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Which methods and techniques I can use for comparing two neighbourhoods on the basis of satisfaction of residents and facilities provided?
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Hi, I have done the similar study, in which I used questionnaire survey to obtain some primary data from the target group. Then, I used the inferential statistical analysis to compare the level of perceived quality of life of respondents' from two different residential areas. If you are intending to do the same thing that I did, you can refer to the attached document for designing your life satisfaction questionnaire. With regard to the types of statistical analysis, you may use T-test or Mann-Whitney test, depending on the types of collected data.
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I would like to find data on Haitian asylum seekers who received temporary protected status (TPS). I am mainly interested in data that has followed them for a period of time after the receipt of this stay or until they left the United States. The data should include relevant socio-demographic and family information.
thank you for your help beforehand.
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Thank you all for taking the time out to respond to me.
Best,
Kenisha
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I would like to discuss the concepts of five human senses, ROS, sensory spectrum, demographic factors and recreation experience preferences
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Dear Jayantha,
May be this articles can helps you.
Kind regards.
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I am trying to use the Censo Ejidal 2001 and 2007 to know the distribution of land by sex in Oaxaca. I have already worked with the data and I have an important number of municipalities (42) without any information about their ejidatarios or comuneros in both years. I have checked that these municipalities do have ejidos and communities by using other sources…So if anyone have information about it, it would be really helpful.
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Dear Maria, I recommended to seeing a some books about the topic:  Mexican Federal Election Court has a many papers http://www.trife.gob.mx/
Regards
Gonzalo
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I have data from two samples (community and clinical/service sample) of adolescents who completed psychological evaluations, and I would like to: (1) determine how well the instrument used for these evaluations is able to discriminate between these two samples.(2) to use the ROC analyses to determine the optimum cut-off for differentiating between the community and clinical/service sample. The dataset has 2 other variables: gender and age. Is this information enough to carry out ROC analysis? I attempted this analysis in stata and the AUCs (ranging from 0.518-0.578), seems to indicate that the performance of the scale was nothing more than chance. I am not sure but I assumed for the purpose of my analysis that the community sample is the negative sample( i.e. most likely to be without mental difficulties) and the clinical/service sample is the positive sample (i.e. most likely to be with mental difficulties). Is that correct?  I would be grateful for any guidance on how to implement this model in stata and general advice on model testing.
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65
The first thing to do is to is to run a Wilcoxon Mann-Whitney with the option to give the probability that a person from one group will score higher than a person from the other group. So in stata this would be
. ranksum score, by(group) porder
The porder option is the one you need.
This gives the area under the ROC. If this is not promising, that's more or less the end of the analysis. If it looks good, then tell us.
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I am trying to normalize data on a cognitive screening test in low educated individuals (mean education is 8 years), their performance on cognitive test is highly associated with education. I tried with the methodology from the Mayo clinic (MOANS study) but probably it is not the most appropiate since first stratification is done by age and then a correction for years of education is applied. In the case of  my sample I think it is better to stratify by education and then correct by age but I am not sure how to do that or if there is a known methodology. All comments are welcomed! Thanks in advance!
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I am not sure what kind of analysis you would like to do. My suggestion would be to stratify by 'years of education' and consequently add age as a covariate/control variable in your statistical analysis.
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In fact in most cases, and although on a different scale, the reasons why people migrate and the consequences of such movments, are the same regardless from the spatial context where the movment occur
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There is a fundamental difference between internal and external migration; but before considering this question, we need to face up to the current context within which this question has to be approached, which is the massive external migration into European-created countries from non-European lands. Internal migration within the EU by Europeans can be problem if the historical diversity of particular European nations is thereby undermined, but what is really threatening to Europe is the external arrival of hordes of migrants from Africa, Near East, and Asian. 
Academics have uncritically accepted the notion that immigration is "cultural enriching" and our current establishment, both the corporate and leftist establishment, barely allow for any critical reflection on this central issue of our times. Also, it cannot be denied that academics are afraid to go against the grain, although they like to pretend they are edgy and rebellious, but basically they agree with mass immigration and diversity, even though most of the evidence is showing that Europe does not benefit from Islamic, African immigration. Just Google "systematic raping of white girls in Britain," or  in Sweden, or in Norway, or Google about the expensive welfare costs of maintaining an African-Muslim underclass in Europe. 
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social scientist
What are the parameters we have to include to get complete demography of certain population? Is there is any standard for conducting the same?
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 My experience is limited to human demography.  The following parameters are enough to predict the behavior of population:
1)     age-sex distribution
2)     age-sex specific mortality rate
3)     age specific birth rate for women
Of course, we do not always get enough data to estimate the above parameters. For instance, instead of age-sex distribution, we may have to suffice us with the number of women before puberty, that of women in reproductive period, and that of women after menopause.
I hope this will be of some help.
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I have Bolivian census data for 2001 and 2012. There are noted discrepancies between the two, particularly the significant drop (as % of total) for "indigenous" population between the two. However, the data for 2012 seems to be on the basis of the total, but the 2001 data seems to be only on the basis of those who answered the question (in 2001 "non-indigenous" was an option, in 2012 it was not). Taken together, this suggests that the 2001 data significantly *overcounted* the share of indigenous population. However, I'm not a demographer. Any advice on how to proceed with using this data?
The discrepancy is large. If only looking at those who answered the question, then in 2001 the indigenous population was about 62% and dropped to about 40% in 2012 (which was calculated using the "didn't answer" figure). But if we use the "no answer" data from 2001, then the indigenous population in Bolivia dropped to 38% (a number closer to the 2012 figure). But does this mean that everyone has been overestimating the share of indigenous population for Bolivia for the past decade?
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Dear Miguel,
I am a historian but I have studied some parish records and Ottoman censuses and I have also had problems what data to use and in what cases. Modern censuses are more precise and complete. You should only be careful to compare the same type data, collected under the same rules and within the same perimeter. Therefore, if you have a percentage of indigenous population within the national perimeter for year 2012, you should compare it within the same perimeter for 2001, i.e. the whole population that not excludes those with no answer. Based on your message, the percentage of indigenous population in Bolivia in 2001 was 38 and that it increased to 40 during the next decade. Consequently, the share of 62 % of indigenous population within the whole population of Bolivia is overestimated because it is only the share of indigenous population within the ethnically defined part of Bolivian population. The probe calculations suggest that the number of people that provided no answer in 2001 is high (39%), but it is a quite deferent issue that needs anthropological, sociological and political science approach.  
Best regards,
Gordana
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I'm after some international examples of legislation or Government policy positions which inhibit or create barriers to increasing urban residential density
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Hi Ryan - you've probably already cottoned on to implementation of residential zone reforms in Victoria, particularly Melbourne's established middle-ring suburbs where application of the Neighbourhood Residential Zone has prevented increased density.  I imagine this dynamic between policies aimed at preserving heritage (however successfully) might come into conflict with urban consolidation agenda might be replicated elsewhere, too.  
There are also articles like the following by Glen Searle that look at how the consolidation agenda has divided communities and encountered an array of political obstacles: http://www.griffith.edu.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0018/48600/urp-rp12-searle-2007.pdf  The interesting question that comes to mind is in what circumstances urban consolidation is desirable.
Best of luck with it!
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Can anyone point me to a publication or detail the difference between data that has been age-standardised using direct standardisation where the data is standardised to the total Australian population of a given year, and data that has been age and sex standardised. I would have assumed that data that has been standardised to the total population was age and sex standardised and thus allowed comparisons by sex?
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I guess it depends on the strata that you're standardising by. Given the formula for direct standardisation
O*= (Sumi(Pi * Oi)) / Sumi(Pi)
with O* the standardised outcome, Pi the size of the standard population in stratum i, and Oi the outcome to be standardised within stratum i (e.g. of a study sample),
the only difference between age-standardisation and age-sex-standardisation would be that in the former, your strata are defined only by age groups, and in the latter, they are defined by a combination of age group and sex. So it depends on what strata your standard population was divided into.
As far as I understand, standardisation on a given characteristic (age, sex, ...) obviates comparisons on that characteristic because you're aggregating across the different values the characteristic can take
HTH, Hans
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For example, we have our reports here http://gsociology.icaap.org/reports.html anyone else have reports like this, or know where we can publish these reports?
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check Australian bureau of statistics website, that is an Australian website that maybe useful
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My research is micro credit (Independent variable) and women empowerment (dependent variable). Demographic variable are age, education, experience and family members etc. 
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it depends  on the type of variables whether continuous or desecrate variables.
you have t-test, one way anova , correlation and chi square, for bi-variate analysis