Science topic

Social Cognition - Science topic

Social cognition is the encoding, storage, retrieval, and processing, in the brain, of information relating to conspecifics, or members of the same species.
Questions related to Social Cognition
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
9 answers
These days Coaching and mentoring are advocated as some of the most important strategic human resource development tools. But it appears, these two terms are often used interchangeably? How will you distinguish between the two terms?
Relevant answer
Answer
Most of the (cricket) coaches I ever had concentrate on a method or technique - and how I should improve on it - eg to improve my on-drive. As a result, they hope that I will improve my on-drive and score more runs and it is good for their team and/or winning record that season. In most cases, the relationship finishes at the end of the season.
By contrast, a mentor often takes an interest in how I play in general (rather than a specific shot or technique) and how I struggle with mental intimidation by the opposition during my innings. The mentor often takes an interest in my development even after the season finishes and I am not part of the team they coach. They call me or text me and ask how I am going with mental intimidation by opposition at the most recent game - which might actually be a few years after I have changed to another team. They are not concerned about my on-drive at all.
So, I have extended the cricket analogy to say what Mary C R Wilson and Maria-Jesus Blanco have said much more concisely! I must say it also applies to my professional domain as well - the mentor who is long retired but keeps track of my publications record and my day-to-day struggles and progress in my work (or lack of!)
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
4 answers
The present situation in the Ukraine and Russia imposes a threat to evaluation of nationalism as such. From the other side, neo-liberal globalization supporters see deep national feelings as a hindrance to their plans and further development. Can nationalism nowadays without extremism and populism be judged positively and in which aspects?
Relevant answer
Answer
Positively - as a type of human consciousness and cultural self-realization.
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
4 answers
Looking for research focus on mood disorders identified while going through divorce/family court system and subsequent impact on work performance. I am interested in how adversarial processes (legal remedy systems) impact mood and work function.
Relevant answer
سؤال قيم كنت اتمنى الإجابة
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
5 answers
Social cognition deficits have been classically studied in psychotic conditions (Schizophrenia, Bipolar disorders) or in Neurodevelopmental disorders (Autism spectrum disorders). But is there a sound rationale in studying this area in individuals with sub-threshold/sub-clinical depression (who usually don't seek any mental health service, and even if they do, they're most likely to visit a psychologist's clinic than a psychiatric set-up)? I'd like to know the research community's views on this.
Relevant answer
Answer
Hi,
Zhang Z, Wei F, Shen XN, Ma YH, Chen KL, Dong Q, Tan L, Yu JT; Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. Associations of Subsyndromal Symptomatic Depression with Cognitive Decline and Brain Atrophy in Elderly Individuals without Dementia: A Longitudinal Study. J Affect Disord. 2020 Sep 1;274:262-268. doi: 10.1016/j.jad.2020.05.097
Geng R, Li Z, Yu S, Yuan C, Hong W, Wang Z, Wang Q, Yi Z, Fang Y. Weighted gene co-expression network analysis identifies specific modules and hub genes related to subsyndromal symptomatic depression. World J Biol Psychiatry. 2020 Feb;21(2):102-110. doi: 10.1080/15622975.2018.1548782
Yi Z, Fang Y. Are subsyndromal symptomatic depression and major depressive disorder distinct disorders? Shanghai Arch Psychiatry. 2012 Oct;24(5):286-7. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1002-0829.2012.05.006
Yang C, Hu G, Li Z, Wang Q, Wang X, Yuan C, Wang Z, Hong W, Lu W, Cao L, Chen J, Wang Y, Yu S, Zhou Y, Yi Z, Fang Y. Differential gene expression in patients with subsyndromal symptomatic depression and major depressive disorder. PLoS One. 2017 Mar 23;12(3):e0172692. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0172692
Hu G, Yu S, Yuan C, Hong W, Wang Z, Zhang R, Wang D, Li Z, Yi Z, Fang Y. Gene expression signatures differentiating major depressive disorder from subsyndromal symptomatic depression. Aging (Albany NY). 2021 May 8;13(9):13124-13137. doi: 10.18632/aging.202995
Xu F, Yang J, Chen J, Wu Q, Gong W, Zhang J, Shao W, Mu J, Yang D, Yang Y, Li Z, Xie P. Differential co-expression and regulation analyses reveal different mechanisms underlying major depressive disorder and subsyndromal symptomatic depression. BMC Bioinformatics. 2015 Apr 3;16:112. doi: 10.1186/s12859-015-0543-y
Rodríguez MR, Nuevo R, Chatterji S, Ayuso-Mateos JL. Definitions and factors associated with subthreshold depressive conditions: a systematic review. BMC Psychiatry. 2012 Oct 30;12:181. doi: 10.1186/1471-244X-12-181
Petersen JZ, Porter RJ, Miskowiak KW. Clinical characteristics associated with the discrepancy between subjective and objective cognitive impairment in depression. J Affect Disord. 2019 Mar 1;246:763-774. doi: 10.1016/j.jad.2018.12.105
Shevlin M, Hyland P, Nolan E, Owczarek M, Ben-Ezra M, Karatzias T. ICD-11 'mixed depressive and anxiety disorder' is clinical rather than sub-clinical and more common than anxiety and depression in the general population. Br J Clin Psychol. 2021 Jul 17. doi: 10.1111/bjc.12321
The concept SSD is not included in DSM 5 or in ICD 11. Hence justification while doing a study may be a problem. Refer also to CANMAT guidelines latest if they have included. Only Judd's paper in yr 2000 seems to talk about it. Examining references above . Some recent papers talk about it while trying to distinguish based on genetic studies. There are hardly any studies in social cognition deficiets in SSD which I could lay on. I would recall my previous message here as to whether social cognition deficiets are relevant in depression?
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
4 answers
I 'd like to study for a PH.D in psychology, what should I do to choose a reaearch topic from so many research topics? I only ensure that I'm interested in social cognition.
Relevant answer
Answer
This is a very important question. Best advice I can give you is to
1) make a brainstorm with the head of the/your research department (or other senior researchers in the field)
2) out of all the good ideas, remove any that is not very feasible. This is where you choose how depressed you will get when you have spent 75% of your PhD time to do 25% of the work. Plan smart, so you do not have to work hard. Choosing what seems an 'easy topic' does not make your PhD less valuable to you, your career or your peers. It will just make it more pleasant to do the work.
3) out of the remaining ideas, take your time alone to feel what actually speaks to you. What captivates your attention? You have to want to spend a LOT of time with this subject. Its kind of like a relationship. If you are feeling a bad itch or having second-thoughts on the first couple of dates, its most likely not the one for you! But if you feel like cuddling up with this topic in a remote book-laden cabin in the woods in front of the fireplace for weeks: Its probably the one for you! :D
Best of luck picking your topic.
/Alex
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
17 answers
Hello,
We are looking for someone who can help us with intro writting for our manuscripts. The topics we cover would be personality, well-being, substain use, tech use. Leave you email if you are interested.
Relevant answer
Answer
Please have look on our(Eminent Biosciences (EMBS)) collaborations.. and let me know if interested to associate with us
Our recent publications In collaborations with industries and academia in India and world wide.
EMBS publication In association with Universidad Tecnológica Metropolitana, Santiago, Chile. Publication Link: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33397265/
EMBS publication In association with Moscow State University , Russia. Publication Link: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32967475/
EMBS publication In association with Icahn Institute of Genomics and Multiscale Biology,, Mount Sinai Health System, Manhattan, NY, USA. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29199918
EMBS publication In association with University of Missouri, St. Louis, MO, USA. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30457050
EMBS publication In association with Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia, USA. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27852211
EMBS publication In association with ICMR- NIN(National Institute of Nutrition), Hyderabad Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23030611
EMBS publication In association with University of Minnesota Duluth, Duluth MN 55811 USA. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27852211
EMBS publication In association with University of Yaounde I, PO Box 812, Yaoundé, Cameroon. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30950335
EMBS publication In association with Federal University of Paraíba, João Pessoa, PB, Brazil. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30693065
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and University of Yaoundé I, Yaoundé, Cameroon. Publication Link: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31210847/
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, 48080, Leioa, Spain. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27852204
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Publication Link: http://www.eurekaselect.com/135585
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and NIPER , Hyderabad, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29053759
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and Alagappa University, Tamil Nadu, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30950335
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University, Hyderabad , India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28472910
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and C.S.I.R – CRISAT, Karaikudi, Tamil Nadu, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30237676
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and Karpagam academy of higher education, Eachinary, Coimbatore , Tamil Nadu, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30237672
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and Ballets Olaeta Kalea, 4, 48014 Bilbao, Bizkaia, Spain. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29199918
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and Hospital for Genetic Diseases, Osmania University, Hyderabad - 500 016, Telangana, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28472910
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and School of Ocean Science and Technology, Kerala University of Fisheries and Ocean Studies, Panangad-682 506, Cochin, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27964704
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and CODEWEL Nireekshana-ACET, Hyderabad, Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26770024
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and Bharathiyar University, Coimbatore-641046, Tamilnadu, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27919211
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and LPU University, Phagwara, Punjab, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31030499
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and Department of Bioinformatics, Kerala University, Kerala. Publication Link: http://www.eurekaselect.com/135585
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and Gandhi Medical College and Osmania Medical College, Hyderabad 500 038, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27450915
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and National College (Affiliated to Bharathidasan University), Tiruchirapalli, 620 001 Tamil Nadu, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27266485
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and University of Calicut - 673635, Kerala, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23030611
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and NIPER, Hyderabad, India. ) Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29053759
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and King George's Medical University, (Erstwhile C.S.M. Medical University), Lucknow-226 003, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25579575
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and School of Chemical & Biotechnology, SASTRA University, Thanjavur, India Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25579569
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and Safi center for scientific research, Malappuram, Kerala, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30237672
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and Dept of Genetics, Osmania University, Hyderabad Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25248957
EMBS publication In association with Institute of Genetics and Hospital for Genetic Diseases, Osmania University, Hyderabad Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26229292
Sincerely,
Dr. Anuraj Nayarisseri
Principal Scientist & Director,
Eminent Biosciences.
Mob :+91 97522 95342
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
9 answers
Hello,
We are working on a project relates to personality and friendship. We need some one to report the statistics in our manuscript. You will be included as one of the coauthors. If of interests, please leave your email address so that we could contact you. Thanks
Relevant answer
Answer
Please have look on our(Eminent Biosciences (EMBS)) collaborations.. and let me know if interested to associate with us
Our recent publications In collaborations with industries and academia in India and world wide.
EMBS publication In association with Universidad Tecnológica Metropolitana, Santiago, Chile. Publication Link: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33397265/
EMBS publication In association with Moscow State University , Russia. Publication Link: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32967475/
EMBS publication In association with Icahn Institute of Genomics and Multiscale Biology,, Mount Sinai Health System, Manhattan, NY, USA. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29199918
EMBS publication In association with University of Missouri, St. Louis, MO, USA. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30457050
EMBS publication In association with Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia, USA. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27852211
EMBS publication In association with ICMR- NIN(National Institute of Nutrition), Hyderabad Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23030611
EMBS publication In association with University of Minnesota Duluth, Duluth MN 55811 USA. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27852211
EMBS publication In association with University of Yaounde I, PO Box 812, Yaoundé, Cameroon. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30950335
EMBS publication In association with Federal University of Paraíba, João Pessoa, PB, Brazil. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30693065
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and University of Yaoundé I, Yaoundé, Cameroon. Publication Link: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31210847/
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, 48080, Leioa, Spain. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27852204
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Publication Link: http://www.eurekaselect.com/135585
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and NIPER , Hyderabad, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29053759
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and Alagappa University, Tamil Nadu, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30950335
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University, Hyderabad , India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28472910
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and C.S.I.R – CRISAT, Karaikudi, Tamil Nadu, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30237676
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and Karpagam academy of higher education, Eachinary, Coimbatore , Tamil Nadu, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30237672
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and Ballets Olaeta Kalea, 4, 48014 Bilbao, Bizkaia, Spain. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29199918
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and Hospital for Genetic Diseases, Osmania University, Hyderabad - 500 016, Telangana, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28472910
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and School of Ocean Science and Technology, Kerala University of Fisheries and Ocean Studies, Panangad-682 506, Cochin, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27964704
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and CODEWEL Nireekshana-ACET, Hyderabad, Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26770024
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and Bharathiyar University, Coimbatore-641046, Tamilnadu, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27919211
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and LPU University, Phagwara, Punjab, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31030499
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and Department of Bioinformatics, Kerala University, Kerala. Publication Link: http://www.eurekaselect.com/135585
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and Gandhi Medical College and Osmania Medical College, Hyderabad 500 038, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27450915
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and National College (Affiliated to Bharathidasan University), Tiruchirapalli, 620 001 Tamil Nadu, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27266485
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and University of Calicut - 673635, Kerala, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23030611
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and NIPER, Hyderabad, India. ) Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29053759
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and King George's Medical University, (Erstwhile C.S.M. Medical University), Lucknow-226 003, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25579575
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and School of Chemical & Biotechnology, SASTRA University, Thanjavur, India Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25579569
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and Safi center for scientific research, Malappuram, Kerala, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30237672
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and Dept of Genetics, Osmania University, Hyderabad Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25248957
EMBS publication In association with Institute of Genetics and Hospital for Genetic Diseases, Osmania University, Hyderabad Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26229292
Sincerely,
Dr. Anuraj Nayarisseri
Principal Scientist & Director,
Eminent Biosciences.
Mob :+91 97522 95342
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
34 answers
Hello,
Is there any interested in helping with our analysis? We are working on a project relating to personality and friendship. Leave your email address if you are interested.
Regards,
Relevant answer
Answer
It will be good to know the type of psychological data you want to analyse and possibly the research hypotheses
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
3 answers
I doubt it is halfway between low and high arousal nor halfway between negative and positive valence. Does anyone know where listeners rate emotionally "neutral", conversational speech?
Relevant answer
Answer
I read this somewhere in the RAVDESS paper ( ): "Many studies incorporate a neutral or ªno emotionº control condition. However, neutral expressions have produced mixed perceptual results [70], at times conveying a negative emotional valence [71]. Researchers have suggested that this may be due to uncertainty on the part of the performer as to how neutral should be conveyed [66]. To compensate for this a calm baseline condition has been included, which is perceptually like neutral, but may be perceived as having a mild positive valence."
Intuitively, neutral would be a low arousal state to me so I bet listeners would judge it like so. Based on the excerpt above, I would expect listeners to perceive such utterances as slightly negative in valence on average.
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
3 answers
recent studies point out presence of social cognition deficits in substance use disorders , are there any therapies developed especially for substance use disorder, or can therapies like social cognition and interaction training program (SCIT) be used .
Relevant answer
You can read the method section and discussion and see what we thought was important.
Swedish high-school pupils’ attitudes towards drugs in relation to drug usage, impulsiveness and other risk factors
Fariba Mousavi1, Danilo Garcia1,2, Alexander Jimmefors1,Trevor Archer1,3 and B ́eatrice Ewalds-Kvist4,5 (6) (PDF) Swedish high-school pupils’ attitudes towards drugs in relation to drug usage, impulsiveness and other risk factors. Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/262881950_Swedish_high-school_pupils'_attitudes_towards_drugs_in_relation_to_drug_usage_impulsiveness_and_other_risk_factors [accessed Jul 21 2021].
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
4 answers
Hi
is anybody aware of a questionnaire about the social cognitive tendencies that go along with higher and lower social classes as proposed by the social cognitive theory of social class from Kraus et al. (2012; doi:10.1037/a0028756)?
Relevant answer
SESpsychreview.2012.pdf (krauslab.com)
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
6 answers
The narrative of memory dialogues with the 'time of the 'experience recorded' and the 'time of the narrative of remembrance'. Paul Ricoeur in "Time and Narrative" indicates the paradoxalities of the hermeneutic circle between the act of narrating the fact (remembered) and temporal dynamics. What can be understood about the plasticity of time in the dialogues of memory? Something that Ricoeur himself will later explore in "Memory, History and Forgetting". But would this temporal plasticity be a relevant factor in the transformation of non-biographical memory into biographical memory?
Relevant answer
Answer
Thank you very much, Rooney Pinto, for the clarification. Now I see the difference between one thing and another. I tell my PhD student (he has been researching intergenerational memory transmission for two years, and the fieldwork is over) to contact you through Researchgate. Of course, if this doesn't bother you. Kind regards, Maribel
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
6 answers
Hello,
Background: I am doing a meta-analysis using Cohen's d. I am calculating the effect size of having a higher BMI on social cognition abilities. Some studies have a high BMI group and a control "normal weight" control group, and the effect size calculation is pretty straightforward. For studies that used a single group design and reported a simple bivariate r-stats between BMI and my "outcome" measure (social cognition), I used an r-to-d conversion using the following formula:
d = 2r/ √(1-r2)
[Friedman, H. (1968). "Magnitude of experimental effect and a table for its rapid estimation," Psychological Bulletin, 70(4): 245-251.]
My question. Firstly, I'm hoping I used the r-to-d equation appropriately. Secondly, in order to complete my meta-analysis, I need to calculate a standard error (SE) of the effect size to enter into the meta-analysis software. Most standard error equations assume the study design uses two groups, rather than a single group study design. I just know r-values, sample size, and means/SDs of BMI & the outcome (social cognition) variables. Does anyone know how to calculate the standard error in this situation?
Thanks so much!!
Relevant answer
Answer
I'm sorry..i dont have any suggestion about your topic right now..
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
11 answers
Is aesthetics intrinsically linked with objects of art? Or maybe there is some hidden aesthetics in an object of art that people of a certain era do not perceive?
Relevant answer
Answer
Of course not. The main object of aesthetics is art. A person aesthetically analyzes what affects all his feelings. But the criteria for accepting works of art from each period will be different, because the taste of today's youth is very different from the taste of young people 50 years ago.
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
17 answers
Serge Moscovici and his theory of Social representation is a stream of research that interests me a lot. The question of future directions of research is also something I contemplated on. How do you see research in this field evolving?
I did my contribution a month ago with the connection of social representation to international business, entrepreneurship, attitudes , education and decision making logic.
So once again :-) What is the future for social representations?
Best wishes Henrik
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
2 answers
I would like to explore the Optimal Distinctiveness Theory (as studied by Leonardelli, Pickett & Brewer, 2010) in order to link it with some consistent effects assessed through unrelated literature.
This would require finding a way to instigate either a need for distinctiveness or for inclusion, depending on the assigned group (for these will work as my IVs) - what paradigms out there seem to be most effective in manipulating these?
Relevant answer
Answer
If you search the ingroup/outgroup research sites and articles, you will find many research designs you will be able to adopt or adapt for your study. As I understand the theory, people will strive for a balance between distinctiveness and inclusion.
Any technique that will stimulate ingroup/outgroup behaviour will naturally elicit strategies for distinctiveness and inclusion. You will just have to devise ways of spotting/naming these behaviours. After that it merely a matter of counting and statistical evaluation.
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
1 answer
We want to run a mixed effects model for our experimental design using lme4 package in R and want to confirm if our model is specified correctly.
Our design involves two random factors (participants and stimuli) and two fixed factors – first fixed factor is ‘condition’ with 3 levels and the second fixed factor is ‘group’ with 2 levels. The condition fixed factor is a within-subjects factor and the culture fixed factor is a between-subjects factor. Stimuli are crossed across conditions and counterbalanced between participant. The full data set is attached in this post.
We want to test the main effect of condition and the interaction of culture and condition. The model we specify is provided below. We have based this on a paper by Westfall and colleagues (Judd, C. M., Westfall, J., & Kenny, D. A.; 2016)and adapted the code from an app they developed.
We are adapting their code for the ‘Counterbalanced’ design as it fits most closely to our design. We also plan to contrast code the IVs, as specified in the app. Is the code below to test interaction effects specified correctly? Also, should we specify a separate model to look at main effect of condition?
model <- lmer (y ~ condition*group + (1 + condition | subj_id) + (1 + condition | scenario), data = Study1)
modelrestricted <- update(model, .~. -condition:group)
KRModcomp(model, modelrestricted)
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
96 answers
Is it possible to be a good parent and have a sound career in research? Many young researcher struggle with their research-family balance. Family or research, which one we should give first priority.
Relevant answer
Answer
It is difficult to balance between family and research, but it is good to choose both. It is important for everyone to feel the warmth and comfort of the family, but also the satisfaction of scientific work. In some cases, family takes precedence, in others work. The key is in a positive attitude in solving problems both in the family and in research. Success!
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
7 answers
I have searched the web, but cannot locate a copy.TY.
Relevant answer
Answer
I am also looking for the full empathy scale - can't find it anywhere
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
3 answers
I try to explore the effects of System Justification and Beliefs In Just and fair world in Teachers Perceptions.
I am working to develop a questionnaire that explore this field.
Any suggestions to develop also a theoretical base would be helpful.
In previous work I tried to explore the effects of dominant ideology in teachers perceptions about the other and I am trying to expand it.
Thanks in advanced
Relevant answer
Nice Dear Samah Zahran
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
4 answers
Every generation seems to strive for a better future ignoring the immediate present betterment in real sense. Because time is essential to all activities and the results are only obtained at end irrespective of scale and magnitude or the span of it. Thus the present behaviour is in anticipation of a future outcome. In this way the society fails to address the present and gets trapped in this vicious cycle of future driven momentum and ignores the true future. By isolating the driving force itself, mankind should realize the present and secure the future by securing the present.
Is it not the economic problem of the society at this very juncture? Are we actually addressing sustainability?
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Sidheswar Patra.
Thanks for raising an interesting question. I think that it is true that the current society is sacrificing the future of incoming generations. The current world is more governed, say, by the gospel of war, money, greed, competition, lack of respect for the environmental problems and corruption than by the gospel of peace, ethical principles, empathy, cooperation, honesty, and concern with environmental problems. All of this compromises a sustainable development and the future of future generations. We all have the responsibility to make of this world a better place to live in.
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
3 answers
Generally increased exposure to stimuli leads to increased liking (i.e., familiarity effect, mere exposure effect). For example, hearing a song repeatedly leads to greater liking of the song and familiarity with a music genre leads to liking that genre. This is well-established Social Psychology research. But, anecdotally, it seems we get bored with the same old music and come to appreciate new songs, at least within our preferred genres. This applies more broadly (e.g., art). Is there any research on this seeming novelty preference and, if so, does it have a name? The closest concept I know of would be the moderate-discrepancy hypothesis within Developmental Psychology, but this seems like it has more to do with engagement, attention, and learning - rather than liking. I ask because this became a discussion with my Social Psychology students. Thank you for your thoughts. ~ Kevin
Relevant answer
Answer
I think the "habituation effect" may have some influence on this phenomenon.
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
29 answers
Generally, academic career starts with great hopes and expectations. First decade receiving a doctorate degree, new lecture experiences provide a high level of motivation. But sometimes managers can force you to work with a lot of workload. Academic steps are difficult. The lucky ones gain experience abroad and develop their renewed self. Some become unable to handle the workload and their motivation falls. As soon as some of them have less academic work, they lose interest in academia. They find other efforts to give up academic progress. After 15 years, competence increases. The main motivations of the academician who have good relations with the students are their students. But after 15 years fatigue, some things lose meaning lowers motivation. Excessive effort in intensive work such as symposium, preparing the whole faculty lesson plan and accreditation can create discomfort. Often academics are optimistic. But the use of most of the efforts of their superiors can reduce motivation. At the end of 20 years, the motivation can still be maintained by being honored in a certain field. How do you think it is possible not to lose motivation for years due to these thoughts?
Relevant answer
Answer
It is so hard to keep working under negative academic conditions. But I always motive myself to continue. I know that everything what I've done for my working area, can be useful or helpful for future studies. And also my publications are always my production.
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
3 answers
For Mann Whitney U results I have computed the pearson's r (cohen) as an effect size as advised by (Fritz, C. O., Morris, P. E., & Richler, J. J. (2012). " Effect size estimates: Current use, calculations, and interpretation"
Since the sampling distribution of Pearson's r is not normally distributed, Pearson's r is converted to Fisher's z' and the confidence interval is computed using Fisher's z'.
However, for my first result examining group differences on social cognition
Group 1 (Mdn=12; IQR=3.5) & Group 2 (Mdn=12, 1QR=0).
The mann whitney result was U=75, P=0.017, r=0.28 (medium effect size).
When I use the Fishers z conversion method I get r 95% confidence intervals of lower limit -0.082 to upper limit 0.203.
1. As I understand it if your confidence interval crosses 0 your p value should be not significant?
2. Does anyone know what I am doing wrong here or why an incongruent result like this may arise?
3. Is there any other options that would give similar info to confidence intervals for cohens r that are more straightforward to calculate?
( I am only trained in SPSS)
Thanks very much in advance for any help,
Best wishes,
Iona
Relevant answer
Answer
It's not possible to get negative limits for r² from Fisher's approach. So I assume the CI limits (-0.082, 0.203) refer to z. But the z-transform of r²=0.28 is 0.288. This value is not in the CI ! So there is something wrong. It would have been possible to check if you had given the sample size (and more clearly described how you calculated the CI) ...
Apart from that - after Cohen, r² < 0.3 is considered a weak effect, not a medium effect. But ist's anyway more than questionable if these criteria have any relevance.
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
6 answers
I am looking for the child studies that children's skills can change according to lab settings or their natural environments (home, nurseries etc.). It could be any skills (cognitive, social etc.) and any age groups. There is an article which emphasises the importance of research settings in child studies (Punch, 2002), but I need emprical evidences to support this notion.
Relevant answer
Answer
Abdulmumin Abioye I have made a list of papers which were recommended by other researchers. Hope that helps for you and anyone who are interested.
1. Mace & Nevin (2017). Maintenance, Generalization, and Treatment Relapse: A Behavioral Momentum Analysis: There is focus on “generalization of behaviour”. It gives examples of case studies.
2. Singh et al. (1991). Social Behavior of students who are seriously emotionally disturbed: A quantitative analysis of intervention studies: It is a review of children and adolescents’ studies across different research settings.
3. Wahler & Vigilante (2004). Generalization in a child's oppositional behavior across home and school settings.
4. Wulbert et al. (1974). The generalization of newly acquired behaviors by parents and child across three different settings - A study of an autistic child
5. Waddington et al. (2017). Teaching a Child with ASD to Approach Communication Partners and Use a Speech-Generating Device Across Settings: Clinic, School, and Home
6. Strouse & Troseth (2008). "Don't try this at home": Toddlers' imitation of new skills from people on video: This study works in lab, but not at home.
7. Saunders et al. (2018). Reported Self-Control is not Meaningfully Associated with Inhibition-Related Executive Function: A Bayesian Analysis: It is an adult study; not sure this is what we are looking for.
8. It was recommended that I should look at self-report vs behavioural discrepancies and emotional clarity.
9. Iris Mauss’s studies on self-conscious emotion (e.g. shame) and psychophysiology were recommended.
10. Patricia Bauer’s studies on infant memory were recommended.
11. Eisenberg & Lennon (1983). Sex differences in empathy and related capacities: It shows differences in empathy depending on self-report, interview, or observed.
12. Schieler, Koenig & Buttelmann (2018). Fourteen-month-olds selectively search for and use information depending on the familiarity of the informant in both laboratory and home contexts
13. Light & Perret- Clermont (1989). Social context effects in learning and testing. Published in J.-A. Sloboda (Ed.). Cognition and Social Worlds pp. 99-112
14. Schubauer-Leoni et al. (1989). Problems in assessment of learning: The social construction of questions and answers in the scholastic context
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
5 answers
I'm currently working on the influence of work family conflict and locus of control on turnover intention. I need the scale of work family conflict the version developed by carlson et al (2000) to study Ibo people. I need the psychometric properties and the items? 
Relevant answer
this site may help: https://scales.ppsy.pro
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
3 answers
Should they be designed for predefined socio-technical functionality or for context-dependent utilization of stimulated/acquired social, cognitive technical affordances?
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Azam,
Your last question is very relevant and makes a lot of sense for me. The circumscribed issue is far not so trivial as it seems at the first sight. Smart systems will be adaptive (actually, self-adaptive). Therefore, their functionality cannot be described exhaustively in the design phase. (As I wrote somewhere: part of the task of designing will be delegated to the intellectualized systems themselves). This is actually that raises the question about the relevance or appropriateness of functions-centered design. When a system self-adapts (as a consequence of certain system states, behavioral performance, or envirinmental circumstances), it may rely on the affordances offered by the system 'design' as well as on the available and utilizable (un-bound) system resources (built-in or acquired at run-time). Some recently completed PhD studies suggested to me that, in the case of run-time self-adaptation, the system affordances and their exploitation play an important role. The current knowledge is insufficient concerning this complicated (multi-faceted) phenomenon. Further explorative/experimental research and speculations seem to be indispensible ...
Best regards,
I.H.
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
3 answers
I’m preparing an article about oxytocin and development. I'm curious about the differences in levels of oxytocin and possible influences by the subsequent life events.
Relevant answer
Answer
Is there any data on oxytocin levels changing through the lifespan? Do they go down with age like testosterone levels (after puberty)?
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
3 answers
Hello
Can any one suggest any labs or places that is working in the area of culture and cognition (Effects of culture of cognitive processes/culture and social cognition/cultural differences in cognitive development) in India or in association with India.
I am Rahul, (Masters in Neuropsychology) from India and actively looking for associating into projects working in this area.
thanks in advance for suggestions.
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Rahul!
You were born and live in a beautiful country. India has ancient traditions of wisdom and knowledge of the world. I suggest you at this stage draw up a plan for studying the traditions of the culture of one of the regions of India. You will independently collect specific data about the culture and traditions of a particular group of people. It is necessary to publish this data. Further, you will be able to participate on an equal footing in international projects in which your data will be in demand.
All the best,
Vladimir
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
4 answers
I am looking for different questionnaires based on Bloom Taxonomy (Affective, Cognitive and Social domains) to assess the learning of computer science student in CS1 courses(such as intro to programming class with java or c or python).
Relevant answer
Answer
Can you recommend some VALID questionnaires for Affective, Cognitive and Social domain?
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
2 answers
The creation of cognitive-cultural niches and the Baldwin effect are necessary for the development of social cognition. Are there more criteria to be taken into account in the human self-domestication process?
Relevant answer
Answer
Gentrification, a clearly modern and interesting process. Although I do not think I can use it in the study of the self-domination of the Homo genus since its inception. However, there could be processes with some similarity.
Thanks for your interest.
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
1 answer
Outcome expectations questionnaire by betz and Hackett.
Based on The Social Cognitive Career Theory
Relevant answer
Answer
This is in ResearchGate: "Gender, Ethnicity, and Social Cognitive Factors Predicting the Academic Achievement of Students in EngineeringArticle (PDF Available) in Journal of Counseling Psychology 39(4):527-538 · October 1992 with 3,675 ReadsDOI: 10.1037/0022-0167.39.4.527 📷 Gail Hackett 32.19Virginia Commonwealth University 📷 Nancy E. Betz 37.54The Ohio State University 📷 J. Manuel Casas 📷 Indra A. Rocha-Singh Abstract Examines the relationships of measures of occupational and academic self-efficacy; vocational interests; outcome expectations; academic ability; and perceived stress, support, and coping to the academic achievement of women and men enrolled in university-level engineering/science programs. 197 students from diverse racial/ethnic backgrounds responded to scales measuring the variables of interest; high school and college academic data were obtained from university records. Self-efficacy for academic milestones, in combination with other academic and support variables, was found to be the strongest predictor of college academic achievement. Outcome expectations, vocational interests, and low levels of stress were in turn the strongest predictors of academic self-efficacy. Prediction equations for Euro-American and Mexican-American students revealed no significant contribution of ethnicity to the prediction of college academic achievement; however, ethnicity did enter into the equations predicting the 2 self-efficacy variables. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)"
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
3 answers
Hi, I am curious whether we can find the social richness of a response among the many given based on the query asked?
For example:
Query: How are you?
response 1: i am fine
response 2: thanks for asking, yes i am fine
response 3: yes, i am fine and what about you?
by social richness I mean: which response is considered more socially connected with the emotions and other psychological aspects e.g. empathy (please note that I am not expert in this field, this is my rough imagination of social richness)
Is there any way to achieve this using existing libraries in Python e.g. NLTK or some APIs e.g. IBM Watson or others. Can as assign the social richness scores to each response?
Thanks,
best,
Tahir
Relevant answer
Answer
Hello Tahir,
I am not sure how useful it will be, but you can try topic extraction using Latent Dirichlet Allocation. Following is the link to scikit api
Based on the co-occurrence, it clusters the words into components. You can select the components and check their frequency in the sentences.
I hope this helps.
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
9 answers
To date, what studies have been performed using SCORS-Q (Social Cognition and Object Relation Scale - Q sort version; Westen, 1995)?
As I know, no studies have been performed, at least in scientific articles.
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Andrea,
I used the SCORS-Q in my dissertation research. Below is the reference for the journal publication. I hope that this is helpful.
Tony
Bram, A.D., Gallant, S.J., & Segrin, C. (1999). A longitudinal investigation of
object relations: Child-rearing antecedents, stability in adulthood, and
construct validation. Journal of Research in Personality, 33, 159-188.
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
4 answers
Can you suggest 5 sense of science for complete harmony?
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear, Amit
We can not interact with outer world completely in absence of anyone.
Same way what are five crucial things by which science is speaking with universe.
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
8 answers
Can anyone recommend validated scales that tap into extremism and radicalization?
Relevant answer
Answer
Our paper on developing and validating two generic scales pertaining to (1) endorsement of extremism and (2) acceptance of violent and/or illegal means has been published.
Please see:
Ozer & Bertelsen (2018). Capturing violent radicalization: Developing and validating scales measuring central aspects of radicalization. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology.
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
7 answers
I'm currently studying on a social cognition project. I want to know if the different mental states in individuals (for example, level of mood or anxiety) lead to the different attribution of traits to others?
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Mohammad,
You want to know if different mental states in individuals (for example, their level of mood or anxiety) lead them to attribute different traits to others.
If I am not wrong, you are using two terms (i.e., states and traits) as if they were synonymous and they aren't. State refers to a transient form of feeling or thinking (e.g., I feel happy/unhappy; I am in a positive, negative or neutral mood), where trait refers to a permanent characteristic of one's personality (e.g., to be introvert vs to be extrovert).
The issue you raise is a highly debated topic in social psychology. it has been found that people often attribute to others their mental states. If, for example, you are in a good or positive mood it is liked that you think that others are also in a good or positive mood. This tendency is more frequently obseverd in young than older children, adolescents or adults. This is so, because young children are, say, more egocentric than older children, adolescents and adults and, hence, they have some difficulty to attribute to others mental states different from their own. However, it is not always the case that individuals attribute to others their mental states or even their personality traits. Have you ever heard of the fundamental attribution error? It has been found that, when attributing causes to their and others' behaviors, individuals tend to explain their failures in terms of external causes (" I got a D" -- an exam low mark -- because the exam was too difficult" ) and others' failures in terms of internal causes ("S/he got a D because s/he is not intelligent"). As for successes, individuals tend to explain their successes in terms of internal causes ("I got an A -- an exam high mark--because I am quite intelligent"), and others' successes in terms of external causes ("S/he got an A because of luck"). These two manifestations of the fundamental attribution error, are known as the self-deserving bias or a bias in favor of one's self.
Thus, dear Mohammad, for your research project to get ahead, I would urge you to be relatively acquainted with the attribution theory. And good luck for your project.
Kind regards,
Orlando.
PS. This is a short answer to your question. Even so, I hope it helps
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
3 answers
Isn't it pure psychoticism to have the most fundamental unit of analysis of a presumed foundational behavior pattern of AN organism INCLUDE MORE THAN ONE ORGANISM'S BEHAVIOR necessarily (or really AT ALL (ever), FOR THAT MATTER)? Yes, yes, yes. YET see the following recent papers INSIST ON such an explanation NECESSARILY (as necessary -- i.e. no other "reasonable" way):
Enactive Mechanistic Explanation of Social Cognition
and
Mechanistic explanation for enactive sociality
They claim 25 years of such just-pure-speculative (and by-now obviously useless) "conceptualizations".
This embarrassing nonsense is what can happen when you do not know or do not examine or analyze your true base/foundational assumptions YET THOSE ARE very poor, baseless, and UNPROVEN AND MOST-LIKELY _NOT_ TRUE (because of inconsistencies with BIOLOGY, as I have clearly indicated in my essays). [ It is desperation for progress with a basic view and approach THAT CANNOT MAKE PROGRESS rationally -- it is desperation in science/"science" . ]
Relevant answer
Answer
Since basically the same criticisms hold for "embodied" 'theories', that should be noted here. The follow scathing peer critique holds against both enhancement 'theory' and "Embodied" 'Theories':
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
2 answers
I have written following code based on knowledge which i understood. I have done mistakes in PSOoptimize() method but not getting what exactly it is ? fitness_function is not working for swarm[i].position then with what I can optimize number of features?
Relevant answer
Answer
In my opinion, your program does not implement a feature selection. The particle obtained by PSO should tell you what features you should use in the construction of your classifier.
For example, Bing Xue in indicate that:
"In PSO for feature selection, the representation of a particle is a n-bit string, where n is the total number of features in the dataset. The position value is in [0,1], which shows the probability of the feature being selected. A threshold θ is used to determine whether a feature is selected or not. "
Best regards
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
8 answers
What effect is digital technologies having on our teenagers. and who is actually a teenager.
Relevant answer
Answer
It depends on what the teenagers do with digital technologies.
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
3 answers
i want to assessment the affects of Social Cognition as independent variable on School Liking as The dependent variable among students, so i need the relevant questionnaire for Social Cognition that measure it?
Relevant answer
Answer
Hello,
I don't know if there is anything of help here:
Boor‐Klip, H. J., Segers, E., Hendrickx, M. M., & Cillessen, A. H. (2016). Development and psychometric properties of the classroom peer context questionnaire. Social Development, 25(2), 370-389.
This is the RG link but not full text:
Very best wishes,
Mary
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
46 answers
What are the characteristics of a representative man?
What are the criteria for a desirable and satisfied life?
Hard to reach, Worth it to try getting closer!!
Relevant answer
Answer
Gratitude, Gratitude, Gratitude
Optimism is key
stress reduction, a positive self-bias, and increased pain tolerance, all of which could enhance motivation and performance during competitive tasks.
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
4 answers
Hello, i am conducting a health report for a psychological assignment, this report is based on the reduction of risk in contracting hiv in a prison setting. Unfortunately after reading a fair amount of journals I am quite confused in which Social Cognitive model within health psychology would be most effective ? If anyone can offer any advice it would be greatly appreciated. Thankyou..
Relevant answer
Answer
Hi Rachel,
A difficult question to answer without a bit more context. By the way, Grimsby used to be quite a haunt of mine when I lived in Boston (UK) many moons ago before arriving in New Zealand and Australia. Louth, Grimsby, Scunthorpe etc were regular trips for me - and I lived near Hull for a umber years. Anyway - there are a number of seminal social-cognitive models that might fit the bill - it depends what you want them to do in relation to HIV and the prison setting. The attached articles might assist. They are nursing-related - but the principles are generic.
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
2 answers
My question is raised in research in psychology but may apply to other subjects in social sciences. The study is about the influence of a social cognitive capacity (SocCog) on a social behavior (SocBeh). The SocCog is known to be present in children, but it influences the SocBeh only in some contexts, and I would like to present this graphically (or in whatever way understandable) with PPT.
Any advice would be appreciated. Thank you all.
Meng
Relevant answer
Answer
I think your suggestion is worth a try. Thanks.
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
5 answers
I'm currently analyzing the data for my master's thesis and trying to disentangle a significant 3-way interaction. I have 2 repeated-measures variables (time: 1, 2 and 3) and emotion (sadness, cheerfulness, anxiety, anger) and one between-subjects factor (gender: male vs female). What I now want to know is on which levels of emotion the gender x time interaction is significant. I have come across 2 different ways of analyzing simple interaction effects in SPSS. One uses the MANOVA subcommand, the other GLM. However, all the examples I’m finding for this are for far simpler designs (only between-subjects factors or less levels of the within-subjects factors) and I’m somehow failing to apply them to my data. Is there anyone who has experience with this and who might be willing to give me some tips?
Relevant answer
Answer
A very delayed thanks for all your suggestions!
If anyone is facing the same problem: I have found what I was looking for in
Page, M. C., Braver, S. L., & MacKinnon, D. P. (2003). Levine’s guide to SPSS for analysis of variance (2nd ed.). Mahwah, NJ: Psychology Press.
The book shows a lot of ways to unravel complicated interactions.
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
12 answers
A human is an ability to eat, to walk, to memorize, to think, to rightly express your moods. Then he goes to work as electrician, musician, physicicist, physician, etc. All these human  activity is generated by human society, government.
WHERE IS A PURE MAN? Do we think about ourselves (our memory, thinking, why do we live, why do we do such action, etc) frequently? NOT AT ALL! We immersed in highly complicated "whirlpool" оf self-preservation of ourselves, our children, our parents, our relatives, our MONEYS, etc. Our self-preservation is  so complicated that we have no time to think on other subjects. So we are ants, we get commands and we just execute it. That is essence if our life - we do what we do not understand but we are in hurry to make it on time! All it is a comedy.
Besides Shakespeare`s phrase "all the world is a theater" I say all the world is comedy.
Relevant answer
Answer
No
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
4 answers
Hi everyone, 
I am searching for a specific kind of material assessing empathetic processes. I would like to measure empathetic decision taking, where the participant might choose between the interests of a collectivity (to the detriment of an individual); or the interests of an individual (to the detriment of a collectivity). 
Therefore, it is a kind of material mixing the public goods and the trolley dilemma: an ecological situation assessing empathetic behaviours without involving money.
If this material does not exist, does any collaborator would be interested to develop this kind of material with me?
Many thanks in advance,
Julian
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Julian,
I agree on the use of empathy scales such as the 60-item empathy quotient available on Cambridge website. I thought from what you described that you were also interested in moral judgement.
For this, I would recommend the moral judgement task:
Or the moral dilemmas developed by Patil and colleagues. The authors are available on RG.
Best regards,
Moussa 
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
3 answers
Two studies found self-uncertainty salience increased the subjective distance with the past self. How to build a rational story of them in the introduction? I thought about temporal self-appraisal theory, temporal comparison theory, construal level theory etc. But still cannot build a satisfactory rationale and highlight the contribution. The results are solid and interesting, Happy to hear some suggestions and may cooperate on the revision of this paper. 
Relevant answer
Answer
I would be interested in the paper (as it stands).  This might be very important in areas like career theory - when are we willing to step into a new identity?
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
14 answers
A bunch of cognitive evaluation of our body can exist paralelly in us. The pattern of their activation can be regarded as a personal connection with our body. Has it been investigated if the simple act of turning with the attention towards the body activates immediately 1) a/some cognitive element of the connection with the body (e.g. acceptance, judgement), 2) and consequent emotional reactions (e.g. shame, love). Or if the experience brought by acute body attention (body sensations, emotions, thoughts) is linked with the personal connection with the body?
E.g. imagine that you ask your subject in your research to close the eyes, pay attention to the body and report the emerging experiences. She says, she felt a tingling sensation in the chest. Does this tingling reflect her connection with her body, the thoughts, emotions that were triggered in that moment when she payed attention to her body? 
If you know a scientific work that examines such question, so that I could refer to it in a manuscript in progress, I would thank you to introduce:). 
Relevant answer
Answer
Benedek, Thank you for your comments, and I do agree with them. However, my life situation is different from yours.
As a non-academic meditation teacher with a singularly effective form of meditation to teach, and with a volunteer and charity business model that chooses to sell our course for the lowest feasible amount (under $50 USD), and as someone recovering from Stage IV cancer, I am forced to choose to participate in whatever online forums allow me to generate publicity for NSR among those who can really make a difference in society: scientists.
While it is true that many of our public statements, such as can be found on our website, could be wonderful candidates for serious and important research, I find that there is a substantial barrier for others to do so (mostly a barrier made up of beliefs and assumptions). And as for myself, I have neither the scientific training nor the personal time or energy to write papers on these interesting concepts and statements.
I do appeciate your input and interest, but so long as Research Gate feel that I am not being outright commercial, or a spammer, I plan to continue to champion and advocate for NSR here and elsewhere as the solution to the practical psychological problems and limitations that cause such suffering in our society today. NSR is an open project, currently consisting of three organizations distributing the course in three languages. We are not in this to make money, and indeed it would be impossible to do so given the extremely low prices for instruction and support for our clients.
I am not at all opposed to academic research in psychology. But I find that the majority of it confuses causes and effects, or attempts to combine effects along with other effects (such as anxiety and fear, which are different but both produced by overloads of experience which have lasting impact on the nervous system, see www.nsrusa.org/about-stress.php) in ways that do not work. I find that all this research does not result in practical public health programs to eliminate problems and bring natural peace of mind, harmony with others, and happiness to all citizens.
The day that research psychology succeeds in helping the human race cease its suffering, I will shut up. Until then, I have something relevant to say, something that I hope will influence researchers and theoretists to study and verify.
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
4 answers
Dear colleagues,
Together with some colleagues, we are planing to run a study on moral development among children. Do you know any electronic task, which measures moral development? 
I will appreciate any kind of help/hint.
Thank you in advance
Fitim Uka
Relevant answer
Answer
Thank you for your suggestion Indeira, 
All the best 
Fitim 
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
11 answers
I want to understand the place of self-worth, sense of responsibility, guilt, and shame, in possibilities of a decision to engage in alternative development-enhancing actions.
Relevant answer
Answer
I have done research and published articles on the distinctions between shame and guilt, as well as responses / coping / emotion-regulation.  I think people make too much of the distinction.  I view shame as an evolutionary adaptation.  I view guilt as a human-defined state that may be accompanied by a variety of emotions: distress/empathy (over consequences to others); fear (of punishment); joy/excitement (guilty pleasures); and usually shame (if I did a "bad thing", you probably view me as less worthy).  As an evolutionary adaptation, I don't believe shame requires any sense of responsibility, for example shame over some bodily feature (weight, hair, defects).  Shame only requires the perception that others "devalue" you, meaning think of you as less than how you would like to be perceived.
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
4 answers
I am trying to understand whether the feelings of guilt and shame precede social values, and how the three [guilt, shame, and values] determine the choice of [decision for] alternative-actions that will enhance social development. 
Relevant answer
Answer
You  have to be a bit careful when using guilt to encourage people to act to benefit broader communities. People are very good at avoiding guilt by doing things like dehumanizing the people they've harmed. 
I published a paper demonstrating this effect recently: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0192512116630750
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
4 answers
There is ample evidence demonstrating that attractiveness is constrained by biological motives. Facial attractiveness has been positively related to reproductive success (Jokela, 2009; Rhodes et al., 2005), health and longevity (Henderson and Anglin, 2003; Shackelford and Larsen, 1999), immunocompetence (Jones et al., 2001; Scheib et al., 1999), immune function (Klein, 2000; Lie et al., 2008; Roberts et al., 2005; Roney et al., 2006), and healthy aging and diet (Fink et al., 2001; Jones et al., 2004; Matts et al., 2007; Stephen et al., 2012). 
However, is evident, and some theorists argue, that socialization also plays an important role. The attractive patterns are different in different societies and times; and other non-physical aspects, such as intelligence, humour or creativity, also influence this. While some theorists consider that attractiveness ratings are universal, while others state that they are highly idyosincratic. 
¿What is the current state of the art on sociological accounts of attractiveness?
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Bo, 
Many many thanks for your response. 
Although most work on attractiveness has been focused from the Biologicism/ universalism perspective, there is no doubt that there is plenty of room for other social or intrapersonal influences. 
Great contribution!!!
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
3 answers
i need a article by Jie Shen When CSR Is a Social Norm
Relevant answer
Answer
see the attached file 
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
2 answers
I am working on identification, specifically the concept that an individual working in a team would have both collective identification (towards the team as a whole) and relational identification (with strong role relations with other teammates) based on Zhang et al., 2012. When I am reading another paper, I came across this affective integration developed through liking, respect and trust based on Cronin, 2004 and Hass, 1981. I know they both are not same. But can someone distinguish them in a better way? What would be the underlying factors that differentiate them? When would you consider one to be more salient than the other? Thanks in advance.
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Sriteja.
I truly sorry for being late to answer to your question. If I understand it well, you are looking for the differences between affective relations and relational identifications. Your question can be answered, I think, through a long or short answer. What follows is a short answer.
As I see it, by its very nature an affective relation is primarily an affective and emotional, and only after this it can involve cognitive components. In contradistinction, a relational identification is primarily cognitive and only after this it can involve affective components. For example, love and sympathy are affective relations that can exist without any cognitive components. We generally love and are sympathetic to our children, parents, brothers, sisters, and other relatives without having any cognitive motives to do so. It is generally said that they share our own flesh and blood. We generally love our wives or husbands, not because of, say, flesh and blood reasons, but mainly because of affective reasons. In these both cases, cognitive reasons are generally invoked as post hoc rationalizations to justify what is, say, visceral. This is not the case, for example, of friendship. Although there are several levels of friendship (see, for this respect, R. Selman's work on interpersonal understanding), in all of them cognitive components are priori to affective components. Thus, as I see it, friendship typifies more a specific type of relational and interpersonal identification than an affective integration or affective relation. Even so, friendship, comradeship, and the like speak more in favor of, say, individual relational identification than in favor of collective relational identification. An example of collective relational identification is the case when students of a given school (elementary, secondary, college, university) share, for instance, the main goals pursued by their respective school. This is also generally the case of players and supporters of a sport team or club.
To sum up, an affective relation or integration is affective and emotional at its very nature. When it involves cognitive components, most of the time they are peripheral or even post hoc rationalizations. We generally love our relatives without cognitively question why this is the case. In contradistinction, when relational identification is the case, cognitive components come generally first than cognitive components.This is quite visible in one's identification, for example, with his/her school, sport club, political party, or even country.
I hope I got your question and that this helps.
Best regards.
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
4 answers
I mean how our ideas and the words in our minds come out from our mouth as an organized words. Is it really organized or we imagine that  because we understand each other and for someone didn't know any English, it looks like nothing. could we make animals talk if we connect the animals brain with a human brain and make the word come out from a human mouth?
Relevant answer
Answer
McNeill D., 2005, Gesture and thought. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press
McNeill D., 2012, How language began: gesture and speech in human evolution. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press
Arbib MA., 2012,  How the brain got language: the mirror system hypothesis. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press
Grice HP., 1989, Studies in the way of words. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press
Holler J, Beattie G., 2002, A micro-analytic investigation of how iconic gestures and speech represent core semantic features in talk, Semiotica 142, s. 31–69 (doi:10.1515/semi.2002.077)
Holler J, Beattie G., 2003, How iconic gestures and speech interact in the representation of meaning: are both aspects really integral to the process?, Semiotica 146, 81–116 (doi:10.1515/semi.2003.083)
Holler J, Tutton M, Wilkin K., 2011, Co-speech gestures in the process of meaning coordination. In Proc. 2nd GESPIN—Gesture and Speech in Interaction Conf., Bielefeld, 5–7 September 2011 See http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0012-1BB3-D
Levinson SC., 2000, Presumptive meanings: the theory of generalized conversational implicature. Cambridge, UK: MIT Press
Levinson SC. 2013. Recursion in pragmatics, Language 89, s. 149–162 (doi:10.1353/lan.2013.0005)
Levinson SC., 2006, On the human ‘interaction engine’. In Roots of human sociality: culture, cognition and interaction (eds Enfield NJ, Levinson SC, editors. ), s. 39–69 Oxford, UK: Berg
Levinson SC., 2003, Space in language and cognition: explorations in cognitive diversity. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press
Levinson S.C., Holler J.,2014, The origin of human multi-modal communication, Philosophical Transactions of The Royal Society B. Biological Sciences, DOI: 10.1098/rstb.2013.0302.
Liberman A.M., Cooper F.S., Shankweiler D.P., Studdert-kennedy M., 1967, Perception of the speech code, Psychological Review 74, s. 431-461.
Orzechowski S., Wacewicz S., Żywiczyński P., 2014, Orofacjal gestures in language evolution. The auditory feedback hypothesis [w:] red. E.S. Cartmill, S. Roberts, H. LYN, H. Cornish, Proceedings of the 10th International Conference (EVOLANG 10), Singapore, s. 221-227.
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
3 answers
Hi all!
I am studying the influence of human attributes (physical appearance (PA) & way of interacting (WoI)) on trust in automation (chatbots) and the relationship between trust and reliance. I have four conditions (2x2), C1 = NoPA + WoI; C2 = PA + WoI; C3 = NoPA + NoWoI; C4 = PA + NoWoI).
I have 25 items (5-point likert) on trust (both cognitive & affective) and a scale for reliance (1-100%).
With my research I want to show that with chatbots becoming more human this influences both cognitive and affective based trust and therebye reliance. Tested with four conditions..
But is this than moderating (in that sense that the relationshop between Trust & Reliance is influenced by the four conditions? Or is trust mediating the relationship between the four conditions and reliance? Or do I just need to do an anova to compare the means between the four conditions? But what about reliance then?
I hope I have been clear (I've tried, but its dazzling me). If you need more input or perhaps a glance into the dataset, feel free to ask! :)
Thanks!
Relevant answer
Answer
Thanks for the respone! :) I am now thinking of a oneway Anova to check for differences between the conditions on trust and then use the Hayes process for mediation --> to discover whether trust is a significant predictor for reliance. If rightly explained..
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
3 answers
Hello,
I am currently doing my MA course and my project is about oxytocin's effect on social behaviour. I have two questions,
1. Can the hormones such as oxytocin or serotonin be released into the atmosphere from the human body? and people around can share the hormones?
2. If yes, can the hormones in the atmosphere be detected/ measured?
Thank you very much!
Relevant answer
Answer
Thanks very much!!
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
4 answers
I am trying to desing an experiment to establish the relationship between Inhibitory Control and Theory of Mind, and I would like to know if somebody has used similr experiments. My hypothesis is that Inhibitory Control modulate the expression of theory of mind. Your help will be valuable for me.
Thanks
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Stephen,
Thanks for the paper, it will be helpful.
Regards
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
5 answers
In a previous study Afsari et al. (1st link) we could show a leftward bias early during visual exploration and its modulation (up or down, depending on reading direction of the native language and precise conditions) by reading text primes before. In the present follow-up, we address mechanisms of that effect. Within the group of authors, we can not agree on the relative influence of asymmetries on the level of anatomy, physiology, and behavior. Essentially we discuss the full range from nature to nurture. Thus, I'm looking for arguments, ideas, and opinions. What is your view?
Best and thanks in advance, Peter
Relevant answer
Answer
Onur Güntürkün suggests that a mechanism triggered by light
plays a role. Chicks in the shell turn their heads to a
genetically determined side. Human fetuses do this before birth
as well. One of the chicks' eyes gets more light and this
might lead to an asymmetry in the brain, besides
the normal 'handedness'.
Regards,
Joachim
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
6 answers
If learning theories are broadly (behaviourism, constructivism and cognitivism ) what are the teaching theories?
Please I have been searching for 'Teaching theories' only found one literature by Dennis Fox (1999) are there others?
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Martina, Hendrika and Jim,
Thank you so much for your comments.
They were really helpful.
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
6 answers
I am conducting research into the prediction of chocolate consumption by implicit processes, and in addition to measuring implicit attitude, I want to measure automatic approach-avoidance tendency (e.g. Neumann, Hülsenbeck,& Seibt, 2004; Rinck & Becker, 2007). I therefore need to either access or develop an AAT for chocolate. I cannot find reference to one in the literature, so was hoping some-one may either know of one I have missed, or have developed one they have not yet published that I could possibly utilise. Alternatively, if anyone has developed an AAT for a similar category that could be adapted, that would be extremely helpful.
Relevant answer
Answer
Hi. I found very interesting your answer in this discussion group and, because I'm conducting research into implicit tendency to high or low caloric food, I'd have a question about the programming of an AAT: is there any particular software to realize an AAT or does exist already  an available  version with stimuli similar to those of my research? Thanks
Laura
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
1 answer
You have mention about experiments. I will be happy to know more about it.
thanks 
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Mofizur.
In you question you refer to the methods of attribution. I thinking that you are referring to attribution theory. As you certainly know attribution theory deals with how we attributes causes (internal vs. external; stable vs. unstable; controllable vs. uncontrollable to our and others performances. The theory was formulated mainly by B. Weiner. I wonder if attribution theory can be transferred to physical events, such as extreme weather  events in Bangladesh. In what follows, I elaborate a bit on attribution theory and hope that you can apply it to your research interests.
 As you know attribution theory has become a dominant paradigm, namely, in social psychology. Psychological research into attribution began with the work of Fritz Heider in the early part of the 20th century, subsequently developed by others such as Harold Kelley and Bernard Weiner. Three dimensions play a central role in this theory.
The first is consensus information, or information on how other people in the same situation and with the same stimulus behave. The second is distinctive information, or how the individual responds to different stimuli. The third is consistency information, or how frequent the individual's behavior can be observed with similar stimulus but varied situations. From these three sources of information observers make attribution decisions on the individual's behavior as either internal or external. There have been claims that people under-utilise consensus information, although there has been some dispute over this issue.
There are several levels in the covariation model: high and low. Each of these levels influences the three covariation model criteria. High consensus is when many people can agree on an event or area of interest. Low consensus is when very few people can agree. High distinctiveness is when the event or area of interest is very unusual, whereas low distinctness is when the event or area of interest is fairly common. High consistency is when the event or area of interest continues for a length of time and low consistency is when the event or area of interest goes away quickly.
Weiner's achievement attribution has three categories:
stability (stable and unstable)
locus of control (internal and external)
controllability (controllable or uncontrollable)
In attribution theory we often find a reference to the fundamental attribution error. The fundamental attribution error describes the tendency to overvalue dispositional or personality-based explanations for behavior while under-valuing situational explanations. The fundamental attribution error is most visible when people explain and assume the behavior of others. For example, if a person is overweight, a person's first assumption might be that they have a problem with overeating or are lazy and not that they might have a medical reason for being heavier set.
The core process assumptions of attitude construction models are mainstays of social cognition research and are not controversial—as long as we talk about "judgment". Once the particular judgment made can be thought of as a person's "attitude", however, construal assumptions elicit discomfort, presumably because they dispense with the intuitively appealing attitude concept
A self-serving bias is any cognitive or perceptual process that is distorted by the need to maintain and enhance self-esteem, or the tendency to perceive oneself in an overly favorable manner. It is the belief that individuals tend to ascribe success to their own abilities and efforts, but ascribe failure to external factors. When individuals reject the validity of negative feedback, focus on their strengths and achievements but overlook their faults and failures, or take more responsibility for their group's work than they give to other members, they are protecting the ego from threat and injury.
These cognitive and perceptual tendencies perpetuate illusions and error, but they also serve the self's need for esteem. For example, a student who attributes earning a good grade on an exam to their own intelligence and preparation but attributes earning a poor grade to the teacher's poor teaching ability or unfair test questions is exhibiting the self-serving bias. Studies have shown that similar attributions are made in various situations, such as the workplace, interpersonal relationships, sports, and consumer decisions.
Both motivational processes (i.e. self-enhancement, self-presentation) and cognitive processes (i.e. locus of control, self-esteem) influence the self-serving bias. There are both cross-cultural (i.e. individualistic and collectivistic culture differences) and special clinical population (i.e. depression) considerations within the bias. Much of the research on the self-serving bias has used participant self-reports of attribution based on experimental manipulation of task outcomes or in naturalistic situations. Some more modern research, however, has shifted focus to physiological manipulations, such as emotional inducement.
In what follows I elaborate a bit more on the three dimensions of attribution theory: consensus, distinctiveness and consistency.
Consensus refers to the extent to which other people behave in the same way in a similar situation (e.g., Mary smokes a cigarette when she goes out for a meal with her friend.  If her friend smokes, her behavior is high in consensus. If only Mary smokes it is low.
Distinctiveness has to do with the extent to which the person behaves in the same way in similar situations.  If Mary only smokes when she is out with friends, her behavior is high in distinctiveness. If she smokes at any time or place, distinctiveness is low.
Consistency refers to the extent to which the person behaves like this every time the situation occurs.  If Mary only smokes when she is out with friends, consistency is high. If she only smokes on one special occasion, consistency is low.
 Best regards, Orlando
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
4 answers
Hi
I need to assess emotion perceptions, theory of mind and social cognition in teenagers.
1- whats the differences between these three?
2- what interactive (computerized) tasks would you suggest for assessment in teenagers?
Relevant answer
Answer
Hi Amir, looking at your questions and the research you are undertaking to explore high social cognition, it might be worth considering a main focus to be social cognitive functioning as the prime research question and that can subsume theory of mind. The way emotions and feelings are construed is really emotional perception, self and other.
Daniel Goleman has written a couple of books, Emotional Intelligence and Working with Emotional Intelligence where he identifies 5 main areas that constitute emotional intelligence.
Recognise your emotions, manage your emptions, stay motivated, recognise emotion in others' and handle relationships. There is some discussion about whether emotion intelligence exists or if it is really part of personality. That said, the idea of recognising emotion in others, staying motivated and handling relationships fits in with your second order perspective and social cognition. You might use a scale to measure second order principles in your research. Goleman continues to spread his word on EQ so you could check him out on the net. Also, It may be useful for you to check out the sociality corollary proposed by the personality theorist George A. Kelly in the Psychology of Personal Constructs.
Good luck
Barry 
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
3 answers
I am currently finishing my PhD dissertation regarding adaptative strategies of teenagers with HFASD in mainstream high schools, in France au Quebec (age 12 to 16). I’d like to find more studies exploring self-perception in high functioning autistic teenagers, mainly regarding academic, social and friendship dimensions. I’d like to discuss my results with the current literature. Thank you very much for your help and suggestions!  
Relevant answer
Answer
Hi Morgane, 
here is a link to a fascinating study on teenagers with ASD being overconfident in their self-perceptions of interpersonal skills by Locke and Mitchell (2016).
regards,  
Christian
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
3 answers
My collaborators and I are putting together a symposium for Psychonomics 2017 and have some findings that go against the grain (we don't find an attentional bias to select faces across several studies).  We are looking for other presenters for this symposium, so if you have data that is relevant that you'd like to present with us please email me directly - ebirming@sfu.ca
Relevant answer
Answer
We found attentional capture by inverted faces. I can share the outcomes of our new set of experiments. Best Nicolas Burra
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
5 answers
I want to know mereology method applied 
Relevant answer
Answer
The prominent American philosopher David Lewis used mereology in some of his papers.  All David's papers are available online.  I think you can find them there.
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
3 answers
I would like to know your perspective on the values which you consider every human beings must have. Please list out the values for me. 
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Arun and Claudia,
I think a distinction should be made between the "must-have" values mentioned by Arun and the personal universal values identified by the Schwartz Theory on Human Values as mentioned by Claudia.  
The first, the "must-have values", depend on moral and ethical systems which differ depending on every culture as well as on personal constructions of value systems that each of us produces as a result of the interaction between our culture's input and our genetics.
The second, the universal values, constitute a pattern of value system that Professor Schwartz has evidenced through his investigations with transcultural samples in more than 80 countries during the last three decades. This pattern presents a list of values that, with reasonable differences, generally constitute the main motivational domains in western societies.
Regards,
Jose Luis
  • asked a question related to Social Cognition
Question
3 answers
Fischer and Schwartz (2011) found more consensus (than disagreement) on values across countries. Kirkman, Lowe and Gibson (2016) claim that a relatively limited part of the overall variation in cultural values resides between countries, and over than 80% resides within countries. Beugelsdijk, Kostova and Roth (2016) proposes that researchers should use the interaction between country level cultural variables (e.g. Hofstede scores) and cultural tightness to correct for the degree of consensus in a country. Given above, I have two questions: 1) Is it still legitimate to use country level cultural scores as explanatory variables? 2) What about personal traits and attitudes, for example, what about the level of happiness?
Relevant answer
Answer
Nationality can have explanatory power but it's ultimately incumbent on the researcher to justify its use as a predictor theoretically. It may also prove advantageous to use different regions, as indexed by regional codes, the predictor variable; previous research has had success with it (e.g., Murray, Trudeau, & Schaller, 2011; Schaller & Murray, 200