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Scuba diving - Science topic

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Hello, I am working as a PhD student in the field of marine biology. I am preparing for a sampling procedure of live shrimps via scuba diving in a remote area for aquaculture purposes. Could someone provide me with a suitable protocol for marine habitats? Thanks.
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Hamed Ghanaatian studied species are Hemimysis speluncola and H. margalefi
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There are many ways the scuba diving sector can actively participate in MPA management, in all MPA governance types recognized by the CBD (gov-gov, co-managed, private, community-based). In less participative frameworks, the sector is just consulted eventually or even only informed about new regulations. I'm searching for more descriptions in the literature on any of those situations. Any suggestions?
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Here's a successful example from the UK
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Recreational and scientific scuba diving are for me insatiable passions. However, it came to my mind that we are currently experiencing a shift in underwater data acquisition thanks to the development of AUV, ROV, surface drones and acoustic methods. This interest is also linked with a shift in my career going from extensive underwater sampling by scuba diving to remote sensing by acoustic methods and the awareness that came with it. So my (heartbreaking) opened question foreseeing the end of the scuba diving era within few decades.
What is your feeling about this?
Which fields see the fastest changes?
Which remote or automated techniques already exist or will emerge?
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I still think nothing can or will beat human observation in situ underwater. While I have no idea on the real end of SCUBA, or its evolution, I truly hope it never does end, and if anything, becomes more important and even safer.
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I would appreciate to hear whether any of you have had vestibular schwannoma (VS) patients experiencing serious vertigo during diving or whether you have some theoretical observations on whether or not these patients should be allowed to dive.
Have any of you seen cases of pneumocephalus in patients diving after temporal bone surgery?
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Personally I have no experience with VS patients who dive thus the following is only my insights based on the pathophysiology of this SOL.
VS located in the IAC or CPA is slow growing and is almost never associated with acute vertigo. One exception is the uncommon intralabyrinthine schwannoma which might cause meniere like attacks.  I believe diving limitations in VS should be considered according to the status of hearing and vestibular function. Mostly well compensated unilateral vestibulopathy, which is usually the case in VS,  would not present particular hazard to the diver. If the subject has complete deafness due to the VS this would be a case of "only hearing ear" and I would not recommend diving.
I hope this help.
Avi Shupak    
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Greetings,
 I am a marine ecologist and very experienced SCUBA diver. We have recently been using a medical device called a BEMER to reduce the fatigue associated with SCUBA diving. In October we did 29 dives to deeper than 30m in 13 days (apprx 3 x day) with no fatigue! (see www.aquabemer.com and the video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BGdnMLlExJk). Since then we have used it extensively on expeditions and in every case its use reduces fatigue.  The BEMER enhances vasomotion  with a pulsed magnetic field signal. The system is in wide use throughout Europe for a variety of ailments (see www.bemerme.com).  I am looking for collaborators to help better understand why BEMER reduces post-dive fatigue. I think it would be a great help for people on live-aboard dive trips, expeditions, and perhaps commercial diving.
  If your your research seems to be complimentary.  Hope to hear from you
 Thanks,
   Phil
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Hi Phillip,
You should check your dive profiles: 3 x 30 m dives every day for 2 weeks generate high probability for DCI. Fatigue is one of DCI clinical symptoms...
Good luck and be careful.
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what is also the physiological impact of scuba diving at a depth of 30m for 1hour and then ascending rap[idily to the surface?
In the context of changes in atmospheric pressure.
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Recently, I collected qualitative samples of marine soft-bottom zoobenthic communities at 10-15 meters depth by skin diving. I used hand-operated corers of 8cm diameter. I wonder whether there is any publication/report/manual on sampling procedures by skin diving.
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Dear Ferrucio
The following 2 book chapters are devoted to techniques in use for biological study by SCUBA diving: 
Hiscock, K. 1987. Chapter 9: Subtidal rock and shallow sediments using diving. p. 198-237 in: Baker J.M. & W.J. Wolff (eds). Biological surveys of estuaries and coasts. Estuarine and brackish-water sciences association handbook, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.
Munro, C. 2005. Chapter 4: Diving systems. p. 112-159 in: Eleftheriou, A. & A. McIntyre (eds) 2005. Methods for the study of marine benthos, 3rd ed. Blackwell Science Ltd, Oxford.
Also on this subject:
Fager, E.W., A.O. Flechsig, R.F. Ford, R.I. Clutter & R.J. Ghelardi 1966. Equipment for use in ecological studies using scuba. Limnol. & Oceanogr. 11 (4) 503-509.
Stoddart, D.R. & R.E. Johannes 1978. Coral reefs: research methods. Monographs on oceanographic methodology 5. Unesco, Paris.
In German, somewhat outdated but with a lot of references:
Riedl, R. 1967. Die Tauchmethode, ihre Aufgaben und Leistungen bei der Erforschung des Litorals; eine kritische Untersuchung. Helgol. Wiss. Meeresunters. 15 (1-4) 294-352.
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I have a colleague who has an eye disability and is concerned if scuba diving could impact this negatively?
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Diving with a mask can induce barotrauma, if the negative pressure differential between the air inside the mask and the water outside the mask is not equalized (forcing the eye outwards). This trauma would, I imagine, be more likely to cause a retinal detachment in those already predisposed to such a condition (e.g. those with previous retinal detachment, high myopia, associated systemic conditions (see more below), etc.). Obviously if your friend has any intra-ocular gas (e.g. post-surgery), then changes in the volume of this bubble can be another cause of trauma, and they should not dive whilst there is any gas bubble remaining in the eye. This is an excellent review of SCUBA diving and possible ophthalmic complications:
Butler Jr FK. Diving and hyperbaric ophthalmology. Survey of Ophthalmology. 1995;39(5):347-66.
Although I am not aware of any case reports in the literature of SCUBA diving causing retinal detachment directly, there is a report of a SCUBA diver losing sight in one eye due to sinus barotrauma causing a secondary orbital cellulitis (Bellini, M. J. Blindness in a diver following sinus barotrauma. The Journal of Laryngology & Otology 101.04 (1987): 386-389), and orbital cellulitis has itself been reported to cause retinal detachment. Systemic associations in those people who have had a retinal detachment should also be considered before SCUBA diving; for example, people with Marfan’s syndrome have an increased risk of retinal detachment, and also have an increased incidence of lung abnormalities including a spontaneously collapsed lung (pneumothorax) – the large changes in pressure in the first few meters of a dive may increase this risk further.
Hope that helps!