sociology -at times even cultural studies or history- all work this field. And in some occasions, establish a quite fruitful interchange of ideas.
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My dissertation (ongoing) is on a psychological profile of tribes in violent conflict in the Sahara/Sahel. Specifically, I'm interested in exploring (in part) cognitive imprinting on developing cultures based on extremes of geography, geology and climates of deserts, mountain habitats that are threatened with encroachment, war, desertification and the like, and one example of what I am interested in is the Ek tribe in northern Uganda.
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Francesca, this is the link to that paper. It is as you say, a difficult subject matter, but one that must be addressed. respectfully, Patrick
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Foe years we have come out with wonderful performances of our students, with flying colors. Indeed, the rat race competition helped our children to outperform their best.
Yet, many researches reveal the negative impact of our schools, and no actions have been taken. Students find themselves struggling in an unknown war, consequently, missing their childhood and innocence at early ages.
Are we destroying our species?
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I think besides all the things said above, one quite important role of schools is to condition children to function in society. They learn to be more or less disciplined, sit w/o moving, concentrate and listen for 45/60/90 min. depending on the system they are in. For example, I find it always very interesting to realize how conditioned my students are when we engage in a discussion in the seminars and a situation comes up where a student wants to say something and no one else talks. They still raise their hands to "ask for speaking permission", even though there is no need for it at all. In the end, it is not that surprising given the long time they have undergone schooling.
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With very few exceptions I consider the first two -nationalism and god - as almost "dead" phenomena in the Western countries. Considering welfare state, the retreat of it during the last 30 years is felt everywhere too, as G. Esping-Andersen's three welfare capitalisms models division is not so actual and important as before. Left-right political division's disappearance point to the same direction of welfare state diminishing. Who can be the political, social and cultural vehicles for the present and future Western societies?
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God and Nationalism are alive and kickin' - at least when you look at the right wing movements in most European countries. In fact, I have the impression that the crisis led to a further strengthening of right wing tendencies - take for instance Hungary or the latest elections in France. Actually, the dismantlement of the welfare state is very much a part of this tendency - right wing populism for the middle classes (heading for a bigger social stratification) and right wing extremism for the under class (hating Jews or Roma or whoever fits instead of their national elites). Maybe Hungary is in fact the model of what to expect in Europe.
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I am looking from a perspective in which the modern day democratic politics play a role in state-tribal relations....
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Branded by law by Dilip D'souza,about denotified tribes
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Study of tribal or indigenous people has been one of important element of Anthropology, but how can we justify Tribal study in today's globalized world?
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If we consider that designations like "band" and "tribe" and "chiefdom" which have been applied to societies encountered by anthropologists are analogous to other typologies, these words are merely reference points on a distribuition mapping of societies. In the models of Sahlins and Service, they may have been considered points along a continuum, but human societies are much too complex to place along a linear distrbution. Even a 4-quadrant grid may be too much of a simplification. But the essence of understanding political organization and complexity may be to understand how communities not only make decisions, but also how issues of disputes or competing interests are resolved. Who are the players? What are the rules or expectations?
As James Dow points out, it is very important in interacting with a society to have a sound understanding of the local customs if one is to successfully interact. By "successful" I mean to imply a fair and judicious interaction, not a forceful suppression of a society. Knowing what is important to the other parties can be useful in proposing a collaboration that benefits both sides and has a reasonable chance of acceptance. Ignoring what is important to the other parties greatly diminishes acceptance, or risks acceptance with a misunderstanding of essential factors.
Merely understanding the other society does not insure productive cooperation, however, because there may be situations where the two societies or cultures have mutually antagonistic value systems. But knowing this to be the case can be vitally important.
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For quite a long time I have been thinking about Oscar Lewis' theory of a culture of poverty that determines in part that people stay poor - by providing a set of cultural values that impede them getting ahead. Of course, this theory has been heavily criticized for being stuck in a developmentalist point of view - no wonder if one considers that Lewis did his research in the 1960s. Nevertheless, it might be possible to decolonize the concept by integrating newer theories - for instance Bourdieu might be helpful.
What are your experiences with Culture of Poverty? Is anyone actually working with this theory? Do you know of actualizations - maybe like what I just wrote?
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Dear all,
I push this conversation forward by using an emic perspective of anthropology. I guess Oscar Lewis' theory of a culture of poverty originates from an era of cultural determinism, as an analogy of adaptinost premises, where enculturation is seen as a cultural transmission from one generation to another, to “the passive minds of people”.
I treat this concept “culture of poverty” from the western perspective. (I)Traditionally, the Arctic reindeer herders have been called "the people of the culture of poverty". I am a member of those people of hunters and gathers (like the desert people of Australia, Africa) because our basic life focuses on herding/gathering/hunting food. The most of our energy goes for basic survival. (ii) From modern western perspective our salary is about 2e/hour while the cost of living in Finland is one of the highest. The classic definition of poverty according to amount of income and a cost of life fulfils the definition of poverty.
From the emic perspective, the art of survival is not only focusing on food, but it is also based on skilled exchange work, without circling cash. The concept of enskilment (Palsson 1991) comprises flexible and practical ways of gaining livelihood and situated informal learning (Lave & Wegner 2001, Ingold 2000). In a modern world of information society (Scandinavia) people can also value their immaterial aspects, such as childrearing, respect for their elders, the closeness of community life and wildlife.
Not ruling out those basic needs of education, and health care and food, we can turn the concept of poverty upside, too. As Nisha tells us about from her experiences of well of people buying the book of D. Ray;” Understanding poverty, 2006”. Adding Mohammad´s: “poverty is when peoples' needs are more than their income” lightens up the perspective of criticizing the western concept of poverty – where the richness and economic wellbeing is mostly based on Hamza´s definition “The idea behind creating markets at the BOP is born after the confusion between the immensity of needs with the poor populations and the reality of their demands (El Fasiki, 2011).” Shortly, us who share the culture of poverty should work on those concepts of immaterial richness, self-respect and sustainability –for the survuval of future generations.
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Leisure requires industry (broadly speaking) to produce that which we need or want. However, it concentrates on time spent doing that which one wants rather than laboring to produce and consume. Leisure indexes could include cultural activities, sports and exercise, dance, library use, civic activities and so on. Leisure is not the same as sloth.
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Bhutan was in the UK media a few years back for their Gross National Happiness survey which has been developing since the 70's
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What are these post-Weberian thoughts that can adequately represent the digital age and the networked society we live in? Why is Government still associated with the old-fashioned notion of hierarchies patronising and constraining human development? How do we want to see Government acting in the context of the Occupy movement, or the most recent allegations of sniffing around personal lives?
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I think it is misleading to construct a radical difference between 'old-fashioned' and 'modern' governance and government. Ultimately, government in modern as in historic times is about collective action. Digital media and other developments have changed the coordination cost of getting organized and voicing interests, resulting in new power configurations. But the underlying dynamics of social collectives have not really changed. The fact that social contracts of societies usually involve some form of hierarchy (or agency) does not mean that all resulting structures are 'patronizing'. The occupy movement itself required enforcement of equality rules. Bacon said that 'knowledge is power' more than a hundred years ago - what else is the purpose of intrusive information collection? In my experience, most of the time classic theories still have a lot to tell and teach, and the wheel does not really need re-invention.
How do we want governance to act in the face of Occupy and how do we assess privacy breaches? My decision rule would be Confucius, writing more than 2,000 years ago: "Advance the upright and set aside the crooked, then the people will submit. Advance the crooked and set aside the upright, then the people will not submit.”
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I need to provide information about how to develop a conceptual framework. Any suggestions?
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Conceptual framework. Well I think it depends a bit on what science you are coming from (I am a social scientist with some biology background) Conceptual framework is as I see it an explanation of how you see the concepts of issues that you are going to research are interlinked with each other. In natural science it would in several ways be quite close to your hypothesis but may be a bit broader taking into consideration and explaining what the "parameters" of the hypothesis are and how they are interlinked. In social qualitative science it is more an explanation of how you see the concepts you examined are interlinked. A good way to start an analytical framework is to do a brainstorming and put the concepts you want to examine up on a paper and then start to develop their interlinkages (that can be hypothesis).