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I need to know if I can compare statistically the fluctuation on one variable of only one subject to the fluctuation of the same variable of the rest of the group; is it possible? Statistically can I compare subject to group?
Here I'm talking in terms of conductance and heart rate.
If anyone could help me, it would be great. 
Gotta say, I'm using SPSS and I'm not very familiar with statistics
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Try the Crawford-Howell test
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I have written a theory based of the Strauss-Howe generational theory that involves the social hormones (oxytocin and vasopressin) and how they modulate the in-group vs. out-group dynamics in societies, and how this in turn is currently creating the rising populist nationalism.
The theory is easily accessible to everybody, even if you're not that familiar with oxytocin and vasopressin. The premise of the theory is that human populations have a similar generational hormone cycle than what the cyclical animal populations do, but the cycle is 80-years in length: https://jannemiettinen.fi/FourthTurning/ (the text is also attached as a PDF-file).
At the moment, these three questions are the biggest ones remaining that would further validate the theory: 1) if historical vasopressin proxy statistics are found, 2) if generational variances to the neuronal efficiency in the human hypothalamus are observed (neuroimaging), or 3) if the mechanism regulating the generational hypothalamic variances is found (presumably related the SCN).
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The statistics have to be historical statistics (like they are in the theory) in order for the decades long shifts to be seen. Is there such data from Mexico?
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Hi all, unfortunately I haven't been able to find a review paper about this topic. Is there anyone who happen to know about a paper that describes ERP components that can be modulated by unconsciously processed stimuli (e.g. stimuli suppressed from awareness in binocular rivalry paradigms)? I'm particularly interested in unconscious processing of emotion. Any suggestion is welcome. Thanks.
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I hope that several articles from my electronic library will help you understand the complex problem.
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Based on the columnar Dimensional Systems model and the applied Clinical Biopsychological Model, I have proposed Type-G and Type-T patterns. Please feel free to comment both pro and con on the attached article.
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I added a popular book primarily written for psychotherapy patients being seen in clinical biopsychological treatment.
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Anybody has the Emotion Reactivity Scale(EAS)? Better Dutch Version, i need it for my fmri experiment! Thank you in advance!
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Thank you for sharing this with me!
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I am particularly interested in leisure (and tourism) experiences. 
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Dear all contributors to this thread of discussion on the links between sensory experiences and positive emotions,
Many thanks for your suggestions. My work is now completed in the form of a book chapter (see attached). You may find it interesting. Best wishes and a happy life! xavier
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I tried to find but I haven't found any article discussing this issue. I've noticed that in most online psychological surveys, the response rate is greater for women (in my own research, the sample was about 65% of women). 
I'm looking for something that talks about this issue to cite in my own discussion. Unfortunately, I've found nothing about this. 
Thanks
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Hi Rafael, I had a feeling there was something else on this: http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED501717.pdf.
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The topic of my study is Emotional communication. Categorical measures of emotional somatic and facial expression will be assessed with the STAI serving as the outcome variable in the AVONA.
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I also would say it is problematic to combine state and trait scores from a theoretical point of view. And while your reasoning that also past behavior influences current behavior makes sense, this could be mediated by the current state. 
Why you want to create a "larger range" anyway? 
Just a side note: If you are mainly interested in anxiety, then the STAI is not the best measure (since it has bad discriminant validity regarding depression and anxiety). 
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In my research about shame, I made up some scenarios designed to induce the participants’ shame emtion in experiment. When participants read these scenarios, participants would experience the shame. But, how to get the validity of scenarios? How to assese these scenarios?
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A part of this validation process could involve correlating state reactivity on your induction (e.g., through the previously validated State Shame and Guilt Scale) with a previously validated measure of trait shame proneness (e.g., the Test of Self-Conscious Affect). If your scenarios are valid, people who are high in shame proneness should show a larger reaction to your induction than people who are low in shame proneness. 
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We are looking for papers about the relation between cognitive flexibility and the hayling task (beyond the relationship between behavioral inhibition and the hayling task). Can anybody help?
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THANK YOU!
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I am doing a research about development of theory of mind, and I would like use ERP, I need to know the components associated to theory of minf and the paradigm used in this kind of studies.
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Why sticking with ERPs? There is so much more information in the EEG signal. For such a rather complex construct as theory of mind, I would expect that there are several brain regions involved. So, TOM might be a process of mutual information exchange between these areas, rather a single ERP component. You should think about other measures, such as coherence, imaginary coherence etc to catch possible information "flow".
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The task is for a project that will study associations between executive functions and emotion regulation in older, midlife, and younger adults.
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Dear Rebecca,
Very interesting question for us. We are working in normalization of the affective words originally translated by Hinojosa. Our normalization is being held in México with the affective words in spanish, we are measuring emotion-attention interference.
I am now attaching the affective-word database that we are using, the words are both, spanish and english. We built up out attention-emotion model using SuperLab, based on the Stroop effect.
Hope this can be useful.
Best regards.
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Neuroscience has been applied or employed to provide insight in many areas of research and human activity. Does anybody know of any work that falls under the title of environmental or conservation neuroscience? By this I mean research that could directly be used to assist our understanding of environmental protection or play an applied role in conservation activities.
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Hello, Gregory Bratman (https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Gregory_Bratman) from Stanford has done some very interesting and recent work that I would consider falling under this topic. And there has also been some work in Korea too, e.g. DOI: 10.3348/kjr.2010.11.5.507
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My bipolar sample has undertaken the CANTAB assessment over 8-year follow-up. Since I do not have a control group, I consider to use Z-scores to compare the raw scores with their norm group according to age and gender.
Based on previous literature on neurocognition, I have not found consistent evidence regarding cut-off levels for Z-scores. Which Z-scores should be considered for cognitive deficits (Z<-1.0, -1.5, or -2.0)?
Thank you
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usually, z-scores below 1.0 SD indicate "borderline" cognitive impairment; 1.5 SD indicates minor cognitive impairment (where cognitive deficits start to be evident) and 2.0 SD indicates major cognitive impairment. So it really depends on how stringent you want your analysis to be. Hope you find it useful.
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My lab used the Woody (1996) Focus of Attention Questionnaire in the past, however, alphas were not great. 
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Hi, may I suggest AMQ. If you are prepared to translate it from swedish. There is a preliminary version in english, and a polish one. You may return to me for a webb-version. However, the FileMaker Pro version or a paper version is to be recommended. The AMQ measures four factors: 1) Absentmindedness (popularly "Prospective memory", a somewhat misguided term), 2) Person memory (face recognition, face recall, interior memory) , 3) Local memory (geographic, topographic, etc), 4) Codes.
Kind regards,
S-E
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Thanks.
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Hello Joshua,
We've successfully used funny movies in our lab (http://miplab.epfl.ch/pub/eryilmaz1101.pdf  and http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24603023). In terms of pictures, there exists an updated version of the good old IAPS which has been validated in a number of ways. Recently they even added erotic stimuli (I saw a poster, not sure it's already out but you can email the people), if you wanted that type of positive emotion. It's called Necki Affective Picture Set http://naps.nencki.gov.pl/Site/Home.html
On top of that, there are the Geneva affective pictures which offerts various types of appetitive stimuli:
Music is also a good elicitor, you can ask Wiebke Trost for the stimuli (http://cercor.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2011/12/15/cercor.bhr353.full).
All depends on your design and what emotion exactly you want to elicit. I wouldn'd go for gifts unless you're studying the reward system or pleasure (giving people sweet food will surely activate the opioid receptors in the NAccumbens). Reward is one type of positive emotion.
Good luck!
Ewa
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Although it gives quite clear description on the mechanism of empathy,
I didn't ever see the visualization directly deals with the model.
Has anyone visualized the Perception-action model of empathy (Preston & de Waal, 2002, Preston, 2007) in flow-chart-like diagram as a 'process'?
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Hello,
Essi Viding and I have done something like that - available (for free) here https://sites.google.com/site/geoffbirdlab/papers
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I want to analyze the three basic motives achievement, power and affiliation with children between six and ten years with the Childrens Apperception Test (CAT). Is there a manual for scoring these motives in children? Or is it a suitable to use Winters manual? Has anyone ever used Winters manual for the CAT and what are the experiences?
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u should use the manual of CAT
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I am looking for a large number of images of cigarettes, illicit drugs, alcohol, and gambling for an upcoming study.
Specifically, images of the target items themselves (e.g. an image of burning cigarette or an image of a mug of beer). 
Preferably, stimulus sets will have been used in prior research.
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There seems to be such a set for smoking cues, which also includes
tested neutral pictures:
  • Gilbert, D. G., & Rabinovich, N. E. (1999). International smoking image
series (with neutral counterparts), version 1.2. Carbondale, Integrative
Neuroscience Laboratory, Department of Psychology, Southern Illinois
University.
For drinking/alcohol there is a specific set called "The
Geneva Appetitive Alcohol Pictures" (GAAP), as described in Billieux et al. (2011). The pictures are avaiable in the Supplementary Material of the Publication on the original publisher's website (http://www.karger.com/Article/FullText/328046).
Stritzke et al. (2004) is another interesting paper about such drinking and smoking cues from what the authors call the "Normative Appetitive Picture System". However, I found no newer information about this system or how you get access to the picture set.
Additionally, you could of course use pictures from the International
Affective Pictures System (IAPS) (Lang et al., 2008), which have been used in lots of different experiments. But you would have to go through the set and see how many of them you can use. You will not be able to use many of them, but a few could be interesting for your project.
You can find a link to send in a request to get access to the IAPS pictures
References:
  • Billieux, J., Khazaal, Y., Oliveira, S., De Timary, P., Edel, Y., Zebouni, F., ... & Van der Linden, M. (2011). The Geneva Appetitive Alcohol Pictures (GAAP): Development and Preliminary Validation. European addiction research, 17(5), 225-230.
  • Lang, P.J., Bradley, M.M., & Cuthbert, B.N. (2008). International affective picture system (IAPS): Affective ratings of pictures and instruction manual. Technical Report A-8. University of Florida, Gainesville, FL.
  • Stritzke, W. G., Breiner, M. J., Curtin, J. J., & Lang, A. R. (2004). Assessment of substance cue reactivity: advances in reliability, specificity, and validity. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, 18(2), 148.
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does it make sense to do that?
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Sure, plenty - you might start with Boynton et al 1999, Vision Research "Neuronal Basis of Contrast Discrimination" - they fit a single d' model of contrast discrimination to fMRI response. This recent JOV paper is also a good example in the same domain: http://www.journalofvision.org/content/9/2/20.full.
In vision science, at least, this kind of thing is now common practice, although the theoretical link between neural response and a construct like d' isn't very clear (but they certainly can be correlated). You should be able to find hundreds, or thousands, of studies along those lines...
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What are the neuropsychological perspectives on the theory of exploring risk aversion in social behaviour?
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Scholten, Marc; Read, Daniel. (2014). Prospect theory and the “forgotten” fourfold pattern of risk preferences.
Journal of Risk and Uncertainty (Jan 22, 2014).
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I've been thinking for some time about the neural correlates for social priming. One social priming task, for example, is the sentence unscrambling task of Srull & Wyer (1979) sentence unscrambling task that has been used in numerous studies. There are various versions for this sentence unscrambling task and one in particular is with the use of the subject vs. object pronouns "I" vs. "me".
I'm interested to know the following:
1) Is there any research on the neural correlates of social priming in general that you would recommend reading?
2) Is there any research on the neural representation of subject vs. object pronouns "I" vs. "me" that you would recommend reading?
Thank you in advance for your help!
John L. Dennis
Reference:
Srull, T. K., & Wyer, R. S. J. (1979). The role of category accessibility in the interpretation of information about persons: Some determinants and implications. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 37(10), 1660-1672. doi: 10.1037//0022-3514.37.10.1660
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Here you have an email to a person that may know the answer: tfeinberg@bethisraelny.org
Feinberg, Todd E.. (2002). How the brain creates the self: Comment Neuro-Psychoanalysis4.1-2 (2002): 31-35.
Other:
Brain connectivity and the self: The case of cerebral disconnection.
Uddin, Lucina Q.. Consciousness and Cognition: An International Journal20.1 (Mar 2011): 94-98
Bendicsen, Harold K.. (2013). The transformational self: Attachment and the end of the adolescent phase.
London, England: Karnac Books, 2013.
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There is some evidence, but what about people changing political affiliations during their life? Any longitudinal studies?
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Great! thanks so much.
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I've been trying to a neurological basis for the development of religious beliefs. So far, I've found none that stands out. I'll be glad if someone can point out any interesting research on this particular subject.
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Geraldo,
http://www.andrewnewberg.com/ has also published many peer reviewed papers. #1 below has some interviews. #2, 3, 4 are samples from RG about the neuroscience of beliefs.
2. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/45424067 The brain and the biology of belief: An interview with Andrew Newberg, MD. Interview by Nancy Nachman-Hunt.
3. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/226867964 Hardwired for God: A Neuropsychological Model for Developmental Spirituality
4. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/33684757 Why we believe what we believe: How our beliefs affect health
Interesting line of research! Hope these help.
Rosi