Science topic

Scientific Diving - Science topic

Explore the latest questions and answers in Scientific Diving, and find Scientific Diving experts.
Questions related to Scientific Diving
  • asked a question related to Scientific Diving
Question
4 answers
Acrylic plastic viewports/spheres are often used in submersibles. Jerry D. Stachiw in his book Acrylic plastic viewports presented a experimental spherical (non-conical) viewport design made out of a special type of ceramics that could go deeper (more than 10000m as far as I can remember). What is the present status of the research in this area of transparent materials for non-conical view-ports/spherical hulls ? (Note: question corrected after first answer)
Relevant answer
Answer
I have a picture of the window used in the "Five Deeps" boat. It is acrylic. Its the bottom image of the page. http://www.kempereng.com/archives/1187
  • asked a question related to Scientific Diving
Question
5 answers
The last developments of the ADS technology (civilian diving) are still within the 350-450 metres range (Exosuit, hardsuit etc.). It is fully known that necessity is the mother of invention, and ROVs are here to stay and for greater working depths they can manage it somehow. However, my question is: Suppose there would be the need for ADS to go deeper say, 1500 metres. Could current ADS technology (Not only rotary joint based movement) answer to this demand?
Relevant answer
Answer
I've reviewed the two MIT thesis documents. They are in line with my understanding of the current technology. A question that needs to be addressed is why risk (and spend money) on a person instead of ROVs. If the need is there, then the R&D costs can be weighed.
  • asked a question related to Scientific Diving
Question
12 answers
Recreational and scientific scuba diving are for me insatiable passions. However, it came to my mind that we are currently experiencing a shift in underwater data acquisition thanks to the development of AUV, ROV, surface drones and acoustic methods. This interest is also linked with a shift in my career going from extensive underwater sampling by scuba diving to remote sensing by acoustic methods and the awareness that came with it. So my (heartbreaking) opened question foreseeing the end of the scuba diving era within few decades.
What is your feeling about this?
Which fields see the fastest changes?
Which remote or automated techniques already exist or will emerge?
Relevant answer
Answer
I still think nothing can or will beat human observation in situ underwater. While I have no idea on the real end of SCUBA, or its evolution, I truly hope it never does end, and if anything, becomes more important and even safer.
  • asked a question related to Scientific Diving
Question
15 answers
I've been wondering since a few months ago what do you think is the most important virtue a scientific should have or develop to make impactant or good research? I supose there are a few critical features a scientific cannot rid off before, during and after they start making research for the very first time.
Thanks for answering.
Relevant answer
Answer
Scientific ethics
  • asked a question related to Scientific Diving
Question
10 answers
A lot of organisations do exist and have their own certifications but do you know a standard or recognition?
Relevant answer
Answer
Hello please note that CMAS ( World Underwater Federation) has programs which are recognized globally and in particular from   UNESCO,  non the less most of the federations belonging or affiliated local  governments, please inspect this website.http://www.cmas.org/science/standards   
Kind Regards,
Stavros
  • asked a question related to Scientific Diving
Question
14 answers
Recently, I collected qualitative samples of marine soft-bottom zoobenthic communities at 10-15 meters depth by skin diving. I used hand-operated corers of 8cm diameter. I wonder whether there is any publication/report/manual on sampling procedures by skin diving.
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Ferrucio
The following 2 book chapters are devoted to techniques in use for biological study by SCUBA diving: 
Hiscock, K. 1987. Chapter 9: Subtidal rock and shallow sediments using diving. p. 198-237 in: Baker J.M. & W.J. Wolff (eds). Biological surveys of estuaries and coasts. Estuarine and brackish-water sciences association handbook, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.
Munro, C. 2005. Chapter 4: Diving systems. p. 112-159 in: Eleftheriou, A. & A. McIntyre (eds) 2005. Methods for the study of marine benthos, 3rd ed. Blackwell Science Ltd, Oxford.
Also on this subject:
Fager, E.W., A.O. Flechsig, R.F. Ford, R.I. Clutter & R.J. Ghelardi 1966. Equipment for use in ecological studies using scuba. Limnol. & Oceanogr. 11 (4) 503-509.
Stoddart, D.R. & R.E. Johannes 1978. Coral reefs: research methods. Monographs on oceanographic methodology 5. Unesco, Paris.
In German, somewhat outdated but with a lot of references:
Riedl, R. 1967. Die Tauchmethode, ihre Aufgaben und Leistungen bei der Erforschung des Litorals; eine kritische Untersuchung. Helgol. Wiss. Meeresunters. 15 (1-4) 294-352.
  • asked a question related to Scientific Diving
Question
12 answers
I have little experience with divers competing in platform and springboard. I am aware of many core exercises that have limited specificity to joint movement in diving, however would like to include some new exercises that are perhaps more specific. I currently prescribe Swiss ball pikes and hanging leg raises (athlete holding onto chin up bar lifts feet towards hands), plus other general core exercises. Does anyone know of a wider range of movements that will target the core muscles in a way similar to the diving movements?
Relevant answer
Answer
Hello Daniel,
I have been directing the strength and conditioning of the USA Diving Olympic and National teams for about the past 10 years so I think I can add some information to what has already been said. It would take pages and pages to respond thoroughly, but I will give you some things to think on.
I organize 'trunk' training ('core' using your terminology) according to movement specificity for diving. The primary trunk movements in diving can be organized into 4 categories:
1). trunk moving on legs - as in sitting up type exercises
2). legs moving on trunk - as in hanging pike ups
3). trunk and legs flexion/extension - as in a 'v-up' exercise
4). long-axis twisting - as in 'log rolls' and variations
Then I use these categories to ensure that at every workout at least one exercise from each category is included, and then add more sets to weaker areas for specific athletes. In addition to movement specificity, force/velocity characteristics and general training principles need to be considered. For example, during some times of the annual plan divers will do standing weighted somersaults (wt vests - not ankle wts). Sometimes of the year the emphasis is on higher resistance trunk training (exercises are weighted and tempo is slower), and other times the same exercises might be used but with a focus on speed of execution and excellent form and control. For elite/Olympic divers I use a rule of thumb of about 400+ repetitions of 'trunk' exercises each day, every day of the training week (depending on the specific athlete, time of the year, which year of the quadrennium, etc). Having worked with a bazillion strength coaches over the years, this is one area where they generally lack a good 'eye' for specificity since most don't have personal experience with acrobatic type movements. If you follow the 4 categories from above, and come up with exercises that fit each category, you will already be way ahead of the game.
I hope you found this information useful. If you will be at the USAS National Convention in Anaheim next month, I will be presenting on S&C for junior divers in the coaches' sessions.
Best wishes,
Jeni McNeal, PhD
Eastern Washington University
USAD Lead Strength and Conditioning consult