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Dear Colleagues,
I would like to invite pointers to references on these topic. If anybody would like collaborate on a panel for the Modern Language Association or to write an essay, please comment below.
OUTLINE OF POINTS
DISCUSSION TITLE: The Rhetoric of Naming Urban Spaces
Field of Socio-Onomastics (does this field cover the topic here?)
-----Journal of Onomastics
Architectural journals dealing with onomastics
Protocols for naming in publicly-funded Research Institutions
Shift in naming
Ethos and Power of Naming
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Buildings are becoming tombstones for the wealthy who are putting their names on them. Ozymandias redux.
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Hello everyone.
I'm trying to select the optimal approach to my research study and I'm having some doubts about solely using semiotics. My plan is to carry out a semiotic analysis on a small selection of visual texts (video ads), however I intend to not only analyse the mise-en-scène, sound, and camerawork, but also examine the text that appears on screen and what the voiceover says throughout the length of the commercials.
Thus, my question would be if I look at let's call them verbal aspects, would that mean I will also have to adopt discourse analysis or rhetorical analysis as a research method along semiotics? I'm asking this because I feel like a semiotic analysis would only help me to uncover the visual meaning and if I look at 'written text' I should employ a different approach. But on the other hand, I'm not trying to go in depth with the analysis. I would say that much of what I would do would involve an interpretation, similar to analysing a metaphor.
Thank you in advance for your answers. Any help is appreciated.
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Hello Adelina, I suggest social semiotics first, and if you are looking for ideologies, you can add a critical discourse analysis approach. And lexicometric approches like Quantitative Discourse Analysis should be a plus to highlight representations, stereotypes and ideologies.
Good luck
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Dear Colleagues,
I put up this question at RG in order to find out what is being studied about the effects on people of social media memes as they attempt to find reliable information regarding social media memes.
In my original data set about the addictive power of memes to shape memory storage and alter personality, I was mainly looking at political memes.
It may be also important to study the effects of memes upon people's ability to find verifiable information. So please post any studies that you are aware of so that we can compile these in one place. I hope this inspires some study because I already know the power of memes from my past work on rhetoric, communication theory, and meme addictive behavior.
Here are an initial couple of links to studies which I have not read as yet, but which may be of interest. Check the bibliographies or Works Citeds, as well.
Social Media Reigned by Information or Misinformation About COVID-19: A Phenomenological Study
Social Sciences & Humanities Open Online journal:
MIT Psychologists study:
Fighting COVID-19 misinformation on social media: Experimental evidence for a scalable accuracy nudge intervention
Peer-edited Polish Journal
SOMEBODY TO BLAME: ON THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE OTHER IN THE CONTEXT OF THE COVID-19 OUTBREAK
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Dear Colleagues,
This week on Public Broadcasting in the US, there was a documentary about InfoWars, one of the persistent purveyors of disinformation in the media. It is well to learn how this rhetoric works. First--going back to Aristotle--you assign a good ETHOS to a speaker, then you will follow any path in this person's arguments.
To take a "base audience" farther into believing more and worse sketchy logic, tie your outrageous claim to some other "outrage" the audience already believes. "It's just like the time that...happened...and did the mainstream media tell the truth then?"
A good example was that the InfoWars host claimed on many shows that the Sandy Hook massacre of school children was "fake" news. He even had a court battle with one of the grieving parents.
These same outrageous techniques of misinformation and lying are being applied daily to the problem of the corona virus. Memes are primary vectors of this spread of misinformation. They have no traceable source and are generated by data mining concerns tasked with "meme flooding' a huge audience. This audience, once addicted to sharing memes, will become more and more trapped in a misinformation bubble reinforced daily.
See this documentary if you have time.
LINK:
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And also, can anyone point me to a researcher who specializes in Rhetorical Discourse Analysis?
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التحليل البلاغي قد يكون لخطاب او نص او اي قطعة ادبية معينة يراد تفكيك مكوناتها لإعادة تشكيلها وفق المعاني الجديدة المستخلصة من عملية التحليل.
أما تحليل الخطاب البلاغي فهومحدد بخطاب بلاغي يراد تحليله
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What distinguishes fine art from narrative art? Is this distinction (Bourdieu) important to maintain? For whom? Why? All of these issues in Art History are heating up due to recent shows of van Gogh's painting that cite letters to his mother and sister (primarily) in which he explains why he painted Bedroom in the Yellow House at Arles as one prominent example. van Gogh states the painting was inspired by his reading of George Eliot's Felix Holt the Radical and was vG's attempt to recreate these spartan surroundings of the novel's protagonist Felix Holt, yet to do so in bright colors.
Why have traveling shows often omitted van Gogh's Le Borinage paintings, esp. shows coming to the US? And another mystery, why is the work of Vincent van Gogh with the miners sometimes referred to as an unhappy early period that van Gogh more happily grew out of when he learned to paint better. What subjectivity holds these views and why are they the foregrounded view, at least in English-language studies of van Gogh at this time.
Will rhetorical analysis added to the standard formal approaches to painting aid in gaining a more parallax view of this painter and of art history in general?
Your comments are most welcome.
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D.E. Morant Sometimes artists' intentions are significant, sometimes not. But as you suggest, de-narrativized abstraction has it own narratives; however, they are not the Rorschach-type narratives you suggest but rather the theoretical narratives described by Tom Wolf in The Painted Word.
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As I am interested in any (social scientist's) research on missionaries I would like to gain insights in a "rhetorical analysis" about acculturation of missionaries. Thanks.
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Manuel López-Muñoz
makes an important point. You need to background the work by understanding the training that priests received in rhetoric and, indeed, to compare missionary texts directed at other cultures with the rhetoric of sermons directed at Europeans. This is not my area, but in musicology it's important to understand what the performer or composer would have been trained to do and been expected to do by the audience to understand the significance of what they actually did.
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Dear Colleagues,
I am putting together a collection of essays on Literature and Class for the publisher Routledge.
Some of you may look at this question with different eyes than mine.
So please tell me about any experiences you have writing about literature through the lens of social class.
Have you done such analysis?
What theory did you find most helpful?
How do you define social class when it comes to writing about it in the arts?
Thanks for any and all ideas and comments.
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In an academic sense, social class is a reality directly linked to academic attainment, heritage, financial status and social positions. Hence an individual's knowledge of the literary and relevant theories and concepts naturally will be applied in making an analysis. However, these variables I mentioned, in many ways contribute to an individual's social construction of reality, inclination and attributions. Beyond and within academic stipulations of analysis of texts, individuals view texts based on the aforementioned persuasions and worldviews.
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Dear Colleagues at RG,
As a college English instructor who has taught everything from literature to scientific writing, I was taught ways to read essays in order to grade them that were far from my own field.
Scientists often complain that in this time of increasing specialization they can no longer understand research reports from domains outside their own.
Do some colleagues have methods to share that allow use to understand essays or technical reports outside our own fields?
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Many thanks, Agnieszka Will geb. Gronek !
I hope grad students read this who are assigned large stacks of research essays outside their own areas.
Here are the three key parts in outline form (from my Ph.D. professor):
METHODS (note number of subjects in experiment and who is funding if noted in this or INTRO.) Who funded the study is most important when cnsidering possible biased findings or not.
DISCUSSION OF DATA AND EXPERIMENT (skim this unless needed for evaluating the text. May have difficult material such as advanced equations ans innumerbale names of chemical reactions, etc.)
CONCLUSION
The Intro, methods, and conclusion can re written in understandable langauge. If more is needed, get help from a person of that speciality.
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In the final stage of my PhD dissertation, I am stuck about how to theorize from my narrative data such that my theorizing is 'not functionalist' in nature but 'something new or novel' - an advice that most supervisors would want their PhD students to heed.
For example, in my study about the rhetorical practices of two foreign teachers in my university, how I read/analysed Teacher A is this:
Her rhetorical practices in the classroom are targeted at two domains: academic (accomplishment of personal goals, e.g., finishing a university degree) and industry (accomplishing life, e.g., entering the workforce as a knowledgeable and competent employee).
Any idea about theorizing from this interpretation? Appreciate any thoughts.
Thank you.
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Thanks for your thoughts, Naeem. Since this is a qualitative study, I started with no hypothesis in mind. My communication pursuit is to find out if intercultural communication is a rhetorical act that accomplishes teaching and learning. To do so is to analyse the 'rhetorical practices' of teachers in an intercultural classroom context. I was advised to theorise (higher form of abstraction) from the narrative data. I did so but it seems that the way I theorised was 'functionalist' in nature, and my adviser doesn't approve of it. Yes, you're right, textual coding is both frustrating but fruitful once you see the unrepresented. I still have to figure out that 'unrepresented'. Cheers - Nimrod
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Is the Indian-born cultural theorist Gayatri Spivak's "subaltern" theory a valid approach to the US Rust Belt dominant narrative?
This question grows from the study of symbolic conversion theory and the work of Gayatri Spivak on inequality and voice. especially her landmark essay "Can the Subaltern speak?"
Ernest Bormann called words and phrases applied to people, events, and places not present "fantasy themes." These themes tend to cluster into positive groups around one's own region or group and negative clusters around "the other."
When a group of people or a region is named with what Bormann would describe as negative "fantasy themes" by outside media, are they colonized by economic and media to the extent that they have been effectively silenced? The very fact that the US Rust Belt region and its inhabitants have no voice in the US media then be cited as evidence that they are incapable of articulating a narrative for themselves and may be described with external narratives with no necessity of dialogue.
So is this rhetorical situation the beginning of a true caste system?
The dirty jobs are not only held in disdain by traditional elites but also progressive ecology-minded media. Thus, the dominant narrative follows that omission is acceptable and that there is no need to hear from this region, the rhetorical construct called The Rust Belt.
Spivak usually is cited for Western colonial issues but can this sort of silence be analyzed rhetorically by her methods?
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Thank you, Colleague Altmann.
I had an idea that also embodies this separation over "nature" and "the environment" as signs of privilege. There is a luxury aspect to the environmental movement that Thorstein Veblen probably would have recognized as some kind of conspicuous consumption in terms of virtuous selectivity--organic foods, living among forest and sea animals, etc.
None of these are possible in the more industrial zones. And that causes a rupture of the self. The person is supposed to leave the industrial zones because employment is so limited, but also to shed a sense of self from there, molded by that setting. I wrote in a question about using Veblen for literary analysis. As important illustration is the huge secret that Gatsby is concealing: his father lives in The Valley of Ashes, a dumpy town where solid waste is burned nearby. So we could look through many novels via the lens of management of solid waste, just as some scholars have been re-reading novels as to type and rates of fuel consumption.
Rhetorical analysis of novels regarding solid waste management can give a look at how the physical "discussion" is framed in terms of the rhetoric of place and things. I don't know if I'll have time to do a major study of this issue, but this method will reveal much about the growing separation of the classes. Although all classes generate solid waste, almost all waste that isn't placed on water stays in the industrial or rural poverty areas.
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Hi everyone, I'm writing a dissertation about portrayal of women in newspaper before independence (1926-1927) using discourse analysis. I'm using Discursive Psychology as a framework but had been rejected by panel because it's for spoken discourse. One of the panel suggest to use positive discourse. I try to find out about it but not so much contribute to my research. Any suggestions of journal & extra reading would be appreciated! Thank you!
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Dear Nursyakirah,
I suggest you to read into Discourse & Society Journal. Your topic is usually dealt with there. Cristical Discourse Analysis, which focuses on Power and Ideology could be a good theoretical/methodological approach for your topic.
Jorge E. Benavides B.
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Often we do that job quite well enough on ourselves. But also we still play tapes in our minds going all the way back to grade school. There are various "overcoming writing anxiety" exercises out there.
Do you have an answer?
Who has told you you can't write?
Do you overcome this?
How?
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I had experienced one of my article was submitted in a most reputed journal and i took it in a positive way and i published in the same journal.
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The current Metropolitan Opera production (Feb. 2017) is Antonin Dvorak's Rusalka.  This opera contains what may be viewed as current events references. 
The Grove Dictionary of Music entry on rhetoric and music states that after the Baroque period, the rhetorical underpinnings of music were no longer studied.  But in the 20th C., such highlighted rhetoric in art music is causing a revival of interest.
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What still remains to be fully explained is how these critical interrelationships often controlled the craft of composition. These developments are unclear partly because modern musicians and scholars are untrained in the rhetorical disciplines, which since the beginning of the 19th century have largely disappeared from most educational and philosophical system. It was only in the early 20th century that music historians rediscovered the importance of rhetoric as the basis of aesthetic and theoretical concepts in earlier music. An entire discipline that had once been the common property of every educated man has had to be rediscovered and reconstructed during the intervening decades, and only now is it beginning to be understood how much Western art music has depended on rhetorical concepts. ("Rhetoric and Music." Grove Dictionary of Music. Blake Wilson et al.)
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Does anyone know of research that specifically analyzes the rhetorical aspects of modern era opera since Wagner to now?
Given that directors have much leeway in creating subtexts in classic and contemporary works, this is a topic that is open for more study.
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Dear Hasitha,
Thanks very much.  I will look at them.
G
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Is anyone analyzing film rhetorically?  I refer both to the rhetorical structures in a film and the rhetorical approches that film critics adopt.
There are class, race, and gender structures in films that viewer respond to and reject.  Critics may consciously or unconsciously use terms that bias perception of a film due to "normalized" terms used in describing a film. "Normalized" can mean that a film is being attacked by a film critic while the terms seem innocuous enough.  For instance, "sentimental" is often used for certain mass appeal films and films that depict the lower social strata.  In Europe the term "kitsch" often refers to films popular with the poorer classes of society.  In the US the term "sentimental" serves the same function.
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many film scholars are still analyzing ideology, "race", class and gender are notions in a lot of analysis  by feminist, post-colonialist or marxist scholars. I guess one will not find that much literature under the term "rhetoric", but films are part of greater discourse and play a significant role in constructing and distributing ideological, stereotyped or subversive approaches to these issues. (as for sentiment: there is a whole field of studie in melodrama and sentiment. just have a look at Lea Jacobs The Decline of Sentimemt. American Film in the 1920s f.e.
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I am thinking of a possible study of H. G. Wells' Morlock characters in his 1895 novella The Time Machine.  The Morlocks and Eloi were two separate species of human descendants.  The Eloi were the scion of the UK landed gentry and the Morlocks the offsrping of factory workers and household domestics.
I am theorizing that, since the name Morlock actually exists that perhaps Wells meant someone in particular.  It could be analogous to Dante's sening his enemies to the lowest rung of Hell in The Divine Comedy.
A second line of inquiry is whether anyone is studying J. R. R. Tolkien's Mordor in Lord of the Rings, which seems obviously derivative of Morlocks.  More locks to more doors.
I welcome your comments.
Respectfully,
Gloria McMillan
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''Mordor actually has two meanings: The Black Land or The Dark Land in Tolkien's contrived language Sindarin, and The Land of Shadow in Quenya. The root mor ("dark", "black") also appears in Moria. Dor ("land") also appears in Gondor ("stone-land") and Doriath ("fenced land"). The Quenya word for Shadow is "mordo". It is pronounced with a Russian-sounding r. The gate of Mordor, Morannon, means The Black Gate. It was named this by the elves in the Second Age.
A proposed etymology out of the context of Middle-earth is Old English morthor, which means "mortal sin" or "murder". (The latter are descended from the former.) It is not uncommon for names in Tolkien's fiction to have relevant meanings in several languages, both those invented by Tolkien, and "real" ones, but this of course happens with any two languages. Mordor is also a name cited in some Nordic mythologies referring to a land where its citizens practice evil without knowing it, imposed on themselves by the society long created for that purpose. This quite fits with Tolkien's Mordor.''
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There are a number of English resources available (AIFdb, Araucaria, NoDE, UKP corpora...), but I am not aware of freely available corpora for the German language.
Do such resources exist and where may I find them?
Thanks a lot.
Cheers,
Martin
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Thanks a lot, Jun Wen.
The corpora in this collection seem to have mainly morphosyntactic annotations and classification as per a thematic taxonomy. I didn't see a corpus with annotations specific to argumentation mining.
Could you perhaps say which corpus you mean?
Kind regards,
Martin
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The earlier mode of Greek and Roman civilization of Rhetoric analysis.
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Indeed, as Luisa Isabel tells, it is stasis. Four issues are distinguished. Formulated somewhat losely: did the claimed act indeed happen? Is the act correctly qualified? Can the agent indeed be held responsible? And is the one giving these judgments qualified to give them? In criminal law these issues are formally codified. If you want to find an entrance to read more, go to my favorite website about (classical) rhetoric: sival rhetoricae: http://rhetoric.byu.edu/
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Anadiplosis, according to Dupriez (1991), refers to the repetition of a word or words in successive clauses in such a way that the second clause starts with the same word which marks the end of the previous clause. Some language
use a variant or a modification of this literary device: the “reduced” anadiplosis. The infrequent use of this device either in English or its variant in other languages makes it less knowable. That is why most of translators failed to render it stylistically and semantically in their translations.
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In the novel Don Quixote, Pt. I, to pass the time, Sancho Panza tells his master a story using so much anadiplosis that Don Quixote becomes annoyed. Says Sancho in ch. 20, "In a town of Extremadura there was a goatherd...; which goatherd was Lope Ruiz by name: and this Lope Ruiz was in love with a shepherdess named Torralba: which shepherdess named Torralba was the daughter of a rich cattleman; and this rich cattleman..."  Don Quixote interrupts: "If you tell your story this way, Sancho... by repeating twice what you are saying, you will not finish in two days..." To this Sancho responds, "The same way I am telling it...all stories are told in my land, and I don't know how to tell it otherwise, nor it is good for your grace to ask me to start new customs." 
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In teaching Balaghah (arabic rhetorical studies).
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It is better to design of your own instrument. Try one from Woods concepts.
Woods, P. (Ed.). (2011). Teacher strategies: Explorations in the sociology of the school (Vol. 208). Routledge.