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Even if behavior was "embodied", wouldn't the brain notice? YES, of course: then the BRAIN would become the better "vehicle" for remembering, thinking, and "time travel" (i.e. prospective memory) -- possible (and possibly trivial) sensori-motor components notwithstanding. [ I am really quite tired of the "embodied" conceptualizations (which have yet to be shown as non-fictions *). See my writings. No one has argued against the views/approaches (content) in these writings NOR accepted/liked/or adopted them (now 1+ years (or 5+ years, depending how you look at it) and counting). ]
* Footnote: All this nonsense is ALL because NO PSYCHOLOGY OUTLOOK (other than my own) "believes in" anything psychological, innately guided, and emerging with ontogeny (which is not tenable). (The idea that learning is literally nearly always "the same" (outside of clearly always being associative in nature) is preposterous (think of a two -year-old and an adolescent -- and imagine any systematic and universal instruction you credibly might posit). P.S. Relatedly : "Culture" does NOT directly impinge on the individual -- the actual Subject and ultimate, but absolutely necessary, unit of analysis &/or explanation (for Biology or for Science). All executive or "meta" processes can NOT be properly shown to be anything but homunculi.)
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Dear Gerry Leisman
NONE of what you say is contrary to what I say. I don't, for my most reasonable position, have to believe there are no connections in/to the greater body, JUST THAT THEY ARE LIKELY TRIVIAL AND NOT ALONE (there are plenty of reasons to believe there are the most significant representations in the brain). Neuroscience as a big help to psychology is unlikely (brain patterns are more sophisticated than we can make sense of -- they are LIKELY as sophisticated AS THE NUANCES OF BEHAVIOR PATTERNS THEMSELVES; and, to wit, I have written essays on this and have most-reasonably argued that you must know the BEHAVIOR __PATTERNS__ very well to know what the more obscure brain indicators may refer to -- and DO THIS for the most part, NOT the other way around.)
Sadly all these BIG BELIEFS in/of embodying "representation" in sensori-motor ways is just because you do not have a belief/presumption/assumption structure to believe what is VERY likely, biologically: THAT THERE ARE SUBTLE, BUT IMPORTANT BIOLOGICAL BEHAVIOR SHIFTS WITH ONTOGENY -- these likely BASIC perceptual shifts, in a significant sense originating FROM THE ORGANISM ITSELF in appropriate environments. You are not stage theorists, which essentially means you cannot see behavior __PATTERNS__ (a very rare term, and when used : not correctly) or anything else of the TRUE BIOLOGICAL NATURE OF BEHAVIOR __PATTERNS__ AND PATTERNINGS OF patterns. And, as you are thus separated from the biology of BEHAVIOR ("just behavior", BEHAVIOR PER SE,) you are separated (needlessly) from science (strict empiricism) itself.
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I am thinking to do a study on looking at the relationship between prospective memory and academic procrastination. Rationale is that procrastinator might delay a task intentionally but might forget to get back to the task a result of poor prospective memory?
is it possible?
Thanks
Vatsal
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Identifying the Neural Substrates of Procrastination: a Resting-State fMRI Study
Wenwen Zhang, Xiangpeng Wang, Tingyong Feng Sci Rep. 2016; 6: 33203
Understanding the Cognitive and Genetic Underpinnings of Procrastination: Evidence for Shared Genetic Influences with Goal Management and Executive Function Abilities
Daniel E. Gustavson, Akira Miyake, John K. Hewitt, Naomi P. Friedman : J Exp Psychol Gen. 2015 Dec; 144(6): 1063–1079.
Check if the authors are here on RG and connect with them.
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I have no experience in statistics whatsoever and I am trying to teach myself online. Just wondering if anyone can help.
I have conducted an experiment with two groups
1. Morning Shift
2. Night Shift
and I tested to see how they would perform in a measure of prospective memory (a game they played on their computer)
Participants were engaged in an ongoing task, and then needed to remember to respond with the correct action when a target appeared on the screen.
As well as how many targets they managed to hit, I am also interested in their reaction time and how well they performed in the on going task.
I have all the data in an excel spread sheet I just don't know what to do with it.
I collected other information such as age, gender, cups of coffee, how long they had been awake, activity level during the day, and whether they had a nap and how sleepy they felt before the test.
And I would like to know whether I can see whether these things influenced the results at all, and if they did how I can "see through" that to get a more accurate answer as to whether shift start time affects prospective memory performance.
If anyone can shed some light on where to begin, or steps that need to be taken, programs I need to use, links I can follow - anything!
That would be great!!
Thank you!
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A t-test is of course better tahn an ANOVA, because it takes into account the possible differences between variance. Run the Welch t-test if variances are unequal: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B_1cnwYn7so
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I'm teaching the links between PM and WM and have a couple of articles but ideally need more to shown links between these two.
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Certainly not exhaustive, but here are a few cites you may want to check out:
Marsh & Hicks (1998); Kidder, Park, Herzog, & Morrel (1997); Kliegel, Martin, McDaniel, & Einstein (2002); Smith & Bayen (2005); Brewer, Knight, Marsh, & Unsworth (2010); Unsworth, Brewer, & Spillers (2012); Ball, Knight, DeWitt, & Brewer (2014); Rose, Rendell, McDaniel, Aberle, & Kliegel (2010); Schnitzpahn, Stahl, Zeintl, Kaller, & Kliegel (2013); Reynolds, West, & Braver (2009)
I'm probably biased, but I think the Brewer et al. (2010) paper is one of the easier to grasp studies that demonstrates that WM is needed for attentionally demanding tasks (i.e., nonfocal PM), but not for more automatic tasks (i.e., focal PM). But I'd say Marsh & Hicks (1998) is probably one of the most classic cites on the topic. I also like the modeling approach taken by Smith & Bayen (2005).
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How to find out ERP component in Prospective memory task after stimulus presentation and which ERP component (Peak) is represent it?
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Pankaj,
The 2011 review paper from Neuropsychologia is probably the most complete review of the ERP and prospective memory literature. There are some newer studies that have appeared in the last couple of years; however, these have not really introduced new component but rather refined our understanding of components identified in previous research. I have attached a PDF of the Neuropsychologia paper, I hope that you find it useful in your research. Cheers, Rob
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Why is there a difference between an item on a to-do list or calendar that says "Goto gym" versus one that says "Fit into tuxedo in time for wedding - work out at the gym now!"
Which studies can I read that demonstrate this difference?
Thanks
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See research on "implementation intentions" https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Implementation_intention
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My ongoing task is to count the number of small and large squares, separately. My prospective memory task is to have participants respond with a different key press when they encounter a green square. 
How can I make it harder for participants to identify PM targets (green squares) in this task?
Thanks!
Brandon
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Hi,
How about a (slightly) different PM task where Ss are to press a key when 2 green squares occur in a row ?
Cheers,
SCM
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  • along with few major theories
  • any relation with prospective memory
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Which prospective memory/ongoing task combinations result in the highest proportion of correct prospective memory responses?
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No, not to my knowledge. Contact authors remains, in my view, the best option.
Good continuation Brandon.