Science method

Qualitative Research - Science method

Qualitative Research are research that derives data from observation, interviews, or verbal interactions and focuses on the meanings and interpretations of the participants (From Holloway and Wheeler, "Ethical issues in qualitative nursing research," Nursing Ethics, 1995 Sep; 2(3): 223-232).
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Does sample size matter in qualitative research design? If yes/no, why/ why not? Please, provide your valuable thoughts.
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Yes and no. It depends on the information you want to get and the approach you use. In some cases, N=1 is enough and sometimes, N=100 is not enough. For in-depth interviews, 10-20 would be enough for most studies. My experience is that if you could not get any new and useful information from samples, it is probably the time to stop!
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Hello everyone, I‘m a student from Arizona State University now learning about qualitative research methods.
I recently read an article from AnnRené Joseph about the future of arts education in the setting of Covid-19 pandemic. In this research the author used a qualitative survey with open questions to gather data from the participants. Is there other qualitative methods other than interview and surveys that we can consider in order to seek for the answer for this topic?
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Focus group discussions and Delphi-Technique are the choices. However, these two techniques are based on interviews and required respondents. Another technique is the Documentary method of research, not required for the respondents.
Regards,
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Can a Sony ICD-UX570 dictaphone be used in nvivo for transcription purposes
Many thanks
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I support Dr David L Morgan that you only select to save video files that match Nvivo transcription services. It will automate transferring your recording into transcripts.
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I am working on qualitative research using a critical discourse analysis approach and I don't know the best theory I can use in my research. I am working on an article taken from the daily mail as a case study
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The wisest thing is to test several of them on your corpus, with patience !!
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One of the interviewees mentioned a name in the middle of the conversation. We want to keep the quote but redact the name. Can you suggest a standard practice for handling that? for example, the s quote is like,
"I really think that it was unnecessary for them to get offended by the patient's behaviour. They all are graduates of ABC college who tend to have a different attitude toward patients compared to the rest of the staff. "
We want to redact the name ABC from the quote to protect the college's identity but keep the quote. Could you advise how I can redact and indicate that it was redacted and what the redacted content refers to?
Thank you
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You could simply react the name as you did above, e.g. "ABC College" or "XXX College", etc.
If the respondents mention their own name, then we generally use R1, R2, R3, etc.
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In an Exploratory Sequential Mixed Method Research, I have done qualitative research in stage 1.
I found some new construct, and discover linkage between the new found construct and the constructs under study. After that, based on the findings of qualitative research, I proposed a conceptual framework and I was able to offer some hypothesis.
After that I empirically verified few hypothesis by conducting a Quantitative research.
Now the thesis reviewer criticized that in Literature Review, I should discuss the conceptual framework and the relationships (proposed in the hypothesis). But I found that relationships after I concluded my qualitative research. How should I supposed to know them when I was writing the Literature review.
Please, someone guide me, where I am wrong.
Someone, please guide me, how to write literature review for Mixed method Research.
Regards,
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It is not unusual to discover links to the existing literature, once you have the results from an exploratory qualitative study. Unfortunately, there is no standard solution to how you should report this in either the qualitative or mixed methods fields.
I recommend to my students that when this occurs, they present it in the Discussion section. If your thesis supervisor is not willing to accept that as a compromise, then you will probably have to accept the power differential and do what you are being told to do -- for your thesis. Then, you will be free to do as you wish when you publish your research.
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I interviewed 45 students, analyzed their journals and essays. My study's real aim is to get students' opinions. However, I applied t test for one of the data from essays. I do not think this will change my research from qualitative to mixed design. I need a reference for this. Please advise. Thanks.
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Hi, I am writing a project on the impact of COVID 19 on consumer buying behaviour and initially i was going to use a qualitative research method coupled with a secondary data collection but i noticed from most of the available research online, scholars have used various methods such as quantitative, mixed method etc to approach their objectives. What i would like to know pls is what is the best research method to approach my topic, should i use a systematic literature review and do i necessarily need a peer group to carry on with this, if so what are the best alternative option available. A reply will be much appreciated as i have a limited time to carry out this research
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Here, the answer is mainly focused on the literature search what is commonly called literature review that can be used by the most of the researchers in the world.
Both Qualitative or Qualitative research need the proper literature review for the particular research undertaken by the researchers.
The peer review is the process of checking or selecting the most appropriate literatures are mainly pertaining to the research titles.
The researchers have never considered the peer review process while doing research. It is the duty of the publication office to monitor those mistakes before publication.
AA
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I'm working on my MA thesis which is qualitative research using the interview method. Since I'm going to analyze the data using causal mapping, I wondered if I'd need a theoretical framework.
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The hypotheses are more necessary for a quantitative rather than qualitative study. Just my two cents.
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Hello,
I am doing a qualitative research with semi structured interviews, N=10 and the method of analysis is thematic analysis. However, I see that my themes do not answer or correspond to the research questions. The approach that I followed in analysis is inductive.
Thank you.
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Just my two cents, research hypotheses may not be necessary for a qualitative study. If the literature review is relevant to the interview questions, the content analysis or thematic analysis should give the answer to the research question. Hope you are doing well and stay safe.
All the best,
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I am a qualitative research newbie. This study is for my doctoral dissertation. I am interviewing music professors about their experiences working with student musicians who have an occupational injury. I wish to understand and discuss the themes that emerge most frequently from the interviews of my 15 subjects. Does analysis of my interview data using the code frequency method mean that my research is both qualitative and quantitative?
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Please refer to any published study where it is shared that frequency calculation in a qualitative study does not qualify it as a mixed-method study.
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I have been searching for the reliability and validity of a qualitative research, I haven't found any specific or clear description of the method for conducting it. I am also not sure if there is any statistical tests to be performed in this regard. Please give me a clear answer for my question.
I appreciate your answer.
Nazdar
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Some practical ways to enhance the trusthworthiness of qualitative research findings, based on qualitative scholars viewpoints, include: (a) prolonged stay in the field for data collection and having good relationship with participants, for field-based studies, (b) creating the opportunity for research participants to check their transcripts after interviews (member checking), (c) using two or more data collection methods (data source triangulation), (d) ensuring external checks of your work through peer reviews, e.g., during seminars, academic supervisory team mertings, (d) iterative data collection and analysis, (e) providing detailed description of research processes and changes throughout the research, (f) providing justifications for actions taken by the researcher, among others.
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I have been trying to understand research paradigms (neo- positivism, interpretivism/social construction and critical realism) for a few days now, and I've been reading a number of resources, primarily Blaikie and priest's Social research: Paradigms in action (2017), and Tracy's Qualitative research method. In Blaikie and priest, they say that paradigms are used at the level of explanation, but when I read Tracy's work, I get the impression that paradigms come into play at the level of description as well. These various descriptions creates more confusion for me. At what level of research do these paradigms come into play?
In addition to this, I have been reading many articles that does no seem to follow the descriptions of the paradigms strictly. Are there some researches that don't usually follow?
In light of these two, do you think that survey research follows these paradigms?
Looking forward to reading your views and thought.
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Nice question and answers. All the best
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How to maintain data quality in qualitative research? How to ensure quality in qualitative data collection as well as data analysis?
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My pleasure, professor Dr Devaraj Acharya .
Kind Regards,
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We have total population of 100. I need clarity on use of sampling technique. We wanted to use random sample without replacement by using random no table in a qualitative research. Please guide can we employ or not.
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Dear Mr.Farooq,
First of all 100 is too small of a number to be called as population. As per the objective you need to calculate the desired sample size and that number can be achieved randomly. Secondly there is a flaw in your question as both things you are trying to ask are same.
There are so many on line random number or sample generating software are available and you can choose one
Thanking you
Ravi
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I understand that quantitative and qualitative research may have certain criteria for reliability and validity checks. However, to think of same with SLR appears a bit new to me at the moment. Could this be the inclusion and exclusion criteria used for selection or something else?
I will appreciate your constructive views, guides, or any useful resources you may offer. Thanks in advance!
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This link maybe useful
"JBI’s critical appraisal tools assist in assessing the trustworthiness, relevance and results of published papers"
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I am interested in relationships between photovoice or auto-photography as research methods and social-spatial difference, either as captured in the photographs, or as embodied or lived by the participants. I would particularly appreciate suggestions of literature from the past 10 years.
Recommendations of reading on participant-photography and social-spatial difference would also be relevant in this case.
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I am also interested in the photovoice method. Is that the same as auto-photography?
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What are the main differences between case study and action research in qualitative research?
I want to learn your opinion on this subject.
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Action research is a type of research study that is initiated to solve an immediate problem. It may involve a variety of analytical, investigative, and evaluative research methods designed to diagnose and solve problems. It has been defined as “a disciplined process of inquiry conducted by and for those taking the action. The primary reason for engaging in action research is to assist the “actor” in improving and/or refining his or her actions” (Sagor, 2000). But, a case study is basically an in-depth examination of a particular event, situation, or individual. It is a type of research that is designed to explore and understand complex issues; however, it involves detailed contextual analysis of only a limited number of events or situations. It has been defined as “an empirical inquiry that investigates a contemporary phenomenon within its real-life context; when the boundaries between phenomenon and context are not clearly evident; and in which multiple sources of evidence are used.” (Yin, 1984)
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particularly I am going to conduct an explorativ study using content analisis ; the procedure is to ask secondary school teachers to write a story from their professional activity where they not according to moral norms
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Generally speaking, if a population is very homogeneous and the phenomenon narrow, aim for a sample size of around 10. If the population is varied or the phenomenon is complex, aim for around 40 to 50. And if you want to compare populations, aim for 25 to 30 per segment.
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Dear Colleagues,
In order to analyze the opinion of the experts concerning a specific phenomenon that is going on nowadays, I am collecting social media, web media and traditional media news as data. All data will be in text and analyzed via Quirkos software. This data set will be analyzed to outline their position of them as a reflection of society. My intention is to code the data in a prespecified way, so it can summarize the main 4-5 directions of the phenomenon. I guess, my methodology will be content analysis. However, I cannot find a paper that did the same thing in a relatively simple and straightforward way. Some papers that I have seen so far employ content analysis in a quantitative way. Could you please recommend to me some papers that would meet my expectations? Thank you beforehand.
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Content analysis (CA) is a qualitative research method for interpreting meaning from text. CA has three approaches: Conventional, directed, and summative (see Hsieh & Shannon, 2005). As pointed out by David L Morgan, CA, directed by existing theory or literature, as in your case, is a deductive approach to qualitative analysis where you start with a theoretical framework and use data to either validate or extend that framework conceptually. You could find Mayring’s (2022) guide, referenced below, relevantly useful.
Hsieh, H.-F., & Shannon, S. E. (2005). Three approaches to qualitative content analysis. Qualitative Health Research, 15(9), 1277–1288. https://doi.org/10.1177/1049732305276687
Mayring, P. (2022). Qualitative content analysis: A step-by-step guide. https://uk.sagepub.com/en-gb/eur/qualitative-content-analysis/book269922
Good luck,
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Patton (2001) describes these at samples within samples and suggests that purposeful samples can be stratified or nested by selecting particular units or cases that vary according to a key dimension.
For example, one may purposefully sample primary care practices and stratify this purposeful sample by practice size (small, medium and large) and practice setting (urban, suburban and rural).
Stratified purposeful sampling is different from stratified random sampling in that the sample sizes are likely to be too small for generalization.
Why use this method?
A stratified purposeful sampling approach can lend credibility to a research study.
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Sampling in qualitative studies is based on saturation and purpose. We include participants who will provide data we need to answer the research problem.
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When a case study follows a qualitative research approach, credibility, transferability, dependability and confirmability criteria, as Lincoln and Guba (1985) suggest, need to be met for the study to establish trustworthiness.
When adopting a mixed-method design, how can the trustworthiness of a case study be established?
Thank you in advance!
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Nice day
At this point, I think that it is necessary to focus on the representativeness of the sampling since the completeness cannot be satisfied in all cases. also it is necessary to have a fairly elaborate reference in the field of the problem posed and hypotheses.
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Greetings to everyone,
I am about to conduct a qualitative research for my thesis in the field of geriatric assessment and the impact of rehabilitation to their physical status. The sample will be of a certain group of people, for instance their age. I am confused whether should I use this quantitative tool in a case study to answer questions depending on my observations and given that the sample of the patients will be approx. 13-30.
Should I proceed to comparisons across cases, wouldn't it be helpful this quantitative tool?
Thank you in advance.
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If you goal is to do a statistical analysis, your N of 30 or less while be too small (i.e., the standard errors will quite high).
Can you say more about how you would use the quantitative data?
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Actually, I have asked many statistician about the use of probability sampling in qualitative research. However, I am not satisfied with their answers. As we know the sample size and even we have list in-hand but we are confused whether to use probability sampling or not while conducting interviews. I need guidance from experts please.
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It would help to understand that probability samples are not the same as random samples. As others have pointed out, a true probability sample requires a "known population" (or "universe") from which to draw the sample. In contrast, a random sample simply requires that all sample members have an equal chance to being selected.
In my initial answer, I assumed that a probability sample was possible, but that was probably a bad assumption.
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I have been trying to understand research paradigms (neo- positivism, interpretivism/social construction and critical realism) for a few days now, and I've been reading a number of resources, primarily Blaikie and priest's Social research: Paradigms in action (2017), and Tracy's Qualitative research method. In Blaikie and priest, they say that paradigms are used at the level of explanation, but when I read Tracy's work, I get the impression that paradigms come into play at the level of description as well. These various descriptions creates more confusion for me. At what level of research do these paradigms come into play?
In addition to this, I have been reading many articles that does no seem to follow the descriptions of the paradigms strictly. Are there some researches that don't usually follow?
In light of these two, do you think that survey research follows these paradigms?
Looking forward to reading your views and thought.
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David H. Blah A study and analysis of four important research paradigms—positivism, post-positivism, critical theory, and constructivism—show that they have all been effectively used in a modern theological investigation. Although these paradigms are similar to worldviews in some ways, they are not as comprehensive.
When gathering data, the interpretative paradigm allows for the use of a variety of research approaches, including Action Research. Questionnaires. Observations.
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If anyone can point my to the right direction regarding this question, any industrial sector would be helpful, possibly referencing quantitative or qualitative research in the 21st century. I am only able to find data points and regression analysis in the 20th century. Would like to be able to, compare changes.
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Firms with market power are able to react to tax increases by passing on the burden to consumers. High market power means more tax contributions. Higher tax revenues makes Government better able to spend for public services: safety and health, education and recreation, particularly for those below acceptable living standards and eligible for welfare programmes.
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Dear
Some participants are asked to make requests in some situations before and after direct instruction of some sort of making request strategies. two sets of answers are transcribed and the difference between two sets of responses to the same situations before and after the instruction is going to be compared. based on which criteria, measurement, scale, or.... these responses can be analyzed and compared? this is a qualitative study with very small sample size. What is the best method to analyze two sets of responses and data?
Sincerely
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It sounds like you created a 2x2 design and want to compare the responses in the 4 cells. Given that this is already a quantitatively based approach, I would recommend that you use a deductive approach to content analysis. This would involve creating a codebook for the relevant concepts, and then counting how often they occur in each of your 4 cells.
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I know about theoretical sampling and about theoretical saturation, please don't explain them to me! I would like to ask you about theoretical representativeness. Have you ever encountered this expression? Where?
I know that qualitative research is not interested in generalization and representativeness, but I think this is a bad idea.
My opinion is that if we apply the theoretical sampling correctly, in the case of small and homogeneous populations, we can talk about the generalization of the results from the level of the sample, to the level of the whole population.
This would mean that we could talk about theoretical (not statistical) representativeness and theoretical (not statistical) generalization.
Did you read something like that somewhere? Please help me with some references! French writings are also welcome.
Thank you!
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I am not familiar with theoretical representativeness, but Firestone (1993) introduced the concept of "generalization to a theory" (rather than to a population) in an article titled, "Alternative Arguments for Generalizing From
Data as Applied to Qualitative Research."
My own preference is for the Lincoln and Guba's argument in favor of transferability rather than generalization from samples to populations in qualitative research. For a useful recent overview of this issue, see Maxwell (2021), "Why Qualitative Methods Are Necessary for Generalization."
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I need your valuable feedback for a research that I am working on, both quantitative and qualitative.
What do you think is the answer to this question for both quantitative and qualitative researchs?
Thank you in advance for your valuable comments.
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Hi! As I'm just starting teaching and mentoring students in their coursework I often come across a particular issue related to sampling in qualitative research. Whenever students are assigned to do a preliminary qualitative study or devise a qualitative research strategy which involves getting information from other people they often resort to using Facebook as a place for distribution of their invitations to participate in research, or post links to online surveys etc. I do not find this particularly problematic, but I sometimes encounter MA thesis proposals which resort to this strategy even though the proposed research is not really presented as situated in the context of social media. I've also come across some studies which use a more structured approach where social media is used as a platform to implement the snowballing sampling principle.
My questions are:
1. Do you have any experience with that (in terms of students using social media in their sampling strategies)?
2. Have you used social media in your sampling strategies and what were your justifications to do so?
3. Should this approach be encouraged or discouraged if students are aware of the limitations of their sample creation strategies?
4. Does it matter whether the focus of such research has something to do with social media or not?
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  • Research is of value only when the findings from a sample can be generalized to a meaningful population. When the population addressed by the survey cannot be described, and when the sample is contaminated by respondents with biases, findings from online surveys cannot be generalized and may therefore mislead.
  • Online surveys are becoming increasingly popular, perhaps as a result of their ease, convenience, and low cost of data collection. It provides sampling frames that would otherwise be unavailable (or extremely difficult to obtain). Online surveys commonly suffer from two serious methodological limitations: the population to which they are distributed cannot be described, and respondents with biases may select themselves into the sample. Only when the findings from a sample can be applied to a larger population research is worthwhile. Findings from online surveys cannot be generalized and may therefore mislead if the population addressed by the survey cannot be described and the sample is contaminated by respondents with biases.
  • Research findings are of scientific value only if they can be generalized. At the very least, generalization from the sample to the population from which the sample was drawn should be possible. This is only possible if the sample is representative of the population, which necessitates the fulfilment of two conditions. The first requirement is that the population be known; it is impossible to extrapolate findings from a study to an undefined population. The second requirement is that a valid sampling method was used; a method that recruits a sample that is overrepresented for one characteristic cannot represent the population.
  • Personally speaking I am not a fan of online surveys which are utilized for the purpose of research purpose.
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I am a Master student with a medical background looking into students constructs of medical professionalism when they are taught a western curriculum in a non western culture. I have conducted twelve 1-hour individual semi-structured interviews where student's where given professional dilemmas. I explored how and why they would manage these dilemmas. I believe I have to conduct thematic analysis of this data?
My questions are
1) What methodololgy is best suited to analyse this data ?grounded theory ? Interpretive phenomenological analysis ? Giorgi's phenomomenological method?
2) What text is suitable to read for a beginner to give a broad overview of what may be the most appropriate methodology. I have tried to read SAGE handbook qualitative research Denzin, Lincoln. but dont find it an easy read for a beginner who is doing qualitative research for the first time
Any recommendations would be helpful
TIA
Tabraiz
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Besides, you could avail yourself of the assessment approaches and modalities tabulated by Tay et al. (2020), fully cited below, since your investigation applies to medical sciences.
Tay, K. T., Ng, S., Hee, J. M., Chia, E. W. Y., Vythilingam, D., Ong, Y. T., Chiam, M., Chin, A. M. C., Fong, W., Wijaya, L., Toh, Y. P., Mason, S., & Krishna, L. K. R. (2020). Assessing professionalism in medicine – a scoping review of assessment tools from 1990 to 2018. Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development, 7, 2382120520955159. https://doi.org/10.1177/2382120520955159
Good luck,
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I am looking to work with someone who has experience in qualitative research and is based in India. If anyone is interested please respond and we can connect.
Regards
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Vasanti Lagali-Jirge Surveys, focus groups, and interviews are frequently used in qualitative research. Because qualitative research is exploratory in nature, it is critical to avoid asking leading questions.
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Hi there, I am submitting my topic for my masters thesis next week and after lots of research I am interested in doing de-internationalization. I feel this is a relevant topic due to COVID-19 and Brexit. I am interested in doing qualitative research with a case study approach (either single/multiple).
The following are my potential research questions.
Benefits/downsides of de-internationalization?
What are the implications of de-internationalization on the firm’s business model?
Which parts of the firm’s business model are affected most, how and why by de-internationalization?
I am however struggling on what industry to investigate and I feel I need to find a scope on how to make it more concise as since it is only a masters thesis. Any suggestions/feedback would be great appreciated. Thanks!
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J. Rafiee
Thank you for your detailed response. I looked into the company you suggested and I think they would be an interesting study to undertake. I appreciate your feedback and comments. When you say that the topic and questions are too difficult, do you think this is too much of a broad subject for a master's thesis?
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Have you been curious about the experience of qualitative research participants?
Often when we explore lived experience in qualitative research, participants tell us about some aspects of their life in such a way that they may have never told someone before. When going through such research procedures (like interviews or focused groups) have you been curious about the influence of your designed research procedures on participants' lives? Have you wondered how to do research on the impacts of research participation and the ethical dimensions and issues surrounding such procedures?
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This sounds very interesting Peyman! Of course, participants' experiences of participating in qualitative studies needs to be explored and documented. As a qualitative and narrative inquirer I have engaged with participants with an intention to elicit their stories of lived experiences. I can confirm that they do share with us (researchers) stories they have not shared with anyone else. I think that as qualitative researchers, we have focused on generating data and reporting findings. I like your view which directs us to the perspective of participants.
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Triangulation of method in qualitative research
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I have this same question, and I would be eager to explore any answers to it.
I am currently writing a qualitative systematic review, and it occurred to me that this is triangulation in action.
I would be interested in the differing perspectives regarding this.
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I have conducted a study on socio economic and cultural barriers to access health care among the particularly vulnerable tribes of West Bengal and I want to publish the data . So, my question is the data too old to publish ?
Also, I am searching for co-author(s) to collaborate for writing research papers related to the aforementioned study and any other papers related to qualitative research in health.
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Data does have a shelf life. You will need to demonstrate in your article that the data is still valid and that we can learn lessons from it today.
Either you need to show that the findings would not be different with newer data, or that we can still draw lessons about the 2015-2017 timeframe that are still valuable today.
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Hi there,
I am interested in researching the topic of reverse internalization for my masters thesis in International Business & Management. I would prefer to undertake qualitative research and potentially do a single case study. I am seeking advice/feedback on what scope to investigate and potential sub questions.
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Qualitative research has its rigor and method. It is a valid methodological strategy, which means that research can be carried out using qualitative methodology. However, it is not always given the recognition it deserves. Why?
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I think that it is qualitative or quantitative, the important thing is that the investigation lives. I don't know about other cases, but for me, it's super important, I can't conceive of my day without trying to learn a little more
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Hi,
I have planned qualitative research. Before collecting data, I want to do a pilot study only to test the questions’ comprehensibleness and suitability. But I have a few questions. Begin with, how many people should I have an interview with for a pilot study of qualitative research? (or is the number vital?) Second, do you have anything you can suggest or warn me about a pilot study? Thank you.
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The purpose of pilot test in qualitative study is to familiarize yourself with the field and test whether the interview protocol is serving you well. I do not think that there is a prescription for a sample size, but rather the researcher should be guided by the degree of confidence on the research protocol and instruments being tested.
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Honorable Researchers,
How can I collect data from Facebook videos uploaded by the different users for Qualitative Research?
Your thoughts are very much appreciated here!!
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You can signin at developers.facebook.com and explore the possibilities.
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Hi,
Should the sociodemographic data of qualitative research be equally distributed? I will be glad if you send me your opinions and sources about this issue. Thanks in advance.
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In qualitative research you are aiming to cover the ground, so to speak. Often, this involves purposive sampling to make sure that all relevant points of view, experiences etc are included. However, the demographics may not be (probably are not) the best way of selecting participants. What you want is some way of making sure that everyone is heard.
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We are currently doing correlational research (quantitative) about the gaming habits and academic performance of grade 6 pupils in just one school, that only consists of 150 grade 6 pupils. And we estimated that out of 150 only 35 pupils are only playing online games. Originally our research is about qualitative research. But our panelists suggested that we better conduct quantitative research.
We are not good at conducting quantitative research.
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Purposive sampling is an appropriate type of sampling in particular circumstances. It picks instances based on expert opinion or with a specific goal in mind. Purposive sampling is most commonly utilized when measuring a difficult-to-reach population.
Purposive sampling is used by researchers when they wish to reach a certain group of people, as all survey participants are chosen because they meet a specific profile.
Best Regards
Dr. Fatemeh Khozaei
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Hi everybody,
i am doing qualitative research (interviews) for developing a Grounded Theory with QDA-Software atlas.ti. I am wondering if anyone is interested in sharing experiences, e.g. in respect to axial coding etc.
Greetings!
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It depends on the version of GT you are using, there are about 5 versions. Which version are you using? In the case of coding, it is very important that it is not a linear process, GT is a continuous process between the subject literature, theoretical sampling and coding, especially in the Strauss and Corbin version.
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Hi,
I am a Ph.D. student in bioethics. My main interest is animal ethics.
For my Ph.D. thesis, I will study ecological utopias from a bioethics and animal ethics perspective. My aim is to see, understand and discuss how utopian writers placed animals in their works. I will then discuss my findings in the light of animal ethics literature.
To do that, I concluded that I should be using one of the qualitative research methods since I am not interested in quantitative findings (how many times the word animal is mentioned, how often it was mentioned, etc.)
Now, I am swamped into the theoretical mess of methodological approaches. Although I want to simplify it since I am only interested in animal ethics findings, I just want to approach the qualitative study as an instrument.
I did many readings and the draft conclusion for my methodology is that:
  • I will not adopt any qualitative approaches since my research does not fit into any of them (ethnography, phenomenology, grounded theory, narrative research, case study ... )
  • I will adopt a purposive sampling approach to decide on my sampling.
  • I will use document analysis as my data collection method. (Is this the correct term?)
  • I will use qualitative content analysis as my data analysis method. (or should I use thematic analysis?, or are these the same?)
Am I right with these selections?
Is there any conceptual/nominal/theoretical mistake?
Are there any subcategories to these approaches that will better fit my research?
If you think that approach wouldn't work, what would be your suggestion for a newbie in QR like me. (Although I am new in that particular area, I still want to carry out scientifically rigid research)
Thanks a lot, everyone,
Any help is much appreciated.
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It does indeed sound like you want to do a content analysis, which can range from a more deductive approach, where you use pre-defined codes, to a more inductive approach, where you create the codes during your coding process. A middle approach its known as "hybrid" content analysis, where you begin with an initial set of codes and then add to them as your do your analysis.
In terms of thematic analysis, Braun and Clarke have recently defined their preferred approach as "reflexive thematic analysis," which relies on a strictly inductive approach.
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I am comparing the UN role in two different conflicts. The first remained on its agenda for longer time and awaiting solution, while the second in a lesser time have been solved with proactivity of the UN.
I prepared an open ended questionnaire and sent to purposefully selected target respondents. In a pilot study, the respondents showed their inability to provide inputs for all questions. I bifurcated the questionnaire into two (first conflict plus the UN role and second conflict plus the UN role). I am now receiving back the questionnaires well responded. This indicates that the first respondents miss the second part while at the same time the second respondents miss the first part.
Now point arises that, I have not gone through or came a cross to any research like that, to take it as an example or previous reference.
Can I do that bifurcation? Would it be valid and complacent with qualitative research methodology and data collection technique?
I request the intervention of worthy scholars and experts towards my project, please.
Thanks
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You can do it by comparing both groups and by having the same questions for both
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I am going to conduct a pure qualitative research where I have to perform semi-structured interview for in-depth understanding of my research problem. Although I know how to ensure the validity and reliability of quantitative research, I have no idea about ensuring the validity and reliability of qualitative research (semi-structured interviews). So, I need the suggestion from experts, especially who has/have good knowledge about qualitative research.
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The term validity is very seldom used in qualitative research, because it implies applying the same approaches as quantitative research. Instead, the classic alternative is the discussion of trustworthiness by Lincoln and Guba (1985).
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I'm conducting qualitative research and had originally set out to interview around 15 participants from two groups (30 in total), which represented two perceptions of the same conversations. Group one is fine (15), however, I struggled with the recruitment of the second group (5) and I'm trying to reach out to fellow researchers who may have encountered a similar issue.
My current intention is to take group one data and use reflexive TA to analyze it. Then treat the data from group two as a supporting case study to provide a comparative perspective.
Has anyone followed a similar approach? and if not, what approaches have been used for data in such circumstances?
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A study can have both quantitative and qualitative research approaches, although one could argue that a qualitative study would best precedes a quantitative survey. .Thus, you could present arguments / a case for interpreting qualitative data using, eg, phenomenography perspectives. In which case, you are describing "ways of interpreting" the concepts that you are exploring. In this paradigm you are not sampling people as such, you are sampling "ways of conceptualising". These outcomes would not claim for external generalisability (your stats), but they could enhance internal validity. And you could argue for reader generalisability.
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I am conducting qualitative evidence synthesis for my dissertation. Some of the included papers used mixed method which have some insights about my research question.
Thank you.
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for sure ...it depend on inclusion/exclusion criteria.
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Hi all,
Presently I am starting the venture of writing my master's thesis. The subject of my thesis concerns the implementation of robotic process automation (RPA) software in organisations. I'd like to look at critical success factors in different stages of the implementation process. To ultimately deliver a scientifically grounded and validated framework on how to conduct successful RPA implementation projects. To do so, I will be conducting qualitative research.
However I could use some help with it from our community as I am presently struggling with finding an appropriate theoretical lens to apply in my thesis.
Therefore I am looking for suggestions for possible lenses to use which can be used in qualitative research. I have come across theories such as diffusion-of-innovation (DOI), technology acceptance model (TAM) and unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT). These however have a quantitative nature and thereby seem less appropriate.
To summarize, I am looking for a theoretical lens to study RPA implementation projects which can be used in qualitative research, do you have any suggestions on which lens to use? It may also be more broad or sociological lenses rather than strictly technological lenses.
Please let me know, your help and advice is highly appreciated!
Kind regards,
Dominique
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Hello 👋, so I'm a PhD candidate doing qualitative research combining traditional ethnographic methods and newer participatory action research methods. I haven't done my fieldwork yet, which will take place in India, due to the pandemic and therefore I have no data yet. My research topic has not been explored much and there's nothing about it that was ever done with the population I will study. My research is rooted in Community Psychology and I'm using some of the theories in that field to frame my whole research. Now, the main objective of my research is to deepen our understanding of those concepts as conceptualized by said population.
Here's my issue : my advisor keeps asking me to present what will be my theoretical contributions to the field of Community Psychology. I've told him numerous times that I can't predict what those will be since I haven't collected any data yet.
Am I crazy for thinking that what he is asking at this point doesn't make sense with me having no data at all yet ???
How am I supposed to come up with theoretical contributions with no idea of what I might unearth during my fieldwork ?
Any help, suggestion, advice will be greatly appreciated. I just don't know which arguments to give him anymore. And maybe I'm wrong and he's right ?! Sooo confused.
Help lol !
NOTE: My advisor is a psychologist and he's dead set on psychometrics and stats and the whole quanti thing. I don't think he's ever done anything quali or been the advisor to a student whose dissertation is using a qualitative approach.
Thank you !
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David L Morgan yes he wants me to clearly write those down in my dissertation plan and although I have already done what Gonneke Marina Ton kindly suggested in an extensive manner, covering every angle and detail of my proposed research, he still wants me to come up with what my theoretical contributions will be. I have written about what my empirical and methodological contributions to the field will be, but he is dead set on the theoretical contributions. I am exploring concepts using theories that have not been much explored in a qualitative way in general, even less so with populations outside the West and never with the population I am studying. I will also be integrating photo-voice to interviews and participant observation as well as digital storytelling. I have no clue if I will unearth new theoretical elements but regardless learning about the lived experiences of my studied population is relevant especially in a field, Community Psychology, where we claim the need to hear diverse voices yet barely no research is done in that sense (most research is quanti using instruments developed in the West on pops living in the West).
Thank you all for your insights, it is very much appreciated :)
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Sensitizations act as more of a publicity/ad for companies, government and other bodies. They make use of it through a hidden motivation; the companies name or the "welfare of the people" from the state. Sensitization involves targeting a group of a population and giving specific access to knowledge which is thought to perpetuate. But it doesn't!
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Kindly see also the following RG link:
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I've been asked to give feedback on a study that used a survey with the option for comments in each question. Some participants decided to share additional observations and thoughts for some questions. I've found that these additional comments carry rich qualitative data so I'm suggesting they analyze them and integrate them into the results (since they're currently not).
However, I'm not sure how to justify this methodologically (or even if it's appropriate). Even though these comments add insightful information about the participant's perceptions, they only account for a portion of them.
Options I'm currently considering:
(1) Use a common theme analysis for the qualitative data and relabel the study from quantitative to mixed-methods.
(2) Still define it as quantitative, but mention that some qualitative data was gathered as optional comments and analysed as well (would this be methodologically correct?).
(3) Do not use the qualitative data for the results, since it doesn't come from all participants.
Any thoughts?
Thank you very much in advance!
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Of course, they should be added and used (qualitatively) -- it's data, and respondents felt a need to add them, so we should report them. Since the researcher did not ask for comments, it doesn't make sense to call it a mixed method study. It's a quant study with supplemental comments. You add a section to the report describing qualitatively, what was said, including areas of convergence and divergence if the sample is large enough, and with some representative verbatims in any case. You should also include the % of respondents who added comments, for context.
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I will be conducting qualitative interviews regarding behaviours and social attitudes on Instagram, and I wish to recruit 15 participants through Instagram DM. I could select users that I think have engaged in the behaviours I will be studying, plus that meet my demographic criteria (18+, gender, etc.)
Is this use of purposive sampling problematic; biased and therefore invalidates my data? Are there any alternative sampling methods I could use? Or is there a way to go through with this method if I somehow justify it in some way?
I appreciate any help, thank you.
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Purposive sampling (PS) is justified based on the notion of selecting participants who can provide in-depth information to address the questions under investigation. The common forms of purposive sampling include maximum variation sampling, confirming and disconfirming sampling, stratified purposeful sampling, and snowball sampling. To enhance the rigor (i.e., credibility, transferability, dependability, and confirmability) of a qualitative study using any technique of purposive sampling, a researcher should adopt and follow logical rationale and clear criteria for participant inclusion and exclusion. For deliberation on various PS types, you could refer to Campbell et al. (2020) and Farrugia (2019), fully cited below.
Campbell, S., Greenwood, M., Prior, S., Shearer, T., Walkem, K., Young, S., Bywaters, D., & Walker, K. (2020). Purposive sampling: Complex or simple? Research case examples. Journal of Research in Nursing, 25(8), 652–661. https://doi.org/10.1177/1744987120927206
Farrugia, B. (2019). WASP (Write a Scientific Paper): Sampling in qualitative research. Early Human Development, 133, 69–71. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.earlhumdev.2019.03.016
Good luck,
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I would like to choose a medical research topic, following phenomenological approach in qualitative research. Is there a minimum number set while selecting participants or can it be even two or three. Literature says from 2 to 10 participants are better. Please give your valuable opinion / suggestion
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I understand that Philosopher Rene Descartes initiated and discussed about mind body dualism and cognitive meditation in his philosophical work, and Husserl sought to explicate the origins of knowledge in the constitutive processes of consciousness. Thanks for bringing connections of both their work into phenomenology
Regards
Dr. Shobana G
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I am Nandani Agarwal, a M.Sc. Clinical psychology student who is conducting qualitative research on the topic "Conceptualising goodness in a collectivistic culture". I am looking for an expert to validate my interview guide and would love it if you could assist me in this.
An expert could be anyone who: 1. Has a Ph.D. in the field of Psychology or is currently pursuing Ph.D. in psychology 2. Someone with comprehensive knowledge and experience in the field of qualitative research.
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I believe, if others are validating your interview/topic guide, it will be risky for the quality of your qualitative research. The topic guide needs to be well suited for your research question, conceptual and theoretic framework, and your lens. It needs to be developed though thorough mindmap exercise by the research team members. If an external person (not involved in your piece of research) validate this, he/she may judge it from a different perspective. The comments made by him/her may beneficial for your understanding and will widen your perspective, but that cannot be considered for validation purpose. Keep in mind that you have the full authority to accept or decline the comments as it is your piece of research.
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I'm a simple qualitative researcher who wants to hire a RA to do some analysis of social media data towards identifying trends in community engagement surrounding the shift to on-line activism in a specific social movement organization. But I don't really know where I'd find grad students who have the skills I need. In what kinds of programs do they teach/learn such things?
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Agree with DR. Reza
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Do you know any systematic steps for building taxonomies in the field of HCI? My question is mostly to qualitative researchers.
I would appreciate any advice, reference, or even sharing of experiences.
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Here is a start Reza. Excluded from this would be quantitative designs which may invoke machine learning etc.
Qualitative designs to explore human behavior could take individual, group or larger data collection/ observation strategies. First of course, review the literature to identify what is already known .
Individual data for these goals can be collected through interviews, observations, retroactively (retrospective analysis), experiments, and physical.
Group data may be collected using the above, but not often physical, add techniques including surveys, census, discussion, Delphi, and others.
Larger data collection scope approaches for that goal may include some of the above as well as socio cultural, economic and political.
The key requirement is you must clearly articulate your research question, which will lead to propositions or hypotheses, which thereby direct you to appropriate research designs includingformal research methods and maybe statistical techniques . Generally , the formal research method for creating a taxonomy of human behavior ought to invoke phenomenology, ethnography or grounded theory. Others are possible. The techniques used in the above methodology can include narrative analysis, discourse analysis, etc.
For more ideas maybe start reading these references and let me know how I could help you further.
Strang, K.D. (2021). General analytics limitations with coronavirus healthcare big data. International Journal of Healthcare Technology and Management 18(1), 1-11. doi:10.1504/IJHTM.2020.111964 Inderscience
Strang, K.D. (2015). Developing a goal-driven research strategy. In KD. Strang (Ed.), Palgrave handbook of research design in business and management (pp. 31-46). ISBN: 978-1137379924. NY: Palgrave Macmillan
Strang, K.D. (2015). Articulating a research design ideology. In KD. Strang (Ed.), Palgrave handbook of research design in business and management (pp. 17-30). ISBN: 978-1137379924. NY: Palgrave Macmillan
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right now i am going to write a research proposal for my MS degree. My topic is related to study the problems faced by in-service science teachers in my county . i could not find research articles on this topic. i have hardly found 3 articles related to my topic.
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Yes, the literature review is standard practice for dissertations and later when you undertake scholarly studies. Ken
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Dear Sir/Madam, my question is that as we know we use PICO model in Systematic Literature Review (SLR) mostly for Randomize Clinical Studies. so what model or approach should we use for Observational cohort studies, or case studies or in qualitative research or any other study design? Thank you in advance for kind guidance
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Thanks all of you for your kind answers. I got it because of your support. Thank you guys ,have a blessed life
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qualitative research thematic analysis of phenomenological approach of research.
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I agree with David L Morgan and Mohialdeen Alotumi that thematic analysis does not entail counting the number of codes. Instead, it focuses on generating meaningful themes to capture the essence of your data.
Having said that, thematic analysis is a relevant method of data analysis for phenomenological research. Interpretive and descriptive phenomenology has its own methods of data analysis depending on the methodologist and philosophical tradition (Husserlian or Heideggerian). For example, Husserlian tradition you can use the methods proposed by Merleau-Ponty, van Kaam, Colaizzi, Giorgi, Polkinghorne, Moustakas, & Garza. For Heideggerian, you can use Ricoeur or Gadamer. Researchers use Brun and Clark thematic analysis for almost everything. Please review their papers in which they have clarified numerous times the differences in thematic analysis and other data analyses methods in qualitative research. Please read this recent paper. Please see the following quote. A majority of qualitative researchers will agree that thematic analysis is not a suitable method for data analysis in phenomenology. TA (Thematic Analysis) & IPA (Interpretive Phenomenological analysis)
There are two important differences between reflexive TA and IPA. The first is that IPA incorporates a dual analytic focus: both a thematic orientation—the identification of themes across cases (participants)—and an idiographic approach—interest in and focus on the particular and unique details of each case. Second, related in part to this idiographic focus, IPA procedures are rather different from TA procedures: IPA involves a detailed focus on the analysis of each case, before developing themes across cases” (p.5)
Braun, V., & Clarke, V. (2021). Can I use TA? Should I use TA? Should I not use TA? Comparing reflexive thematic analysis and other pattern‐based qualitative analytic approaches. Counselling and Psychotherapy Research, 21(1), 37-47.
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I'm new in the field of qualitative research. From my transcription experience, I found that the word card techniques is one of the most frequently used techniques in qualitative research. I wonder how the data of this research can be analysed?
Providing link of researches that have used this techniques will be highly appreciated.
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There are many possible uses for such stimulus material in qualitative interviewing, but based on my experience, I would not say that word cards are not a frequently used technique in academic research. The may, however, be more commonly used in "commercial" research.
I recommend you do a Google Scholar search for: Qualitative interviews word cards.
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Hi,
I wanted to do a thematic analysis and I want to know whether there are softwares that highlight dominant patterns/sentiments in qualitative research work. I am looking for academic (non student) low expense or open source options.
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Several of the more expensive academic software programs offer "sentiment analysis," which essentially reports on statements using a range from more positive to more negative.
As for open-source programs, two good options are QDA Miner Lite and Taguette.
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I am writing a qualitative project using autoethnography. As all journals have word count constraints, I struggle to fit my methods section (beyond mere descriptiveness) in my manuscript. As it stands, my methods section loses the minutiae of the meaning making process. I've recently learned that Elsevier offers an option to submit a MethodsX file, offering a space for authors to further detail their methods/methodology. I understand that MethodsX is also an open access journal in Elsevier's database, and would like ask the community for some advice about this option.
-KS
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Anyhow it is new information for me but is possible to publish the Qualitative descriptive manuscript in Elsevier Journals.
Mostly Ethnography research could be conducted in Qualitative approach.
The MethodsX file in Elsevier is the new concept among the researchers.
The main focus in ethnography research is cultural identity, embedded, practiced and Indigenous knowledge based activities in the community or society.
The important thing is that the qualitative data will help the researchers to triangulate with quantitative data to measure the reliability of the data confirmation with the available facts.
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I am writing a qualitative research paper on EFL graduate students' academic writing challenges in a university in Turkey where English is the medium of instruction. The research instrument is a semi-structured interview, and thematic analysis (TA) will be implemented. Based on what should I choose the sample size? What is the best/ideal sample size to reach the principle of saturation?
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Congratulation to the excellent question of the sample size of qualitative research. Please refer to the sooner question about the same topic to get more information: https://www.researchgate.net/post/How_many_interviews_are_needed_in_a_qualitative_research_Is_there_any_rule_or_popular_practice
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A qualitative research study is appropriate when you need to tap into the hearts and minds of the customer. A highly subjective research discipline, qualitative research is specifically designed to look "beyond the percentages" to gain an understanding of the customer's feelings, impressions and viewpoints. Such intuitive, highly subjective personal input can only be obtained through qualitative research. Strengths:
  • Small samples, sharp focus: Qualitative research is laser-focused, dealing only with smaller samples.
  • Probing interviews: Expert moderators, unencumbered by the time constraints of a quantitative survey, use a multitude of techniques during lengthy interviews to obtain in-depth information.
  • Rich responses: The interviews, which last as long as two hours, allow the moderator to elicit extremely candid, highly complex responses.
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Qualitative research is a form of inquiry that analyzes information conveyed through language and behavior in natural settings. It is used to capture expressive information not conveyed in quantitative data about beliefs, values, feelings, and motivations that underlie behaviors. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1496926/
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  • The audience question: What approach is frequently used by gatekeepers in your field?
  • The background question: What training do you have in the inquiry approach that you hope to use? Or what resources are accessible to guide you in your work?
  • The scholarly literature question: What is needed most as contributing to the scholarly literature in your field?
  • The personal approach question: Are you more comfortable with a more structured approach to research or with a storytelling approach? Or are you more comfortable with a firmer, more well-defined approach to research or with a flexible approach?
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By far the most commonly used approach to qualitative research is a combination of semi-structured interviews and thematic analysis, but this is not one of the Traditions/Approaches covered by Creswell and Poth.
I suggest you consult a different introduction to qualitative research, such as Marshall and Rossman, which emphasizes practical skills in the collection and analysis of qualitative data.
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Could you recommend an article or report describing opinion research conducted in a qualitative approach? Research in the field of education would be the most interesting, but I am also interested in other areas.
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Opinion research is a branch of market research or should i say very similar in nature. Whilst it is mostly quantitative in nature (where one would just select options), but there are also many qualitative options. Now for me, this is key to qualitative opinion research. Usually ordinary qualitative research involves smaller sample size but longer responses to each question. However, In a qualitative opinion research setting, it would be the opposite, i would go for much larger sample size, but keeping the responses relatively short eg. 2-3 lines per response per question. This will guard against data overload whilst still giving more depth than a quantitative approach.
There are many articles on the web, have fun with your Research.
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I am using a Qualitative research style to analyse doctor-patient interactions in English and Igbo during a consultation meetings. Please how do I go about tape recording such interactions without the consent the interacters. Secondly, how do I use Gail Jefferson's CA notations to transcribe the extract of doctor-patient interactions.
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I don't think it is ethical to record such data without the consent of the subject.
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Dear all,
What are the challenges that researchers face in conducting qualitative studies? What suggestions would you make to overcome those challenges for researchers planning to adopt qualitative research?
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Inconsistency between research question and methodology, insufficient methodological knowledge, and lack of attention to the philosophical underpinning of qualitative methodology are some important challenges.
The main problem for qualitative data analysis is that in the study of social life, the data is often concerned with the 'everyday activities' that the researcher and the participants take for granted. A reading through of the transcripts can often lead to the response 'so what'!
Keep the language and format of surveys simple. When possible, word questions so that the response options are the same and try to eliminate or reduce reverse worded questions. Always validate your surveys before using them. Challenge: Insufficient identifying information for matching pre/post responses.
Best Regards
Dr. Fatemeh Khozaei
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What are the advantages and disadvantages of using Delve software for qualitative analysis rather than NVivo?
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I've used Nvivo which seemed fine and I'm just learning about Delve so in time, I'll know which one is easier to use. I've also noted down ATLAS.ti (thanks to Richard Kamara) and I'll find out about that.
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Dear readers,
Recently, I have read a research article "ESL students' perceptions of Using a Social Bookmarking Tool for the development of reading in a second language". I realized that this research used a multiple-case study to do a deep research with 5 students. The logic of this article is very clear and easy to understand. I want to discuss with you if there is any other qualitive research other than multiple-case study could be suitable for this kind of topic? Or if you have any insight regarding this area.
Thank you, Laura
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is it okay in qualitative research with 10 samples or respondents? if okay how many fgd should be taken in this case?
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The recommended size of focus groups has been dropping over the years, so it would be rare to find social science groups as large as 10. Still, the minimum size is usually considered to be 4, so 10 participants would yield 2-3 focus groups, which might well be too few for saturation.
As an alternative, you might consider dyadic interviews, where two participants share and compare their experiences and perspectives. Here is some basic information about that method.
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I need qualitative research to see the methods of analysis and health steps.
Do you have qualitative research that you considered an excellent example?
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Hi. This might give you some insights on Qualitative Research drsign although my focus is in Social Science. https://www.weijournals.com/index.php/WEJSS/article/view/22
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What is the best way to present the results of a qualitative study? How do you select the most relevant items? Can this be done in the form of tables, diagrams, graphs? If so, what types of tools should be used? Is data visualization compatible with qualitative research?
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Data visualisation is compatible with qualitative research. You can use graphs and tables to describe or summarize your findings. Nowadays, qualitative data analysis software such as NVivo, atlas.ti and so on come with various features that are very helpful in visualising qualitative data. For example, you can word count, word tree, thematic mapping etc. all using an application like NVivo.
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I am intending to do qualitative research on effect of detention on education of former detainees. What questions should be asked for assessing the impact on education?
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Dear researcher, I would like to ask about secondary informants in phenomenological qualitative research. Some of my friends said that qualitative phenomenological studies should not use secondary informants to support the data. would you please explain and recommend journals that discuss this. thankyou
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It sounds like you might be going through the options in Creswell and Poth's Five Traditions, which is not a useful way to design a study.
Instead, you should concentrate on your research questions, and then ask what would the appropriate ways to collect and analyze data for answering those questions.
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Hello everyone,
I'm currenlty writing my bachelor's thesis about the impacts of COVID-19 on the hotel sector in Germany, with the goal of developing a training manual for hotel management and entrepreneurs on how to cope with future pandemics.
One of my sub RQs is: What is the correlation between hotels responses to the pandemic and their occupancy rates?
How can I answer that questions if the hotels responses are based on qualitative data (interviews about entrepreneurial behaviour, e.g. one hotel said that in order to cope with the pandemic they increased their social media presence and improved their online appearance) and the occupancy rates are quantitative data?
Basically, my goal is to support my recommendations - which will be a training manual for hotel management and entrepreneurs on how to cope with future pandemics - by saying Hotel A did this and their occupancy rate increased (I'm obviously aware that correlation doesn't mean causation and this will also be one of the major limitations of my research, only using one hotel KPI).
Best,
Felix
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Suggestion: Code your qualitative data into a small number of categories that reflect the main ways hotels cope. Assuming there are several hotels that fall in each category, you could do a one-way analysis of variance to see if the mean occupancy rates differ among the category groups.
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I would like to know more about qualitative research designs, techniques used for analysis and report presentation of qualitative research.
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The SAGE Handbook of Qualitative Research
FIFTH EDITION
Edited by:
  • Norman K. Denzin - University of Illinois, Urbana - Champaign, USA
  • Yvonna S. Lincoln - Texas A&M University, USA
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Hi,
My current qualitative research (for my master thesis) looks at how a company can respond better to scarcity in its supply chain. My theoretical framework consists of the whole supply chain risk management process and defines characteristics that I'm comparing to determine if missing one of the characteristics could explain the success or lack of success. But before I could answer the 'why' it was a success or not, I need to analyze 'if' it was a success.
The company has a lot of data available. I defined a few variables that determine 'success' (e.g., percentage the company can fill regarding customer demand). Is there a methodology that describes how to look at the available data? The closest methodology I could get was descriptive statistics, but I'm not sure if it covers everything I want to do. Can somebody help me with this?
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