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Hello to everyone,
We are waiting for your articles on aging and long-term care. The review process for submitted manuscripts has been planned not to exceed six weeks.
The Journal of Aging and Long-Term Care (JALTC) is being established as an open access, quarterly peer reviewed journal that accepts articles in English.
Published articles can be accessed on the following website..
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Although the JALTC has completed its first year in publication, it is currently indexed by thirteen internationally recognized indexes around the world.
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I once flew from SW China to Argentina – 5 flights each way – to attend an IPCC lead authors’ meeting aimed, ultimately, at avoiding dangerous climate change. Did I make the wrong decision? Flying is a significant and growing contributor to the carbon dioxide emissions that are the main cause of global climate change, and has additional impacts on climate through the contrails (the line-shaped clouds behind a high-flying aircraft), and on general air pollution from the nitrogen oxides, particulates, and other chemicals emitted. On the other hand, international conferences may help generate the science, policies, and actions needed to mitigate climate change and reduce pollution. Do the benefits outweigh the costs, both for individual scientists like me, and for each conference as a whole? If you fly to conferences, or organize conferences that other people fly to, how do you justify these actions? Do you sometimes skip a conference primarily because of the negative impact on the environment?
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Designing electronic meetings that are as dynamic and engaging as in-person meetings is a hard task. But as scientists, we investigate hard problems all the time! Can we approach this as a research problem? Test impacts of different electronic meeting styles by randomly giving some grad students funds to travel to a conference and some access to electronic meeting.
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Propose a discovery or hypothesis for the first time is important in science. Frequently, pioneering research is published in abstracts of scientific meetings (for example, the abstracts of the Society for Neuroscience). In these meetings, new, preliminary and / or controversial ideas are more welcome than in the journals and they are defended face to face...
Therefore, the publication of the title and the date of the abstract in the references of a paper is very important.
Is this a good reason to convince reviewers that they should accept abstracts in the references?
Why do some reviewers not accept this easily?
How many publications have really been withdrawn or rejected because of disagreements on this issue?
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Hi,
The mention of an abstract in the reference is important, mostly because not always a full research paper follows this abstract, and it is well known that abstracts are rarely cited, and if the abstract is not mentioned in any reference, its priority could be lost.
It is difficult to say how many papers were rejected on this issue , or why some reviewers do not accept this easily, maybe they are not aware what a rejection of this type of reference could cause.
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Few years ago, I volunteered an answer in this article: https://arxiv.org/abs/1510.08320
But the perception of importance is subjective and varies with time and topic. So, what is YOUR answer?
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This is a deep question. Here is a take: Can Africa wrought a frame for policy under the fourth industrial revolution? I think 4IR will provide a jolt for action by Africa. The nexus of McNamara (World Bank) is diminishing. Cf.
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I see that the call for papers deadline has passed, but it was only today that I received this notification. Is there still time to submit? (asked on 5-5-2017)
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You can alway try to send it
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I'm specifically looking for new data and/or ongoing studies regarding this issue. Also, for anyone interested in science policy / animal protection issues, please feel free to connect with me.
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Hello Shalin Gala.
Here are tree links that I found, maybe these are of some use:
These are not all 100% an answer to your question, but could maybe provide some further insight, information or contact information of researchers in the field.
Christoph
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There are many daunting issues faced by policy-makers in their bid to select between alternative policy options, which are meant to enhance social change. While on the one hand policy elites may be genuinely willling to bring about 'good' change, they could also be demonised by their own personal interest, 'politics as usual', and 'crisis situation' to formulate policies to their own advantage. They also, in some cases, do not trust researchers to tell them what they want to hear! Scientists, on the other hand, are bedeviled by their own shorcomings as well. These include what I refer to as the 'silo effect', excessive fixation on career advancement and personal gains, poor quality of research, inability to simplify research information, which users could relate with, etc. The questions of how to resolve these challenges, therefore, remain.
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Many thanks, Arthur! The 'we' means researchers and academics. Thanks once again.
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This workshop will examine how academics engage in pedagogy and the practice of teaching controversial issues, from gender and minority identity and inclusion to genetically modified foods, biofuels, synthetic meat, and nanotechnology. We will bring these and other contentious issues into the discussion to illustrate possible value incongruences within the classroom, in local communities, and among development practitioners, activists, policymakers, applied scholars, and scientists.
Examples of pedagogical questions this workshop aims to answer are as follows:
1. Available research suggests that academics are conscious to provide a balanced examination of controversial issues without necessarily disclosing their own preferred position. Is this the right pedagogical approach to teaching critical thinking and analytical skills? Does this practice limit the academic freedom to engage in public policy advocacy on controversial issues?
2. What pedagogical and curriculum development supports are available (or should be developed) for effectively engaging in controversial issues in the classroom and beyond?
By the end of this session, you will be able to:
· Discuss appropriate pedagogical approaches to engage in controversial issues in the classroom and beyond
· Identify resources and gaps in teaching support services to effectively engage in controversial issues
· Identify appropriate pedagogical approaches to handle controversial issues in the classroom and beyond
· Understand the current state of pedagogical and curriculum development supports available at various Canadian universities
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I have created an icebreaker exercise to get the group thinking, talking. that I have used before, and it works well. Takes about 10 minutes.
Ask the group to individually make a paper unmanned plane drone to hit a target (a controversial topic in itself). Give them policy instructions or potential designs if you want, but main instruction is 3 minutes, and they have to hit target on the wall. At 3min point, time up, they throw their plane creation and all will miss. (Link this to your meat/fuel context - not all inventions hit their target). Now give them a redesign but give them 2 minutes only. At 2 minute point, they throw, all will miss. (Link back to your context – controversial topic, oopps they all just created lots of collateral damage, but no social responsibility there). Now given them 1 minute to redesign – customer really needs to hit the target. Then 30 seconds. Then 10 seconds. Eventually, someone will break the rules, and they will scrunch up the paper into a ball and throw it at the target. It may hit. Others will then copy that design. Someone will eventually hit the target with the paper ball. Yay! The point you can make is about breaking the design rules, fitness for purpose, unexpected damage etc that are relevant to your topic. Hope this helps. Besides, this exercise is a lot of fun. Please cite my design if you use it!
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I appreciate your citing my work on timemscales, reference frames, and coordinate systems.  What application is your work intended to benefit?  Mine is astrodynamics and orbital mechanics.  There are many sources of imprecision in estimates of the future state of a satellite.  
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Dear Dr. Finkelman
The main scope of this project was the study on how accurate results regarding the position and velocity accuracy we obtain using the 4 main space techniques (VLBI,SLR,GNSS and DORIS). The aim of the global TRF is 1 mm and 0.1 mm/yr accuracy for the position and velocity estimations, respectively (GGOS-requirements). In this project, we used simulated observations to a part of each-technique network.
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I am looking for emerging environmental issues, not widely known about now, which could have substantial big impacts (positive or negative) on wildlife or nature. This is for an annual horizon scan. Please respond here, or directly to me (lynn.dicks@uea.ac.uk) with your ideas, in the next two weeks - deadline 19 June. If your issue is selected in the final published paper, you will be acknowledged by name, if you wish to be. 
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A few others:
- Fracking. The current campaigns may be vigorous, but the various criticisms have inconsistent support from science.
- Microplastics and pharmaceuticals. They are both passing down the food chain and killing some animals, but the extent of impact is only just emerging.
- Accountability of zoos. These institutions reach hundreds of millions of people with conservation messages each year, but only now are we understanding their success at inspiring the public and directing funds to the field.
- Social costs of conservation. People are not always benefiting from conservation, particularly in developing countries and yet without there support conservation will fail.
I could come up with more but for the sake of time will stop there. I have the key literature on most of these if interested.
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The deadline on the last update of the special issue entitled "Recent issues and future directions on effective multi-tier supply chain management for sustainability" was 15th July. However, the information about it is not found anymore on the link provided. I kindly ask if the submission to this special issue is still available and if there are any changes concerning the deadline and the description of the special issue? Thanks in advance
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I would recommend to resent the Call for Papers with the subject matter and instructions on how to submit the paper.
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Hi ,
I think that one of the reasons of why High Ranked Universities in computer science become more higher is the strong packages that were provided for research replications by them. This cause a tremendous of citations every week for their methods. Is that true?
Thank you very much 
Best wishes,
Osman
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I do agree with above comments and would add that ranking criteria may vary somehow in different regions of the world. During my work in South Korea, I noticed that ranking has become essential to best schools and indeed a matter of prestige.  
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My university has begun charging an arbitrary "maintenance fee" as a percent of unrestricted research accounts (e.g. reverse interest).
Are you aware of any other university that does this?
If so - do you have any recommendations on how faculty can save enough unrestricted funds for a large purchase (e.g.  a PhD student-year or research equipment) without having it potentially undercut by an arbitrary fee hike in the future?
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For any projects that we get fund from any agency we shall also get the overhead charges that we need to deposit on to the University acct, as far as I know that should be kept with the university side and they should own some interest and try to support the maintenance fee. Other than that a nominal charges are also collected for usage of equipment and that is also utilized for the maintenance. Other than that our university has a system of autonomy for each dept. and mostly the funds are handled by the individual project investigator and their head of the dept. The system is entirely different in our case. 
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Could you please indicate the deadline for the submission? Thanks!
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Great! Thanks a lot. Are there any additional instructions or separate submission platform for this issue?
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In 1999, at the World Conference on Science it was acknowledged that the social contract for science had been broken. That people do not consider that science breakthroughs or developments  will always mean good things for them.
National Science and Technology Systems have taken notice because this "contract breach" means that people "want more for their money". In order to protect national science budgets, people must be able to link easily science achievements to their well being and the solution of societal problems. Transdisciplinary research, translational medicine and postnormal science are some of the most known efforts to bridge the gap. And new forms of collaboration (citizen science, crowfunding, participatory research) that provide increased access to resources and knowledge have emerged.
But the problem is that the new forms of collaboration mean developing new skills and capacities- on both sides. So scientists must devote increasing portions of their time just to get funding and resources, at a time when policy changes may imply the "death" or downturn of big and small lines of research. And it takes time to learn how to engage (and train)  non scientists to collaborate with researchers (as in citizen science, crowfunding and participatory research), just when you may need it the most.
Society has developed ways to manage risk of losses, by distributing the risk among many. This form of risk management is called insurance and it helps people cover losses that they can´t afford on their own. 
 Is there a way that we scientists can collaborate with each other in order to prepare non scientists to collaborate with us to provide access to resources and funding in time of need (that, is to manage the risk of decreasing research budgets and positions)?
If there is a way, it probably involves social networks and sharing our resources (knowledge) with non scientists so that they decide to share theirs with us. 
Do you think that a Social Insurance for Scientists is possible? Why? What would it take to make it happen? Do you think it would be worth to invest in it valuable researchers´ time? Please share your views on this proposal. 
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Maria,
I can get what you are saying. The following literature may be of your interest.
L
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Alguien tendría información bibliográfica y linkografica acerca de las Universidades Medievales?
Se los agradecería mucho.
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Aquí tiene algunas referencias que puden serle útiles:
RASHDALL, H., The Universities of Europe in the Middle Ages (1895), ed. F. M Powicke y A. B. Emden (Oxford: Clarendon, 1936), 3 vols. [Res. G. Post, Speculum, XII (1937),
PEDERSEN, Olaf, The First Universities: Studium Generale and the Origin of University Education in Europe (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1997) [Res. John W. Baldwin, Medievalia et Humanistica, 28 (2002), 145-147].
POST, G., “Masters’ Salaries and Student-Fees in the Mediaeval Universities”, Speculum, VII (1932), 181-198.
LAWRANCE, Jeremy N. H., “The Universities in Spain at the End of the Middle Ages”, Atalaya, Paris, núm. 6 (1995), 21-40.
GIBERT, R., “Poderes Públicos y Universidades españolas. Edad Media y Renacimiento”, Miscelánea... A. Marín Ocete, I (1974), 349-360.
ACKERLIND, Sheila R., “Alfonso X of Castile and Diniz of Portugal: Patrons of Medieval Universities”, From Linguistics to Literature. Romance Studies Offered to Francis M. Rogers (Amsterdam: John Benjamins, 1981), 95-107.
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I want to know how many years I have to respect the 'white' constrains, i.e. Can I share the final paper when it was publisshed before 1997 (20 years ago)?
The same quation ... how long the journal can protect the difussion of a paper?
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Hola,
Creo que la diferencia es que la patente son los derechos que una sociedad le da a un inventor de explotar económicamente su invención. Cuando la sociedad le concede esos derechos le hace la restricción de máximo 20 años.
Pero el artículo es la cesión de los derechos del autor a la revista. A menos que esta decida liberarlos, no hay restricción. Es cierto, en las obras literarias a los 50 años de la muerte del autor, que tiene los derechos. Pero si la editorial no muere, y el autor no le dio un plazo máximo de cesión de derechos en el contrato, ¿si hay razón legal para que se acabe los derechos editoriales?
Saludos
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There are many policies regarding the national park and wildlife reserves. I want to know the literatures written on the implementation status of these related policies, rule and regulations.
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Dear Mr Shrestha
During the last three decades, Nepal has not just been an exemplary model of conventional wildlife conservation, but has also successfully established a model of participatory management of protected areas by introducing the concept of buffer
zones in the peripheral areas of parks. You can find some of the evidence through attached paper and for better understanding, you can pay a visit to ICIMOD which is located in Kathmandu. This organisation is a great knowledge hub and learning platform. Recently I was there in a youth forum and international conference and I feel much benefitted.
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I ask you if: are worth more the indicators of my jobs that have not even been examined by the national scientific commission: they are of significant scientific interest; those arguments and results are unique in the world, but the scientific journals that are political, found the excuse of lack of reviewers for not to publish them, and so they have no indicators; everything, so that no shouldn't having the comparison with my work that having to bury the outdated work them; thereby preventing me to teaching them.
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I was recently offered by the editorial team of Omniscriptum Publishing Group a free of charge publishing through Lambert Academic Publishing.
Briefly speaking, they invited me to publish my yet unpublished articles as an independent printed book which will be listed by major libraries and online bookstores.
I'm too poor in Italian so I can't judge your attached file but maybe you could try this!?
Cheers
Sophie
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Many people go to do phd in top universities in the world and publish A level conference and Journal papers. But once they finish PhDs and move back to their home countries they are not able to publish at A level anymore in 99% cases. Why is this?
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The environment plays vital role. Many underdeveloped countries lacks a research environment culture and no research incentives.
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i need to have the latest stats (figures) for the global pesticide use total and top ten countries for year 2015-16 with reference/s
any web link or paper will do
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Check out FAOSTAT, but they offer only data up to 2014. But be careful this is not high quality data at least for Argentina, the case I know best. If you find something about 2015 or 2016 please tell me.
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Currently I'm working on public participation on environment improvement especially improving water quality of river.
However, I realize that awareness is not enough to improve our environment quality and took generation to see the result.
We have lot of experts in research covered all kind of study areas but unable to deliver the message to public citizen.
So, here I'm looking for suggestion/opinion from all experts on :
1) What you would do to make public citizens aware about the importance of our environment?
2) What they can do to contribute? Considering various level of public participation (industries, community, educational institutions)
3) How you can deliver your study/research to the community? In what way?
Thank you.
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Hi Dhiya,
I think that citizen science can play an important role in what you are trying to achieve. The key - from my perspective - is to start with the citizens first. Do some research with them first. Find out what they know already, what their misconceptions are, and which methods and channels for communicating are most important to them. Ask them who they trust for environmental information. Then you can start to develop your communication plans, based on what you know about your target audience.
You can also ask them what sort of questions they have about local environmental issues, and help them to do the research to answer those questions. The GardenRoots project in Arizona, USA, is a  great example to look at.
That's just a couple of suggestions for starters. Hope it's of some help!
Kind regards,
Vicki
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(Specifically thinking of academic research in the health area)
Is it more important for funds and efforts to go to research that tackles the most necessary issues for the country, region and/or world or is it a higher priority to ensure researcher autonomy on the choice of their topic of investigation?
I think there are many pros and cons for each possibility, but I haven't been able to find out what the consensus is, if there is one or what are the arguments for or against any existing position.
Are there any sources on this topic you could recomend?
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That's an important distinction. Thank you for your contribution.
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This is a poll asking what is your preferred stats program for your data analyses. I've seen plenty of researchers using R, but is it because it's free?
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I have recently started to use R and have been learning how to use R via YouTube videos and blogs. It takes a bit of time to get used to the syntax, but is very feasible to learn and to be successful with in a short time. Although point and click programs are indeed faster for simpler analyses, R is more powerful and you can control more aspects of how things are modeled and analyzed. Thus, R is better for more complex questions and 'wonky' datasets. And websites like StackExchange have lots of forums where you can search for code or ask questions to fellow R users.  I still use JMP or SPSS for quick tabulations and normally distributed models, but as I am getting more used to R, I'm transitioning to just using R for everything. With respect to creating figures, the visual display options for your data seem just as customizable in R as in SigmaPlot, but SigmaPlot is expensive. The graphic displays in JMP are horrendous, and I can't speak to those that can be created using SPSS, as I have not made any in this program. Two final thoughts: 1) R has a community of diverse users.  As you collaborate with more people outside your focal discipline, it is important to use a program that everyone can access, and the combined data can be synthesized into a meaningful product. So, overall, R is the way to go. 2) The only word of caution and concern that I have with R is that there are so many packages, and I don't know they are vetted for accuracy and credibility. Granted, those that are cited in publications are likely highly credible and accurate, so just do your homework when choosing packages.
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Are training opportunities the main solution for the development of the field of neuroscience in poorer countries?
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Cuba may be a good to explore.
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In 1929 Albert Einstein visited Havana and wrote in the golden book of the Havana Geographical Society that the only truly cosmopolitan society is the society of researchers. We know excellent examples from the past of researchers sharing information, papers, and even manuscripts with colleagues from other countries and supporting programs for scientists from less advanced countries. We know about the great initiative by Abdus Salam about the creation of a Scientific Center for researchers from the third world countries.
Is that spirit alive today?
When I see that I am not allowed to read many important papers and when I can publish only in open access journals, I feel doubtful about Einstein's assertion.
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Jose,
Just reading these moving pieces.
Don't give up my brother.
"Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it's the only thing that ever has."  Margaret Meade 1930's
Silburn
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There is a renewed debate on how “real” the energy and resource crisis is in the world. Some say it is based on faulty science and politics and the reality looks different. It seems that we have enough renewable energy which helps use to handle our limited resources of raw materials when using intelligent concepts of reuse after lifetime of our products.
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In order to give you a correct answer, we have to define what you understand for the concept of energy crisis. If we are talking about of lack or energy source, the answer is no, we do not have an energy crisis, because we have enough energy sources to satisfy the current and future energy demand. However, if we talk about a specific type of energy source, the level of reserves and the impact on the environment, then we can say that there is an energy crisis in the case of oil and coal. The reason is the following: We have limited reserves of oil and coal and the impact on the environment due to the use of these energy sources for electricity generation is very high.
If we talk about the use of some types of energy sources as a baseload energy, then we can say that we have an energy crisis, because several renewable energy sources that we now use for electricity generation due to its limited impact on the environment, cannot be used yet as a baseload energy. If we want to reduce the negative impact on the environment due to the use of oil and coal as a baseload energy, then we have only hydropower and nuclear energy as the main energy sources that can be used as a baseload energy, being nuclear energy a very controversial type of energy source for the public opinion of several countries.
If we talk about the level of energy consumption, then we can say that we have an energy crisis, because some energy sources are very ineffective and millions of people do not have no access to electricity.
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The EC-funded project INSPIRATION – http://www.inspiration-h2020.eu – is to formulate an end-user driven Strategic Research Agenda (SRA) for land-use, soil management and spatial planning and the related, impacted compartments of the Soil-Sediment-Water (SSW) system in order to meet current and future societal challenges.
In a series of bottom-up stakeholder engagement activities across EU nations the project gathers Research and Innovation (R&I) needs related to the INSPIRATION scope (land and SSW-system use and management), including topics such as:  
  1. What are the strategic research topics? 
  2. What are experiences regarding connecting science to policy/practice?
  3. What are national and transnational funding schemes to implement such Research?  
To complement these activities, I would appreciate your view and contribution! What is your view on the research and innovation needs and opportunities? Do you have a vision on, and what is your insight in upcoming knowledge demands (short, middle and long-term)?  
Collecting input from you is crucial for the project in order to help us describing the state-of-the-art as input into the European research agenda.  
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Interesting project, question and approach to use research gate for this. 
I would argue for research which contributes for assessing the efficiency of land use from the point of view of sustainable development. Many policies (including those that explicity aim for SD goals) have implications for land use: protection of BioDiv, Bio fuels and use of bio based raw materials, renewable energies, organic food, etc. Is all this coherent? How can efficiency of use measured and inform decision making, while considering also non-monetary values (or alternatively improving the data base for monetarization). 
Best Klaus 
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It would be very useful to identify priority in R&D policy support when considering less developed economies, as southern regions of Italy are.
It is not serious to imagine that every sector may claim for support. It is not serious that support regards every area of research and innovation. Phrased differently, a selection of R&D support is needed. How can this selection be implemented? How can priorities be decided? Should this be done in accordance with the expected results or according to the past effectiveness? Furthermore, is a policy coordination required? If it is, at which level? National? Regional?
Comments welcome.
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Get rid of the mafias? Or .... something else.
How about transparent tenders in R&D, and established monitoring mechanisms to ensure that planned activities towards a research objective are in fact taking place (while recognizing that a fairly high share of R&D activities do not pan out).
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I mean a formal assessment of research output, as in the UK and other countries. If you know of papers that talk about this, that would be useful too. Thanks in advance.
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Hi Diego,
Some authors make assessment, for example with respect to funding of the private R&D sector. See: http://www.jstor.org/discover/10.2307/2098599?uid=3737592&uid=2&uid=4&sid=21104638720863
And  for all activities? Well over the last decade, ex post research assessment at the program level in the United States has seemed much less active than the equivalent activities in Europe, both west and east. This seeming lull was the result of a decline in program evaluation activity across the U.S. government in the 1980s, which slowed the rate of formal evaluations. Program review activities within agencies, however, were common, especially at such mission-oriented research supporting organizations as the Department of Energy and the Office of Naval Research. Review processes at these agencies relied primarily on expert assessment, sometimes at the project level, supplemented by user inputs. Quantitative performance measures were seldom used. That situation is about to change. In 1993, Congress passed the Government Performance and Results Act, which requires all agencies including those support research to set quantitative performance targets and report annually on their progress toward them. Agencies with clear technological goals are rapidly developing sets of indicators for this use, including peer assessments, bibliometric measures including patents, and customer satisfaction ratings. But fundamental research agencies do not find such measures satisfactory, and are just beginning to develop alternative ones.
See more for recent developments at: http://www.akademiai.com/content/jt5r523248835u24/
And this one a well:
The US National Research Council released A Data-Based Assessment of Research-Doctorate Programs on September 28, 2010. The report consists of a descriptive volume, and a comprehensive data table in Excel containing data on characteristics and ranges of rankings for over 5000 programs in 62 fields at 212 institutions. See: http://sites.nationalacademies.org/PGA/Resdoc/
Cheers,
Frank
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I observe that different political parties often use conflicting information/data to back up their position. Usually this data is information that would not stand up in a peer reviewed journal. Rarely do UK politicians refer to a scientific peer reviewed journal. Often the mainstream political party’s become the servants of public opinion and re-shape their policies to match the populist view.
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Gary: on the contrary, I am rather confident that politicians, policy makers and high level decision makers do NOT base many policies on research evidence. It is rather the wallet that talks, and their own agendas. This is my experience from Swedish health care. As a health services researcher, I also feel that we may be focusing too much on trying to affect clinician behaviour, while we need to increase research on organisational and policy makers' behaviour. And we need to be much better at disseminating and implementing research findings to policy makers and political decision makers, in digested formats. To their defence, they can maybe not be expected to read and interpret primary research but need it "served on a platter". The whole idea of systematic reviews would be particularily important in this context, since I think a lot of individual studies get unwarranted attention and are used for specific purposes, hidden agendas, etc. Basing decisions on systematic reviews would decrease this bias and would help make some sense in areas where data are conflicting.
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When should we say that a researcher or a team of scientists make a "mistake”, and when are they committing an ”infringement“? Who has the power to determine this difference? The scientific community of peers? The judges of the courts of justice? Or the community of citizens, on the basis of their usefulness?
I'd use the example of a recent [alleged] error, which resulted in severe punishments to some seismologists convicted for committing "errors" [or "infringements"?], providing a wrong scientific judgment about the earthquake probability — in L'Aquila area, (2009) — http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2009_L'Aquila_earthquake
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The issue of "scientific errors", and "infringement of rights" by scientists is very complex, and - on the other hand - clearly extends beyond the boundaries of the scientific community.
In my opinion, a researcher does not commit "infringement" so long as his actions are purely scientific and not intrusive in the public sphere. Such employee shall be verified only by their environment, taking into account the purely scientific aspects, which may affect its prestige in the environment.
Following this line of thought, "infringement of rights" may be ordered with respect to the scientist, who decides to presentation his opinion publicly, in the non-scientific community (eg. political, socio-economic). For example, in this type of situation may find themselves the experts appointed by different public or government bodies, or scientists-forensic experts.
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Impacts may be on scientific knowledge, societal outcomes, workforce outcomes, economic growth, etc.
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Dear Marianne,
This is an interesting and complex question. I think that first of all the impact is on the scientific knowledge. More you invest more you develop. So, the scientific impact should be with the gratest influence on the measuring methods. No doubt there are several following beneficiaries including also industry, workforce outcomes, social sphere and so on. But the impact on the economic growth comes after years and I think there is not uniform method to measure all aspects at ones.
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Print media has been virtually overtaken by instantaneous dissemination via internet. Advertisements are providing research-work with free access to scientific publications. And yet, many high impact journals sell access to individual users on hefty payment. What future holds in store for end-user?
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They will remain inaccessible, of course, which is not at all a thing to be applauded, but we definitely can't deny the role Internet and overall IT has played in dissemination of knowledge !
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This is the description of the round table at the upcoming ECPR general conference in Bordeaux, between 9:00 and 10:40 on Thursday 5 September, room P9:
"Academic journals are an important infrastructure for a scholarly discipline like political science. Professional editing and reviewing are instrumental to achieve high-quality products. Moreover, it has become common to scientometrists, research managers and policy makers to use journal output and article citation for their analysis and decision-making. One early, and particularly prominent variable in this game has been the "impact factor" (IF). With the "San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment", the scientific community recently attempted to critically counter the tendency to misuse the IF, as well as other metrics. In this round table, the usage of the IF among leading political science journals will be discussed, as well as its usage for decision-making processes in the social sciences. Are there alternative models to assess scientific quality in the social sciences?"
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Hi Thomas, Bordeaux sounds like a fantatsic location for any discussion. I do think that discussions of IF tend to generate more heat than light, however. This is because the arguments are well known and well rehearsed. The San Francisco Declaration website and Reed Elsevier's position statement and response to the San Francisco Declaration published on their website summarise they key positions. My thought was that as the ECPR haven't signed up to the San Francisco Declaration perhaps it might be more lively to put forward the proposition that they should!
My other thought is to discuss why academics cannot entertain more than one measure of quality. There seems to be a fixation with having numbers and only one at that. Why can't they entertain a plurality of metrics? Perhaps even some qualitative measure, take a more holistic view? Best Wishes, Matt
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Increasingly, the lines are blurred between academic publications in the 'peer-reviewed' literature, which attract comments and debate amongst scientists, policy-makers, and others, and comments and discussions which take place on blogs and in the serious twittersphere. If we want to improve the evidence base, generally, of decision-making, is it timely to look at the quality of evidence we bring to bear on social media sites for communicating science and entering into policy dialogue?
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You may find the work of Dr Gerald (Gerry) White useful (yes we are related :-). Here is a link to a recent presentation he gave in Rome http://www.slideshare.net/GreyLitStrategies/grey-literature-in-australian-education - the Tyndall Framework on Slide 17 may be useful for what you are looking for as it is grounded in Evidence Based Practice. Jessica (Jess) Tyndall is a Medical Librarian and manager of the Gus Fraenkel Medical Library in the School of Nursing & Midwifery at Flinders University in Adelaide Australia. I work at Flinders University in developing online learning resources but have no medical background. I am currently preparing a PhD proposal that will look at the transferability of Evidence Based Practice as it is used in nursing to teaching in tertiary education. I am particularly interested in the use of expert opinion as a qualitative source of evidence (as modeled by Joanna Briggs http://www.joannabriggs.edu.au). Hope this is helpful.