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Hello,
I would be very interested to know if there are any papers (in English/Romanian) based on Strauss-Howe's generational theory, applied on Romania/Eastern Europe's population (ex-USSR countries) instead of Anglo-American.
I'm mostly interested in the generations which came after WW2 up to now.
Thank you!
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I have developed a new theory based on the Strauss-Howe generational theory, and the name is generational hormone theory. I've found a lot of statistical evidence to support the theory, which is that it's actually an 80-year generational hormone cycle. I know that this might sound strange, but check out the theory and tell me what you think: https://jannemiettinen.fi/FourthTurning/ (or attached PDF-file)
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Optional:
What are your reactions to this panel discussion on the underrepresentation of BME historians in Academia:
Social History Society 2018 - History and Diversity Panel:
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I follow the question
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What are your reactions to this panel discussion on the underrepresentation of BME historians in Academia:
Social History Society 2018 - History and Diversity Panel:
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I follow
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Any recommended reading would also be greatly appreciated.
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Chartism was a working-class movement for political reform in Britain that existed from 1838 to 1857. It took its name from the People's Charter of 1838 and was a national protest movement, with particular strongholds of support in Northern England, the East Midlands, the Staffordshire Potteries, the Black Country, and the South Wales Valleys. Support for the movement was at its highest in 1839, 1842, and 1848, when petitions signed by millions of working people were presented to the House of Commons. The strategy employed was to use the scale of support which these petitions and the accompanying mass meetings demonstrated to put pressure on politicians to concede manhood suffrage. Chartism thus relied on constitutional methods to secure its aims, though there were some who became involved in insurrectionary activities, notably in south Wales and in Yorkshire.
please check the attachments for more information
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I've checked Ingrid H. Tague's Dead Pets: Satire and Sentiment in British Elegies and Epitaphs for Animals and John. D. Blaisdell's A Most Convenient Relationship: The Rise of the Cat as a Valued Companion Animal already.
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Many thanks, Asim. Could you give me the source for this? 
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Colonial regimes fashioned diverse aspects of culture in the colonized territories, dislocated indigenous knowledge systems and in the process suppressing any possibility for growth of new technology.
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However, there are a number of obstacles that hinder attention to this approach, or their introduction into development planning as a measure, anticipation, application and sustainability. Among these negative constraints are bureaucracy, lack of democracy, and the absence of a human rights philosophy. Poverty, hunger, unemployment, the spread of non-scientific thought, its dominance over the simple masses, the dominance of spontaneous education systems versus critical education, the spread of illiteracy in the alphabetical, cultural and technological fields, the lack of targeted and constructive monetary media, Discouraging competencies and creative frameworks, and the absence of material and moral motivation.
On the other hand, since it is impossible to separate sustainable development from culture, since the relationship between them is dialectical, organic and complementary, it must be linked to sustainable development in terms of cultural, social, economic and environmental. The cultural approach in establishing the mechanisms of sustainable development is planning, To contribute to the enrichment of globalization. The cultural dimension, which is moral, intellectual, spiritual and sentimental, must be integrated and local policy makers and local and international social actors should be empowered to integrate the principles of cultural diversity and the values of multiculturalism into all policies, applied mechanisms and practices. The promotion of civil society, democracy, the development of education, the belief in the philosophy of creativity, the acceleration of action and the adoption of a comprehensive and sustainable development policy.
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I am researching the topic of martial law in the early modern period, 1550-1700 (as it was utilized upon social undesirables e,g, vagrants, rebels, criminals), primarily with a view to examining its impact upon the British Atlantic Empire (such as Ireland, Scotland, and the American Colonies). I'm looking to answer a number of questions including but limited to the ideology behind it, its role alongside the common law, its importance in our understanding of government in the Early Stuart Period, its operation within different jurisdictions (how can we differentiate the practice of this law from the mainland i.e. England and its superfluous colonies?), and most important of all, can it be taken as a serious catalyst for the 1641 rebellion in Ireland and the constitutional crisis that led to the English Civil War?
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The procedures of the courts in the colonies have largely coincided with the proceedings of the English courts for their simplicity and the primitiveness of the formation. They are available to every person and have a number of purposes. These include alleviating the tensions and conflicts within the colonial society as well as the differences between the inhabitants of the colonies and the rulers who administer them. (English).
       Decisions taken in the courts by judges are based on previous decisions rather than the legislation and laws issued at the time. Most of the cases and crimes brought before the courts are divided between two main types of crimes: felonies and misdemeanors. (Including the use of a body of several persons known as Jury), allows the citizen to participate in the criminal justice process, by representing citizens in the composition of the indictment or trial - or Both- In their capacity as nationals and not as specialists who decide whether there is sufficient evidence to prosecute.
     The number of judges in the colonial courts has been markedly fluctuated since the inception of the courts, with each court having one judge of two, and their number increasing in subsequent years to ten. The judge in the administrative hierarchy of the colony comes after the post of governor. They are either political leaders or clerics in the colony who believe that their role in society is to apply the will of God, and to take the confession and repentance of the accused to the best of their ability to punish him.
       The cases are classified as small, directly served by the judge, and major and dangerous crimes that require lengthy procedures and complex investigations. Most of the crimes brought to court are from cities and nearby areas. The remote or remote areas rarely resort to the courts because of their ignorance of the courts, Courts in their areas.
legal procedures:
     The legal procedures in the colony courts are applied according to simple rules. Once a crime has been reported, it is investigated and the evidence is submitted to the court for consideration by the judge. After the examination it is determined that it is a real crime. When the judge obtains evidence of the offense, The accused shall not be involved in this part of the case. When hearing the answers and clarifications of the accused, the judge shall determine whether there is a need for a trial or release of the accused on bail until such time as the accused Trial.
     The trials are sometimes conducted in public, and the governor of the colony appoints a public prosecutor to pay his fees. This is in contrast to what was followed in England when the trials were held in secret with the accused being charged. The position of the prosecutor becomes a political office in the colonial government. As prosecutors.
     The weakness of the lawyer's role in the trials has caused widespread controversy within the American colony community, as he has been denied the role he is required to do. He has interpreted the tradition of the colonial courts as English courts that refrained from the role of defense lawyers. Due to pressure exerted by the judges on the colonial rulers to allow them to refrain from interfering in their work and the high standard of living of the colonists who contributed to the costs of lawyers assigned to defend the accused.
Punishments
      The sentences imposed by the courts on the accused varied, and did not differentiate between men and women engaged in sorcery, witchcraft, infanticide, adultery and other crimes. These trials were called witch trials, and the trial was conducted in public and in front of a group of persons. The punishment of the accused is to evaluate his behavior and make it a lesson to deter others so as not to violate the laws in force in the colonies.
     There are many forms of execution in the colonial courts, sometimes whipped, and practiced widely and openly in the courts of the southern colonies, especially with the slave (), and sometimes the perpetrator of the crime and the slander of the perpetrator of the crime among the inhabitants of the colony, the death penalty is few, and less common than it In England, this punishment was carried out against the perpetrators of murder and rape. The prison sentence was not common at the beginning but was used over time after the construction of a number of prisons that were used to detain the accused and then bring them to trial. The prisons are simple, in it The problem is that prison overcrowding is a persistent problem that continued even after the beginning of the 19th century, in addition to the spread of epidemic diseases in prisons, At a time when the task of arresting criminals was not only between their walls, but through the detention of the homeless and the unemployed, especially the slaves fleeing their masters, the poor and the homeless, and even the debtors who are held at night and released on the day to work and pay their debts. .
     The prisons are protected from persons assigned by the Governor-General of the colony for low wages. They are exchanged for a period of time for fear of their agreement with the convicted and to smuggle them out of the prisons in secret. The police apparatus in the colony prisons has not been formally accredited. The time of Louis XIV (1676) was founded by Louis XIV in 1667 with the aim of establishing a system of security and security in the city of Paris,
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After a PhD about the public land registries from the rural spaces of medieval and early modern Southern France, I am beginning new researches about the role of the surveyors in the same region.
I am very interested in improving our knowledge of this underestimated microcosme, which inserts between the masses and the notables of the countryside, whether these last ones were noble persons or commoners.
I will take with pleasure any bibliographical information or archives references.
Thanks !
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Dear Mr. Jaudon and Mr. Pizzati
It's a lecturer from Department of Economics in University of AJK Pakistan.
I would like to invite you in the class to give 30-60 Minutes Skype lecture about European History in undergraduate course class of History of Economic Thought.
In response to that we can volunteer for your students in any affordable virtual activity. 
The class will be every Monday to Wednessday at 11am (Pakistan time)
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I do a research about christianity & it's impacts on iranian art, but I have not seen a book or article about this in Iranian documents (in persian language). If some one knows references about this, pls. help me! 
thanks a lot!
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Dear Mr.
Mehrdad Momeni (mir momeni)
Università Ca' Foscari Venezia
I think you can find what you need in this book: The Grove Encyclopedia of Islamic Art and Architecture. http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780195309911.001.0001/acref-9780195309911
and this books (pdf file):
Hope that it is useful for you.
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Zizek, among others, uses Walter Benjamin's statement that "Behind every fascism, there is a failed revolution." I am looking for the original source. Does anyone know where Benjamin is making this statement? In German it would be: „Hinter jedem Faschismus steht eine gescheiterte Revolution“. but my search in open access works of Walter Benjamin didn't result in anything. One source claims it is from Benjamin’s ‘The concept of history’, but in the English translation there’s no such quote.
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Dear Jeroen,
According to me, it is a "sentence" that is directly from "theories of german fascism (about the collective book "Wars and warriors" edited by Ernst Jünger). I do not know the original article and edition of this article but I already read the french translation " Théories du fascisme allemand (à propos du collectif Guerre et Guerriers édité par Ernst Jünger)" article from Walter Benjamin, published in1991 into the review " Lignes" n°13 (1991/1). I send you the french translation into a file below, with all the references.
Hope it can be useful,
Christophe Gibout
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I need a discussion of the feminist critique of social policy in the post war era
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In asking about the role of feminist critics it does not appear you are asking about the role itself of women in the post war years.  The critics wish women would stay out of what was men's world and stay in the kitchen. But they know it can't be so most of their work is sub rosa and attacking things like birth control and abortion. 
One of the best ways I have seen in history for women's rights to be won is in the Iroquois League, the federation of American Indian tribes in the New York, Pennsylvania region that began some 300 years prior to the colonization of America. The writers of the US Constitution knew of the League and copied from it, but they either did not see, or ignored the part of it that made it so long lasting: the chiefs could be impeached by a quorum of grandmothers. I cannot think of a better way to convey women's values into  what is still mostly a male dominant arena. 
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From 1853 to 1910 the orphan trains were run by the Children's Aid Society (New York) founded in 1853 by Charles Loring Brace.
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Meanwhile I gained the impression also from Brace's writings that his action was very ambivalent. A double vision of the deported children prevailed: they were regarded both as lamb-like beings in an inhospitable and vicious environment and as a nuisance endangering urban security and peace. This strange mix of compassion and fear meant that they were simultaneously victimized as suffering, helpless creatures and demonized as criminals and outcasts.
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Are there any resources focusing exclusively or primarily on this topic? Doing a research that (among other things) concerns the inculcation of Confucian values by non-elite social strata in Joseon Korea, as well as the various responses to these processes by the so-called commoner and lowborn people; so far found a few interesting texts but I am wondering what others can recommend me. Could be on Ming/Qing society as well (since I am considering to add comparative elements to my research); detailed elite (ie. by scholars, aristocracy, etc) opinions on lifestyles/beliefs of lower social strata are fine as well.
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I am looking for articles or books which are trying to shed light on the relationship between Japanese capitalism from the perspective of state and capital relationship. Particularly, investigations from a political economy economy perspective and most preferably the marxist or leftist analysis. Thankx. 
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I think you can take a look on the work of Benjamin Coriat, specially "The shop and the robot" or John Holloway in "The red rose of Nissan". Both of them talks about the so called "Japanese model" of the post-fordism era. You can try with some of the works of David Harvey (I could say the chapter seven of "The condition of posmodernity" can help you). 
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The book was first published in 1831. Child was an abolitionist, a feminist, an opponent to American expansionism and an Indian rights activist. 
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I'm doing research on quality of life in big cities (metropolitan areas, mostly) , and I need to find out about large old cities as well (to compare and find patterns). I need to read about what life was for an average citizen, the problems they faced (crime, mental illness, disease, personal interaction). 
(Cities like Rome, Athens, Constantinopla, for example)
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The seminal book is Jerome Carcopino's 'Daily Life in Ancient Rome: The People and the City at the Height of the Empire'. Originaly published in 1936, it set the trend for later works of this kind. And though dated, I still highly recommend reading it.
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I read recently that according to an Israeli study, older people have more problems with alcohol after retirement. This study, conducted by the University of Tel Aviv claims that not only retirement leads to drugs and alcohol abuse, but rather a series of other painful circumstances that occur in this stage of life, like the death of the partners/spouses and friends. A similar US study indicated that about 3 million Americans, 55 years or above, suffer alcohol problems. I would be interested in research this aspect of aging in more details, focusing Holocaust survivors. Thank you in advance; would appreciate your comments and also the pointing of literature.
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Thank you George for your interesting view.
Nevertheless, my question does focus the problems with survivors, exactly because those who are still alive are aged and most likely very depressed.
All the best and a Merry Xmas
Tom
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Hello everyone
The trust game (Berg 1995) is quite well known in experimental economics. Is there game theoretical analysis of user behavior for this repeated game?
The paper of Berg:
[1] Berg, Joyce, John Dickhaut, and Kevin McCabe. "Trust, reciprocity, and social history." Games and economic behavior 10, no. 1 (1995): 122-142.
You can get the PDF from:
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You may try to check this meta-analysis from 2011:
Johnson, N. D., & Mislin, A. A. (2011). Trust games: A meta-analysis. Journal of Economic Psychology, 32(5), 865-889, http://noeldjohnson.net/www.noeldjohnson.net/Research_files/Trust%20Games.pdf
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I'm looking for sources that discuss American Indian student involvement.
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Some primary sources may be found on Calisphere (photos): http://calisphere.cdlib.org/item/4fb28b83090fe6eb91d938928fd62368/
Although there are no online items, the San Francisco Public Library has a substantial collection on the event:
Good luck in your research!
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I would like to write a paper about Langmuir's thesis related to anti-Semitism. It seems to me that Harari's book (Sapiens) extends Langmuir's definition to the prejudices against other minorities. What is your opinion? How would you reason for or against this idea?
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Think that one part of the Thesis of Harari is, that man was an "unimportant animal 100.000 years ago". We know now fairly well, that even homo ergaster was no unimportant animal. 400.000 years ago by the first known cemetary in Sima de los Huesos (Spain) it could be shown he cared until death for ill and handicapped ones. Auditorium Cave in Bhimbetka (Madhya Pradesh / India) Shows artistic expressions like snake lines and cupulas, dated  700.000 - 290.000 years. The first Stone Venuses from Israel and Marocco both could be dated because of vulcanic eruptions above and beneath to between 800.000 - 230.000 and 500.000 - 200.000. Aerodynamic perfect spears have been used in Schöningen (Germany) 400.000 years ago and modern world Champions say nowadays spears are not better. And we crossed the sea in Indonesia to reach the Islands of Flores and Timor already 850.000 to 700.000 years ago. For this you Need a Kind of boat and language to plan, perform and act together. This is no unimportant animal, which can do this and thus Hararis main hypothesis is dead. 
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I been researching the democratic transition of Chile. My focus is on the cinematographic representation of everyday life and politics (State) during the democratic transition of Chile. I read the most important theories in the relation cinema and history, such as Pierre Sorlin, Robert Rosenstone, Roman Gubern, Marc Ferró, Gilles Deleuze, Christian Metz y José María Caparrós.
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The constitution in Chile is heavily influenced by ideas of Hayek. There is a paper, unfortunately in German: Der Gesellschaftsvertrag einer Diktatur: Ideen- und Realgeschichte der chilenischen „Verfassung der Freiheit“, by Karin Fischer, See: http://www.metropolis-verlag.de/Der-Gesellschaftsvertrag-einer-Diktatur%3A-Ideen--und-Realgeschichte-der-chilenischen-Verfassung-der-Freiheit/12568/book.do;jsessionid=1622CB5E6F3FF58632E57A11B64E03DB
Here is the literature cited in this paper,
Sincerely Walter Ötsch
Baird, Charles W. (1989): James Buchanan and the Austrians: The Common Ground. In: Cato Journal 9 (1), Spring/Summer 1989, 201-230.
Barros, Robert (2003): Dictatorship and the Rule of Law: Rules and Military Power in Pinochet`s Chile. In: José María Maravall/Adam Przeworkski (eds.): Democracy and the Rule of Law. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 188-219.
Bauer, Carl J. (1998): Derecho y economía en la Constitución de 1980. In: Perspectivas 2 (1), 23-47.
Buchanan, James (1982): Democracia limitada o ilimitada. In: Estudios Públicos 6, 37-51.
Centro de Estudios Públicos (CEP), Corporación de Estudios para Latinoamérica (CIEPLAN), Libertad y Desarrollo, Proyectamérica (2011): Frente a la mayoría: leyes supramayoritarias y Tribunal Constitucional en Chile. Santiago: Programa de Naciones Unidas para el Desarrollo (PNUD).
CEP (1982): Conferencia Mont Pelerin. Estudios Públicos 6, segundo trimestre. Santiago: Centro de Estudios Públicos.
Corvalán Márquez, Luis (2001): Del anticapitalismo al neoliberalismo en Chile. Santiago: Editorial Sudamericana.
Cristi, Renato (1998): La Génesis de la Constitución de 1980: Una Lectura de las Actas de la Honorable Junta de Gobierno. In: Revista Ciencia Política, XIX, 208-228.
Cristi, Renato (1999): Jaime Guzmán, capitalismo y moralidad. In: Revista de derecho (Valdivia) 10 (1), diciembre 1999, 87-102.
Cristi, Renato (2000): Pensamiento Político de Jaime Guzmán. Autoridad y Libertad. Santiago: LOM.
Ebenstein, Alan (2001): Friedrich Hayek. A biography. New York: Palgrave.
Fischer, Karin (2009): The Influence of Neoliberals in Chile before, during, and after Pinochet. In: Mirowski, Phil/Plehwe, Dieter (eds.): The Road from Mont Pèlerin. The Making of the Neoliberal Thought Collective. Cambridge/London: Harvard University Press, 305-346.
Fischer, Karin (2011): Eine Klasse für sich. Besitz, Herrschaft und ungleiche Entwicklung in Chile 1830 – 2010. Baden-Baden: Nomos.
Fontaine Aldunate, Arturo (1988): Los economistas y el Presidente Pinochet. Santiago: Zig-Zag.
Fontaine Talavera, Arturo (1991): El miedo y otros escritos: El pensamiento de Jaime Guzmán E. Estudios Públicos 42. Santiago: CEP, 251-570. Online unter http://www.cepchile.cl/dms/lang_1/doc_1182.html  (12.4.2012).
Fontaine, Juan Andrés (1993): Transición económica y política en Chile: 1970-1990. In: Estudios Públicos 50 (otoño 1993), 229-279.
Gamble, Andrew (1979): The free economy and the strong state: the rise of the social market economy. In: The Socialist Register 16, 1-25. Online unter http://socialistregister.com/index.php/srv/article/view/5431 (10.3.2012).
González-Rossetti, Alejandra/Chuaqui, Tomas/Espinosa, Consuelo: Enhancing the political feasibility of health reform. The Chile case. Boston: Harvard School of Public Health 2000 (= LACHSR Serie 40).
Guzmán, Jaime (1976): Habla el abogado Jaime Guzmán: Actas constitucionales darán vida a una nueva democracia en Chile. Por Hernán González Valdebenito. In: La Tercera de la Hora, 13. September 1976, 4-5.
Guzmán, Jaime (1979a): Editorial. In: Revista Realidad 1 (3), agosto 1979.
Guzmán, Jaime (1979b): Editorial. In: Revista Realidad 1 (5), octubre 1979.
Guzmán, Jaime (1980): La Definición Constitucional. In: Revista Realidad 2 (3), agosto 1980, 17-39. Online unter http://www.jaimeguzman.cl/wp-content/uploads/documentos/escritos/la-definicion-constitucional.pdf (12.4.2012).
Guzmán, Jaime (1981): Una entrevista que me impresionó. La Segunda, 15 de mayo.
Hayek, Friedrich August (1981a): Recht, Gesetz und Freiheit, Band 3: Die Verfassung einer Gesellschaft freier Menschen. Eine neue Darstellung der liberalen Prinzipien der Gerechtigkeit und der politischen Ökonomie. Landsberg am Lech: Moderne Industrie.
Hayek, Friedrich von (1981b): Lider y Maestro del Liberalismo. Interview mit Friedrich August von Hayek von Renée Sallas, El Mercurio, 12. April 1981, D8–D9.
Hayek, Friedrich von (1981c): Friedrich von Hayek: De la Servidumbre a la Libertad. Interview mit Friedrich August von Hayek von Lucia Santa Cruz, El Mercurio, 19. April 1981, D1–D2.
Hayek, Friedrich von (1981d): La Fuerza de la Libertad. Interview mit Friedrich August von Jaime Guzmán. In: Revista Realidad 2 (24), Mayo 1981.
Hayek, Friedrich (1982): El Ideal Democrático y la Contención del Poder. In: Estudios Públicos 6, 12-20.
Hayek, Friedrich August (1991): Die Verfassung der Freiheit. Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck.
Hayek, Friedrich August (2007): Der Weg zur Knechtschaft. München: Olzog.
Junta de Gobierno (1973): Bando No. 5. Santiago, 11 de septiembre 1973. Online unter http://www.archivochile.com/Dictadura_militar/doc_jm_gob_pino8/DMdocjm0023.pdf (12.4.2012).
Junta de Gobierno  (1974): Declaración de principios del gobierno de Chile, Santiago, Marzo 11 de 1974. Online unter http://www.archivochile.com/Dictadura_militar/doc_jm_gob_pino8/DMdocjm0005.pdf (12.4.2012).
Peireira, Anthony W. (2005): Political (in)justice. Authoritarianism and the rule of law in Brazil, Chile, and Argentina. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press.
Pinochet, Augusto (1977): Discurso en Cerro Chacarillas con ocasión del día de la Juventud el 9 de julio de 1977. Online unter Archivo Chile, Centro de Estudios Miguel Enríquez http://www.archivochile.com/Dictadura_militar/doc_jm_gob_pino8/DMdocjm0003.pdf (5.4.2012).
Schneiderman, David (2008): Constitutionalizing Economic Globalization. Investment Rules and Democracy`s Promise. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Valdivia Ortiz de Zárate, Verónica (2008): Nacionales y gremialistas. El “parto” de la nueva derecha política chilena, 1964 - 1973. Santiago: LOM.
Vergara, Pilar (1985): Auge y caida del neoliberalismo en Chile. Santiago: FLACSO.
Walpen, Bernhard (2004): Die offenen Freinde und ihre Gesellschaft. Eine hegemonietheoretische Studie zur Mont Pèlerin Gesellschaft. Hamburg: VSA.
Walpen, Bernhard/Plehwe, Dieter (2001): „Wahrheitsgetreue Berichte über Chile“. Die Mont Pèlerin Society und die Diktatur Pinochet. In: 1999. Zeitschrift für Sozialgeschichte des 20. und 21. Jahrhunderts 2, 2001, 42-70.
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I'm working on the collection of mortality data in London during the mid-1550s, That effort was established (or perhaps confirmed as official) by two ordinances, one in 1553 and the other in 1555. I have found the first but no one seems to have seen the second since London was bombed in WWII.
James Christie and others quoted bits and pieces of both ordinances,  but I would love to see the whole of the second and what other specific measures the City took when which it was passed.. Any suggestions - including secondary literature - would be appreciated.
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I haven't published anything in a major journal, only two or three small pieces in rather obscure publications. My current research relates to a PhD I am doing at the University of Rennes2 regarding the Laki volcanic eruption in Iceland in 1783-1784.
Good luck with your Tudors an I hope the documents you find are written in legible handwriting.
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A small lutheran community coming from Germany exists in Lyon from the 16 century. This group owned a church, settled in Geneva from 1707.It was mostly composed of traders who went to Geneva four times a year for the holy communion. But, from 1770 onward, when the Calvinists from Lyons got their priest, the Lutherans went more and more to that church, letting down Geneva. For about 75 years, the Lutherans disappeared from Lyons. At the turn of the eighteen and nineteen centuries, the community spent her life in the shade of the Calvinist church. Between 1800 and 1850, the immigration movement of swiss, germans and Alsatians was quickening. In 1851, after multiples fruitless tries during the last fifty years, the Lutheran reverend Georges Mayer create an evangelic german church which is quickly linked with the Augsburg Confession. The german community managed the church for nearly 30 years until the arrival of the first French vicar in Lyons .For another 30 years, the relations were stormies between the two communities. The first world war marked the death of the german parish. The French church survived with difficulties during the twenties and thirties. The “renaissance” was due to two extraordinary personalities: André Desbaumes and Henry Bruston The Lutheran church became an inescapable part of the Lyons’s oecumenism and opened itself to the world.2007 marked the beginning of the merger between the Calvinist and Lutheran churches.
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Dear Stephen,
Thanks for your answer.
I wish you a happy new year 2015
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Recently I have been researching on how to understand the historical content of the cultural practices of sociability in the second mital of the nineteenth century. I've noticed that the concept of sociality exists before being typified by contemporary sociology as an object of study. I hope you have some points of view dissimilar to enrich the debate
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I think "sociability" can be a useful historical category. Precisely because it allows for interactions and interconnections in society. Its not a rigid and structural term, in my view.
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Throughout the centuries and history of mankind, different cultures created the artifacts (in architecture, fine art, applied art, literature, poetry, language [sayings], music)  illustrating the concepts of approaches to disability. 
Do you know in your own or other cultures historical or current artifacts illustrating the direct or symbolic issues of following categories as social inclusion orsocial exclusion of persons with disabilities?
To bring this thread inspired me my dear colleague from RG Ans Schapendonk. 
Please share your comments and optionally photos. 
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Thought you might be interested in this blog
Downs syndrome represented in art;
.
And this fascinating journal article;
.
Regards,
Paul.
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During and after the Great Exhibition in London in 1851, satirical images were produced in both the UK and the US that contrasted 'John Bull' with his North American conterpart, the figure usually identified as the 'Yankee'. I have yet to identify a scholarship that accounts for the embodied or sartorial construction of the Yankee identity. Any thoughts?
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Thank you Stuart. I'm passingly aware of the role of blackface and African/American minstrelry in Great Britain in the period through Blackett (Divided Hearts, Louisiana, 2001) which also has interesting material in relation to your last point on British perceptions of American salveholding. Love and Theft looks well worth further investigation.
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Anything related to this subject would be a big help, I have many primary sources but I would like to consult more contemporary perspectives.
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Can check these
The Myth of Sacred Prostitution in Antiquity (Sthephanie Lynn Budin, Cambridge, 2008)
Sex in the Ancient World. Form A to Z (John G. Younger. Routledge, 2005)
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Any books, examples or ideas would be helpful to me. I'm also interested in how vassalage relationships between Christians and Muslims changed if the Muslims converted.
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I would recommended the book of Ana Echevarría Arzuaga (2006): Caballeros en la frontera. La guardia morisca de los Reyes de Castilla, 1410-1467. Madrid, UNED, which highlights a very particular aspect of chivalrous relations between Christians and Muslims how Muslims knights converted or not may become servants of Christian monarch during more than half a century.
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I am researching the concept of hero and would love peoples thoughts
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With respect to heroes, there have been numerous studies that have tried to identify them. In a study by Allison and Goethals (2011), they demonstrated how we all seem to have a kind of schema regarding what makes a hero, but never agree on who the hero is. Who is considered to be a hero is a matter of perception.
Additionally, a soldier can definitely be considered as a hero. Soldiers, doctors, teachers, fire-fighters, all of them are heroes in their own right. They fall under the category of 'transparent heroes', those who are abundant in society, but unfortunately not appreciated enough for their efforts.
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There seems to be a dysfunctional gap between learning to succeed within society and learning in order to become a capable and fully functioning adult..
Or are we suffering a particular dysfunction where many people are not being taught well enough, nor are they learning anything. It is argued that by many, they are not being taught at all. People learn in different ways and at different rates. Some people do not learn at school but learn from others within their communities or at other types of learning situations.
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Let me show you what Socrates thought about students 6,000 years ago: “Our youth now love luxury. They have bad manners, contempt for authority; they show disrespect for their elders and love chatter in place of exercise; they no longer rise when elders enter the room; they contradict their parents, chatter before company; gobble up their food and tyrannize their teachers.”
I wonder what this tells us about humankind.
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Sports and politics have a close relation in Contemporary History, mostly in the 20th century in Europe.
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There can be found manifold traces of politics in sports, definitely from the early 19th. Century on (f.ex. German "Turners", see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turners, different working-class sports clubs). In many European countries sport was an object in the political landscape as it offers moments of (pre)-military physical education, prestige/propanda via international representation, mass mobilization and in some cases identity/nation-building.