Science topics: ArtVisual ArtsSculpture
Science topic

Sculpture - Science topic

Explore the latest questions and answers in Sculpture, and find Sculpture experts.
Questions related to Sculpture
  • asked a question related to Sculpture
Question
4 answers
Any Form of Visual Art including Illustration, Sculpture, Mural, Poster etc, from any time period.
Such as Chand Bibi playing polo, Akbar hunting, Camel fight.
Relevant answer
chess
Chess was invented in India, and was known as Ashtapada (which means 64 squares). Unlike how the game is played today, it was played with dice on an opposite board, but without black and white squares. A few years later, the game was called Chaturanga (Quadruple). It was divided into four parts called Angas, which were symbolic of the four branches of the army. Just like the real ancient Indian army, it had pieces called elephants, chariots, horses, and soldiers, and they were played to make war strategies. In 600 AD, the Persians learned this game and named it Strang. "Kesh Malak" comes from the Persian term for the game "Shah Mat", meaning "the king is dead".
carrom
Carrom is a board and pocket game commonly played throughout South Asia and in a few countries of the Middle East, and is said to have originated in the Indian subcontinent. Although there is no special evidence, it is said that the Indian Maharaja invented the game centuries ago. You can find antique glass chrome slab in Patiala, Punjab. Carrom gained popularity after World War I and is now played at family or social gatherings for fun.
Ludo
Ludo is a board game that we have all played at least once. Earlier in India it was called Pachisi, and the board was made of cloth or jute. The depiction of Pachisi has been found in the Ajanta Caves in Maharashtra, which indicates that the game was very popular in the medieval era. The Mughal emperors of India, like Akbar, loved to play Pachisi. In the late 19th century, various forms of the same game were played in England. In 1896, a similar game appeared, which was called Ludo, and therefore a patent was registered.
Snakes and ladders
In ancient India, snakes and ladders were called Moksha Patam, Mokshapat and Parama Badam. Created by Sant (saint) Gyandev in the 13th century, this game of vices and virtues was used in Hindu Dharma to teach good values ​​to children. Snakes represent the virtues of vice and ladders. The squares where the stairs were found depict the virtues; For example, square 12 was faith, 51 was reliability, 76 was knowledge, and so on. Likewise, the squares where snakes were found were known as Vices. Square 41 was disobedience, 49 was vulgarity, 84 was anger, etc. The hundred square represents moksha or nirvana.
Over time, the game has undergone a number of changes, but the meaning has remained the same: if you do good deeds, you go to heaven, and if you do bad deeds, you will be reborn.
Dice
If some accounts are to be believed, rectangular casts have been found in excavations at Harrapan sites such as Lothal, Alamgirpur, Kalibangan, Desalpur and Ropar. These dice were earlier used for gambling. Then dice spread to Persia and became part of the popular board games there. Early dice are also found in Rig Veda and Atharva Veda.
cards
Modern playing cards originated in ancient India, and it was called Krida-Patram. It was made from pieces of cloth, and featured ancient designs from the Ramayana and Mahabharata. In medieval India, they were called Ganifa cards and were played in the royal courts of Rajputana, Kashmir (then Kashyapa Meru), Odisha (then Utkal), the Deccan region as well as Nepal. These cards were all handcrafted and traditionally drawn to provide the cards with sufficient thickness, several pieces of fabric were glued together. Later, cards were played by all levels of society, made of tortoiseshell or ivory and decorated with pearls and precious metals.
polo
Although the ancient game of polo finds its origin in Central Asia, it was Manipur in India that laid the foundation for modern polo. When Babur established the Mughal Empire in the 15th century, he made the sport very popular. Later, when the British came to India, they adopted the sport, and it gradually spread throughout the world. The game is often played on horseback, but the British invented another variation - on the back of an elephant. Elephant polo is very popular today in the Indian state of Rajasthan, and in countries such as Sri Lanka, Nepal and Thailand.
khu khu
Kho-kho, or 'game of chase', was earlier played in Maharashtra. It is one of the most famous traditional Indian sports. During ancient times, it was played on raths (vehicles), and was called Rathera. When Akhil Maharashtra Shareerika Shikshan Mandal officially published the rules of the game in 1935, kho-kho became popular. Under the Kho Kho Federation of India, the first Kho Kho Championship was organized in 1959. In 1982, it was included in the Indian Olympic League.
fighting bull
The sport of bull taming in Tamil Nadu is known by various names in India, such as Jallikattu, Manju Virattu and Eruthazhuvathal. It is mostly played during Pongal festivities. Bulls are bred specifically for this sport. Earlier, bullfighting was a popular sport from the ancient tribes of Tamil Nadu. It has become a platform to showcase courage, a form of entertainment and a way to win some financial prizes.
  • asked a question related to Sculpture
Question
1 answer
The second tala of the Brihadeswara temple at Tanjore exhibits specific images of Vasus. Still, they were carved the same as the Tripurantaka sculptures across Tamil Nadu. Is there any particular reason for this? Is the political imagery of the great Raja Raja Chola somehow influenced in the narration of these Vasu images?
PS: Please see the images attached to this
Relevant answer
Answer
attachments
  • asked a question related to Sculpture
Question
11 answers
Music, Literature, Painting, Sculpture and Cinema represent centuries of Culture of Humanity, in its most diverse manifestations and practically all peoples. Are these elements to be taken into account for the personal enhancement of the Researchers?
Relevant answer
Answer
The general culture thiroughly can give the value to the science, academic works and researches. Subsequently, the society attitude can motivate scholars to increase the quantity and quality of their syltudies to meet the society requirement.
  • asked a question related to Sculpture
Question
13 answers
I am making an archive with works of contemporary art (photography, performance, installation, painting, sculpture ...) that deal with the subject of work.
I will be thankful for every contribution.    
Relevant answer
Answer
Berlin based French artist Claude Eigan comes to mind for their 2016 show: Comfort Zone https://www.sleek-mag.com/article/claude-eigan-work-art/ I wrote the piece bc I was absolutely inspired by their work about work. And here is more about the show in Berlin Art Link: https://www.berlinartlink.com/2016/09/14/work-welcome-to-the-after-hours-workplace-an-interview-with-claude-eigan/
  • asked a question related to Sculpture
Question
3 answers
🎹🎼🎻🎥📷📗🗣🕺💃🎭🎨🌍
If you like music, movies, theatre plays, literature, poetry, paintings, sculptures, museums, galleries, fashion, architecture, video games - we need to know your opinion!
This survey is designed to assess the differences in participation in arts by art receivers through natural/traditional versus digital/new ways.
We want to find out how the pandemic time - that forced us to move to digital ways of participation in arts - will influence our future behaviors in this area. We focus on the art receiver perspective.
Dr. Michał Szostak, University of Social Sciences, Warsaw, Poland
Dr. Damian Kedziora, Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland
Prof. Łukasz Sułkowski, Jagiellonian University, Cracow, Poland
Relevant answer
Answer
هذه الفنون تمل لغة ابداعية عالمية
وهناك اتفاق عام من كافة البشر بأنها مفيدة ونافعة
فإن لم يكن بقصد الجمال، فقد يكون بقصد الوظيفة
  • asked a question related to Sculpture
Question
8 answers
Art and Politics
What can you say about art products that are directly the subject of political debate, or that were originally conceived as part of a political debate? What examples can you give in this regard? Painting, sculpture, architecture, music, poetry, novel, etc. Which examples can be given from all areas? For example, how can Picasso's painting Guernica be handled in this respect? Or could Tiananmen Square be the subject of such a controversy?
Relevant answer
Answer
Hi Fatih Ertu.
There is a Colombian artist from Bogota, who have take the political situation of Colombia to create her sculptural pieces. Her name is Doris Salcedo.
One of her most recent pieces was created using the weapons that FARC (Fuerzas Armadas Revolucionarias de Colombia) delivered as part of the dialogues peace process.
It's name "Fragmentos" in spanish, is an "Antimonument" made by the victims of the terrorism done by the FARC at the Colombia's little towns.
There are some colombian artist that maybe you can take into account to your research, Miguel Angel Rojas, Delcy Morelos, Luis Caballero, Beatriz González, just for say someone.
  • asked a question related to Sculpture
Question
4 answers
I am investigating ways of making sculpture using mid to strong grades of hydraulic lime and volcanic rock dust as the main ingredients to make casts from found shoreline objects. .
Over a period of many years I have grown to love and appreciate the Norfolk coastline and I am planning seven walks along some of its shorelines. The first of which began at Holme-Next-the-Sea in Norfolk, UK, where two bronze age wooden 'Sea Henges' or 'monuments' were were discovered. One of which was contraversially unearthed to be preserved.
My interest in lime for the casting process, stems from its lower Co2 emmiting credentials during its manufature and its durability over time when prepared using similar techniques to making Roman Concrete.
Relevant answer
Answer
i have not got that far yet and things have got delayed a bit with Covid 19. I am hoping toexperiment with pozzolanic volcanic ash from garden centers (provided it is pure, so far so good). However I am struggling with out access to Fascilities right now. my next unit has been theorized to a large degree and Exhibitions are incresingly on line. I would like to put Sculptural works out there as a kind of Antethesis to everything in the current climate. Sorry for the Slow reply-had quite a lot of things to sort out with works and my course.
  • asked a question related to Sculpture
Question
5 answers
in terms of the academic inquiry, i am interested in ekphrastic poetry, which is an interdisciplinary genre connecting poetry to art (painting, sculpture, pictures, captions, photography). i am wondering if you could name some poets (from various nationalities) who are indulged in such writings.
moreover, regarding the technical question, how can i be a member of your highly esteemed project?
Relevant answer
Answer
the highly-esteemed researchers, thanks for your answers.
  • asked a question related to Sculpture
Question
2 answers
I have this sculpture project am currently working on that requires me to deliver at a record time, so am working to bypass the clay modeling stage and move straight to the fibre glass and resin. But it's my first time of trying out the technique... Any ideas?
Relevant answer
Answer
Use an alternative material.
you cannot well control form with the side of glass / resin that you see, precision is only to be had by following the mold. In addition, all surfaces exposed to air will be sticky and not cure fully.
Either, go the full process, or, use another technique. The full process requires a model of the item you want, you make a flexible resin mold from this, then make your desired item in the mold.
Sorry, not the answer you want.
Rob
  • asked a question related to Sculpture
Question
1568 answers
One of the main tasks is to cultivate peacemakers. Anti-war arts (painting, sculpture, literature, music, photo) can be helpful in upbringing future generation. Cultivating a culture of peace through awareness of genius message (implicit and explicit) is important in schooling. We are going to research the sources, organize the conference and stage one of the creative works. We will be thankful for every contribution.    
Relevant answer
Answer
Wolfgang Borchert (1921-1947): The Rats Sleep at Night; The Man Outside; The Sad Geraniums; The cherries; The Bread; The three dark kings; Along the Long, Long Road ..
  • asked a question related to Sculpture
Question
34 answers
Research has demonstrated that few talented people are sufficiently well known and revered-many songs have been composed, operas written (far more than people imagine) but the number of celebrated composers is tiny. Many pictures are painted, images constructed and sculpture made but few artists are genuinely remembered. Why?
Relevant answer
Answer
Everyone is talent but very few bothers to come out of their mental inertia
  • asked a question related to Sculpture
Question
10 answers
What is the difference between architecture and the rest of the arts, such as sculpture or drawing?
Relevant answer
Answer
Architecture is part of everyone's lives, frequently a prerequisite for a good life / shelter. Art is a part of human life, and a central part of architecture.
  • asked a question related to Sculpture
Question
3 answers
anticlinal cell wall boundaries , periclinal cell wall including outer and secondary cell wall sculpture
Relevant answer
Answer
yes you right, unfortunately links are not working now.
  • asked a question related to Sculpture
Question
2 answers
Concepts - Trends - Artworks - in modern sculpture
Relevant answer
Answer
Virtuality, the nature, properties and responsive behaviour of virtual materials. This is central to digital sculpture, a rapidly growing practice.
  • asked a question related to Sculpture
Question
6 answers
Don Quixote has alethic and aesthetic poles but does it not have more than that?
Do great novels, plays, paintings, sculptures need other qualities to impress?
Relevant answer
Answer
No but Shakespeare had to face censorship (2 versions of Othello) and in a certain way the Merchant of Venise is related to the same fascinating character English kings didn't want to hear about: Antonio Manutius aka Hassan Pacha Veneziano, king of Algiers, master of the slave Miguel de Cervantes. Normally, Shakespeare does not concentrate on ordinary people (even if not in my favorite play, As you like it). Cervantes is a clear precursor and his work is so subtle.
  • asked a question related to Sculpture
Question
5 answers
Non violence sculpture, in New York:
What does this sculpture synbolise? What is her message? What is it devoted to?
What is her goal? Where is it? Who is its author? When was it made?
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Jutta Eschle
This is the right answer to the question: what are the non-violence sculptures?
As you say: the desire for global peace.
Regards
  • asked a question related to Sculpture
Question
19 answers
I am interested to hear from anyone who can point me in the direction of work on philosophical understandings of fine art. I am especially interested in more abstract and conceptual forms of art. For example, the use of the Klein Group to explicate figure - ground relationships in contemporary, abstract art. I would really like to hear about her's and any other approaches.
Relevant answer
Answer
Hello,
Though I come from a scientific background, where biology, chemistry, physics, computer sciences are the main domains which are to be paid heed to. But, I have considered philosophy my first love ever.
Sir, please find the attached PDF titled as: 'The Philosophy of Happiness', by Charles Kenny where the author has beautifully described "happiness" using different perspectives of very famous intellectuals such as: Aristotle.
Best Regards,
Sahar
  • asked a question related to Sculpture
Question
4 answers
I did my masters in commercial Industrial fine art majoring in sculpture. Can i cross over and major in painting for the PhD proposal and research?
Relevant answer
Answer
This is complicated. In principle one can develop a different PHD project from the Master project, as long as the Master provides a good platform for research skills. Somy Master subject was quite substantially different from my PHD proposal - I did printmaking for one of my masters, and a thesis on the ethics of terrorism for my other MA (in Philosophy). My supervisors accepted a proposal that combined drawing research with an ethical question about drawing nature (ecological) connected via John Ruskin; so yes the foundations were provided by my two MAs but the actual proposal was very different from either. So I would encourage you to go ahead with a new proposal, but with caution. Could you provide evidence of a sustained engagement with paint since you completed your MA? In my case having developed a professional profile in drawing since completing my two Masters no doubt supported my PHD proposal.
  • asked a question related to Sculpture
Question
12 answers
As per my assumption the hen has come first then egg.
Because life start with one cell species like amoeba etc.
there are an analogy for it.A sculpture make first statue then make a mold(sancha) and after that make many statue by that mold . So mold work like a egg .
Relevant answer
Answer
When I saw the delayed Jorge's answer to this question , originally the:
and some recommendations, too, I decided for my own contribution. I hope to stimulate some (a lot of) thinking in scientific sphere...
I think that this answer touches also the question, Jorge sets at:
So I will put it also there… Thanks for (further) reading…
In the field of searching answer to the fundamental ecologic question (Why we must save the Earth?) I collected from the read literature and partly developed information from three sources, which first set the doubts to the theory of evolution and then gave finally the ultimate answer. It's not a religion. It is today's state of the scientific art… The fields, which give us the "hence", are:
· Genetics, with complex molecules and advanced biochemical processes, probably unable to be synthetized and "developed" in early Earth's oceans;
· Geology and archeology, with unlogical time gaps between appearing different forms of life;
· Psychotherapy, with insight to the causes of the many individual's diseases and health troubles.
I decided to translate my essay, explaining and connecting the reasons, which connect these three fields. But it will last one or two days and I'm asking for some patience. The answer to the upper set question gave also the answer about the real origin of the (our organic) life. The Earth must be preserved because (maybe our) highly developed souls created it, the nature and the human, too, to use them for incarnations into material life forms, which give other possibilities of learning.
For today, I made a transcription from a book of psychiatrist Michael D. Newton, a scientist, who made the breakthrough into possibilities of recovering memories, carried by our souls from one to the next incarnated life, and which tell about the soul lives between incarnations… Acquiring these memories of very old and experienced souls are the ultimate answer about the "hence". I append this transcription and I hope that the author will not stand for his rights…
I am giving also the links to the Institute of Linguistic Wave Genetics, where they research the meaning of "junk" DNA between genes:
and to the article of Peter Garjajev & Co., which was also published here on RG:
For next days, I believe, enough reading…
Regards, Milan Malej
  • asked a question related to Sculpture
Question
3 answers
I am looking for a somewhat structural (preferably natural rather than synthetic) material that can be dissolved very easily by another agent in the same way that Polystyrene quickly dissolves in acetone.
Ideally the material would be cellulose based, like paper, but it seems that paper and cellulose can't be easily dissolved. Another good example would be sugar in hot water, but I am looking for a less fragile and more stable solid to dissolve. (I haver, incidentally, tried to dissolve cellulose acetate in acetone, but it barely did anything at all to a .003" sheet.)
This is for a visual arts application.
Relevant answer
Answer
Thank you both very much for the answers! I see there is actually a "dissolvable" paper made from this very material that I for some reason ignored early on in my research. I will definitely investigate it and see how it works :)
  • asked a question related to Sculpture
Question
14 answers
The pottery fabric is light brown with a white slip. There is a line of  circles, 80mm dia on 120mm centers, inscribed around the vessel. See the attached picture of the sherd.
Relevant answer
Answer
Timothy: I have access to JSTOR. Thanks.
Hatice: Thanks. The circle decorations on my sherd seem to be inscribed rather than stamped.
  • asked a question related to Sculpture
Question
3 answers
I can find various suggestions about ashigaru, foot soldiers, in combat in Japan and Korea. There are numerous artistic depictions (byobu, folding room screens) and accounts of battle and battle formations. Could someone recommend sources describing ashigaru training and life between campaigns? How did units drill (e.g. close order drill?), unit cohesiveness develop (e.g. recruitment and term of service?) and weapon proficiency improve (e.g. maneuvers and live firing of weapons?) between campaigns? (I am familiar with the Zouhyou Monogatari, the Prof. Turnbull books and Prof. Zaporis' Tour of Duty. Explained skills only imply training and skill development.)
Any suggestions would be welcome. Thank you.
Relevant answer
Answer
The Heian period origin of "ashigaru" concept is mentioned in the Heike Monogatari, vol. 4, "Together with about 4,500 ashigaru . . ."; ashigaru is also found during the struggle between the Heike and Minamoto clans, the Gen-Pei Gassen, taking place in the late Heian period, in the 12th century, leading to the establishment of the Kamakura period, the first shogunate to "govern" Japan: 『平家物語』(13世紀成立)巻四に、「足軽共4、500人先立て」とあり、平安末期である源平合戦期にも見られる。
  • asked a question related to Sculpture
Question
151 answers
At two sites in Roman Britain, I have noticed bowls and a dish in 'samian ware' [terra sigillata] pierced, post cocturam, with occasional holes: the holes are too large to be the standard, small rivet-holes which were commonly used to repair pots with metal-work here.
The holes in question are of diameter c 8 mm and were pierced through the lower wall or base, above the footring of the vessel. Just 'flying kites' here, but... Were these vessels pierced for hanging up by a cord, or some ritual or culinary purpose? One hole shows smoothing or rubbing of the hole: it seems more likely that the hole was smoothed to stop the cord from snagging on a rough edge, than that the cord's rubbing caused the hole to be smoothed. Or was it smoothed for pouring?
So far, the only two sites at which I have noted these large holes are amphitheatres. This may be fortuitous, as such holes may have been described in excavation reports as repair-work. However, amphitheatres had external stalls and booths, portable ovens, etc. So far, the only Roman depictions found of pots hanging up are a few sculptures which show wine-sellers with flagons hanging up, but hung by the handle. I have found references in classical literature which may be relevant, but more would be appreciated.
Without more evidence, it will be impossible to give a firm answer to the question of their function, but any further ideas would be welcome!
Relevant answer
Answer
i have two suggestions based on seeing pottery in Pompeii from two gardens - the holes are large because the pot was potentially used to establish a plant - the holes may have been smaller to start with and made larger to allow the root system to eventually grow larger and penetrate soil - and become established.  Eventually the pot is removed.  This is a practice through time when you have a precious but vulnerable young plant - a staged planting out, where the pot forms protection and an attractive container until the plant is mature.  I also don't discount the sieving idea as from the hisotrical sources, textiles, such as silk or linen were used especially to filter liquids, especially wine, (or curds from whey, etc)
  • asked a question related to Sculpture
Question
8 answers
How can we find the % of gold in a vessel with out damaging the item? Also how can we extract the metals like Ag or Au from its alloys?
Relevant answer
Answer
Don't forget that nondestructive methods like XRF (or any analysis - EDS, AAS - of tiny amount of sample from surface) are all techniques which are characterizing surface only. Not only sculptures but any old objects can be gilded/plated and under this layer material with completely different composition can be found (and corrosion or patina can affect surface techniques results aswell). If the sculpture is hollow, you can try to get some small piece of matter from inside. If it is possible and sculture is not too big, very useful can be hydrostatic weighing (applications of Archimedes rule). This can confirm/disprove very easily and cheaply the composition found on surface by other techniques (ofcourse too complicated alloys is hard to determine, but for Ag/Cu, Cu/Au or Ag/Au alloy it si quite easy). For example: if XRF will find 80% of Au and the density of object will be e.g. 11.2 g.cm-3 (and no cavities are present) than it is clear that object is not composed from material with 80% of gold (inside can be e.g. silver or lead). Very useful for binary and ternary Cu, Ag, Au alloy is article from Kraut and Stern (first link). Once I have nondestructively analyzed some gold medal (second link) which has nearly 100% of gold on surface but on some scuffed places only 70% Au, 20% Cu and 10% Ag was found with EDS and than confirmed with hydrostatic weighing (possible compositions of ternary alloy with known density is expresed by the red line).
  • asked a question related to Sculpture
Question
8 answers
Sanding of wood is a crucial process to finish the surface of wooden products. Sanding of flat surfaces and straight edges on conventional machines (or even handheld/manually operated equipment) are usually practiced on wide scale in the relevant industry. However, it seems that sanding of wood on CNC machine is still require much investigation to identify proper parameters, applicability, and feasibility.
Anyone so far has worked with sanding of wooden products on CNC machines? I am particularly interested on results of applying the process on 3D carved or sculptured surfaces.
Many thanks for providing your answers.
Relevant answer
Answer
Many thanks Mr Mark.
Really appreciated.
  • asked a question related to Sculpture
Question
245 answers
When artists try to cultivate art in three dimensions, works like Michelangelos' "David" result, or the great mobiles we find in airports and stations, or the unusually structured airports themselves. In your opinion, which is the most meaningful and expressive of these artworks? Could you cite specific examples, post pictures, and explain the meanings you find in such works?
Relevant answer
Answer
One of the most famous world Lighthouses
  • asked a question related to Sculpture
Question
2 answers
Shantinikaitan is where Ghani Khan was educated in fine arts and I heard that some artworks may be there. 20th century Indian Art.
Relevant answer
Answer
thank you Raj