Science topic

Prostate - Science topic

Prostate is a gland in males that surrounds the neck of the URINARY BLADDER and the URETHRA. It secretes a substance that liquefies coagulated semen. It is situated in the pelvic cavity behind the lower part of the PUBIC SYMPHYSIS, above the deep layer of the triangular ligament, and rests upon the RECTUM.
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I am trying to run WB to detect full-length AR and AR-V7 in sc xenograft tumor tissue generated from 22Rv1 human prostate cancer cells (implanted in mice). I've been using Santa Cruz AR (441) antibodies, but the results have been fairly poor. There is a lot of background and non-specific binding, and the desired bands are not very sharp. Band intensities of the same samples vary considerably from one experiment to the next, in spite of a fairly uniform and consistent loading control (B-actin). Would anyone know of a good quality AR antibody for this application? Or has anyone used AR (441) successfully in xenograft protein samples? Incidentally, I have used this same antibody for IHC in these tissues, and I have had good results.
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Thank you so much for replying, Dr. Andl and Dr. Iborra. Most appreciated!
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Hi everyone,
I want to buy a primary anti-PSMA (prostate specific membrane antigen) antibody for western blot and immunofluorescence purposes. I am considering to acquire one of these three:
- Abcam ref: ab76104 clone: EP3253
- Cell Signaling Technology ref: 12702 clone: D4S1F
- Invitrogen ref: 37-3900 clone: 1H8H5
Have any of you used any of these antibodies? If so, I would really appreciate some feedback :)
Or if you use a different anti-PSMA antibody besides these and can recommend it please let me know as well!
Thank you so much,
Diana
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Hello Diana,
In this link (https://www.citeab.com/antibodies/search?q=PSMA) you can see different PSMA-specific antibodies, and the number of publications in which it has been used as an approach to decide for one of them
I hope it is useful to you
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Our lab protocol was adapted to a Santa Cruz antibody (sc-816) that worked perfectly in mouse prostate, but it has been discontinued. I've since tested a few others that didn't work. I'd like suggestions for androgen receptor antibodies that could be used for WB and IHC in rat and mouse tissue.
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Hi Danieli,
I think you can try the one mentioned below
(5153) Androgen Receptor (D6F11) XP ® Rabbit mAb by Cell signalling Technology.
Hope it helps!
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I have read that you should fix from 6-24 hours, but since the prostates are so small I'm considering 6-8 hours. Do you think that will be sufficient?
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Yes 6-8 hours is enough. See the "attachment" for depth of tissue vs. penetration rate
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I injected the prostate cancer cells in mouse dorsal prostate gland.
For tumor measurement, I used ultrasonography (vevo2100 model), but it's hard to recognize where tumor is.
I dissected one of the mice, and I confirm the tumor growth.
Can you recognize which one is spine, kidneys, seminal vesicles or something?
The region which I detected is pelvis on supine pose.
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I labeled section.
I think
red: bladder
skyblue: spine
purple + blue arrow: prostate tumor
Is it right?...
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What are the long term side effects of Abiraterone drug used in Ca. prostate in combination with androgen deprivation therapy?
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Mood changes, bone pains and bone fracture, depression, seizures
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I am developing a research project that will use 3D printed models in health education. I'm looking for 3D models of the prostate, pelvis and or male bladder.
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Hi Luiz,
I would recommend checking out the following repositories:
-Open Anatomy Project: https://www.openanatomy.org/
You still might need to optimize the meshes, but I'm confident you will find the structures you need to print.
Best,
Roberto
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Enlarged prostate also known as benign prostatic hyperplasia, or BPH, is a common medical condition.  Prostate gland continues to grow...Read More
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Pumpkin seeds
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I used the SMARCD3 Antibody from Proteintech (12838-1-AP) on FFPE material (prostate), and observed a strong brown background all over the glass slides , right after the application of AEC.
Using the same staining conditions (AR: pH 9, 10 min 3% H2O2 digestion, AB diluent with 0,5% TritonX, 1% FCS in PBS, incubation o/n on 4°C, UltraVision LP AEC detection system from Thermo fisher, BIOTIN FREE!!) I had no problems with SMARCD1 and SMARCD2 antibodies on the same slides.
Have you ever seen something similar?
All the best, and thanks for help!!!
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it has to be washed repeatedly after each step for 15mins
.
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I cannot find any ultrasound image regarding the prostate. Could anyone give me the link if you find any? It is preferred to be 3D transrectal ultrasound images, but 2D is fine
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SURE-send me your email i can share some of prostate images from my image library
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Hello everyone,
Has anyone try to culture the normal prostate RWPE-1 cell line in RPMI medium supplemented with foetal bovine serum? There's some articles available but neither describe details about the adaptation process,
I would need an adaptation protocol or some technicals advices,
Thanks in advance,
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Hello Lyda Espitia-Perez
Please refer to the link below. It gives you the details of RWPE-1 cells.
Regards.
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I am trying to purify recombinant Prostatic Acid Phosphatase that has a His-6 tag at the C-terminus from HEK293T media for downstream functional assays. I have tried using a HisPur cobalt purification kit, but the purified protein no longer displays phosphatase activity after purification. Is there any way to purify this protein from HEK293T cell media that keeps it in a functional dimer conformation (this is essential for protein function)?
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Before I dive more into this:
So you protein dimer gets dissolved and you only purify monomers?
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I need some specific cancer tissue samples' slides for IHC which is resistant and sensitive to specific cancer drugs, especially for prostate, lung, and breast cancer. Is it possible to buy or collect from some organization? If anyone has the information of proper source as well as if anyone has some sample, I would like to request you all to help me with this issue.
Thanks in advance.
Regards,
Mamun
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Gürhan Abuhanoğlu Dear Professor, Thank you for your kind information. However, I do not need any cell line, I have so many cancer and normal cell lines. I am just searching for a cancer drug-resistant tissue array for the immuno-histochemistry experiment.
Regards,
Mamun
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Hi,
I am trying to choose the appropriate statistical test to evaluate cells (drug vs control) over 4 different time points (inc. 0hr). Specifically I was testing prostate cells treated with a drug and evaluating the %area of lipid droplet size. I have acquired a % area of the lipid droplet for approximately 60 cells at 0hr (no treatment), 15hr (drug vs control), 24hr (drug vs control), 48hr (drug vs control) and calculated mean change in lipid droplet size at each timepoint. Ultimately I would like to show the significance of drug vs lipid droplet size against time. Advice is much appreciated and a thanks in advance.
Regards,
Ewan
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It appears that Matlab can fit generalized linear mixed effects models:
One of the packages widely used is Stata. I suspect that you could take the GEE approach using its -betareg- command with the vce(clustvar) option, using a unique ID code as the cluster variable.
For the mixed effects (multilevel) approach, I would investigate the -meglm- command:
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Dear all,
Over the past ten years my centre has been collecting data regarding our management of patients following transurethral resection of the prostate. It is common practice to place a three-way catheter and run bladder irrigation post-op, however my centre does not do this and we believe our method streamlines the post-operative course and patients can be discharged quicker.
We are writing up our results and my understanding is that as we have not arranged this as a RCT that it will be difficult to prove the superiority of our method. However I am hoping to say that our method is as safe as common practice measured by multiple variables.
We have collected data for multiple points such as duration of admission, complication rates, re-admission rates, transfusion rates, success of removing catheters etc. To make a comparison between our novel method and common practice I have analysed papers included in NICE guidance regarding prostate resections - all of which would have used the common method. I have attached a table that I have filled in with available data.
I'm afraid I am quite lost as to how to analyse this table - my assumption would be that I should analyse each variable independently between the papers with a nul hypothesis being our method is inferior to common practice and a hypothesis that it is non-inferior. My research has suggested maybe an ANOVA test would be appropriate but again my understanding of this is severely limited - any help would be greatly appreciated!
Many thanks,
Leo
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Briefly saw your table and question. So ur unit does something differently and has better results than literature. My first strategy would be to look locally or across site if a group of patients were dealt by conventional practice and compare.... even if not rct setup but a comparison group will make statistics easy.
Ur sample is big. I note ur grams resection is on average lesser than others, would that be the cause of ur short admission.
You could do a subset analysis here splitting groups in a few categories by grams resected..I'm just assuming here it may have no relevance.... But you could then compare with other similar studies...
Getting a stat test p value by comparing to others studies...hmmm not sure.. read into one proportion Z test. Anova I think u will need raw data of others aswell which u wont have... dunnets test runs with anova I vaguely recall....
lastly as Charalampos suggested.. stick to simple numbers and compare without stats.
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I need a public benchmark MRI Prostate dataset for image registration/fusion. The dataset should be segmented with multiple segments per image i.e
1)Prostate gland
2)Peripheral zone
2)Central zone
3)Suspected Lesions
Thanks
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I can find no references to this in the English medical literature or in my institutional surgical specimen or post-mortem path reports.
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The median lobe is generally classed with the transition zone histologically, even though it is an anatomic construct, you may not find it in a pathology report, just TZ at base is probably in the path report. Anecdotally I think I have seen maybe 1 case that looked to be a TZ cancer that may have started there.
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the Motic program ( or another program according to your advice ) used for a photomicroscope image analysis for measuring the folds of seminal vesicles and the prostate.
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Dear, colleague!
Unfortunately we did not use the Motic Software program for measuring in our researches. The micrographs of the prostate glands were processed with the use of the Image Fiji  software .
With best wishes
Alexander Usovich
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I am a beginner in the research field and a resident in urology and I would like to try a journal that will be appropriate for me to try for the first time, publishing a case report about targeted prostate biopsy with micro-ultrasound.
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Search for a journal that suits your work
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I'm looking for a program that will do automatic approximate image segmentation for prostate T2 MRI images.
The program should be:
  1. Fast
  2. Automatic without the need for user supplied landmarks
  3. Robust in the sense of always producing an answer in a reasonable timeframe
  4. Reliable in that it will always approximately outline the prostate
  5. Freely available
The program does not need to be:
  1. Accurate. I only need an approximate answer, accuracy is not as important as reliability
  2. Open source
Sample Prostate MRI Image with segmentation attached
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We have developed an online segmentation tool with implemented AI-models, one of which can segment the prostate gland automatically. Find it here: www.medseg.ai.
A somewhat late answer but perhaps useful for future projects!
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We would like to evaluate a blood testing device for serial monitoring (ideally 3+ times in different cancer stages per patient). We couldn't find a blood bank that stores a series of samples for prostate and colorectal cancers... Is there any?
Thank you.
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I recommend you to search hospitals for patients of colorectal cancer and prostate cancer otherwise I don't think you will find this samples at blood bank.
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Prostate biopsy specimen should be put in a formalin solution (10% NBF) as soon as possible after sampling. However, if formalin use is not preferred within the operating room, can saline be used as a holding solution until all samples are taken (6/8/10/12 depending on the systematic biopsy scheme). Some, rather less verifiable sources, state that there will be a strict time limit on holding the specimen in saline until they really have to be placed in a formalin solution. However i cannot really verify this statement and cannot really find an explanation whether / why it is or is not allowed.
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No way to use normal saline because such tissue spaceman underwent abnormal cellular & architectural changeswhich that may give a wrong results at diagnosis. Only use formalin & kept at room temperature.
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I am working with prostate cancer cells, i want to know who is presently working with PCa cell lines in viro and in vivo in kolkata.any leeds will of great help.
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Unfortunately no one yet
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Hello, dear community,
I am currently researching semantic segmentation of the prostate in transabdominal ultrasound recordings.
My current data are insufficient, so I am wondering, whether there are any available transabdominal ultrasound image sets of the prosteate in adult male patients.
I thank you for your input,
Yours sincerely,
Richard Schultheis,
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Arnaud Doerfler Yes, I was fearing that would be the case.
Thank you for your answer
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We know that prostate secretes various vitamins and proteins including prostatic acid phosphatase into seminal plasma.
But I was wondering if some of these ( particularly prostatic acid phosphatase) is secreted into/comes in contact with blood.
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For nearly 30 years, we have been measuring serum prostatic acid phosphatase as part of our clinical staging workup of all new prostate cancer patients. PAP has a very high negative predictive value for a nuclear medicine bone scan result, so we risk stratify patients to avoid bone scans is most patients. I've attached two of our papers on the usefulness of the test.
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We're working on a project for which we require data in which the stage is also mentioned.
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Cześć
I send Polish cancer registers for comparison. you'll find interesting morbidity and mortality statistics.
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some authors suggested the "anteroposterior approach" rather than retrograde approach
I assume that anteroposterior approach is a bit challenging in a large prostate as the plane between the adenoma and the capsule is easier to find posteriorly, where the major bulk of the adenoma is located, than anteriorly?!!
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I think that the most important step in enucleation even for experienced surgeons, is to mark the distal end of enucleation proximal to the anatomic landmark vero, and at the vero turn the scope anterioly to mark the territory there as well. That way even if the field becomes bloody safety margins are respected throughout the operation.
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Carcinoma Prostate has been risk stratified and management based on the same is well established.
However, clinically T3a disease still remains a "grey zone" in the management strategies, in order to achieve the "Prostatic trifecta"".
With emerging radiological evidence that long capsular contact as well as capsular bulge (on MRI) should be considered as clinically T3a disease, the T2 disease paradigm also has had a dramatic shift.
What should be the ideal treatment strategy- Radical Prostatectomy or Radical Radiotherapy?
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Our aim with surgery is to have R0 N0 M0 disease. So extended PLND is also indicated during surgery.
Otherwise do radiation therapy
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I am doing work on prostate cancer cell line - LNCaP - and using PSA antibody to show androgen deprivation. We currently have 3 in our lab, none of which are giving us a signal for western blots. They have worked previously for someone else in the lab - all that being said not very well. We have the Santa Cruz (A67-B/E3): sc-7316 and 2 Abcam 1 mouse monoclonal (A67-B/E3 ab2218) and 1 rabbit monoclonal (EP1588Y ab76113). All are stored at 4C as stated on data sheet and have been used as concentrated as 1.100 with no signal. I even tried a native blot which again no signal was observed. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
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Agree with previous answers. Is the positive control working? Are you sure the protein quality and quantity in your samples proper? Revise your procedure for other errors.
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Dear all,
just a quick question about experience in reading the prostate MRI: is there any minimum number of prostate MRI/year to define the experience of the reader? (i.e: 50 prostate MRY/year = low experience Vs 200 prost MRI/year = high experience).
If yes, is there a consensus about that? Is there any reference in literature? 
Many thanks!
Best regards,
Filippo 
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The most common way to do it is X years post fellowship experience or X years experience in interpreting prostate MRI. By far, this is the most common way it is expressed. No consensus that I am aware of.
Alternatively, in addition to the years of experience, can try to estimate the total number of prostate MRI's the radiologist has interpreted during their career, e.g., Pickersgill et al.
Pairing years of experience with the latter is probably more useful but the X years post-fellowship or years with interpreting prostate MRI experience is far more common.
I don't think exams/year would be a better metric compared to estimated total number of exam interpreted.
All and all, you're probably safe with years of experience. If expertise is one of the underlying themes of your study, pair it with estimated number of exams interpreted.
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Hi,
We are trying to establish subcutaneous tumor in NSG mice using prostate cancer cell line PC3 (engineered with firefly luc). We use IVIS to monitor tumor growth and noticed that the tumor size (Fluc intensity) was largest on Day3, decreased half on Day7, and slowly increased in the following 2-3 weeks, but still not reaching or surpassing the reading on Day3. We worked with subcutaneous tumor model in NSG mice before using other cell lines (eg, lymphoma) and we have always observed very fast and exponential tumor growth.
So I would like to ask;
1. Is what we observed with PC3 cells normal?
2. Would other prostate cancer cell lines (Lncap, Du154) form better subcutaneous tumors in NSG mice?
3. Are there other ways to improve PC3 tumor growth in vivo? (We noticed that the PC3 tumors grow better with matrigel, but we would like to avoid matrigel usage if possible. Also there is this paper where they seemed to grow PC3 tumors just fine without matrigel:
Thank you!
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Ellen S Vitetta Thank you very much for the suggestions!
Brett P Gross Hi Brett, thanks a lot for sharing the data! It is very interesting to know that starting with a smaller number would actually result in better tumor growth and larger tumors in the end.
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we need to hear from the experts their experience on the field.
thanks
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Dear Inyang
Here you can see a current review in this matter
Prostate cancer: diagnostic criteria and role of immunohistochemistry
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Hi,
I need some reference to the following question:
I need some rules of a thump for a retrospective multivariate survival analysis. We are looking at cases that got cancer of urinary bladder, prostate and kidney. All together there are 320 cases of urinary bladder, 1500 of prostate and 352 of kidney.
We have around 40 variables and want to do a multivariate survival analysis (approximately 300 deaths happened in all groups together) and a multivariate analysis of how those variables are related to the incidence of cancer (variables such as number of symptoms at their visit of GP,..).
For the multivariate analysis there is role of a thump to have 15-20 variables for each independent variable.
Does something like this exist for multivariate survival analysis for retrospective data (for example we have 320 cases of cancer in one group, how much deaths must occur to be able to calculate the multivariate survival analysis)?
Thank you very much for your help.
Špela
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it might be, however i prefer divide the studies. Because reader wants to read in simple not complex
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Are there any known foods and known food contents that can increase prostate enlargement related symptoms such as frequent calls and low urine flow most often with urine retention in the bladder?
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I don't think so. The main mediator of prostate enlargement (benign prostatic hyperplasia) is dihydrotestosterone (DHT), a metabolite of testosterone that is formed in the prostate cell by the breakdown of testosterone. The enzyme 5-alpha reductase converts testosterone to DHT.
Please also have a look at these useful links.
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What causes Abacterial prostatits?
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There is no direct evidence for pathophysiology. I guess sexual behaviours and std pathogens like ureoplasma and mycoplasms etc should be investigated.
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Hi,
I am trying to model 3D prostate CAD model for COMSOL multiphysics. I've heard that I can produce 3D image from CT image slices. Is there any way to get CT images slices? Also, it would be great to get some recommendation about software that converts 2D image slices to 3D CAD.
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3D slicer can help you out in converting the medical image (DICOM) to 3D model(Stl)
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I need to isolate and culture prostate tumor cells from the clinical sample. The clinician will be providing the sample after prostectomy. So I ve to isolate tumor cells out of the sample which may contain normal cells too. Can anyone suggest me a method to differentiate tumor cells from the normal ones?
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expression of the DD3PCA3 gene is a very sensitive and specific marker for the detection of prostate tumor cells in a high background of normal (prostate) cells.
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RWPE-1 and WPE-stem are two prostate cell lines which need K-SFM(Gibco 17005-042) as their culture medium,which is in the protocol provided by ATCC.Problem is that in China mainland,because the medium has BPE(bovine pituitary extract) as a component,it is prohibited to import from overseas.My colleagues told me KM(sciencell 2101) or defined K-SFM(Gibco 10744-019) could be used as equivalence.But I asked technical support of Gibco to assure it,they gave me a negative answer.Could anyone tell me is there substitute medium which also could be used to culture these two cells? Thanks!
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Hi, Have u tried to grow them in other media like RPMI??
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I have downloaded CEL files of two datasets from GEO and I want to combine them. Each dataset has some benign prostate glands and some prostate cancer samples and they both have the same platform. first, I decided to compare their benign samples by R and if they didn’t show significant differences then I combine them. The result was totally unexpected! All q-values and p-values are significantly different and the numbers are very large. Now, I can’t understand why they are so different and I need to know whether it is necessary to compare the benign samples in order to combine them later? What criteria are important for combining two data sets?
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Thank you very much Greeshma.
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I am beginning a literature review for the last semester for my degree and need some reliable statistics from England for the prevalence of prostate cancer and also statistics of how many men are undergoing PSA and/or prostate exams.
Thanks
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Hello Jeremy,
These stats from UK charities for prostate cancer are from past years; if you contact them, they may have something more up to date:
This might help with the PSA stats:
Young, G. J., Harrison, S., Turner, E. L., Walsh, E. I., Oliver, S. E., Ben-Shlomo, Y., ... & Donovan, J. L. (2017). Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing of men in UK general practice: a 10-year longitudinal cohort study. BMJ open, 7(10), e017729.
Littlejohns, Thomas J., et al. "Lifestyle factors and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing in UK Biobank: Implications for epidemiological research." Cancer Epidemiology 45 (2016): 40-46.
Best wishes with your degree,
Mary
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dear doctors I am looking for someone who helps me to evaluate the anti-prostate cancer activity of plants and their active ingredients in vitro?
best regards
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BRCA1 and BRCA2 are considered as tumour suppressor genes but mutations of these genes are selectively increase the risk of breast and ovarian cancers, compare to other type of tissue cancers.is there any reason for tissue specificity?
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Hi Kamalathasan.
The organs are all expressing ER during embryonic development, certain cell phenotype differentiation and maintenance of the adult organs. And BRCA genes may be involved in ER signaling. Thus, Epigenetic regulation of BRCA genes appear to be related to ER-activated other gene regulation.
Regards.
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I am looking for a research article that has specifically written about histopathological effect of filed cancer in case of major cancer sites such as breast, lung, liver, prostate, colon, etc.
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I am already very deep in literature survey since I am in my 3rd year of PhD. I am currently reading about field cancerization... And since my work focuses on histopathological analysis of images.. I couldn't find any good reference paper with respect to histological changes due to field effect. Hence thought to ask here. Thank you for your suggestion.
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I am planning to use COBAS 4800 to test for HPV in prostate cancer.
What will be the best sample type for DNA extraction and the best protocol?
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yes.thet thru.
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A 65 year old diabetic male.
Presented with first time Acute urine retention.
A urethral catheter was fixed for 2 weeks and tamsulosin starte
DRE revealed large prostate of benign feeling
LAS is 3.6 ng/ml
Ultrasound showed large prostate 200 gm
After removal of the cather he can void
Urodynamic showed hypocontractile bladder but he can void using abdominal pressure
PVR is 85 cc
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I agree with Dr Basulto-Martinez. I would add Finasteride or Dutasteride to the Tamsulosin and reassess him in a few months. If failed medical therapy then I would suggest to consider HoLEP rather than TURP.
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I am looking for a chemical target unique to prostate cells either at the cell surface or within the cell.
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Hi Daniel, important is how you want to target those proteins, either through western blots, immunofluorescence, immunohistochemistry, or flow cytometry or anything else. And, also whether your target is a normal, hypertrophic or a malignant prostate.
Numerous unique markers exist on prostatic cells like the famous PSA, which is a powerful serine protease elaborated by epithelial cells of prostatic duct.
Alpha 2 macroglobulin and alpha -1 antichymotrypsin, both of them sheath the PSA molecule.
Heavy expression of CD166 (ALCAM), which is a transmembrane glycoprotein, especially in CRPC (metastatic) cases.
PSMA (Prostate specific membrane antigen), a transmembrane protein present in all the tissues of prostate.
PSCA (Prostate stem cell antigen) of 10-24 kD and found in basal and secretory epithelial cells of prostate.
And may this article will help you further!
Regards....
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I am doing IHC in prostate tissue and all the time I loose the nucleus in the cell. I follow the standard protocol. Kindly suggest me what different I should do?
The following is the protocol which I follow:
1.       Xylene I       3mins
2.       Xylene II      3mins
3.       Xylene III     3mins
4.       100% EtoH  3mins
5.       100% EtoH  3mins
6.       90% EtoH    3mins
7.       75% EtoH    3mins
8.       50% EroH    3mins
9.       Distilled water    5mins
10.   Antigen Retrival (Soudium Citrate using vegetable steamer)  40mins
11.   Room Temp    20mins
12.   Distilled water   5mins
13.   TBS               5mins
14.   Peroxide Block      15mins
15.   TBS                       5mins
16.   TBST                     5mins
17.   Blocking               13mins
18.   1oAb                    1hr RT followed by 4oC overnight
19.    TBS                     5mins
20.   TBST                    5mins
21.   Super Enhancer   20mins
22.   TBS                      3mins
23.   TBST                    3mins
24.   2oAb                     30min
25.   TBS                      3mins
26.   TBS                      3mins
27.   DAP                      5mins
28.   TBS                      3mins
29.   Distilled Water      3mins
30.   Hematoxylin         15sec
31.   Running Tap water     3mins
32.   Blueing Solution         1min
33.   Running Tap water     2mins
34.   Mounting                   
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Dear Venkatesh,
Are you sure you need the antigen retrieval. Have you tried the staining without that step. If you really need it you might consider a slightly different AR and do that, cooled, in the microwave, If there is no experience for that, let me know.
The 1st Ab step is rather long. This does not cause the nuclei to disappear, but shorter incubations may lead to better results, less bachground signal.
Good luck
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exercise and prostate cancer in animal model, and how long time for induction cacner in prostate of Rat
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Increasing physical activity decreases the risks of prostate cancer in patients between 20 to 65 years of age.
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Are there studies to see if pre or post operative physiotherapy is more effective for post-prostatectomy patients?
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Hello Niamh,
The use prior vs postsurgery pelvic floor muscle exercises does not appear to provide additional benefit.:
Influence of preoperative and postoperative pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) compared with postoperative PFMT on urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy: a randomized controlled trial.
Geraerts I, Van Poppel H, Devoogdt N, Joniau S, Van Cleynenbreugel B, De Groef A, Van Kampen M 
Eur Urol. 2013;64(5):766. 
BACKGROUNDThe efficacy of preoperative pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) for urinary incontinence (UI) after open radical prostatectomy (ORP) and robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RARP) is still unclear.
OBJECTIVETo determine whether patients with additional preoperative PFMT regain urinary continence earlier than patients with only postoperative PFMT after ORP and RARP.
DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTSA randomized controlled trial enrolled 180 men who planned to undergo ORP/RARP.
INTERVENTIONThe experimental group (E, n=91) started PFMT 3 wk before surgery and continued after surgery. The control group (C, n=89) started PFMT after catheter removal.
OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS AND STATISTICAL ANALYSISThe primary end point was time to continence. Patients measured urine loss daily (24-h pad test) until total continence (three consecutive days of 0 g of urine loss) was achieved. Secondary end points were 1-h pad test, visual analog scale (VAS), International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), and quality of life (King's Health Questionnaire [KHQ]). Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox regression with correction for two strata (age and type of surgery) compared time and continence. The Fisher exact test was applied for the 1-h pad test and VAS; the Mann-Whitney U test was applied for IPSS and KHQ.
RESULTS AND LIMITATIONSPatients with additional preoperative PFMT had no shorter duration of postoperative UI compared with patients with only postoperative PFMT (p=0.878). Median time to continence was 30 and 31 d, and median amount of first-day incontinence was 108 g and 124 g for groups E and C, respectively. Cox regression did not indicate a significant difference between groups E and C (p=0.773; hazard ratio: 1.047 [0.768-1.425]). The 1-h pad test, VAS, and IPSS were comparable between both groups. However, "incontinence impact" (KHQ) was in favor of group E at 3 mo and 6 mo after surgery.
CONCLUSIONSThree preoperative sessions of PFMT did not improve postoperative duration of incontinence.
Best wishes
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I am looking for prostate adenocarcinoma images specifically. Ideally would be a large repository that is free and downloadable looking for these types of images:
Thanks!
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Greetings .I find these are suitable 4 ur purpose.
sincerely yours.
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Looking at the anatomy of the male urinary tract, there's the urinary bladder which gives off the prostatic urethra where urine passes through when the internal urethral sphincter relaxes. The prostate gland itself surrounds the prostatic urethra, and I would think the gland secretes into the urethra (hence how some urinary PSA gets into urine samples collected).
Do these prostatic secretions leak backwards through a contracted internal urinary sphincter and into the urine stored in the urinary bladder when a man is in a "resting state" (i.e. not urinating, which would relax the sphincter)?
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Interest Ask.
I think you're right. Such leakage can affect the concentration of the biomarker.
Alternatively, the sampling should be carried out not on the first morning urination
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Dear colleagues,
I am Jakhongir F. Alidjanov, urologist from Uzbekistan, working on Research Project at the Justus-Liebig University of Giessen.
The main aim of the project is to investigate changes in metabolomic profile of the urine due to causative pathogens of urinary tract infections. Since being clinician, I am not so familiar with advanced microbiology. Therefore I would really appreciate if you could help me to clarify some advanced issues.
What pathogenic bacteria (E. coli, P. aeruginosa, E, faecalis, K. pneumoniae, S. saprophiticus etc.) do usually use as a nutrient source for living and multiplication in the urine? Below, I am posting some metabolites present in the urine which in my humble opinion could be appropriate to be investigated.
1. 1.3-propanediol (K. pneumoniae);
2. 4-Pyridoxic acid;
3. 6-hydroxylnicotinic acid (P. aeruginosa);
4. Acetate (highest in presence of Gram+);
5. Androsterone (may be reduced in stress urinary incontinence);
6. Citrate;
7. Creatinine;
8. Ethanol;
9. Formate (highest in presence of Gram-);
10. Glucose;
11. Glycerol (K. pneumoniae);
12. Glycolic acid;
13. Hippurate (highest in presence of Gram-);
14. Indoxyl sulphate (may be converted by uropathogens into indirubin and indigo – “purple bag syndrome”);
15. Lactate (highest in presence of Gram+);
16. L-alanine;
17. L-cysteine;
18. L-fucose (may have an influence to virulence of some E. coli strains producing verotoxin);
19. L-glutamine;
20. L-histidine;
21. L-lysine;
22. L-serine;
23. L-theronine;
24. L-tyrosine;
25. Mandelic acid (antibacterial properties);
26. Methanol;
27. N-acetylneuraminic acid (found in cell membranes, may make a sense in diagnosing intracellular E. coli?);
28. Nicotinic acid (P. aeruginosa);
29. Nitrite;
30. Succinate (highest in presence of Gram-);
31. Taurine;
32. Trimethylamine (E. coli);
33. Trimethylamine N-oxide (E. coli);
34. Urea (highest in presence of Gram-);
35. α-Aminoadipic acid;
Could you please look on them and give your suggestions regarding this issue? What else should we investigate?
Thank you all in advance for your responses.
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Dear Jakhongir,
It is a very interesting project. I suggest that you take a look on the recent advances in this field. For example, H-NMR has been utilized for profiling of urinary tract infection.
Ekaterina Nevedomskaya et al. have published an article entitled " 1H NMR-based metabolic profiling of urinary tract infection: combining multiple statistical models and clinical data" and the conclusions emerged from their study:
"In the current paper we used a metabolomics approach to profile UTI, which is on the one hand one of the most common infectious diseases among the adults, and on the other hand a disease that still lacks markers of morbidity. Using 1H NMR profiles of urine we generated various statistical models: (a) discriminating UTI patients and control subjects, (b) following the recovery process of UTI patients and (c) associating urine metabolic content with bacterial contamination. The discriminative model was able to classify most of the independent samples correctly according to their diagnosis, which indicates its high predictive ability. Comparing the sets of molecules derived from different analyses, we concluded that some of the compounds (e.g. trimethylamine and acetate) can be attributed to the effect of bacterial contamination of urine; others (e.g. para-aminohippuric acid, scyllo-inositol) can be considered markers of morbidity."
On the other hand, Haitao Lv et al. have used LC-MS as an Integrated Metabolomic Profiling Approach for Infectious Diseases Research. The following is the publication abstract for quick view:
Metabolomic profiling offers direct insights into the chemical environment and metabolic pathway activities at sites of human disease. During infection, this environment may receive important contributions from both host and pathogen. Here we apply untargeted metabolomics approach to identify compounds associated with an E. coli urinary tract infection population. Correlative and structural data from minimally processed samples were obtained using an optimized LC-MS platform capable of resolving ∼2300 molecular features. Principal components analysis readily distinguished patient groups and multiple supervised chemometric analyses resolved robust metabolomic shifts between groups. These analyses revealed nine compounds whose provisional structures suggest candidate infection-associated endocrine, catabolic, and lipid pathways. Several of these metabolite signatures may derive from microbial processing of host metabolites. Overall, this study highlights the ability of metabolomic approaches to directly identify compounds encountered by, and produced from, bacterial pathogens within human hosts.
Other important publications which may be helpful are contained in the following links:
Hoping this will be helpful,
Rafik
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I am a Medicine School student at Koç University (Currently a Junior.) I have an animal certificate regarding my eligiblity on conducting animal researches (CITI and Local Ethical Comitee.) I am now interested in prostate and testis cancer looking for a new research to be involved.
Thank You
Oğuzhan Şal
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@Ceren G Korkmaz Clinicians in Turkey have been assesing prostate cancer solely using PSA; Recatl Digital Examination and radiologic imagining.
However there are other markers indicating that there is an abnormal  proliferation in prostate such as Kİ-67,EPCA,PCA3,Fatty acid synthase and even RT-PCR allowing clincians to asssess whether the reason of rise in PSA due to a prostatitis or a cancerous tissue.
My question is this; In Turkey are these methods started to be used; if used for how long and where? (other than PSA,RDE,USG); prostate biopsies can also irritate prostate and lead a false increase in PSA and can hurt the patient (also including risk of infection).
If not; can you give reasons?
@Karan Sood; I have no opportunity to come India; as a researcher in this topic, can you suggest me a link to catch-up recent studies and a lead topic to join a research group.
Thank you all
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As I have understood,castration resistant prostate cancer is a rather clinical concept,which means prostate cancer progress to a non-responsive state to ADT after a session of ADT treatment.I am interested in how to understand CRPC from molecular and biological perspective.Although read articles in this field,unfortunately,I got no answer.So I ask this question here,and appreciate any expert can help me with my confusion.
best regard!
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respected Xudong Yang
Your question was exactly takyu So I wrote. I do not mean to offend you.
on the mechanisms and biology of this cancer have to work more. Good links already shown counterparts. There are a number of works at the last congress of the EUA
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What category of patients you perform monopolar TURP?
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 According to my experience, if we analyse the resected mass of the prostate there is stil advantage of the monopolar TURP. Of course new generations of the bipolar instruments could change it.
I agree with Walter that the incidence of N. Obturatorius reflex is much lower performing  bipolar TUR .
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I want to do classification of prostate E&H cancer tissue images 
Need some Gleason graded dataset to train my algorithm
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My topic of PhD research is "Computer Aided Detection of Prostate Cancer from MRI Images using Machine Intelligence Techniques". From where do I have to start prostate segmentation? Does registration has to be done before segmentation or is it optional? Are there any open source codes available for learning the existing methods of prostate segmentation?
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Hi Bejoy,
If you are able to post an example image or dataset, we may be able to put together a recipe file for you in our new extended free trial software MIPAR (http://MIPAR.us) that should at the very least make you aware of the processing techniques involved in prostate segmentation if you need to track down open source codes yourself.
Cheers,
John
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I am working on prostate gland modeling and I am looking for anatomical detailed information of the prostate gland and its enviroment
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Dear Sir,
For to understanding the anatomy of prostate gland and associated organs, its environment  Gray's Anatomy is too good. Additionally Netter's atlas of human anatomy and McMinn's colour atlas of human anatomy will help you better understanding of Morphology and and its related structures.
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which is the approximate incidence of pseudo hyperplastic prostate adenocarcinoma between carcinomas of its population or hospital?
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which is the approximate incidence of pseudo hyperplastic prostate adenocarcinoma between carcinomas of its population or hospital?
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I am trying to expand a prostate antigen specific T-cell population in NOD mice. I have tried to culture bone marrow derived DC's from NOD mice and not had much luck in getting functional mature DC's (CD11c low, MHCII high, CD86 pos). I also tried using irradiated splenocytes from a naive NOD mouse based off the methods section included in the PLOS ONE paper I have attached. The only way I strayed from this protocol was by using splenocytes, instead of a pure CD4 population. Please help me if you know of ANY other way to expand a specific population of T-cells
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Hi Ashlee, going by your last statement, i believe you are trying to "expand a specific population of T cells".
I am attaching a publication of mine with the protocol to expand single cell T cell clones, done in NOD mice. The trick is to be patient. Generally, you will get 4-5 wells/96 wells with some cell growth and survival. So start with 4-5 96W plates, plated at 1 cell per well. Also use U bottom plates. Once you have cells growing out, transfer them to 2/3 96W plates, then 48 w plate, 24 w plate, before you can finally expand them in 6 well plates. I would suggest making freeze downs in the 48 or 24 well plate stage. Finally, do not over stimulate the cells. Use half the peptide concentration that you would use for bulk stimulation while cloning.
Good luck
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Uoflowmetry has limited role as an independent predictor of failure of medical management in patients with BPE.
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Uroflow should not be relied upon as an "independent" predictor of successful medical management of BPE.  BPE is not necessarily synonamous with BPH and may be due to inflammation or malignant neoplasm.  Reduced uroflow may often be a sign of detrusor insufficiency, a common cause of failure of medical management of "BPH".  Transrectal US can be helpful in evaluation of the lobar distribution of BPH and critical in demonstrating intra-vesical protrusion of prostatic growth (including median lobe).  The latter has been associated with treatment response as has prostatic shape (Presumed Circle Area Ratio).  US or MRI classification of lobar hyperplasia abd correlation with symptoms, signs, and treatment response is also in early stages of research.
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Dear all,
I am developing a biomechanical model to estimate prostate deformations during brachytherapy. I am working with finite elements on a tetrahedral mesh derived from segmented images. I am trying to figure out currently how from the deformed mesh (result of finite element analysis) i will go back to the volumetric image (deformation of the initial image).
Any insight of somebody who have adressed similar tasks or any references would be very helpful.
Thank you in advance,
Konstantinos.
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Hello,
What you could try is (if your image are from ct scan or mri data) :
- Export a list of nodes coordinates data after simulation from the FEM software to a .txt file or .xls
- Convert them to the same image space as your segmented image, using interpixelspace , interslicespace found in the dicom
- Round the coordinate list, this will give you the index of every pixel representing the deformed mesh
- Change the pixel value of the original image using the previously found index to display the deformed shape on the image.
The rounding may lead to the creation of gaps, but this can be corrected if it's annoying.
Depending on your segmentation software you can directly import stl files and convert them to mask. So that you will just have to export your deformed mesh to a .stl file and import it back to your segmentation software.
Hope it helps.
Jean-Baptiste
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Unnecessary prostate biopsies can be avoided in patients with serum PSA values in gray-zone of 4-10 ng/ml by simply excluding prostatitis.
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PSA density, the ratio of free PSA to total PSA and PSA velocity are very usefull to select the best candidate for biopsy. So yes we should always repeat PSA. There is no role for antibiotic treatment in these patients except when you suspect a chroni bacterial prostatitis so a prostatic massage and a culture of prostatic secretion or post massage urinary drops are mandatory. At present, MRI had shown a clear advantage in these patient as a normal MRI avoid unnecessary biopsies.
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Institutional and technical obstacles against learning HoLEP
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Good mentoring
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Dear RG community,
I need to obtain information of the prostate volume changes during the brachytherapy for my project. The software used in the collaborating clinic is Variseed for brachytherapy dosimetry. In the brochure of the software I see is possible to obtain a so-called "User-defined report for contiguous volume analysis" has anyone experience with the software and this feature?
Thank you very much in advance,
Konstantinos.
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Of course there is. And the last calibration comes up as the default. You just need to click through the wizard to confirm nothing has changed.
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I need to induce chronic inflammation in prostate of adult rat using LPS via injection, but I don't want to use surgery.
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I'm not sure if this would help but Wade Bushman's lab developed a transurethral prostate inflammation model in mice
Prostatic inflammation induces urinary frequency in adult mice.
Lee S1, Yang G2, Bushman W3.
 We developed an animal model of bacterial induced, isolated prostatic inflammation and examined the effect of prostatic inflammation on voiding behavior in adult C57BL/6J mice. Prostatic inflammation was induced by transurethral inoculation of uropathogenic E. coli-1677.
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Hello, I am investigating the evolution of prostate edema during brachytherapy. The key factors of the edema is the tissue trauma due to the needles insertion and the radiation deposition of the radioactive seeds. Are there any references to studies or experience regarding the needles insertion. I am trying to find standardised parameters for a generic model.
Thank you
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3 articles are attached, which may be useful in your studies.
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When we consider the various tissue samples such as testis,seminal vesicle,vas deferens,prostate,kidney.Is the expression status of B-actin in various tissue sample  is same or different ?
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I think the expression level of the B- actin is different in different tissue, Its one of six isoform of actin and majorly seen in cardiac myocytes and CD33 expressing myeloid cells. I worked on this protein in establishing synaptic connection B/W nerve fiber important for chronic headache.
for full report please see database site.
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Hello, my question is about how I am able to add two or more meshes.
My goal is to export a mesh  of a ct scan of the prostate. I do that using slicer3d to create a surface mesh from the label map. I continue by creating a volume mesh using gmsh derived from the surface mesh.
I want to set specific domain around the surgery needles (used during the brachytherapy procedure ) in the prostate mesh.
To do that I think to make a label mask for the needles position and create another mesh which will be consisted of a number of aligned parallelepipeds.
Now my question is if its possible to combine the volume mesh of the prostate with the volume mesh of the needles in order to obtain a mesh with multiple domains which I will use for FE analysis giving different conditions to the needles domain.
ps. By needle domain i refer in fact to a region of the prostate (around a needle) where edema is considered to be initialised.
Thank you in advance Konstantinos.
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Hi Konstantinos
For Open Source tools, take a look at
GMSH is executed using commands.Salome & Meshlab have GUIs.
Salome can do volume from surface mesh, but uses a plugin that is commercial. I believe academics may get it for free. Netgen is used in Salome.
Meshlab is intended for preparing geomtry for 3D printers.
Sincerely
Claes
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Hello, I am wondering if it is possible to give specific attributes in specific elements in COMSOL. In more detail I want to set some elements of the a real prostate mesh as liquid sources in an edema study. Is possible to give conditions to some elements by choice in COMSOL and if yes how?
Thank you in advance
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Hi Konstantinos,
Your question to apply properties to an element is not according to the philosophy of Comsol. Other FEM codes work with the concept of applying conditions or setting to nodes and elements. But elements and nodes are not existing features in your physics, and the solution should not be dependent of element shape, size and positions of nodes, so your conditions should rather be formulated in function of positional variables. For instance, a point source which is mentioned before, can be added in the physics as a smoothed Dirac function at any given position, independent of the presence of nodes. Of course, the smoothing is necesary to avoid that the Dirac function remains unnoticed in the nodes around. For the same reason, it should always be avoided to use boolean switching type of functions and prefer to use smoothed versions, in order to avoid spurious variations when changing mesh or time steps (if functions or atributes change as funtion of time instead of position). 
The approach also makes it much easier to work with moving sources or attributes that move in time. Comsol has som predefined function for smoothed unit step (Heaviside) or smoothed Dirac. Look in the manual for functions like flsmhs, flc1hs, flc2hs (different versions of step functions) and their derivatives (=Dirac) with names that just add a "d" in their name, such as fldsmhs, etcetera.
Typically, the mootheing transition size that you must provide in the function (second parameter) should be of the order of the element size, or the time step, depending on the situation.
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Hello, I am trying to make a biomechanical model of the prostate gland using the COMSOL software and I am searching for proper biomechanical properties of the prostate for accurate modeling.
Could anyone help me in this task?
I need this characteristics:
1) tissue density
2) Young's modulus
3) Poisson's ratio
4) Permeability
5) Biot-Willis coeficcient
6) Porosity
7) Permeability
Thank you in advance!!
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HI!
this looks pretty good:
Mechanical Property Characterization of Prostate Cancer Using a Minimally Motorized Indenter in an Ex Vivo Indentation Experiment
Bum-Mo Ahna, Jung Kima, Lorenzo Ianb, Kun-Ho Rhab, Hyung-Joo Kimc, d, ,
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Hello! I am trying to do a poroelasticity analysis for the prostate gland in the COMSOL framework using the poroelastic module. I need to set the poroelastic parameters of the prostate's material for the solution of the equations, however I cant find something relevant in the bibliography. Has anyone tried something similar for other soft tissues too? And if so what parameters have been used?
Thank you in advance for your answers.
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We've done poroviscoelastic modeling of the lung parenchyma in COMSOL. Not sure if this would be helpful to you, but you can check out: 
Z. Dai, Y. Peng, B. Henry, H. A. Mansy, and T. J. Royston. A Comprehensive Computational Model of Sound transmission through the Porcine Lung. J. Acous. Soc. Am. 136 (3), 1419 - 29 (2014). doi: 10.1121/1.4890647.
Y. Peng, Z. Dai, H. A. Mansy, R. H. Sandler, R. A. Balk, and T. J. Royston. Sound transmission in the chest under surface excitation: an experimental and computational study with diagnostic applications. Med. Biol. Engin. Comp. 52, 695–706 doi: 10.1007/s1151