Science topic

Social Mobility - Science topic

The movement or shifting of membership between or within social classes by individuals or by groups.
Questions related to Social Mobility
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Hi frds,
Much research aims at mobilizing 25% of the population for initiating a social tipping point.
Is this reasonable for climate change too?
Climate change seems to be difficult to transport given the intergenerational time lag, complex topic, elitist, moral hazard issues, and unpopular non-mainstreamers who transport the issue.
Additionally, may the saturated sticky demographics make it impossible to let the 25% domino into the rest?
What are your thoughts and research? Can the social tipping point issue be addressed with the complex topic of climate change?
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Thx@Peter. The sinus milieu of the climate movement hints at a compartmentalized milieu with inside out dynamics, which create antagonistic adversaries, in my opinion. See strong reactionary nationalistic simplistic ranking clusters taking hold everywhere - no environment for peaceful dominoing in. Would love to have more non-subjective gut research about this.
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Need to be more involve in my area of interest
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GIS Users conference, San Diego.
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Hi everyone!
I´m writing my bachelors thesis and originally wanted to study the effect of tuition fees on socioeconomic/intergenerational mobility. I couldn´t find any suitable theory so I´ll have to figure out a new subject.
I´v now thought about the following themes and would be extremely thankful for recommendations on theory or another interesting subject/viewpoint.
  • The effect of an additional year of schooling on intergenerational mobility; the relations theory and actualization during years 19XX-20XX. (I`ve found a dataset for mobility and would like to use STATA or R for the empirical chapters)
  • The effect of compulsory secondary/upper secondary education on intergenerational mobility
  • Interrupted work careers and subsequent earnings; gender earnings gap
  • The obligations/binding nature of unemployment benefits and its effect on the employment rate( comparing Finland, Switzerland, Sweden, USA, Denmark. Obligations on a scale from 1-5)
I`ve studied each subject, but am most familiar with economics of education and social/socioeconomic/intergenerational -mobility.
Stay safe!
Br,
Koskelo Sara
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Thank you for your question. Not finding a "suitable theory" doesn't mean that you have to change your topic. Just start with the empirical part and then figure out the theory on the fly. For a Bachelor thesis this should suffice.
Good luck!
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For the majority of the population, education is an investment for social mobility. Enrolling and completing school widens opportunities for professional growth. Whether it is a job or an entrepreneurial initiative, the time spent in school and doing school work raises knowledge and ability levels of individuals in their fields.
To provide the utmost opportunity for growth, it seems logical that schools need to keep up or take the lead in a world where change is constant. Educators in K-12 and higher education are hesitant to transform learning experiences to simulate real-world and futuristic professional environments. How many of us remember theories, algorithms, and definitions that we memorized for examinations in K-16?
Still, for many educators, pedagogy is not as important as content knowledge. This, amidst all the research that proves how pedagogy is key to achieving optimal learning. Rote education strategies and tests continue to dominate the world of education. Innovation is not a course offered in academic education programs.
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By properly disseminating those different research outputs to concern beneficiaries in the most appropriate platform.
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Much has been discussed about the policy that best contributes to the incorporation into the labor market of young workers. In this discussion, I liked to focus the question on three points of view, higher education, vocational or professional training or the promotion by the governments of entrepreneurship and self-employment of young people. Regarding university education, during the last half century it has been seen as a tool for social mobility. However, many countries with high rates of university graduates have high levels of youth unemployment and important percentages of graduates work below their qualifications, while inequalities in the labor market grow. I thank you in advance for your opinions.
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The best plan is a plan (policy) that provides more options. Training in the broadest sense of the word, seems to be the best policy for youths. But training needs to be "credentialized" by a trust-worthy party. Better still if it's the crowd that does this instead of a invested-interest party. So "proof of work" has trumped "proof of stake" in education. Can-do is often what gets youth employed, not willingness to do. Because the later does not address the short term performance requirements of businesses
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What happens to your knuckles when you crack them?
This video explains the process, and mentioned a case report of one scientist cracking one hand and the other hand as control, with no long term sequel:
Is this scientifically proven? Is such habit "safe" or can that lead to arthritis on the long-term?
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Mohamad-Hani Temsah I worked as a hand surgeon for most of my career. I believe that many joints can make various sounds and may be annoying but not harmful. Popping from knuckles is probably caused by gases coming out of solution under pressure and exploding causing bubbles to suddenly form. So I think the video is true. I don't think any of the sounds from joints directly leads to any form of arthritis but may lead to some transient synovitis and weakness of grip. see
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Parental involvement has seen a great emphasis in early years education as schools look to facilitate parental validation for positive behaviours displayed in school. However very little is done to facilitate this validation later on when students are undergoing pubertal transition to adulthood where the neurocircuitry remains structurally and functionally vulnerable.
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It is our parents where we have the seen the world & thru the parent care in the earlier period they have grown up as a childhood with an study ,play & all the loving environment .
It is this environment which our adolescence in t he right & worthy manner ,unfortunately it is very likely children may move in the negative direction which I believe this is the resulting fruits of their earlier life .
Anyhow some time back I have my publication under the captioned '' Parents Care which I submit herewith for your perusal with a request to offer your valuable opinion
Thanks
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I want to know about the effect of some variables like perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness, facilitating condition,... (constructs of technology acceptance model) on behavioral intention to adopt mobile based assessment.I plan to assess L2 learners' speaking abilities through the use of mobiles and social media and after that use a questionnaire to know about the relationship between the BI and other variables in the technology acceptance model. Because I cant assess learners' intentions in just one semester (since i cant access enough students) , I have to do the experiment three times in three semester and after each experiment learners should answer the questionnaire. I wanted to know whether its feasible or not? (I have seen in many papers that they use the questionnaire only once so I doubted about the possibility of it).
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One questionnare for three different classes (semesters)? Or is it one in the beginning, on in the middle and one at the end of a semester, so that you can see changes in perception etc? Is it an experiment, a qualitative or a quantitative survey? I did not quite understand the survey design. Regards, Jens
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When I was young hardly anyone took degrees. Only the privileged went to university. Now it has become a necessity and rite of passage. Unfortunately, in the UK, with changes to the attainment of university fees and rising costs, it is costing students far more and they are now entering adult life with huge debt. Universities continually increase their fees, or appear to. There has recently been some expressed concerns about teaching, especially in the traditional, older universities (Where I went to, and with which accusations I am in agreement . The best teacher there, stimulating and innovative, was Italian).
It seems to me that we need to re-look at first degrees, make them shorter and cheaper, with fewer holidays. Make sure there are far more ways open to students, those who want the qualification but can do without the experience, to study rather than say attending in this committed way to a single school/university. This is an extension of school life surely. Weekend study perhaps? As long as the standards are kept up, should there really be a problem?
Kingsley Amis, the British novelist, considered extending degrees to so much of the population a mistake as thereby degrees get diluted, but in the modern world it is essential for as many people as possible to obtain qualifications. Need they be degrees? Amis himself was the product of university life being extended in the UK to the Middle and Lower MIddle-Class (British obsessions of the time), now the poor can can as long as they get into debt. Degrees function after all as a way of influencing and ensuring social mobility.
In Amis' day professional work and jobs in general gave day to day training (TV, journalism), but usually there was little for young entrants to learn compared to today and competition now is fiercer. Amis taught at many of the New Universities of the times (such as Wales) but never acquired a PhD (not generally popular then) nor a BLitt, the equivalent of a Masters. How times have changed!
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when I engaged in my university study, there was just 10 medical colleges in my country. and we were about 50 students. now there is about 30 colleges, with about 150 students per year, with same facilities, this explosion, pull the education down.
As well the number of those with master and doctorate, was very little, now they are more than those with primary school graduated, at that time.
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I identified four theories that relate to my study: Technological Determinism Theory, Uses and Gratifications Theory, Media Dependency Theory and Computer-Mediated Theory?
Also, If I am required to have two theories, what would be the second suitable theory and why?
Thank you. 
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in my opinion the new media theory of McQuail and also the second aged media of Poster are more related to your subject.
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I want to address in particular horizontal sectarian mobilization (between minority and majority sects) as well as the top-down sectarian polarization strategy of the government to mobilize sects.
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Hi Annette,
I would recommend you to have a look at introductory texts (readers, etc...) to the different parts of your question. Regarding ethnicity, identity and sectarianism you could have a look at the oxford reader Ethnicity by Hutchinson and Smith with plenty of extracts on the different theories on those topics. For a serious introduction on the issue of ethnic conflict you could have a look to Horowitz's Ethnic group in conflict (but this would probably be a hard work). For a whole theoretically informed and highly explanatory perspective on the arab revolts undoubtedly you could have a look at Gilbert Achcar's The people. There is already plenty of literature in the form of articles or reports on ethnicity or sectarianism in Syria and Bahrain, ie. reports on both countries by International Crisis Group and so on. The book Burning Country by Robin yassin-Kassab and Leila al-Shami has interesting explanations for sectarianism (particularly the role of government) in the syrian conflict and you could also find those explanations in the many videos they have posted on youtube.
Interesting topic
All the best.
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Abstract
Menstrual health and hygiene has strong inferences on the health and wellbeing of a woman in general and of the overall society, in particular. The study of United Nations, 2013 revealed that globally menstrual women make up half (49.58%) of the population. Therefore, it is important to not overlook a phenomenon that a large percentage of the population experiences this on regular basis. The challenge of addressing the socio-cultural taboos, beliefs, and misconceptions about menstruation, is further compounded by the low knowledge levels, understanding and awareness of menstruation health. In 2010, Government of India has launched ‘MHS’ for the promotion of menstrual health and hygiene among adolescent girls in rural areas. Therefore, there is a great demand and need for accurate and relevant communication strategy which have been credited with advocacy, behaviour changes and social mobilizations to approach in combating this issue. In the words of Cohen (1963), the media “may not be successful in telling their readers what to think, but are stunningly successful in telling their readers what to think about”. Thus, this study is an attempt to examine the communication strategy and its efficacy to encompass good menstrual information, knowledge which influences individual or community decisions that enhancing, motivating and mobilizing them towards the use of good health practices and responds to care interferences.
The main objective of the study is to target and tailor menstrual health and hygiene messages to the rural women to find out the best communication strategy. The research will be based on the empirical study, where the researcher will examine the efficacy of the selected medium to be used for the diffusion of health related programme. The study will adopt quasi-experimental method wherein villages of Gaya district of Bihar will be selected through multistage sampling. The sample from the study subject will be selected by probability sampling. The data collection technique will be an interview schedule and focus group discussions of the study subjects. Communication strategies evaluations were reviewed to determine their impact on awareness, information seeking, knowledge, attitude and behaviour change towards the use of good health practices and responds to care interferences. Further the study will be helpful for government and non-government organizations for disseminating health awareness related information and practices.
Key Words: Menstrual Health, Communication Strategy, Gaya District, Empirical Study, Bihar
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Thanks Guys for putting all this valuable information together.
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Hi everybody
I am working on my thesis about "philosophy of money in pattern of social mobility in transition from tradition to modernity in the new wave of Iranian cinema".I need some papers and articles about this subject in all of the world.
Thanks
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I confess I do not understand the whole title of your thesis, but I can recommend to you the 'History of Money from the Ancient Time to Present Day', by the British professor Glyn Davies and my book 'Money and Market in the Economy of All Times' (Liviu C Andrei),published by Xlibris.Co, UK, in 2011.   
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for example polio and RCH has been given enough emphasis for social mobilization and development communication. Tropical diseases and especially leprosy have rarely been addressed with such vitality. can mass level mobilization and awareness creation about the disease be helpful in eradicating?
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Apart from awareness creation about basic symptoms of disease, a lot needs to be done in the area of stigmatization. Infected persons especially females may be reluctant to seek medical help because of stigmatization, and this will hinder control efforts. So emphasis of the social mobilization should rest more on sustained, simple and repetitive information to discourage discrimination against infected and affected persons. This is very vital. Advocacy visits to political leaders and government should engender the desired shift in priority from curative to preventive programs such as community mobilization for adequate participation. In other words, advocacy can lead to political will and commitment by Government in favour of leprosy control and eradication.
also be carried
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Except degree of education and people's reading hours
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Reading habits is always a consistent and widely used variable but other extra-curricular and enrichment activities (such as; music lessons, sports participation, being in scouts or cadets, visits to museums etc.) are also being increasingly used and found to have a positive impact on social mobility and educational outcomes.  The Sutton Trust in the UK have produced a few reports on this, also the UK government department for culture, media, and sport has a large longitudinal national survey called 'taking part' which captures engagement in various cultural activities and some organisations have linked this to certain outcomes.
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Doing a research project on how democracy is presented on Twitter in MENA
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this article is good too!
The Twitter Effect: How Social Media Changes the News Narrative.
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The aim is to find how, why and where infrastructure is creating inequality/inequity/disparity?
And is there any easy way, how a town planner should try to remove inequality or inequity from the society - what should be the priority as both have different pros? Is there any way, that political interference can also be reduced while providing infrastructure and prioritizing it?
Case study will help, especially from India.
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Dear,
About infrastructure and urban segregation in Brazil, I recommend:
TOLEDO SILVA, Ricardo. The Connectivity of the Infrastructure Networks and the Urban Space of São Paulo in the 90s. International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, Oxford, v. 24, n. 1, p. 140-164, 2000.
and in Portuguese others two important authors:
ROLNIK, Raquel. A Cidade e a Lei: legislação, política urbana e territórios na Cidade de São Paulo. São Paulo, Studio Nobel Fapesp, 1997. (The City and The Law: Legislation, Urban Policy and Territories in the City of São Paulo)  
SANTOS, Milton. A urbanização desigual (The unequal urbanization), Vozes, Petrópolis, 1980.
I hope be useful.
Best Regards,
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I am doing research on migrants' social mobility in labour market and educational-occupational mismatch in migrants' population. Some of my respondents attain social mobility in  labour market by using their "ethnic knowledge" e.g. mother tongue, cultural knowledge of their country of origin, ethnic social networks etc. Can anyone recommend literature, research on that?
Thank you very much in advance.
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• Joane Nagel, “Constructing Ethnicity: Creating and Recreating Ethnic Identity and Culture”, Social Problems, Vol. 41, No. 1, Special Issue on Immigration, Race, and Ethnicity in America, Feb., 1994,
• Pelle Ahlerup and Ola Olsson, “The Roots of Ethnic Diversity”, Working Papers in Economics, No. 281, school of Business , Economics and Law, Göteborg University, Sweden, December 10, 2007,
• John Hutchinson and Anthony D. Smith (Eds), Ethnicity, Oxford University Press, Oxford, New York, 1996,
• James D. Fearon and David D. Laitin, “Violence and the Social Construction of Ethnic Identity”, available online at https://www.google.co.in/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=6&cad=rja &uact=8 &ved=0CD4QFjAF&url=http%3A%2F%2Fftp.columbia.edu%2Fitc%2Fjournalism%2Fstille%2FPolitics%2520Fall%25202007%2Freadings%2520weeks%25206-7%2FViolence%2520 and % 2520the%2520Construction%2520of%2520Ethnic%2520Identity.pdf&ei=nlPuU7Gp LILl8AWrk4H4CA&usg=AFQjCNHqxUJEP5DMj6gOh1DsmMhqsFQCsg&bvm=bv.73231344,d.dGc
• Max Weber, “The Origin of Ethnic Groups”, Oxford Readers Ethnicity, John Hutchinson and Anthony D. Smith (Eds), Oxford University Press, Oxford, New York, 1996,
• Montserat Guibernau and John Rex, The Concept of Ethnicity”, The Ethnicity Reader: Nationalism, Multiculturalism and Migration, Polity Press, USA, 2010.
• Paul R. Brass, Ethnicity and Nationalism: Theory and Comparison, Sage Publication, India, 1991
• Rebecca Kook, Ethnic Challenges to A Modem Nation State, Macmillan press. London, 2000.
• John Hutchinson and Anthony D. Smith (Eds), Ethnicity, Oxford University Press, Oxford, New York, 1996.
• Thomas Hylland Eriksen, Ethnicity and Nationalism: Anthropological Perspectives, Pluto Press, New York, London, 2010.
• Will Durant, The Story of Civilization: 1: Our Oriental Heritage, Simon & Schuster, New York, 1963.
• Connor, Walker, "Nation-Building or Nation-Destroying" in Hutchinson John and Smith, Anthony D (ed.), Nationalism: Critical Concepts in Political Science, vol. I, (Routledge, London: 2000),
• Joane Nagel, “Constructing Ethnicity: Creating and Recreating Ethnic Identity and Culture”, Social Problems, Vol. 41, No. 1, Special Issue on Immigration, Race, and Ethnicity in America, Feb., 1994.
• Paul R. Brass, Ethnicity and Nationalism: Theory and Comparison, Sage Publication, India, 1991.
• Thomas Hylland Eriksen, Ethnicity and Nationalism: Anthropological Perspectives, Pluto Press, New York, London, 2010,