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Rock Music - Science topic

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To date, there is an extensive and quite evidence-based literature on the negative impact of rock music (primarily hard rock) on the natural biorhythms of the human heart, brain and other organs. it's easy to get a list of hundreds of papers on the subject by googling keywords like rock-music and heart arrhythmia or similar.
An analysis of these publications shows that the harm of hard rock to people's health, in any case, is no less than the harm of smoking. So isn't it time to extend to heavy rock the same bans that apply to smoking in public places?
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I confess that I emotionally overestimated the relevance of the sources I found. However, on more calm reflection, I can say the following. The question I raised still requires serious research. This is indicated at least by the fact that in most works the effect of music on cardiac activity is considered, mediated through emotions, and not direct. Moreover, some authors claim that they did not observe the enthusiasm (that is, assimilation) of the heart rate to the rhythms of music. However, according to my experience in physiology and physics, this lack of assimilation of rhythms is possible only under the condition of the absolute impossibility of the resonance of the rhythms of music, with all their overtones, and the rhythms of the heart. In fact, the rhythms of the drummer and bass in hard rock, transmitted through the subwoofer, have frequency components that resonate not only with the heart rhythm, but also with alpha, theta and other brain rhythms.
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I would really like to find out the impact of music with lyrics on language competency as an academic research, because I myself as an English instructor and TEFL MA student have always been impressed and inspired by music, specially rock music in both my language learning and language teaching processes.
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When I was 16, the Titanic movie had gone viral due to Celine Dion's song 'My heart will go on', so I tried to listen to the song using a walkman and writing down the lyrics that was not accessible to me back to that time via internet. Music helped me along the years to develop my listening discrimination skill and so is my pronunciation because if the sound or the tone is well perceived this allows an intelligible production as well. The choice of the musical track has to be appropriate including high volume and less noise, rock music is not always helpful with loud musical instruments, but I think if the students listen to what they like they will achieve better results.
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I need to analyse the music structure of a haevy metal song, is there any "protocol" to follow, for best and more objective analysis? I am a biologist and in my PhD course I want to study the impact of rock in cell metabolism.
Thanks for helping me.
Danielle - Brasil
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You could try a musical harmonic (and melodic) analysis If you think there is something harmonic affecting the cells, but given that such things as harmony have cultural origins I would find that surprising.
However, you may have success with a spectral analysis of the music being played. That is not particularly musical in the traditional sense of music theory (although it's used in electroacoustic music) but it is likely to give you some repeatable results with accurate data points. There are several tools available for spectral analysis, including Praat, Tapestrea, and others.