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Hello,
Aside from Beall's List of Predatory Journals and Publishers, are there other lists of the same content? For example, World Scientific Publishing Company is not on the list of Beall, but how to know if this publisher is predatory?
Thanks.
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Dear Ma.Kresna Navarro In addition to the replies of Wolfgang R. Dick and Rodney Duffett which might help you to answer your question in general, I can say that the particular publisher you mentioned is discussed here on RG already: https://www.researchgate.net/post/Is_World_Scientific_Publishing_a_reputed_and_reliable_one
Not being included in the Beall's list can be a reassuring sign but in the given you can find some of the arguments why this particular publisher is not predatory.
Best regards.
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In many of these serious journals authors should pay for publishing (more than in pirate journals) and process of acceptance is unreasonably too long and too formalistic. I found a lot of very good papers (high quality and scientific) published in pirate journals. In some of serious journals engineering approach and practical use are neglected. The most important criterion for the paper acceptance is using of any new statistical method and/or model (in recent time especially machine learning). Remember Klemeš and his papers: Dilettantism in hydrology: Transition or destiny?; Political pressures in water resources management – do they influence predictions? etc.
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In my humble opinion, the biggest problem is a quite big period from the submission till the first decision. How it is solved in many ''so-called'' predatory journals? Simple. Reviewers are obtaining the vouchers for their review for every quick review, i.e. within 1 week. Of course, the review has to be done rigorously. But professor Bonacci is right - it depends mostly on the editorial and a reviewer.
You can find a not-so ''high-impact'' paper in journals with a high IF, while in ''predatory'' journals you can find a very quality paper.
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With the advances in community review and Web3 on the horizon, I've been starting to wonder if the way in which traditional peer-review works is outdated. Have y'all found any systems out there that feel like the future of peer-review?
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That is the matter of reality. We have to face it. In recent years the number of retractions in journals, even top journals has increased.
Even when an article had been retracted many years ago, other authors were or are still citing them as a part of their literature review. For example lets have a look at this paper:
  • "Regression of human metastatic renal cell carcinoma after vaccination with tumor cell–dendritic cell hybrids" published in: Nature Medicine volume 6, pages332–336 (2000).
But in this URL we find the retraction note
Retraction date is sept 2003.
But a Google Scholar search shows, it has been cited 59 times, by different researchers, from 2018 up to now. Now let's ask ourselves where were/are peer reviewers? (in such a case)
After start of Covid 19 a "Paper Rush" began, every one wanted to be the first or among the first ones to have it in his field of teaching, expertise. So now there are a huge number of retracted papers just on Covid 19.
The problem so tense, some researchers addressed it in this article with a term "PAPERDEMIC" to attract concerns
  • "COVID-19 research: pandemic versus “paperdemic”, integrity, values and risks of the “speed science”" DOI 10.1080/20961790.2020.1767754
and then among too many other articles about the problems with peer review, these two articles by the New York Times:
  • "Two Huge Covid-19 Studies Are Retracted After Scientists Sound Alarms"
and this one
"The Pandemic Claims New Victims: Prestigious Medical Journals: Two major study retractions in one month have left researchers wondering if the peer review process is broken"
  • When we follow the cases of retractions in different journals, the role of whistleblowers is great. Now they have become gatekeepers of science . So it is a kind of "Post peer review" that is of great help. I firmly believe peer review in scientific research is gatekeeper of our health, life, nature, future and other good things, but we need new methods, as far as I have been thinking about and testing, post peer review could be a valuable option. Let me quote a sentence from the above mentioned article. "The truth is that the “scientific research has changed the world” but now, and more than ever, “it needs to change itself” (Ricardo Jorge Dinis-Oliveira, 2020) DOI: 10.1080/20961790.2020.1767754
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The Dolos list has started to work well, but I do not think this opposition to predatory publishing is enough. From what I have seen, there is no collective or institute (consisting of researchers) of reference that denounces this sector. It could be a collective whose objective would be to establish regular reports and publish statements about this sector. The collective aspect would give more weight to this opposition. For the moment, I have the impression that these are mostly isolated actions from researchers. What do you think about this idea ?
I just have to warn you of one thing: A researcher who publicly opposes this sector would have to assume unpleasant consequences. For my part, a few days after launching the Dolos list, I was already receiving threatening messages.
Best regards,
Alexandre.
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Researchers based at Russian institutions are more likely to publish in predatory journals if their university leader already does so, according to new analysis.
The authors of the study, analysed the work of 1386 rectors – the most senior officials at Russian universities – over a 10-year period and found that 149 officials had published in journals classified as potentially predatory in another study. What’s more, the rectors found to have been publishing in predatory journals had been doing so for an average of eight years, the study found...
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(Edited)
World Scientific Publishing Co Pte Ltd is a Singapore-based publishing company that has been in the business since 1981. They publish a lot of edited books each year. How well accepted are those books in academia? Are they peer-reviewed?
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One little correction, the publisher “World Scientific Publishing Co Pte Ltd” is not China-based, their headquarter is in Singapore. Hans-Georg Petersen can you give some examples of the sources that mention this publisher as potential predatory? I was unable to find anything substantial, they are not mentioned in the Beall’s list (https://beallslist.net ).To answer the question it is good to know that they publish both journals and books.
Scopus indexing is some indication of the legitimacy and reputation of their journals. The majority of their journals are indexed in Scopus (see enclosed file).
An indication of the legitimacy and reputation of a book publisher can be found here: http://wokinfo.com/mbl/ when you search for “world scientific pub” you get 704 hits (comparable to IGI Global with 797 hits). Of course, a publisher like Springer gives more hits, but that is largely explained by being bigger and because of their long tradition in (book) publishing.
Another indication about the reasonably good reputation of this publisher (and their journals) is the fact that they are a level 1 publisher (like Elsevier, Springer Nature, etc.) according to “Norwegian Register for Scientific Journals, Series and Publishers” (https://kanalregister.hkdir.no/publiseringskanaler/Forside ).
So, overall I would say that they are not as reputable as Springer, CRC press, Taylor & Francis etc. when it comes to book publishing but it is a pretty safe choice.
Best regards.
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We've all been in circumstances when we couldn't find the literature we were looking for. Other times, we found exactly what we wanted, but very late. Thus, beginners in research are pushed to formulate a clear and innovative title. Keywords rescue us, but, is it enough?
In these days of data mining, what tools can we utilize to structure our research paper titles such that they are search engine optimized (SEO)? How can we write technical titles that are both engaging and readable?
1. Google Trends
Track changes in word usage over time, within a region, etc.
2. Web-of-Science
Regular keyword literature search, to find jargon usage.
3. Semrush
Helps with Keyword Research, Competitive Research, PR, etc. It is a marketing tool, perhaps used by industrial researchers and product developers?
4. What am I missing? What are your tricks and tips?
Thank you!
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Just use a simple description of your study, including your question, who performed the process, effects, and location . For example, my paper: 'Size-based fruit selection by a keystone avian frugivore and effects on seed viability in New Zealand' :)
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Recently I visited <https://research.com/> (R) (a platform that lists top scientists around the world from the areas of computer science and electronics) and later I also visited <https://atlas.cern/> (A) (the ATLAS Experiment at CERN). I made the following observations (I intentionally don't mention names):
1. One of the top authors at R has published 1,816 papers.
If one's professional career lasts 40 years, the calculation says:
40 years X 365 days = 14600 days; 14600 / 1816 = 8 days to publish a paper
That means 1 paper is published every 8 days during the entire professional life! That's about 45 papers a year... every year!
2. The same author at R has an h-index of 167.
"The h-index is defined as the maximum value of h such that the given author/journal has published at least h papers that have each been cited at least h times."
The R's top author has 167 papers each one cited 167 times!
3. A paper published by A's researchers had 78 authors!
I realize that CERN is something "big" and quite complex. But... there are 78 authors anyway...
Probably all those people are high-level scientists. But... what makes them hyperprolific? Is it real? How is it possible? Is it more for the benefit of science or is it a kind of business?
What's your opinion?
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Dear Yassen V. Gorbounov . Concentrating on quantity more than quality in the research output.
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I have personally experience that its relatively tough to publish in a good journal in social science, for example let us suppose in the field of finance, marketing and so on. In comparison i have seen that in natural sciences the publication chances and frequency are higher. What are the possible reasons for this? 
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The ideological interest factor is greater in social science than in natural science.
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I have been asked to submit a paper on a special issue of Genes- MDPI. The impact factor of the journal is showing to be 3.4 but I saw conflicting articles about the MDPI journals being a predatory one. Though the editor of the issue is a reputed person in the field, I am bit confused about the journal in general. What are your thoughts?
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I think this is a complicated question. I did a quick search and found the IF to be even higher (1) than the figure you quoted. That means that journal is cited a lot, if that's useful to you. But, as we know, and has been discussed in other parts of this platform, IF is not the only factor to consider. There are many other metrics used.
Personally, I would not be able to afford the amount of the fees that they charge so publishing in that journal would never be an option for me.
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I recently read a recent publication, that was well done experimentally, results and discussion were excellent, but the abstract contained facts, that were not results of this study, they contrasted the results of the study. It was possible to make a list and put sentences in the abstract against the corrsponding part of the main part and the discussion and to see to difference. The main author did not answer to my question about it.
How is this possible ? Can Abstracts be changed after the review process und go to print without a check ? Or do you think, something like this may have been overseen by referees.
In Germany it is possible to send such findings to a DFG commision.
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Most readers are satisfied with the abstract of your paper. A few, if it is of their interest, will read the whole paper. So, Abstract is the most important part of the paper and should be carefully drafted, containing the salient features of the paper.
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Dear community,
this seems to have been out there since 2018 in medical sciences, but I only stumbled over it recently:
T&F are offering extremely fast review and publication times for a higher fee, they pay reviewers for handing in reviews in time. How do you feel about this? Will this bias acceptance of papers and just be a new way to buy a publication? Or do you think this is the right incentive for reviewers and a way to recognize the importance of fast and constructive review?
I would be interested in your opinion.
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Daniela E. Winkler If time is of the essence in your publication strategy, our Accelerated Publication options can help you quickly have your research published in a high-quality, peer-reviewed journal. You may use Accelerated Publication to align your publication schedule with conferences, medication approvals, and drug launches.
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Differentiating Science from Pseudoscience is becoming a challenge at so many levels these days. How can we separate the two and acknowledge a grey area in between?
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The page https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pseudoscience gives a rather good overview about the distinction between science and pseudoscience, about indicators of possible pseudoscience, and about the resons for it. For a discussion of the reasons, see also https://www.researchgate.net/post/What_is_the_explanation_for_the_appearance_of_some_people_who_believe_that_the_earth_is_not_round_and_that_man_has_not_reached_the_moon.
See also these discussions about astrology - for me as an astronomer it is hard to believe how many scientists believe in it:
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I received an unsolicited email from Scientia Global and I can't tell if they are a predatory publisher of scientific journal articles or news articles or if they are legit.
"Dear Dr. April Robin Martinig, I hope you do not mind me emailing you directly, I thought it would be the easiest way to make first contact. If you have time for a short discussion I was hoping to speak with you about your research and our interest to feature your work in an upcoming issue of our science communication publication, Scientia. I will run you through this in more detail when we talk. But to give you a very quick insight into Scientia and the style in which we publish, I have attached a few example articles from research groups we have recently worked with. I have attached these as HTML files to reduce the size, but I can send PDF versions if you would prefer. You may also view one of our recent full publications here: https://www.scientia.global/scientia-issue-132/ Please let me know if you might have 10 minutes for a short phone call and advise when would be a good time and day for you to discuss further? I look forward to talking soon. Kind regards, Paris Allen"
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Previously there were predatory journals; now there are predatory publishers. Scientia global is one of them. This can also be validated by their emails in which they write that the results of the academic research papers will not be published (at first). This means that the research papers will not be peer reviewed just like predatory journals which are although claimed to be peer reviewed, but are not . They send unsolicited emails to author's and try to persuade them to publish their already published work in their publications, which is obviously chargeable. The charges are as high as 3300 GBP. The name of this publisher should be included in the blacklist issued by Cabell’s International.
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Hi everyone,
I am about to define an experiment where we want to investigate 10 - 20 de novo small proteins. We are mainly interested in affinity but also want to show that proteins are folding properly. For that we are thinking about using circular dichroism. I am having seconds thoughts though if this is the right method in the long run. When it comes to publishing, I have the gut feeling that reviewers might ask for a crystal structure of the protein or even the complex. I am working on getting an impression myself by reading nature and science papers but I would like to get to know your advice and experience concerning the matter. What methods are best suited to give our research credibility that might be expected in high impact journals?
cheers
Martin
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If your protein fulfills a measurable function (e.g., enzymatic activity), then you can take the presence of that activity as proof of folding. To measure the stability of that structure, I'd try differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), which measures the change in heat capacity during (un)folding. Integration then gives the average change of enthalpy ΔH between two temperatures. Proteins unfold (and ideally refold) cooperatively over a narrow temperature or [denaturant] range.
If you have several related proteins, you can use the protein engineering method (10.1351/pac199163020187) to associate ΔΔG with sequence changes.
It is also possible to plot the rates of (un)folding as function of temperature and/or [denaturant] (chevron-plot, 10.1016/j.ymeth.2004.03.013), stopped-flow CD would be nice for that.
A transverse [denaturant] gradient can be used to measure unfolding by electrophoresis (10.1016/0022-2836(79)90279-1), amide deuterium exchange is used to measure their accessibility by ESI-MS or NMR. Some bound fluorescent dyes (e.g., ANS) change their intensity during unfolding, sometimes this can be done also with intrinsic Trp residues.
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Does anyone have experience with Columbus Publishers?
trustworthy or predatory journals?
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This publisher is new (and certainly too new to be mentioned in for example the Beall’s list (if they turn out to be predatory). I do see some red flags:
-Location is suspect, Google the address and you end up with some pretty nice-looking real estate but a highly unlikely location for an office
-I noticed in literally the first paper that this publisher is not sharp in copyright permissions of images, this is a red flag for the lack of proper peer review and use of well-established scientific standards
-The photo used on their homepage is probably not original since it is already used here https://professionals.hartstichting.nl/samenwerking-en-financiering/samenwerking/talentontwikkeling
-They are new so consequently non-established but still they a membership with ridiculous prices https://www.columbuspublishers.com/membership
-The APC’s are way too high for a basically non-indexed journal https://www.columbuspublishers.com/journal/research-journal-of-gastroenterology-and-hepatology?submenu=article-process-feefor a research/review article they charge 1499 USD
-The journals I checked are empty (no papers and no board members…)
Even if this might turn out to be a genuine and legit initiative I would go for another journal. Looking at your publication list you found way better one’s than this new player.
Best regards.
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As a researcher, I suffer a lot from the dilemma of global research cooperation, and since I am mainly from a poor African country, and I have no research support and I rely in my research on the laboratory capabilities available in the workplace, I face great difficulties in front of scientific publishing, in which I waste a lot of time and effort..
While research cooperation spawns scientific papers and innovations like the village of ants and at frequent intervals because each member of the group has a small and specific task!
So far I have failed to find a serious research group that suits me and would like to share with me, what are the possible reasons??
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Please have look on our(Eminent Biosciences (EMBS)) collaborations.. and let me know if interested to associate with us
Our recent publications In collaborations with industries and academia in India and world wide.
EMBS publication In association with Universidad Tecnológica Metropolitana, Santiago, Chile. Publication Link: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33397265/
EMBS publication In association with Moscow State University , Russia. Publication Link: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32967475/
EMBS publication In association with Icahn Institute of Genomics and Multiscale Biology,, Mount Sinai Health System, Manhattan, NY, USA. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29199918
EMBS publication In association with University of Missouri, St. Louis, MO, USA. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30457050
EMBS publication In association with Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia, USA. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27852211
EMBS publication In association with ICMR- NIN(National Institute of Nutrition), Hyderabad Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23030611
EMBS publication In association with University of Minnesota Duluth, Duluth MN 55811 USA. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27852211
EMBS publication In association with University of Yaounde I, PO Box 812, Yaoundé, Cameroon. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30950335
EMBS publication In association with Federal University of Paraíba, João Pessoa, PB, Brazil. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30693065
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and University of Yaoundé I, Yaoundé, Cameroon. Publication Link: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31210847/
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, 48080, Leioa, Spain. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27852204
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Publication Link: http://www.eurekaselect.com/135585
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and NIPER , Hyderabad, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29053759
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and Alagappa University, Tamil Nadu, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30950335
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University, Hyderabad , India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28472910
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and C.S.I.R – CRISAT, Karaikudi, Tamil Nadu, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30237676
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and Karpagam academy of higher education, Eachinary, Coimbatore , Tamil Nadu, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30237672
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and Ballets Olaeta Kalea, 4, 48014 Bilbao, Bizkaia, Spain. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29199918
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and Hospital for Genetic Diseases, Osmania University, Hyderabad - 500 016, Telangana, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28472910
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and School of Ocean Science and Technology, Kerala University of Fisheries and Ocean Studies, Panangad-682 506, Cochin, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27964704
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and CODEWEL Nireekshana-ACET, Hyderabad, Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26770024
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and Bharathiyar University, Coimbatore-641046, Tamilnadu, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27919211
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and LPU University, Phagwara, Punjab, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31030499
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and Department of Bioinformatics, Kerala University, Kerala. Publication Link: http://www.eurekaselect.com/135585
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and Gandhi Medical College and Osmania Medical College, Hyderabad 500 038, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27450915
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and National College (Affiliated to Bharathidasan University), Tiruchirapalli, 620 001 Tamil Nadu, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27266485
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and University of Calicut - 673635, Kerala, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23030611
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and NIPER, Hyderabad, India. ) Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29053759
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and King George's Medical University, (Erstwhile C.S.M. Medical University), Lucknow-226 003, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25579575
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and School of Chemical & Biotechnology, SASTRA University, Thanjavur, India Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25579569
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and Safi center for scientific research, Malappuram, Kerala, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30237672
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and Dept of Genetics, Osmania University, Hyderabad Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25248957
EMBS publication In association with Institute of Genetics and Hospital for Genetic Diseases, Osmania University, Hyderabad Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26229292
Sincerely,
Dr. Anuraj Nayarisseri
Principal Scientist & Director,
Eminent Biosciences.
Mob :+91 97522 95342
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Hi all,
I have submitted a paper for publication in June 2017 and I am wondering how long people generally wait? I submitted to a relatively small journal, Impact Factor ~ 1, and waited over 8 months for my first response from them (while their home page says it is generally 185 days ~ 6 months). I emailed them a couple of times during the process for a check, but they just said there is nothing they could do and they are waiting for the reviewer. I worked on the revisions promptly and returned them after a week. I was then told again that I would have to wait (this time about 2-3 weeks for a second revision). I got it back (2 months later) and it was conditionally accepted with more revisions requested. Again I worked on it promptly and re-submitted. Now it has been almost 3 months again. Prior they told me that revisions in this stage only take 2-3 weeks (and last time they had to switch out a reviewer because they took so long, after my requests). Now I am not sure what to do, it feels like their deadlines keep getting pushed back, and they say there's nothing they can do and there has not been an update since the day after I submitted it. Should I request new reviewers or is that just the way it is? It has been over 16 months since I originally submitted the article.
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Dear Dr. Justin C. Luong , thank you for this relevant discussion.
I agree with Dr. Daniel Adrian Doss .
In every profession there are people (say around 10 percent) with sadist tendency. Some reviewers think too much about themselves once they receive a manuscript from a journal. And, these kind of people like to project themselves as busiest persons in the world. Also, in the name of review, such reviewers suggest irrelevant opinions, suggestion or inputs.
It is unfortunate that we have few people among us. We can not identify from the name, religion, race or nationality of such people. They are everywhere. We have to omit, neglect, reject these reviewers/ journals.
I echo the words of Dr. Daniel Adrian Doss , you may consider withdrawing the paper, if possible.
I seek your kind attention to the fact that there are 90 percent of reviewers who are sincere, time bound, and offer genuine suggestions for the improvement of article quality. Reviewers are not paid. So, we should appreciate, promote, recommend, celebrate and respect these great people while boycotting & rejecting the remaining unworthy 10 percent of reviewers (related journals).
Best wishes and warm regards
Yoganandan
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I have heard as good as bad commentaries about this scientific publisher. In my case, I feel that the generalized perception is that this publisher is predatory. Can anyone tell me any experience (good or bad) with this publisher?. Your comments can help me to decide if I publish with this group.
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Personally, I consider that one must always distrust Magazines that request money from the author of the Article or Contribution to publish it.
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I have just published a book with a big international science publisher (CRC Press, a branch of Taylor and Francis). The multi-author edited book is nice and hopefully useful for many (https://www.researchgate.net/publication/321016401_Grasslands_of_the_world_diversity_management_and_conservation), but the experiences with the publisher were so disappointing that some co-authors and I decided to start a public discussion on writing scientific books in the age of greedy publishers.
Here are some key facts of our collaboration with CRC/Francis and Taylor:
· The communication with the publisher was very unreliable and inefficient: e.g. did we receive various requests multiple times and the publisher “forgot” about previous written agreements.
· The typesetting as the only service provided by the publisher was very poor: about 90% of the changes made by the publisher introduced errors into previously correct text or tables and it was very time-consuming for us to find all these errors and remove them again.
· Instead of paying the authors a honorarium for their work, the publisher forced us to pay for the colour figures in our articles.
· The publisher refused to give the authors a complimentary print copy of their book (only the editors got one).
· First the publisher wanted to provide an electronic version of the chapter/book only to each corresponding author, not to all authors, and only after serious negotiations they accepted to provide e-books to all authors. We assumed that these would be functional pdf’s, but instead they received the books in a very weird e-book format with a display in an ugly and hardly readable layout (e.g. all text in bold), not allowing proper printing nor sharing parts of the content (e.g. single pages or figures) with others. This means that the authors did not receive any printed or electronic copy of that exactly corresponds to the published version of their own work.
I am extremely frustrated about the behaviour of CRC/Francis and Taylor and consider the last point as being at the edge of unethical. My feeling is that CRC might only reflect the strategy of most international science publishers to maximise profit by pressing money out of both authors and readers/libraries, while at the same time minimising the service they provide. On the other hand my gut feeling tells me that nowadays with cheap print-on-demand technology and the possibility to distribute printed or open access e-books without the need to involve a big marketing/distribution machinery should allow for other solutions.
Therefore, I would like to ask you two questions:
· Did you make similar experiences with other science publishers, or are they better or even worse?
· Do you see ways how those among us who would like to continue to write nice and useful books can do this without sacrificing themselves to profit-maximisation strategy of the big international science publishers?
Looking forward to your responses and hoping for a lively debate,
Prof. Dr. Jürgen Dengler
(ZHAW, Wädenswil, Switzerland)
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I had a positive experience with Springer. I was involved in two book chapters; the publisher sent me a hard copy of the book.
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Lets say you know very well the basics about writing, contents, formatting and style. Right before submission (your research is complete), do you focus only on the instructions for authors of the selected journal? Do you try to make the best/catchy title ever? Select a specific editor? do you contact the editor/journal before you submit? In short, Do you have a formula/method you apply? would you share it?
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It all depends on novelty of the work. If your idea or methodology is new then a good indexed journal also accept and publish it it in very suitable time. Check this article which i publish in one month in high impact journal of Springer because this type of work was not published yet.
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Colleagues,
do you know some UAV-dedicated Special Issues that are open for submission now? Both Magazines and Journals SIs will be highly appreciated! No discrimination on the publishers (IEEE, Frontiers, MDPI, Elsevier, River....)!
Thank you :)
PS: I think following this discussion will be useful. both to find Special Issues and/or to advertise them
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Please see this one:
Special Issue "Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Communication and Networking" A special issue of Electronics (ISSN 2079-9292) (IF: 2.397)
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Despite certain disadvantages, peer-review is generally accepted as a quality control of manuscripts submitted to scientific journals. The higher the rank of the journal, the more often manuscripts are rejected by the Editor for various reasons (lack of novelty, routine work, low technical quality etc.). Getting you manuscript back with staggering reviewer comments is a rather frustrating experience. What are your personal tips and tricks to avoid rejection?
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I think this technical report will helps how to write good manuscript and what things should take care in the mind while preparing it.
Regards
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In many cases, the reviewer may suggest that the author reads this or that article to supplement their literature review.
But it is correct to get suggestions for various quotes?
What would you do? Would you argue against suggestions? Would you inform the editors? Would you give up the publication?
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Dear
It is not unethical if reviewer suggest some references if they are in scope of the study. Moreover, it enhance the literature and helps to define the research gap.
Regards
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I came across various types of Impact factors like GIF, SJIF, SCImago, h-Index, Eigen factor etc .Please help me in knowing more details of these and which one among them is valid.
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For those still interested. The only company that assigns the official ‘impact factor’ is Clarivate (for journals indexed in SCIE or SSCI) you can check here: https://mjl.clarivate.com/home . A notorious fake one is CiteFactor (same is true for GIF, SJIF).
This is an example of a so-called misleading metrics (https://beallslist.net/misleading-metrics/) often used by predatory journals. Be careful with these fake impact factors one.
Ahmed Al-Shukaili be careful with ISI (international Scientific Indexing (ISI)) is another notorious fake one.
Best regards.
PS. For those interested find here the latest JCR report with all journals with an official impact factor.
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Delhi, Tamil Nadu, and Kerala Ophthalmological societies have their own journals which are unfortunately not indexed in pubmed? What's your take on publishing works in these journals as first choice?
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Respected sir,
Indian journals like TNOA, KJO, JCOR,etc are indexed in directory of open access journals (DOAJ). According to recent NMC guidelines articles published in DOAJ indexed journals will be considered for academic promotions. Even case series published in these journals will be considered. So if somebody has academic promotion as the primary aim for publishing, then he/she can consider publishing in these journals.The quality of these journals are quite good.
But on the flip side, as has been previously answered, these articles will not get wide peer attention since they are non pub Med indexed.
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Recently, one of my papers has been published after five year of its final acceptance by a SCI index journal, that to after lot of reminders. Can anybody suggest about fixing the upper time-limit for the publication of manuscripts at least in peer reviewed Journals?
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I have had the same experience. I received the acceptance letter in 2018. It will publish in the next issue of the journal (2021).
DOI: 10.1615/JPorMedia.2021025407
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What is the future of scientific publishing in light of the trend of most journals to open access? And will this affect the quality of the scientific publication, as the view is still that the open-access is of lower quality and prestigious than the non-open one?
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Open access provides more chances for developing countries to access quality research. In addition, open access papers are more likely to be cited. Note that the quality of publications does not depend on being open access or not (but keep away from predatory journals). On the one side, many journals offer discounts and waive to developing countries and early-career scientists. On the other side, for senior scientists, by choosing open access you are showing that you can support your research with projects. So, if you can, yes, YOU SHOULD GO FOR OPEN ACCESS!
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Dear RG colleagues,
Let us discuss on what basis are the authors sequence in multi-authored publications is arranged? Does it depend only on the contribution’s weight of each author? How to estimate the contribution’s weight of each author? Are there other criteria to determine this arrangement? Thank you very much for sharing your opinions with us,
Kind regards
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In between some journals require the author's contribution irrespective of their order.
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Although the costs of scientific publishing are on a continuous decline, especially with the development of electronic publishing, the APC for publishing in scientific journals are constantly increasing. Why do major publishing houses try to exploit researchers to this degree. How should the scientific community respond and what measures should be taken against them?
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From my point of view, this is because the number of subscriptions in print magazine libraries has decreased significantly. Also because what was gained with the print subscription when migrating it to electronic format decreased by more than 50%, that is why publishers seek not to lose in economic matters. They also decrease the costs of process and edition of the journals but the costs of storage and distribution increased since they should offer stable services and access for users.
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As all of us are familiar with the different journal ranking systems and requirement conditions, in many cases we meet different kind of fees, charges for publishing our researches. Usually only the submitting and the previewing cost US$ 50-250, which is non-refundable and the paper may be rejected by the editors without being sent for review. Others introduce fees for the publishing US$ 500 -1000 (extra fees for colour graphs, maps etc. or for appeals against a Chief Editor's decision). For good English, they offer some links for the grammar review: US$ 100-200. Besides all of this, they employ embargo for 12-36 months, and ask US$ 600-2500 for open access. I think these fees sometimes unreasonable, so it is hard not to find the business factor behind them.
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I do agree with the expert answers above
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What are some of the difficulties or disadvantages, if any, of publishing in high impact journals?
Thanks in advance for your participation!
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The only drawback is the time. These journals take a long time for research to be accepted for publication and some of them are very expensive for my person.
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How to distinguish between a predatory journal and genuine journal in publish our research work??? Every now and then we get emails for the publisher to submit our work to their journals......
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please search on https://doaj.org/ here for checking your journal
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Dear Colleagues, I hope someone can provide some answer :
I recently had notified by Research Gate that ELSEVIER editorial did notified them that they needed to take one Scientific Article I had on my Research Items down, due to violation of ELSEVIER's Copyright.
This article was published on the Journal "Nano Energy", of ELSEVIER's, and I appear as the first autor.
Is there a way to keep one of this articles on your RG Items without infringing the Copyrights of ELSEVIER ?
Can I try to upload it again? This time under the "Private" mode (not open sharing, but via request)
Or it's better to leave the matter alone? Meaning that all ELSEVIER's editorial articles cannot be shared freely on Research Gate ?
Thank You! Best Regards !
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inerestibg situation, very actually in modern time. answers will be useful to many researchers
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There are several journals with varying impact factors. Still we find journals having no impact factor. I want to know whether the impact or importance of a researcher becomes less to a scientific community when he/she publishes a paper in a journal with low impact factor or no impact factor?
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Dear All, I may be old-fashioned, but in my personal opinion publishing in high-ranked and high-IF journal is the best way to make your valuable research visible to exopert colleagues in your field of research. Please see in this context this closely related RG thread entitled "How do you increase the visibility of published article?"
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I need a co-author for a scopus article to participate in ІСSF 2021, Innovative Approaches for Solving Environmental Issues Workshop (IASEI-WS'2021), Kyiv. The article has already been written and is ready for publication. I am the main athor of this article. It is is an overview article about means of remote monitoring of air quality, and the possibility of their use for operational monitoring in Ukraine. I place a discreet emphasis on using the UAV.
link to the conference website: https://icsf.ccjournals.eu/2021/index2.html
Requirements for a co-author: student, PhD student, or any other researcher who works in a scientific institution at a given time. The institution should not be located in Ukraine or in the Russian Federation (such co-authors already exist).
If you are interested, please contact me as soon as possible.
Deadline of this offer - 28.12.2020
Anastasiia Turevych,
Thank you!
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I am interested and from Kenya. I have PhD in environmental studies. Please count me in.
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In the scientific world, some terms and practices are universal. Look at botanical names that are uniform in all nations for example. I think global standardization should apply to research paper formatting too. It is very challenging and stressful to keep reformatting a research paper to suit each new journal you want to submit to. Some formats are very dissimilar that the effort is sometimes more than writing the paper. I propose the motion that there should be a universal format for all research papers to make it easier on authors and publishers.
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Even though uniqueness establishes the journal identity, but I agree that a one format style for all journals would save the time for researchers.
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We in the scientific community often hear about and are aware of some unworthy individuals copying and reproducing results (without due recognition of authors right). How shall we create responsibility and make aware of those who may do such unlawful acts presumably without knowing?
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We should build honesty with the people at the early stage when they are kids.
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The peer review system has been the cornerstone of scientific publishing for centuries.
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Let me point to another case. Another journal gave me a chance to publish one free-of-charge paper at the expense of I was one of their reviewers.
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I am looking for research papers copied (in full or in part) by other papers to identify a "percentage of plagiarism". Authors can be different. Can you help me find any papers?
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plagiarism free check
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Kindly, could you please see the following warning that is related to this valuable question of Dr. Muhammad S. Mansy?
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I just found Viper but I'm having some problems with it. Is there any other plagiarism software online?
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Let me point to another perspective that Katalin Bikadi said.
I don't recommend using such free software checkers for plagiarism. This is because the original content of your manuscript might be copied and sold to others before it is published. Use your own words instead.
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Hi,
I'm working with a set of soil analyses obtained from an external laboratory.
Studying the results, I am highly confident that one of the analyses gave incorrect results because the values are extremely unlikely (in total disagreement with what is normally naturally occurring).
Besides, I have conducted additional analyses to triple-check this analysis.
The results I have obtained contradict, as I expected, the anomalous data.
The problem is, that the method I used is not the same as the initial method (unavailable at my lab), but is supposed to measure the same variable.
Now that it is time to write a research article, what would you do to overcome this problem?
Should I explain that for this particular analysis, results were abnormal and were not considered further?
Should it be done early in the results section, or later in the discussion section?
How have you dealt with unexpected/erroneous data with your research, when you cannot repeat the same analysis?
Will a journal accept to publish results which include one bad apple, while the rest of the basket is fine?
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First thing, I would present this to the external lab. Perhaps they can look back at notes, strip charts or other outputs to check for mistake. Then if that fails, present the truth with the possible erroneous value and cross checked with other methods, and discuss briefly in findings. Like suggested, if the whole journal paper has no value with this issue included, then you will probably get some bad marks from editor or reviewers, possible suggestions to recover. When you say the value from lab is extremely unlikely or unnatural, it is likely the lab just made a mistake, it happens. It would be better for them to review the circumstance and your cross checking, and agree there was a mistake and then use your value based on their agreement, with a footnote perhaps briefly mentioning this attached to the value. Other issues can develop such as if your cross checking followed much later in time and samples were not preserved and/or stored properly. You may have to justify your work too.
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I know it gives another chance to resubmit after major revision. But could corresponding author consider "Reject & Resubmit" as a simple reject, and submit the article to another journal? Should corresponding author ask for permission of previous journal?
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Thanks T. Edelmann-very informative! I do a reasonable amount of peer-review and have never been offered "Reject & Resubmit" as an option for my use. It's always, accept, accept with minor revisions, accept with major revisions, reject.
Perhaps it's something the Editor can use after reviews are in?
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In some journal papers, I am included in the acknowledgement section. Reason for this is, I have helped them in taking some measurements. How should we mention such contributions in the CV?
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This is such an interesting discussion thread question because I think that it depends on where the researcher may be in their development. For instance, I just placed my answer to a similar Research Gate discussion thread question, as follows:
" Rokia Sakr ,
In my opinion, there are a number of benefits to gain if your name is acknowledged in a scientific paper: (1) When you list your References on your Curriculum Vitae, it will be very helpful to the readers of your CV to know that you contributed to the research and writing of a scientific paper, and, yes, you should, absolutely, acknowledge your work relationship with your Reference; (2) Acknowledgments are somewhat similar to Research Gate, which has both scientific and social factorials; (3) Acknowledgements notes or sections in a published work are informative, so that readers of the article, review, or monograph may increase their knowledge of researchers in the field; in this regard, acknowledging persons or groups or organizations actually might be viewed as a foundational part of the research because often entities mentioned in the Acknowledgments really have been instrumental in making the research and writing and publication possible! " [end of my quoted answer]
In addition, in my view, it is both an honor for the recipient of a formalized acknowledgement and it is also, it seems to me, an obligation for a researcher to acknowledge the contribution and/or participation of other people, whether colleagues, administrators, research assistants, students, staff members, and any persons who helped in the creation of the work activities and material results.
Of course, the issue has some intricate and delicate aspects. For example, should any individuals be acknowledged if they are simply doing their jobs? In other words, should acknowledgements be reserved for persons whose efforts on behalf of the research project go above and beyond the call of duty? And what about mentioning the names of nuclear family members, such as the researcher's parents, siblings, spouse, children, or grandchildren? On a somewhat humorous note, I have even observed book authors who acknowledge the immeasureable or unfathomable help provided by the family pet(s)!
With regard to the "negotiable exchange value" of being named in the acknowledgements in an article, review, or book-length monograph, I think that it would depend on the individual circumstances. When my name appeared in the Acknowledgements section in The Collected Works of W.B. Yeats, Volume 2, The Plays, by the volume editor, Professor Dr. David R. Clark, and his daughter, Rosalind E. Clark, I considered it to be a great honor to be listed with leading research scholars in the field, particularly so because Yeats won the 1923 Nobel Prize for Literature, two years following Albert Einstein's 1921 Nobel Prize for Physics (discovery of the photoelectric effect).
This is an excellent topic for this Research Gate discussion thread because I think that there is a great deal of latitude, especially because the Acknowledgements are at the heart, and maybe even the soul, of a research project, hence it is a personal decision on the part of the author(s), who may even decide to mention the names of the book publisher's in-house editorial staff, paid or unpaid word processing helpers (who are sometimes family members), and I have often observed scholars of articles and books acknowledge their anonymous referees or reviewers for making helpful and valuable suggestions.
Very best regards and best wishes to all.
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Or, put another way, all the new journals that are created are really necessary?
Here you are our contribution to the debate:
Urbano, C.; Rodrigues, R.S.; Somoza-Fernández, M.; Rodríguez-Gairín, JM. (2020). “Why are new journals created?". Profesional de la Informacion (2020) 29(4) 1-19.
Are you a publisher or an editor who has recently participated in the launch of a new journal ... What is your opinion?
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To increase the chances of publications. For me, I am not capable of publishing in top tier journals like nature, nevertheless, can still publish in small journals that are not as prestigious (low impact factor 2 -3) but undergo a strict peer review process and are pubmed registered too.
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I am curious to know why a methodology will get acceptance in one journal for a given topic and get rejected in another journal for another topic. Take Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) application in Civil Engineering problems for an example. You find Civil Engineering journals accepting or rejecting papers with ANN methodology. How can one overcome these barriers?
As a reviewer, in your view what are the criteria you use to accept or reject a paper with machine learning applications?
If a machine learning method that has not been previously used is applied to a model (a common topic ), how do you as a reviewer respond?
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I have been carrying out research on materials processing with a focus on metal matrix composites and welding processes. Top journals in our field scrapped methodologies based on ANN and design of experiments approach (Central Composite Design, Box Behnken Design, Orthogonal design, Taguchi method etc). It is very rare to find a paper using this methodology in reputed journals now a days. There are two primary reasons. They are mere tools that a researcher uses. It is not countable as original contribution to the research work. Secondly, all of these methodologies simply play around the inputted numbers. None of these tools can understand any manufacturing processes. They can not predict unexpected changes and rapid shifts in process outputs. Their prediction is limited to a narrow range of process parameters.
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I am graduating from business school as part of my med school program in two weeks. I'm working on a paper with a team that will be ready to submit for publication this week. Most likely, I will actually have my degree by the time the manuscript is in front of a reviewer, and definitely by the time it's published. Is it permissible for me to include my MBA in the author's section since I will have it before publication, or am I required to leave it off because I do not officially have the degree at the time of submission?
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Dear Mr. Daniel Hayward ,
I agree with Dr. Madhukar Baburao Deshmukh and Mr. Akash Gupta . Actually you can't add it because you do not officially have the MBA degree at the time of submission. But you may write to publisher when you will get the degree.
Best,
Dr. Vardan Atoyan
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The highest impact factor journals are often criticized for rejecting too many too fast, and often too unfairly, a high proportion of the manuscripts they receive. Since they receive a larger amount of manuscripts relative to lower IF Journals, they are considered (assumed?) able to select the best quality research in their field. But, are they really publishing better science than lower impact journals? Many excellent scientists across the globe are unable to publish in High IF journals because they are unable to afford the publication fees. One may think that in many (most?) cases the quality of science high IF journals publish is not necessarily better than lower IF journals (note that High vs Low IF is a relative comparison, there is not a line/value separating both). What do you think? For instance, are the papers you have published in the highest IF Journal, your best quality papers? Do you see a positive relationship between IF and the quality of the science being published?
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High impact factor journals are, most of the times, more interested in articles from established and well known scholars who have made names in their chosen careers. It is always very difficult for young and upcoming scholars to break into highly rated journals. Whether articles have high quality or not is not always the priority of the first-class journals. Hardly can you see a novice (unknown scholar) publishing in "A*" journals. It is always a hard nut to crack for unknown scholars. Researchers generally pay more attention to articles from high impact factor journals irregardless of the quality. Thus, articles from high impact factor journals tend to attract more citations. This could be reasons many quality articles are eventually published in low impact factor journals.
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I just received a request for a review from "Internal Medicine Journal". I had a surprise recently with Journal of rare disease research and treatment for whom I wrote an "invited commentary" that appeared to be not so free (over 1000$), and I wonder if this one could also be a "predatory publisher". Has anyone information about this journal? Thanks
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In my case a very persistent A. Lesnevskyi, M.D. is inviting me already over 4 times, quite annoyingly, to contribute also something completely off topic to the same journal.
There are so many 'fake' journal contribution invitations spamming my inbox, that I almost always automatically delete them. When it is a serious non-predatory invitation, the author will probably introduce him/herself more properly, have a serious subject in the email, they will know more about your work, and will rather invite you more specifically to write something in the field you are actually working in, instead of some interstellar galactic generalistic non-defined topic that has hardly any direct links with your work.
For me it also works to only publish in journals that I have been reading myself.
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I was and am interested in this topic because I was wondering how much it would actually cost (annually) to run a technical journal for environment, including all costs starting with office space (if one sticks to that tradition) paying staff and expenses (servers etc.). I was wondering if it would be possible to run a small technical journal for environment without publication costs on alterative funding (without excessive need of volunteers). I thank you for your helps and cooperation that will be given to us!
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We know that rejection of research papers is very common in academic publishing, but what really bothers the authors is rejecting their papers without stating the reasons for rejection by editors, particularly when the paper matches the scope of the journal and the writing of the paper is academically acceptable, but it still somehow not enough to get accepted. The decision letter only informs the authors about the decision without any further explanations as to why such a decision was taken, many editors do this, it happened to me a couple of times. Why do editors do this? Why don't they care to explain the reasons for rejection? This is completely unfair to authors, especially if the submitted paper complies with the journal requirements. It's very frustrating. What should the authors do in this case?
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The phrase "academically acceptable" is a phrase that publishers use, and I think it means, literally, that your writing is not academically stringent enough. That night mean, for example, that you write like you talk - which you shouldn't, and It might also indicate that the paper has the wrong structure. I suggest that you talk with a senior scientist near you about this.
I can also give you a hint from me - based on a paper of mine and a colleague about academic writing:
“Subben׳s checklist” and the assessment of articles in mathematical optimization/operations research: In memoriam of Subhash C. Narula
It is - literally - a guide to both the writing of a paper, and how to assess the quality of a paper.
I really do think you will have much use for it, and I suggest you talk with your closest senior scientist so that your use of it becomes optimal. She/he will know. :-)
Good luck!
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Suppose a paper have been reviewed by three different reviewer's.
Two reviewer's suggested acceptance of the article, and one suggests not to accept the article.
In such situations, what the editor does?
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Normally, two referees review a paper. If the answers are conflicting a third referee or the editor decides in which way to go.
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In the medical discipline, the first and the last authors are the most contributed authors and the middle author is the least (in a curve). In contrast, in the Engineering discipline, contribution level goes from the who contributed the most to the least: first (most contribution), second, third, fourth..... last author (least contribution).
If an author is working in both medical and Engineering disciplines, how should he/she fix the author order in publications?
As the scientific community does not follow a uniform standard to express authorship, the readers have no clue about the contributions made by each co-author. Any thoughts?
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I prefer a procedure explained by Roger B. Winston in a 1985 article ("A Suggested Procedure for Determining Order of Authorship in Research Publications"). He suggested a scoring system to order authors. Ten tasks were considered (e.g. research design, drafting, literature search, and interpreting) each of them has a point. One task could be done by more than one person. In this case, point will be divided based on quantitative or qulititave criteria.
I has attached the table. Based on this system, almost a student always will be the first one.
Of course you should connect between your research type and the terms were used in this paper. For example, "instrument construction" when you are doing a CFD based research could be drawing the model, meshing, and setting the solution parameters.
This scoring method could be used in any discipline, I think.
Special thanks to Roger B. Winston, JR
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Some journal listed as good journal in SCImago Journal & Country Rank (http://www.scimagojr.com) with relatively good h-index for example Journal of Computer Science (from Science Publication) is identified as possible predatory Journal in Beall's list. Which one I should follow?
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I agree with Víctor Herrero-Solana
"Scimago just include all the active journals in Scopus database "
and in my opinion, Scopus is not a whitelist. Journal in Scopus can still be predatory, and predatory Journal in scopus can be delisted. So beware, if your article got accepted as it is without peer review!!!
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Does that imply different levels in the process of admission to JCR?
Emerging Sources Citation Index (Is the waiting list to be evaluated for JCR?): http://wokinfo.com/media/pdf/S024651_Flyer.pdf
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I think the journal master list contains journals classified under SCI, A & HCI and SSCI. They already have impact factor.
But those journals under ESCI have no impact factor as far as clarivate analytics is concerned. They may have impact factor in Scopus, scimago or snips.
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Does it mean they found it interesting at first?
I'm a new researcher. All inputs would be appreciated. Thank you very much.
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Is it normal to wait for a year after submitting to a journal only to have your article rejected? I I didn't experience anything as such. To me, this is a too long while.
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There are times when I think that articles are rejected or comments are too mean based on ethnicity and just being female.
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Good responses here from all. Talking specifically about culture (might we also be talking about region/geographical location here?) as I agree with Amin that, related to gender, there is a much better balance of female authors (maybe not always as leads - but as part of teams - and that might be another discussion) in todays academic climate.
So I come back to location/culture here. It is, as I see it, a 'double-edged sword'. If I see good quality research coming out of 'emerging' research cultures/locations then I feel it should be championed over the 'usual' Western-centric research of the same quality. I will make a point in my comments that it is useful to have a 'truely' international perspective of the issue - not just from a Westernised perspective. On the other hand, I would argue that 50% (or so) of 'cultural' manuscript submissions are not of a good enough quality. There are common pitfalls i.e. the national context is stressed too much over the international context (as is the data). That makes it hard to compare and, often, the cited national literature would be hard to access/interpret. Secondly, and more avoidable, is if their are multiple grammatical, language, typo errors throuhgout that distract the reviewer and make it more difficult to interpret findings.
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Depending on your experience in scientific publishing in the field of marketing, there are scientific areas that you recommend taking into consideration the conditions of copyright, cost and time and ranking.
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For the field of marketing, as it is the case with other areas, you need to select a journal that is interested in the topic of your research, of good impact factor and can reach researchers that share your interest. Now whether you chose an open access journal or not, I think this will depend on your budget and your research purpose. You need to discuss the selection of the journal among your co-authors unless they have authorised you for this step.
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Dear one & all Kindly give the details for the similarities and difference between Article, Communication, Notes, Reports, Full paper, Featured Article, Perspectives, Review, & Tutorial ... How to select the suit one? What are the criteria for this? Most us select on the basis of length our findings; and present and previous work summery. This discussion is seems to be very simple.... but it is always better if we get an better idea of each one... May be it will help for research beginners..
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Types of Articles
Original articles.  These are complete papers of experimental research in any branch of physiological sciences. The articles accepted for publication will be made upon the consideration that they describe significant and new findings and that adequate experimental details are given.
Reviews. These are articles that review current research work in the area that has major advancement or of interests by the readers. The papers may be invited and/or reviewed by referees and the authors are fully responsible of their articles. Contributors must follow the general instructions where applicable.
Short research communications. These are short reports of experimental research, which have considered that the results should be distributed quickly. The experimental data have currently displayed in any scientific meeting are also encouraged for publication. The maximum length allowance will be 1500 words.
Editorial comments. These can be invited articles commenting the research article published in the same issue of the journal or unsolicited commentaries on current topics of interest. The maximum length allowance will be 1500 words.
Case report. A maximum of 2 figures and 1 table are allowed with up to 10 references.
Letter to the editor. A letter should be no longer than 1000 words without figure or table and should discuss or comment on an article previously published in the JPBS. Up to 10 references are allowed.
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I have a short article, which I would like to submit to a broad ecological journal and I'd value a few suggestions.
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Marine biodiversity accept short notes in the section Oceanarium. Coral Reefs aslo accept short note in the section Reef Site. More than notes, those are short comment to a picture showing something interesting.
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Dear fellows,
I would like to know your opinion, as authors of academic papers, on your preferred peer-review type(s). Different journals implement different policies, from completely open to double-blind in various shades.
Please feel free to discuss your preferences in the comments!
Here is a starting list of existing and more creative options:
- Single-blind review. A classic. The name of the reviewers is not known to the authors, but the reviewers know the names of the authors. The reviewers may choose to disclose their identity during the peer review process or upon publication.
- Double-blind review. Increasingly popular. The name of the reviewers is not known to the authors, and the reviewers do not know the names of the authors. The identity of the reviewers might be disclosed upon publication.
- Open review. The name of the reviewers is known to the authors at any stage of the peer review, and it's published with the paper afterwards.
- Fully open (all-in). The name of the reviewers is known at any stage of the peer review and afterwards. In addition, the reviews are published online with the accepted paper.
- Open discussion. The manuscript is immediately published as a preprint. Reviewers (which may choose to remain anonymous or not) are appointed by an editor. Their reviews appear online as soon as they are submitted. The authors post their response online together with the revised manuscript, and so on until the editor makes a final decision.
- Very open discussion. Like the open discussion, but also members of the community can post (signed) online comments to the manuscript, and the authors may reply and account for them in the revised manuscript.
- Triple-blind. The review process is not public. The authors don't know the reviewers, the reviewers don't know the authors, and even the handling editor doesn't know the authors.
- Quadruple-blind (poker). The authors don't know the reviewers, the reviewers don't know the authors, the editor doesn't know the authors, the editor doesn't know the reviewers (which are chosen from a pool of eligible reviewers through keywords).
- Quintuple-blind. Like the quadruple blind, but the authors don't know the name of the handling editor.
- Sestuple-blind. Like the quadruple blind, but even the reviewers don't know the name of the handlind editor.
- Hardcore-blind. The authors submit their manuscript to the publisher, without the possibility of indicating the target journal. After anonymous peer review, the publisher suggests the suitable journal based on the reviewers scores. The authors may agree or appeal.
Other variants/suggestions are welcome!
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Double blind review is an illusion as the authors' identity is easy to unveil. Douple-open review is the only ethical, democratic and responsible system. Those who choose to be anonymous reviewers because of fear to say their opinion eponymously are not capable of being reviewers.
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I am going to have printed a scientific book with illustrations. They are small screenshots grabbed from historical books (e.g. 18th-century). The books are available freely online in digital libraries across the world. Can I use such illustrations (they are small-area images cropped from single pages) in my book? The book will be sold by a scientific publishing house. Any experience regarding legal aspects of this will be welcome. Shall I obtain any license or permission? This is neither using the entire source scanned by someone, nor a re-edition of such.
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HOWEVER, while the original work may be out of copyright, the reproduction can have a current copyright. Be sure to read the terms of service of the site where you find the online versions very carefully to determine whether their reproduction is free to use or has a current copyright.
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Some researchers acknowledge anonymous reviewers for reviewing their manuscripts. Do you think that reviewers know that they have been acknowledged? Do you think that reviewers care to read these acknowledgements? Any benefits to reviewers if they are acknowledged when their identities are not known/revealed?
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Yes, it is important to be grateful for anything someone has done for you. It is a show of maturity and you do not lose anything
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There are a number of different databases available to determine how many times an article has been cited by other articles.Does the number of citations reflect the quality or originality of the work?
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It's a very difficult question. Even the Noble committee sometimes consider high value scientific works for decades, before making a final decision. Eventually, world recognition of the scientific results, their value for a particular science, and importance in practice and general knowledge play the key role. Certainly, a number of citations is a very relative indicator of the value, recognition, and importance of the published results.
In some scientific fields people work several years to prepare a publication, whereas in other once people can prepare a half a dozen publications per year. Hence, comparing all scientists by a number of all citations, or repetitive number of citations per a certain amount of years (h-, h10-index) is an unfair, questionable, and unfortunately wide spread practice. One of the reasons is a simplicity, and easiness of making such indexes calculations in the Internet era. However, the value of that approach seriously defeats its purpose.
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I am interested in exploring whether criteria for academic success for professors are culture-sensitive. Is it the academic rank, publications, or teaching excellence?
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Staff must perform their duties in accordance with the ethical principles as set out in the Code of Conduct (PPL 1.50.1).The criteria are intended to achieve clarity about University expectations of academic staff performance, without inappropriate rigidity.Flexibility in assessing staff where factors such as discipline constraints or location (Faculty/ Institute/Centre/Campus) impact upon the record should apply. Flexibility in assessing staff also applies across discipline-specific practices relating to dissemination.
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Studies have shown that as many as 50% of submissions are declined directly by editors after being submitted. If the paper receives a “yay” instead of a “nay,” the journal sends it to reviewers. How do journals select competent reviewers?
Common sense says that more experience and a higher rank translate to better reviewing skills. However, a PLOS Medicine study in 2007 showed no such relationship. The authors examined 2,856 reviews by 308 reviewers for Annals of Emergency Medicine, a revered journal that for over 15 years has rated the quality of each review using a numerical scoring system. The results showed that experience, academic rank, and formal training in epidemiology or statistics did not significantly predict subsequent performance of higher-quality reviews. It also suggested that, in general, younger reviewers submitted stronger reviews.
So what? When presented the opportunity, any physician can and would produce a scrupulous review of a manuscript — right? Wrong.
Flashback to 1998, when Annals of Emergency Medicine cleverly put together a fictitious manuscript riddled with errors and distributed it to 203 reviewers for evaluation. The errors were divided into major and minor categories. The major errors included such blunders as faulty or plainly unscientific methods, as well as blatantly erroneous data analyses. Minor errors consisted of failure to observe or report negative effects on study participants, incorrect statistical analysis, and fabricated references — just to mention a few. According to the authors, the majority of peer reviewers failed to identify two-thirds of the major errors in the manuscript. Forty-one percent of reviewers indicated that the manuscript should be accepted for publication.
What about consistency? In 1982, two authors took twelve papers that had been published by prestigious psychology journals within the previous three years and resubmitted them to the respective journals. The names of the authors for the resubmitted papers, and the names of their affiliations, were all changed to fictitious ones. Three manuscripts were recognized as being duplicates. Of the nine remaining papers, eight were rejected for “methodological inconsistencies,” not for lack of originality. One paper was accepted again.
Last week, I received an email from a well-respected medical journal. The editor wanted my help reviewing a manuscript that was being considered for publication. Noticing the request was addressed to “Dr. Spencer,” I shot back a quick reply saying there’d been a mistake. I’m not a doctor; I’m a medical student.
Hours later, I got this response:
Thank you for your email. We would very much appreciate your review of this manuscript. Your degree information has been corrected.
The peer review process clearly has flaws. It’s no wonder so many publications are retracted every year, or that each issue of a journal includes several corrections of previously published articles. Without universal standards, manuscript reviews remain subjective, imperfect, and inconsistent at best. The time has come to re-examine the quality of this system.
Meanwhile, those who rely on medical journals for practice guidelines should be educated on the flawed nature of this system and should be encouraged to judge publications on their merit rather than the apparent prestige of a journal.
Now, if you’ll please excuse me, I have a manuscript to review.
Robert Spencer is a medical student.
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More worrisome is when reviewers delay and reject research they intend to plagiarize, or steal and publish under their name:
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Hi all,
I have found my experience with Elsevier to be increasingly frustrating over the years, especially with the copy-editing. Once a paper gets accepted (assuming it is in TeX format with perfect formatting), a month can easily pass by until the corrected proofs are actually available. The publisher seems to be careless and irresponsible about the typesetting and copy-editing (which is the only job they actually do in addition to selling our work!), e.g. in my recent Corrosion Science paper I had to submit a long list of comments when they simply messed up the paper layout completely and inserted incomprehensible symbols ("-->") everywhere in the text.
I am wondering what is your experience with other publishers, e.g. AIP, IOP, or Springer? Now I am deliberately trying to choose suitable journals that are not published by Elsevier for my next publication, and so far I've found one belonging to AIP and another to IOP.
Thanks
N.B.: There's almost a monopoly of the above-mentioned publisher in certain scientific fields, which is alarming to me!
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MDPI has fast process.
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Hey,
please, can anyone provide an explanation to me what is the scientific publisher in the worldwide and tell me how many they are and named them?
Based on what they are rated?
Also, what is the relation between the scientific publisher and the database (Scopus and ISI)?
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Before, in my country and several countries was considered the first author more important than the corresponding author. Recently the situation has changed.
I believe that first author is usually carried out most of the practical part of the research and must be the correspondence author too. Co-authors do part of the work.
What is the difference between first and corresponding author? Can PhD students be a corresponding author?
Dear all respected researchers; kindly let me know your opinion.
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Amir - the first author is usually the corresponding author. If a PhD student is submitting their own work then, as with all my PhD students, they are the 'lead' and first author in the article - and that should make them the corresponding author by default. I'm aware that it might be a different arrangement in different parts of the world but, at the end of the day, that is (to me) the fairest and most ethical arrangement. No matter how much support a PhD student receives from the supervision team - it is still their project and their data.
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What do you think the future of scientific publishing? Do you think that all journals will move to open access journals? or do you think open access journals will gradually disappear? What is the future of this area?
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A string of a dozen responses that bear on the future of scientific publishing, especially open access, is at https://www.researchgate.net/post/Do_you_think_all_journals_should_be_open_access_for_knowledge_sharing. My take was that:
"Open access has pros and cons. For sure, making articles (and other knowledge products) free for all does increase readership, which may be particularly important in low-income countries where researchers recurrently explain that lack of access to subscription-based journals is a problem. That said, someone must still cover the cost of publication: where funds are scarce, this may discourage authors from going open access. Other disadvantages may include lack of quality control and sustainability: on the one hand, open access models may incentivize journals to publish more articles; on the other, they may not adequately support the research publication infrastructure in the long term."
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In the era of open access publication and the emergence of a huge number of journals that barely follow publishing ethics (no peer review/pay and publish). It becomes necessary that all journals must be screened by an authority based on editorial/reviewer board/scientific content and other criteria.
I have noted some online journals publishing >150 papers quarterly.
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If grading of scientific journals is a issue then who will grade/what will be the criteria of good journals/ which journals are of high scientific value -many issues like these will come forward. So it is better to leave the issue and to allow it to go as usual.
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I understand today that scientific publishing, to contribute effectively to science, must follow specific strategies. What are the main tactics that should be followed?
(If you liked this question, please recommend it to extend the scope of this discussion.)
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All from here doing great job. Still other have a problem to read the texts in Russia, Chinese o