Science topic

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder - Science topic

A class of traumatic stress disorders with symptoms that last more than one month.
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I am looking for a validated German version of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index Addendum for PTSD. Could anyone maybe direct me to a paper on this matter?
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  • Research article
  • Open Access
  • Published: 31 May 2016
Validation of the German version of the insomnia severity index in adolescents, young adults and adult workers: results from three cross-sectional studies
  • Markus Gerber, Christin Lang, Sakari Lemola, Flora Colledge, Nadeem Kalak, Edith Holsboer-Trachsler, Uwe Pühse & Serge Brand
BMC Psychiatry volume 16, Article number: 174 (2016) Cite this article
Abstract Background A variety of objective and subjective methods exist to assess insomnia. The Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) was developed to provide a brief self-report instrument useful to assess people’s perception of sleep complaints. The ISI was developed in English, and has been translated into several languages including German. Surprisingly, the psychometric properties of the German version have not been evaluated, although the ISI is often used with German-speaking populations.Methods The psychometric properties of the ISI are tested in three independent samples: 1475 adolescents, 862 university students, and 533 police and emergency response service officers. In all three studies, participants provide information about insomnia (ISI), sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index), and psychological functioning (diverse instruments). Descriptive statistics, gender differences, homogeneity and internal consistency, convergent validity, and factorial validity (including measurement invariance across genders) are examined in each sample.Results The findings show that the German version of the ISI has generally acceptable psychometric properties and sufficient concurrent validity. Confirmatory factor analyses show that a 1-factor solution achieves good model fit. Furthermore, measurement invariance across gender is supported in all three samples.Conclusions While the ISI has been widely used in German-speaking countries, this study is the first to provide empirical evidence that the German version of this instrument has good psychometric properties and satisfactory convergent and factorial validity across various age groups and both men and women. Thus, the German version of the ISI can be recommended as a brief screening measure in German-speaking populations.
Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index Addendum for PTSD
Sleep disturbances reflect a core dysfunction underlying Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Specifically, disruptive nocturnal behaviors (DNB) may represent PTSD-specific sleep disturbances. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index Addendum for PTSD (PSQI-A) is self-report instrument designed to assess the frequency of seven DNB. The goal of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the PSQI-A to characterize DNB in a group of participants with and without PTSD. Results indicate that the PSQI-A has satisfactory internal consistency and good convergent validity with two standard PTSD measures even when excluding their sleep-related items. A global PSQI score of 4 yielded a sensitivity of 94%, a specificity of 82%, and a positive predictive value of 93% for discriminating participants with PTSD from those without PTSD. The PSQI-A is a valid instrument for PTSD applicable to both clinical and research settings.
This copyright in this form is owned by the University of Pittsburgh and may be reprinted without charge only for non-commercial research and educational purposes. You may not make changes or modifications of this form without prior written permission from the University of Pittsburgh. If you would like to use this instrument for commercial purposes or for commercially sponsored research, please contact the Office of Technology Management at the University of Pittsburgh at 412-648-2206 for licensing information.
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I am looking for a Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) measurement scale applicable to subjects in low and medium-income countries.
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May I know the kind of subjects you want to administer the tool? If they are students at university in low income countries you may look at this one.
Patent PATENT
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I am currently working on an exploratory research on the prevalence of Bangladeshi news journalists' post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). I need a theoretical framework for it.
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Psychotherapy for trauma desensitization and reprocessing began in the 1980s by the late U.S. psychologist Francine Shapiro who named it Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (later shortened to EMDR because eye movements are only one technique, sound and touch are the other two). The theoretical basis (assumption) is that the brain does not deal with (i.e., process) traumatic experiences the same way it does regular day-to-day experiences. Thus, the need for psychotherapy. This adaptive information processing technique involves bilateral stimulation of the senses while mentally focusing on a particular, relevant image or thought (which changes throughout the process). It has since been modified by others with the more recent ones being Body Awareness (it may have a variation of that name) and Brain Spotting. I am a certified EMDR therapist
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I ran a logistic regression model with PTSD, MDD, Nativity, and (PTSD*Born outside the US) interaction term predicting Nicotine Dependence (yes/no). The main effect of Born Outside the US (ref: born in the US) has OR=9.13, PTSD main effect OR=2.12. However, the interaction term of PTSD and Born outside the US has OR=0.31. I find it very strange that the OR changed direction. Can anyone advise on the potential explanations for such results?
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Hi Stanislava Klymova, by including this interaction term in your model, you're assuming that the effect of being born outside the US is different for those with/without PTSD. Another way of interpreting this coefficient is the 'extra effect' of being born outside the US while having PTSD (assuming you included these predictors as binary variables with yes = 1). It may be a good idea to first run a likelihood ratio test comparing two models - one with/one without the (PTSD*Born outside the US) interaction term to test whether including this effect modification improves the fit of your model.
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Thirteen days from today, I will be defending my PhD. It’s been quite a journey, which I will say more about, eventually. For the time being, I am taking a moment to gather all my strength, energy, and motivation to be ready for this day.
It is important because so much of my life has been dedicated to my research on child maltreatment, trauma and PTSD, depression, resilience, autobiographical narratives and storytelling. Yes, I would like to “pass” this oral exam, but am also looking for ways to enjoy this milestone and not be completely wrecked by stress.
So, I am reaching out for help, since this is something that I struggled with but finally learned to do over the last few years. The Internet is full of tips and tricks but I am looking for advice from friends and people I know, because it’s always nicer and warmer and just more real.
Any tips regarding how to be ready for this, how to deal being a new mom and having this ahead, how to present, what to do, things to avoid, ways to deal with stress or tricky questions (“This is a very interesting question!” has become too cliché), basically, anything that you would like to share is welcome, below or in a private message.
I am also sharing a link to some of my research work below, in case anyone is interested in reading it (and of course, feedback is always welcome): https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Mariam-Fishere
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Sometimes, a doctoral thesis student may have better information than his professors in the field of childhood observation, so trust your little information.
Senior lecturer
Nuha hamid taher
Clinical Psychology
Imam Ja'afar Al-Sadiq University
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Dear all, I'm looking for a measure instrument for C-PTSD to use in research..
I've found the ICD-11 Trauma Questionnaire, and I've seen that has a good validity and reliability, but I don't see that it has been used much in research.
Does anyone have another recommendation to measure C-PTSD symptoms in research? Or ICD-11 Trauma Questionnaire it's ok?
Thanks
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Hi Sara,
The International Trauma Questionnaire is a measure of PTSD and Complex PTSD as per the ICD-11 description of the disorders. It was developed recently and the main validation study was published in 2018 and it has been cited over 350 times since then. I'm not aware of any other measure that is aligned to the ICD-11 diagnostic criteria. There has been a recently published systematic review on psychometric studies that have used the ITQ by Redican and colleagues.
It's my understanding that if you want a measure of PTSD and CPTSD then the ITQ is the only game in town.
Disclaimer - I was involved in the development of the ITQ.
Best wishes
Mark
Redican, E., Nolan, E., Hyland, P., Cloitre, M., McBride, O., Karatzias, T., ... & Shevlin, M. (2021). A systematic literature review of factor analytic and mixture models of ICD-11 PTSD and CPTSD using the International Trauma Questionnaire. Journal of anxiety disorders, 79, 102381.
Cloitre, M., Shevlin M., Brewin, C.R., Bisson, J.I., Roberts, N.P., Maercker, A., Karatzias, T., Hyland, P. (2018). The International Trauma Questionnaire: Development of a self-report measure of ICD-11 PTSD and Complex PTSD. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica. DOI: 10.1111/acps.12956
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I am doing a systematic review and meta-analysis looking at predictors of PTSD symptoms after traumatic brain injury. Some of the studies I have included are analyses of subsets of participants within the same larger prospective cohort study. For example, the papers may explore different potential predictors of PTSD.
I imagine there will be considerable overlap in the participants analysed in each paper, considering that they're coming from the same larger cohort study. However, am I able to still include multiple of these papers given that they're investigating different predictors? Or do I just have to pick the one most comprehensive paper for inclusion? It would seem like a real shame to exclude all papers but one as it would leave out some novel and good-quality findings.
Any advice would be much appreciated please.
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Yes but you have to eliminate the duplicates and make sure you can identify studies from the same centres as they might be reporting the same data.
Worth mentioning that making a single publication (your cohort study together with a systematic review & meta-analysis. Bearing in mind that SRMA is a distinct endeavor in itself, with rationale, methods, results, discussions (with limitations) and conclusions not just pooling of data
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What do you think about this statement:
EMDR is the least invasive treatment for patient and therapist. Therefore, EMDR should be first choice.
Any reference to scientific literature is highly appreciated.
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Although there is robust evidence for the effectiveness of EMDR as a treatment for PTSD, to dogmatically state that (1) it is the least invasive treatment for patient and therapist, and (2) should be first choice, seems (intensionally?) provocative, even insensitive and unscientific, reminiscent of the days when ECT was the first choice of psychiatric treatment. Would it not be better to argue for the prior establishment of a beneficial therapeutic relationship, as well as careful, insightful, clinical evaluation in terms of inclusion and exclusion criteria for EMDR, such as the availability of a therapeutic milieu, to minimize the likelihood of intense emotional reprocessing and seizures, before starting EMDR with persons with PTSD?
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I don't seem to find anything published (or unpublished) to answer my research question. Broadly, when I search for "PTSD + Virtual Reality + First Responders" (and all the variants these words may present) I get 0 (zero) papers in return. As I follow the process for a systematic review, can I call this "A systematic review"? Did anyone already have a similar situation?
Thank you!
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Refining your search study may help you find some papers in the topic of interest. Consulting with a statistician, searching more than one database, searching for papers in any language, including different key terms for search will help you find related studies.
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We are currently investigating an integrated treatment module for patients with PTSD and a comorbid eating disorder. Due to the novelty of the treatment, we wish to asses treatment acceptability (TA).
Sekhon et al., (2017) describe TA as ‘a multifaceted construct that reflects the extent to which people delivering or receiving a healthcare intervention consider it to be appropriate, based on anticipated or experienced cognitive and emotional responses to the intervention’. TA appears to change over time, as various authors state that prospective TA, concurrent TA and restrospective TA may differ. Furthermore, clinicians and patients may differ in their perspectives on TA.
Serveral instruments have been developed, such as Treatment Acceptability/Adherence Scale (TAAS) by Milosevic et al., (2015), which measures prospective TA, or the Distress/Endorsement Validation Scale (DEVS, Devilly, 2004). Previous research has also utilized visual analogue scales or costumer satisfaction reports.
For patient TA, i'm thinking about administering the TAAS or DEVS at different time points (before, during or after therapy) to see how TA changes during the course of treatment. An alternitive idea would be to use a randomisation strategy, where each participant would either receive the questionnaire before, during or after treatment. It would be interesting to also assess therapist TA and to see whether or not these match.
Does this seem like a logical set up? Are there any methodological considerations to take into account? All feedback/suggestions are welcome, thanks in advance.
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Repetitive child abuse with PTSD and chronic adrenal stress is where I am asking about, not only projecting physiological symptoms but developing autoimmune disorders, neuropathology for example carpal tunnel syndrome, nerve pain, circulatory problems, allergies, increased prolactin levels
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Yes:Of course!!
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I am currently researching the emotional and empathetic capacity of live-in caregivers of persons with schizophrenia, bipolar, or post-traumatic stress disorder as they relate to stress management. The survey is about 15 mins long. If you wish to analyze individual results make sure to record your responses separately. I appreciate your time and will publish results at the culmination of the study.
Data collection is currently completed for this survey. Please stay tuned for publication. Thank you all for your contribution to the survey and may mental health and wellness be with you.
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Of course I know them and, even more so, I treat them as a Mental Health Specialist. As soon as I have some time to complete the Questionnaire, I WILL DO IT!
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identification of PTSD triggers
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Various; here I attach some:
-Battered women and posttraumatic stress disorder; de Arroyo, A. Rev. psiquiatr. Fac. Med. Barc; 29 (2): 77-82, Mar. 2002.
Artigo em Es | IBECS | ID: ibc-20192
- PREVALENCE AND TYPES OF POST-TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER IN THE GENERAL AND PSYCHIATRIC POPULATION; by F. ORENGO, M. RODRIGUEZ, G. LAHERA and G. RAMIREZ; Work carried out with the support of a research grant from Pfizer Laboratories. Postal address: Avda. De los Claveles 31,2º D; 28220 Majadahonda (Madrid)
-THE FORENSIC EVALUATION OF POST-TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER; by A. Calcedo-BarbaAL Calcedo Barba - eprints.ucm.es.
-Application of cognitive-behavioral therapy with components of clarification of values ​​and behavioral activation in a case of post-traumatic stress disorder; by A. Hernández-Gómez; Analysis and Modification of Behavior 2018, Vol. 44, Nº 169-170, 11-35
- Post-traumatic stress disorder: studies in North American war veterans and its relevance to Latin America; by R. Alarcón - Chilean Journal of Neuro-psychiatry, 2002 - scielo.conicyt.cl
-Chilean journal of neuro-psychiatry
On-line version ISSN 0717-9227; v. 40 Suppl. 2; Nov. 2002; http://dx.doi.org/10.4067/S0717-92272002000600003: Post-traumatic stress disorder: clinical aspects; by C. Carvajal
-Post-traumatic stress in health personnel
NT Arango Palomino, DT Rivas Soto… - 2020 - 34.199.100.111
...ETC.....
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Mediator is negative, but moderator is positive, how?
These were the results of the mediator analysis:
X - M is significant positive
M - Y is significant negative
My indirect effect is negative, so I think that means that when X gets bigger, Y gets lower, because M also gets bigger.
I did a moderator analysis with the same variables, but now the moderating effect is positive.
What does that mean? I thought it meant when X gets bigger/being a student, causes more positive experiences, which leads to more PTSD-symptoms.
Is it not contradictory with the mediating effect?
X = being a student (0= no student, 1 = student)
M = positive experiences because of trauma
Y = PTSD symptoms
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Another thing was that when I run the model with all mediators I get these results. Is it right for me to say that, when all mediating variables taken together X has a negative indirect effect on Y which means that increase in X reduces A,B,C which in turn reduces
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I have been trying to find studies of adults who experienced adverse childhood events/childhood trauma that assess the link between ACEs and outcomes (bipolar disorder, PTSD/cPTSD, etc) using multiple measures to determine cause and effect.
A hypothetical example would be a study that assesses whether childhood emotional abuse/neglect (ACE) is associated with any 5-HTTLPR polymorphism (genetics), SLC6A4 hypermethylation (epigenetics), AND amygdala activity (fxn) in people with bipolar disorder (negative outcome) but not healthy controls who experienced similar severity of childhood emotional abuse/neglect
I know this is a huge lift and would require a somewhat large study but right now the story is missing a comprehensive view of the molecular and functional changes due to ACEs causes leads to negative outcomes.
Thank you in advance for any help you can give
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I find it quite interesting how experiences with rejection at such a young age can be associated with personality disorder development. Enjoy your research!
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I am looking for studies that show an association between PTSD recovery and whether it translates into improvement in the following areas:
- Improved cognitive function
- Improved pain interference
- Improved symptoms of depression
- Improved neuropsychiatric symptoms
If anyone is aware of studies in this area, please send my way.
Thanks!
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This book might also be helpful: Neuropsychology of PTSD: Biological, Cognitive, and Clinical Perspectives edited by Jennifer J. Vasterling, Chris Brewin
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Is there any Scale (questionnaire) for Diagnosis of PTSD?
Is there any scale for severity assessment of PTSD?
Is the diagnostic / severity assessment scales different in adult and pediatric age group?
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The MMPI -in its latest version- presents two Sub Scales (perhaps the best currently available on Post-Traumatic Stress Syndrome) that evaluate it; there are also the "ad hoc" Criteria of the DSM-5 and, also, there are Military Inventories in this regard ... but they are not in the market although they present a high Pearson correlation with the aforementioned of the MMPI
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Hello
I am doing my Psy.d on the social validity of the intervention of animal assisted therapy (dog) on a PTSD population in the province of Quebec. The only close tool of measure I found is the treatment acceptability ans adherence scale (wich was made for anxiety at the base).
Anyone is aware of a complementary tools that I could use.
Thank you
Valérie Bédard
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I was interested in your question, which led me down a rabbit hole of literature searching. Social validity is a really interesting construct, and one that has been a major concern of mine in my own research, though, comme M. Jourdain, I was unaware that what I was aiming for was called social validity, sans que j'en susse rien!
I found this article helpful : http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.565.3507&rep=rep1&type=pdf. My feeling is that you will have to define the appropriate outcomes and measure them. By definition, almost, a particular intervention in a particular society/social group/context will have particular objectives that must be (I think) defined in partnership with the group. No alignment, no validity. This holds out the exciting possibility that the group, not the researcher, are the people who both define the outcomes and measure them. In this way, if the research works, it gains social validity through both partnership and communication of knowledge.
When I set up the original solar disinfection trials among the Maasai, the principle was that the trials would be in Maasai, all field work would be conducted by Maasai and all findings would be communicated back through community meetings. The trials were a success but for me the big win was the pride that the community had in something they had discovered for themselves.
Interesting topic – good luck with it!
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Good afternoon,
Does anyone know of any articles that show correlation or study of the connection between childhood trauma and disability diagnosis in the educational setting? Trauma can be defined through experience (abuse), ACE scores, or PTSD diagnosis. It is my goal to create a meta-analysis synthesizing the information!
Thank you,
Dave
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Hi David - not sure if this is along the sort of lines you are looking for?In my research the keywords of childhood trauma and functional impact/disability throws up quite few results of longitudonal studies. The American Psych Assoc. and Pearson mention a few online, too.
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It’s not only people’s anxiety or depression during the lockdown in Corona crisis, experts are now worried about post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) of hospitalized patients. More than half a million people have been died from Corona worldwide and at least 10% infected have history of hospital admission.
A “significant proportion” of people who were hospitalized with Corona virus “will go on to develop symptoms” of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), according to a report from the United Kingdom’s COVID-19 Trauma Response Working Group.
Source: June 29, CNN
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Hi,
In my meta-analysis, the intervention is often compared to more than 1 control group. I am analysing a dichotomous variable (PTSD diagnosis). With continuous outcomes (such as symptom severity), I combined means and SDs of multiple control arms using the RevMan calculator. Is it possible to combine data from dichotomous variables?
If not, what is the solution to use this data?
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As a pharmacist and non-statistician, I'm struggling to understand the interpretation of a 2019 meta-analysis on the effect of prazosin (see ). I'm particularly interested in the the analysis of the 7 randomised controlled drug studies where it is argued that despite the by far largest (and most recent) individual study, including 58% of all investigated patients, showing a negative result for three respective outcomes (nightmare frequency, sleep quality, PTSD symptoms), overall the effect of prazosin on these outcomes would be statistically significant; and this also in spite of at least three of the seven studies showing non-significant outcomes for each of the three outcomes (see p-Values in figures 2-4).
The authors argue that, using a random effect model, the relative weight attributed to the largest study is only 19.1, however that even with the relative weight of 68.5 in the fixed effect model, the meta-analysis would show significant effects of prazosin.
This is far from intuitive to me and I would like to understand how to re-calculate these numbers.
I've tried reading a couple of papers explaining the Q-test, I2, and the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions so far.
I would be grateful for an hints understandable by non-statisticians, how to calculate the weights of individual study outcomes for random and fixed effect models and how to calculate overall effect sizes. I'm not averse to R, so please send the names of any helpful R packages, if you know any.
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See the examples of weighting for fixed and random effects here:
In the fixed effect you simply weight bu the inverse sampling variance (1 over the square of the standard error). The random effect weights are identical but also add in between study variation. If there is a lot of between-study variation this will (not unreasonably) dilute the impact of the squared standard error. This acts in a way like shrinkage (well it probably is shrinkage because these are effectively empirical Bayes estimators). We are less certain of the representativeness of a particular study and thus shrink its estimate closer to the population mean - generally producing a more cautious estimate of the average effect.
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Hi there!
It is well known in clinical circles that trauma survivors do not often feel angry about the violations of trust or injustices that happened in their pasts, especially if they have survived a lifetime of relational trauma. On that note, I'm looking for any instruments that measure people's perceptions of or emotions about their past experiences.
If there are no known instruments to measure this, could you direct me toward any qualitative studies on this? I could perhaps develop items based on the words of survivors.
Edit: I found a definition that properly reflects what I am attempting to measure. Here it is:
"Resentments are negative feelings toward someone or something that emanates from the past. Resentment is the re-experiencing of past injustices — real or perceived — and the old feelings of anger connected to them. Resentments form when people get angry toward a person, institution, or situation, and steadfastly hold on to that anger."
I looked at the GRAT–R (2002) but is isn't quite what I'm interested in. Another avenue that I'd like to explore is "negative past time perspective" (or "negative past time orientation"), but the scales that measure this are mostly inaccessible...
Looking forward to hear about suggestions. :)
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Hello
It can be achieved through voice!
Regards
Remi
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Trying to find the best practices and creative ones as well, but all scientifically proven.
Thank you.
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"In 2017, the Veterans Health Administration and Department of Defense (VA/DoD) and the American Psychological Association (APA) each published treatment guidelines for PTSD, which are a set of recommendations for providers who treat individuals with PTSD...Both guidelines strongly recommended use of Prolonged Exposure (PE), Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT) and trauma-focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TFCBT). Each of these treatments has a large evidence base and is trauma-focused, which means they directly address memories of the traumatic event or thoughts and feelings related to the traumatic event..." (Watkins et al., 2018).
These resources may interest you:
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Can separating an infant from its bio mother within the first few months of it being born cause PTSD? I heard the theory the other day and am curious if there's been scientific study specific to this phenomena.
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Infant adoption: Psychosocial outcomes in adulthood
S Collishaw, B Maughan, A Pickles - Social psychiatry and psychiatric epidemiology, 1998 -
Adoption studies are able to provide important insights into the impact of changed rearing environments for children's development. A number of studies reporting on the childhood adjustment of adoptees have found an increased risk for disruptive behaviour problems when compared with children brought up in intact families. The long-term implications of adoption for psychosocial adjustment in adult life are less clear. We have used data from the National Child Development Study (NCDS) to examine the psychosocial functioning over a number of life-domains of an unselected sample of adoptees, non-adopted children from similar birth circumstances, and other members of the cohort. Adopted women showed very positive adult adjustment across all the domains examined in this study, whilst our findings suggest some difficulty in two specific domains (employment and social support) for adopted men. Implications of the fndings are discussed.
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I am attempting to write a paper on the relationship between left-handedness and psychopathology, including PTSD, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.
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Sommer, I., Aleman, A., Ramsey, N., Bouma, A., & Kahn, R. (2001). Handedness, language lateralisation and anatomical asymmetry in schizophrenia: meta-analysis. The British Journal of Psychiatry, 178(4), 344-351.
Chicago
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I am a psychologist with a caseload that includes a number of people who report severe physical, sexual, and psychological abuse, usually starting in early childhood and compounded by later traumatic experiences. They meet criteria for PTSD (chronic, complex), and the focus of our work is the mitigation of PTSD symptoms in the context of improving important aspects of their functioning. The polyvagal framework has been extremely illuminating to many of them, and has added what seems to be an effective dimension to our therapeutic work. What is anyone's opinion of how to integrate the "debunking" of the theory with the clinical uses for which it was largely intended?
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I do think the arousal one experiences with trauma, retraumatization and related memories is a physiological response of the autonomic nervous system, which includes sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve functions including the vagus. This is an incredibly complex system that i sure cannot claim to even nearly understand. There are some old (post-war) theories in German research (the Kippschwingungsprinzip) that sound suspiciously similar to Chinese Medicine, in that the vagus would become more active when a persistent sympathetic activation has been moved the system out of its homeostatic balance, and the vagus tries to swing it back. Just an illuminating theoretical model that I am not sure has ever been proven. Somatic Experiencing (SE) and other differentiated mind-body approaches can be very efficacious in the right patients/clients. This is not questioned and of course warrants good clinical studies to support them.
How SE may work is a separate question. I am convinced that the autonomous nervous system plays a major role during the SE sessions. And i agree that SE pays particular, careful, and sophisticated attention to symptoms and experiences related to it. There is a theoretical article (Peter Levine is co-author) that I actually 'helped' into a scientific journal (by Peter Payne; Frontiers in Psychology). It was not based on Porges' thinking, which would have made it difficult to publish it there. Also, I have friends who underwent and others practice SE. All great people! Otherwise they would not be my friends. :-)
However: When homeopathy 'works' it is not based on simile-similibus pharmacological 'theories' of past centuries. Acupuncture cannot be well explained by Western science/physiology and can have impressive effects. You can/should still practice these methods. And they do require that you fully endorse them to have a healing potential. Paul's critique does not have to affect your work/practice at all. It is just that the human body (and psyche) is so incredibly complex, and that we all want to understand it and feel that we have a scientific backing for what we do. The vagus remains a key player in our human psychophysiology. It does not have to fit into Porges' concepts and models.
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I am doing a class project on a case study involving a 34 year-old male who was injured by a falling box. Our group is trying to gather information regarding our diagnosis; however, we are seeing signs of TBI, PTSD and Acute Stress Disorder. We are trying to determine if the diagnoses are interrelated by case studies, which I have not yet found. Any thoughts regarding this? Or a research paper that we could review and gather some further information?
Please advise.
Thank you - Tim Gomolak
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THE DIFFERENCE - RELATING TO THE BREAKFAST STRESS DISORDER AND THE TEPT- IS THE TIME TRANSCURRED WITH ANSITIVE ANSWERS, ETC. CLASSICS FROM THE TIME OF THE INCIDENCE OR EXPOSURE TO THE STRESSFUL EVENT. Q, THE DSM V STATES THAT THEY HAVE TO PASS 6 MONTHS TO CONSIDER TEPT
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I am conducting qualitative research for my doctorate in counselling psychology, exploring humanitarian workers’ experiences of morally conflicting events, through the lens of Litz et al.’s (2009) model of moral injury. I’m using theoretical TA underpinned by critical realist ontology and constructivist epistemology that foregrounds researcher subjectivity in the co-creation of knowledge. I received feedback that the philosophical stance of the project does not fit comfortably with theoretical thematic analysis. I’m trying to establish whether a) it’s because my argument was weak and not presented clearly or, b) whether CR ontology, constructivist epistemology and theoretical TA are fundamentally incompatible. Any thoughts on this?
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I would not say the Braun Clark rename Thematic Analysis as Reflexive Analysis. Instead, they now define three different versions of Thematic Analysis, of which their preferred one is what the call "Reflexive Thematic Analysis." (There terms for the other two versions are "coding reliability TA" and "codebook" approaches.)
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I am looking for testimonials that deal with the topic of inpatient PTSD treatment; which factors influence the therapeutic success of inpatient PTSD treatment combined with an addiction?
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I would look into research and clinical work conducted at VA sites, as they frequently run these types of programs.
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I want to study child trauma, with the end goal of not only working with traumatized kids but also teaching others how to respond to, recognize and 'handle' traumatized kids (e.g. cops, teachers, staffers at psych hospitals etc...). If that's the end goal, where should I start? What sort of literature is considered to be a staple in this field?
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Hi Frances,
The journals Child Maltreatment and Child Abuse & Neglect would be good to look at. You can go to their websites and just start to look at abstracts of their recent issues to get an idea of what is currently being published. The journal Trauma, Violence, & Abuse would also be great to look at. It is a review journal that has a high impact factor (very influential in the field) so everything published reviews the literature in the field and you can get ideas of specific articles to read from there. Though, it isn't specific to child trauma, you can get a sense from the titles if they are focused on children.
The National Child Traumatic Stress Network website would also be great. They have compiled a ton of resources and materials that are easy to digest, have fact sheets, and also host free webinars.
Finally, though you did not ask about it, since you are at Hamline, the University of Minnesota Institute of Child Development (where I received my PhD) has some very key faculty in the field who study child trauma, including my graduate advisor, Dante Cicchetti, and his colleague, Ann Masten. Abi Gewirtz and Canan Karatekin (my secondary advisor) would also be good to look at and you could even reach out to them to try to volunteer in their research labs during the summer/semester. Just go to the icd.umn.edu website and click on "People" to view their faculty profiles to learn more about what they do.
Hope this helps! Good luck.
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Can anyone help me getting the links for different social communities (available worldwide) of patients from neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders like Alzheimer's disease, Parkinsons' disease, Huntington's disease, ALS, MS, Ataxia, Mood disorders, depression, PTSD, and also brain-related orphan diseases like dravett syndrome, Ataxia telangiectasia, Batten Disease, etc.
It will be a great help if anyone can share this information with me.
--Dinesh K. Dhull
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Thank you Prakash for sharing the information.
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I have a plan to conduct a study to measure change of severity of depression and anxiety(general anxiety, social anxiety and PTSD)  after obstetric fistula repairing surgery. topic "Modelling the effects of surgical obstetric fistula repairs on the severity of depression and anxiety associated with obstetric fistula ". the data will be collected two times before and after getting surgical repair. The duration between the two survey is one month.
I have a plan to use structural equation modeling 
: What is the appropriate method modeling, SEM is appropriate?
What is the appropriate study design to see the changes before and after surgical repair. kindly shear your experiences and shear any guideline to advise me  
Bekele
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Agreed. Time gap between 2 surveys is not fixed or a set formula. It does indeed depend upon the research objectives of the study. Typically, 2-3 months can suffice in social science studies but have seen longer gaps as well.
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I am interested in looking into the neuroethics of people who have suffered from severe and sustained trauma and/or neglect and getting them to consent to invasive neurological procedures. With a population where people have frequently adopted instant submission to authority as a survival mechanism, is consent possible? How do we make sure that any sort of procedure isn't somehow retraumatizing? How do we make sure that these people feel comfortable declining to do certain things or voicing their needs, if they have learned that it is dangerous to do so? Do we need to take a different approach or special considerations with trauma subjects than we do with other sorts of subjects? what would those considerations be? Do you personally feel that IRB boards, in general, have enough trauma literacy to understand the risks?
*This question is in reference to people who have NOT yet undergone trauma therapy. *
I'm happy to get anything from opinions, to references, to videos, and literature, any and everything... pertaining to this subject!
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Dear all,
I am in the early stages of undertaking research surrounding PTSD/CPTSD and the prevalence of these conditions in paramedics. Can anyone point me towards some recent research in this field? If there is any recent research concerning any link between post-traumatic growth and paramedics, this too is of great interest to me.
Many thanks in advance,
Jenny
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Bit old now, but how about these from Wales:
Bennett, P., Williams, Y., Page, N., Hood, K., & Woollard, M. (2004). Levels of mental health problems among UK emergency ambulance workers. Emergency Medicine Journal, 21(2), 235-236.
Bennett, P., Williams, Y., Page, N., Hood, K., Woollard, M., & Vetter, N. (2005). Associations between organizational and incident factors and emotional distress in emergency ambulance personnel. British Journal of Clinical Psychology, 44(2), 215-226.
Good luck
Nigel
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Is there any classification of negative life events PTE?
Would it merit for diagnostic or academic purpose?
And regarding EEG effects?
I can't find any reference...
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Yes there are records on this, tks.
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Does anyone know of paychological tests/questionnaires in Macedonian language? Particularly interested in PTSD related questionnaires.
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I have a sample of a group of participants that were given various PTSD measures. IES, IES-R, TSI, TSI-2, and PDS. Although they were not given the same measures. Some had only IES or TSI. How would I combine these measures to make a PTSD in or out a variable?
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When you did not use the same scales the thing you can do is to correlate the two groups. If the test are completely correlated let us say r= 0.95, you can defend using them as one group. If it is not so you can check if there are identical questions between groups and use only them as one test. I would though compare the two groups if the age and gender of the group participants are comparable. You write nothing about the carachteristics of the participants.
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Can anyone reference me to studies dealing with the effectiveness of animals in mitigating stress in patients under palliative care? An example would equine therapy and the mitigation of PTSD. Thank you.
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I'm looking to find a data set that catalogues PTSD along with the particular causes of said diagnosis among individuals.
Thank you in advance!
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Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale for DSM-5 (CAPS-5)
Description
The CAPS is the gold standard in PTSD assessment. The CAPS-5 is a 30-item structured interview that can be used to:
  • Make current (past month) diagnosis of PTSD
  • Make lifetime diagnosis of PTSD
  • Assess PTSD symptoms over the past week
  • Do not really understand what you mean with the best data set. Rehabilitation centers for torture or rape victims have the clients you need to test. You need more than 30 cases. Then you can have a matched control group (age, gender, race) The best would be to test person before the disaster happens and then again after it happened. Giving birth can also provoke PTSD. It does not happen at once, perhaps half a year after the delivery. You can test a person in the end of the pregnancy and then after the delivery. If your sample is big enough there are surely women who suffered much and women are more likely to attract PTSD. Then you should also measure partner support, we found that partner support impacts. It can also be done in the way that you test the persons when they begin the rehabilitation process and retest when they finish the rehabilitation or therapy or group therapy. Then you can see if their PTSD improved (their scores decreased). I attach an example of pre-post depression
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Moral injury has been researched quite extensively in military and veteran populations but much less so in other occupations. I am interested in any research particularly in relation to first responders that may be underway.
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Thanks Paul
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PTSD is associated with inflammation but the cause is unclear. What do you think?. Does neuroinflammation cause the symptoms of PTSD or does PTSD cause neuroinflammation and systemic inflammation?
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An excellent question, Silvia, thank you.
I have benefitted from the entire thread.
Your original question was, "Is PTSD caused by neuroinflammation or does PTSD cause neuroinflammation?" There is growing evidence that supports the view that inflammation is both a process and a signal. This signal is readily communicated between the periphery and the CNS, as with gut inflammation. When inflammation is induced within the CNS, in humans one commonly finds neurobehavioral changes.
An additional field of consideration that supports this occurrence is that of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Since TBI is still associated with an emotionally traumatic experience, the delineation between the physical and emotional factors is more of a gray matter than black and white. If someone is aware of an experimental model or clinical context in which neuroinflammation is clearly induced without associated emotional trauma, then your cause-and-effect question may find a resolute answer.
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I've heard that after leaving the environment in which trauma was inflicted/developed, there will be a dip in the survivor's function. Now whether this be affective, executive or otherwise, I do not know for sure but my question to you all is this: do you have any reading materials relating specifically to this phenomena? I can't seem to find any no matter which variation of phrases I google.
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With the caveat that this sort of generalization as opposed to individual differences can be dangerous, once I read your clarification: "I appreciate your..." I better understood your question and have a suggestion that I think may be very useful. Bruce Perry, who I met when he was at Baylor where he worked with the Waco kids, but I think he's on the East Coast now, in spite of an occasionally flashy personality, can be quite brilliant. I strongly suggest you take a look at (buy?) his book, "The boy who was raised as a dog and other stories from a child psychiatrist's notebook" written by Bruce Perry MD PhD and Maia Szalavitz. In the book he talks specifically about children who come from chaos and unpredictable violence and insanity and are moved to "safe" environments, and then blow up, confusing the heck out of the foster parents (for example) who may be wonderful people with a physically and emotionally safe home. I hope you can find what you need in this book - more importantly, he talks about treatment methodology for the truly (most) severe, egregious cases of child maltreatment we sometimes see. Good luck!
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what are the main curriculum features that help the student
who suffer from stress or anxiety? how can we help them to recover through the design phase to the educational content? any references to refer to?
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Only sometime back I have expressed my views on stress which our student are passing in their study life & also personal life . It is in this line I submit herewith my presentation for your perusal
Stress is a mental attitude related with the sensitive behavior either of student or of any individual .In one way this nothing but temperament of the individual as stress is the individual behavior they have to control only with the mind ,study , & to make the practice for remaining calm & quite even if necessary by taking religious study of practice irrespective of caste , creed & religion .
In this I have expressed my views sometime back which I submit herewith for your perusal
To me Stress ,Depression & other areas have become the order of the day & it applies to every professional & vocational of every categories .I appreciated your valuable suggestion to place subject in educational mode & also under health problem .For students in their schooling period ,the environment to be created in the home as a part of sweet home & parent can play a very fruitful part .
After certain years even teachers can motivate student in their light of their development .As for Health problem apart from the medicine ,faith -healing will also play considerable a good part.
In a very humble mode during my earlier period as an Sr Executive of co's of repute & also as an Adm consultant i have placed the said subject in the management compass & also in the recruitment process of my consultancy areas.
In order to have my own evaluation ,i have also arrange & individual base programmer to keep the participating Calm & Quiet in the midst of Worries-Tension & Frustration .
This is my personal opinion
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This possibility is being explored especially in regard to PTSD. It particularly applies to combat vets who I provide free clinical consultation to. We lose 20 vets a day to suicide due to the repeated and severe traumas they experience.
Rich
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The most difficult memories do not necessary stem from one's own sins
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Looking for any major systematic reviews of the use of virtual reality to treatment military veterans. Thanks
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Thanks you Glynis and Nexhmedin. Much appreciated!
Brad
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Interesting work
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Fluoxetine is the known medication for PTSD
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Which validated self-administerede questionnaires could you recommend to measure psychosocial functioning among veterans seeking treatment by a psychologist? The questionnaire should be able to examine and detect the effect of treatment on psychosocial functioning e.g. among clients with severe PTSD where the symptom severity does not diminish although it is obvious that the clients improve in their contact to their spouse, children, friends and family - and are able to participate in social activities. The assessment is meant to be before treatment initiation and after treatment termination (after e.g. 10/20 times)? I am aware of WHODAS 2.0, recommend by WHO, however I do not find that it suits younger clinets (WHODAS also includes questions about mobility). I do hope you have some suggestings.
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What kind of self-administered questionnaire are there: https://adaa.org/screening-posttraumatic-stress-disorder-ptsd
PTSD scale can be downloaded from the link. You can use BDI, BAI and other available scales. here is my paper you can get an idea from:
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I found an articles, titled " Fluoxetine in post-traumatic stress disorder." in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry. I found it may help me achieve my goals in this research field. However, I am not able to download the full article from everywhere. So I need your help. Thanks!
van der Kolk B A,Dreyfuss D,Michaels M et al. Fluoxetine in posttraumatic stress disorder.[J] .J Clin Psychiatry, 1994, 55: 517-22.
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Check if the authors are on RG:
J Clin Psychiatry. 1994 Dec;55(12):517-22.
Fluoxetine in posttraumatic stress disorder.
van der Kolk BA1, Dreyfuss D, Michaels M, Shera D, Berkowitz R, Fisler R, Saxe G.
Author information
Abstract
BACKGROUND:
This study was designed to establish the efficacy of the serotonin reuptake blocker fluoxetine in the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD).
METHOD:
64 subjects (22 women and 42 men; 31 veterans and 33 nonveterans) with PTSD entered a 5-week randomized double-blind trial comparing fluoxetine (N = 33) and placebo (N = 31).
RESULTS:
By Week 5 fluoxetine, but not placebo, significantly reduced overall PTSD symptomatology, as assessed by the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) score. Changes were most marked in the arousal and numbing symptom subcategories. Non-VA patients responded much better than VA patients. Fluoxetine was an effective antidepressant independent of its effects on PTSD.
CONCLUSION:
Fluoxetine is an effective pharmacotherapeutic agent for treating PTSD and its associated features, particularly in patients without chronic treatment histories.
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The literature often cites high rates of PTSD following sexual violence. It is regularly cited as the most traumatic form of violence but I have found very few studies investigate or hypothesise why this is. Some allude to the interpersonal nature of the crime. I was wondering if anyone could direct me to any research that investigates this in more depth.
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A very wonderful question. It is generally taken for granted. The reasons must be explored. It's true that there is lot of stress and trauma due to such offence over the victim. But mechanism of trauma can help give insights into therapy. Generally we find such explanations in cognitive psychology literature, but they are mostly about alterations in belief structure. Psychoanalytic literature has good coverage of trauma, but I am not aware about specific literature about rape. I think they have covered this in less detail.
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Some authors, from Freud to Sam Vaknin speak about narcissism as originated by traumas in childhood. Perhaps the hypothesis about trauma in narcisism could help to understand and to treat this patients.
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Ok! Thank you very much!
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I am wondering how you will conduct your research. Will you have a questionnaire or will you require a medical determination that a person has trauma-related problem? My husband had PTSD, and I felt quite a bit of trauma after his death.
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I would use a questionnaire for PTSD.
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Am planning research on moral injury but am having difficulties getting ethics approval out of fear that war crimes might be disclosed in the interview process. Any information or strategies appreciated.
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Dear all,
are there any research gaps in the field of attachment, mentalization, trauma, art therapy that could be investigated in a phd study?
Best, Natalia
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Natalia,
Excellent question. Broad questions elicit a variety of responses some of which may intrigue your curiosity. It takes a lot of curiousity to complete doctoral research.
Part of the endeavor would be to take mentalization deeper in toddlerhood
In my clinical work I find very early disturbance in the sense of self underlies development of a false-self that eventually becomes a self-defeating pattern which often locks PTSD symptoms into the Ego. That is how the trauma is personalized.
An example, a combat veteran found that he had taken in a sense of self as "damn fool." He was the youngest child of 6 and had ample opportunity to experience himself as less capable than his older siblings. This developed a need to gain mastery over being seen as "damn fool." Eventually this became a self-defeating pattern in his childhood and through adulthood.
[In a therapy program I developed, the patients use art to respond to questions about theri relation ships during life transitions across their lifespan. Through collaborative analysis of their drawings, we discover repeated patterns that we explore to understand the underlying sense of self that usually developed first before age 6. So, the art in this program opens possibilities for insight but otherwise is a vehcile to treatment, not treatment itself.]
Once the above patient was well over his sense of self as "damn fool," three traumatic events that plagued him for more than four decades were easily treated with exposure therapy. The incidents were effectively disconnected from his sense of false-self, so the trauma became separate from his experience of himself, allowing them to be processed as separate from him.
When we reviewed each incident, the patient discovered "damn fool" was salient and intagral to each incident. In one he thought he had made a damn fool mistake, in the other two, another person behaved as a "damn fool."
Hopefully, that may stimulate some thoughts of your own as you refine your question.
Journey on
Will
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Curious to know if there is any prescribed timeline to investigate the effect of a traumatic event (in the form of PTSD) on the survivors.
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There is an interest in the long-term consequences of trauma, characterised by the kind of problems with forming stable intimate relationships and a robust sense of identity and worth that you would find in borderline personality disorder. Indeed, the hypothesis is that BPD is a complex long-term post traumatic condition, which would account for its very low heritability, in contrast to other personality disorders.
So yes. If anything, post-traumatic stress disorder seems to become more, not less interesting as time passes.
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his very interesting professional discussion. i have tried to construct SEM for my study. i have 5 latent variables in my model, depression (9 questions,), General anxiety (7 question), social anxiety (10 question) and PTSD (17 questions) and also somatic symptom (15 questions). depression and anxiety are my dependent variable and used second order SEM because anxiety measured using general anxiety, social anxiety and PTSD). The sample size of this study is 217. i had conduct data cleaning activity like missing record, outlier, unengaded response and common bias and other also check sample size adequate using KMO (Kmo=0.89). even tried to determain the SEM but the model not fit the required mode fit criteria, could you please help me with any think, What is the minimum acceptable range for factor loading in SEM? Thank you.
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Any item having a factor loading less than 0.6 and an R2 less than 0.4 should be deleted from the measurement model.
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Any idea about Deep Brain Stimulation in Amygdala for PTSD?
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Dear Alireza,
Many new literatures recommend this as I am reading now!
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Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Risk for Coronary Heart Disease.
I wish to send a copy of this research to the lawyer of Lisa Milano,
VA Clerk at the Lebanon VAMC, Lebanon, Pa. 17042
This statement is written in support of Lisa's claim for PTSD benefits
following the death of her husband who was my patient at the VAMC.
Lisa was denied benefits because her husband had PTSD, but died of
heart disease. Research shows that there is a significant correlation between PTSD and Coronary Heart Disease.
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Here is a situation where a veteran who is service connected for PTSD dies prematurely of heart disease. His wife was denied
service connection benefits. She is making a claim for Heart Disease benefits and cites research that shows the significant
correlation between PTSD and Coronary Artery Disease.
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I am intersted in measuring trauma exposed to protracted conflict. among young adults (20-28 years). There are many tests which measure PTSD but I think PTSD or other mental distress (Depression/Anxiety) are the outcomes of trauma but not the trauma per se. There is one Child War Trauma Questionnaire but its too long and there are many items which need to be qualitatively answered.
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thanks for the reply,, Ill modify some of the questions relevant for the study. Ill also include a section on narrative of what happened, how it happened, when it happened and what is the status now.
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The reason for this question is that two individuals diagnosed with PTSD can have very different symptom profiles.
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From a clinical point of view. I totally agree with you. PTSD is described today in a more heterogeneous way than once. A simple confrontation between the diagnostic criteria of the DSM IV TR and the diagnostic criteria of DSM V shows that today PTSD is a more heterogeneous clinical problem. In my clinical practice I focus my attention on the repetition of the trauma in the life of the patient, in his flashbacks, in his recurrent dreamings and nightmares, in the tendency to avoid many sitations that can be associated with the trauma, and in the anxiety when the patient is exposed in certains situation. In my view this is the core of PTSD.
The translation of this kind of symptoms in a psychometric measurement with the feature you ask it' s not easy, I suppose. The aspect more quantifiable is the avoidance of, and the anxiety in a " trigger" situation.
In any case I think that it can be useful for you a reading of the first chapters of : Freud S. Beyond the pleasure principle.1920. The Standard Edition. On the other hand, I find the DSM V diagnostic criteria of PTSD very interesting and well done.
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Hi all.
I am doing a brain imaging DTI meta-analysis in PTSD patients. There are 2 articles which use the same subjects but the subjects were scan in different time point (one at 6 month and one at 24 month) and the results are also different. In this case. Should include both of the studies in my meta-analysis?
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If the study design is the same and the only thing that changes is the duration of the ‘experiment’ after which the outcome is measured, in my opinion I would say that you can combine them (i.e. consider the two publications as a single study reporting outcome at two different time points). Depending on the type of effect size you are adopting (e.g. if the subject are compared to the same control), this could originates non-independency in your data which can be handled in most common R packages for meta-analysis.
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It is oft-cited that people with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have low levels of cortisol and/or a hyporeactive hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, whereas people with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD)/major depressive disorder (MDD) have elevated cortisol levels and/or hyperreactive HPA axes. I'm wondering (1) how psychobiological mechanisms may account for these differences (2) and what this entails for the definitions of stress, anxiety, and trauma.
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Hello Ian,
Part of the answer is that Cortisol fries neurons, particularly those that measure serum cortisol levels, and thus the feedback loop for this glucocorticoid becomes damaged:
here is a possible Tx:
Low-dose cortisol for symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder
A Aerni, R Traber, C Hock… - American Journal of …, 2004 - Am Psychiatric Assoc
And lastly, Adrenal Fatigue has been connected to PTSD. From the seminal work of Hans Selye, organs shut down in respinse to chronic stress. Link:
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We are writing a paper on Prolonged Exposure Therapy for people with schizophrenia and PTSD, and can't find any theoretic arguments/litterature for NOT using PE with people with schizophrenia? We can see that they are often excluded from studies but we can't find any theoretic reason why?
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Here is a relevant recent review and meta-analysis.
Brand, R. M., McEnery, C., Rossell, S., Bendall, S., & Thomas, N. (2018). Do trauma-focussed psychological interventions have an effect on psychotic symptoms? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Schizophr Res, 195, 13-22.
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I am looking for papers (or other resources) addressing the treatment of comorbid (non-veteran) posttraumatic stress disorder and schizophrenia. I haven't had any difficulty finding materials on epidemiology or differential diagnosis, but I keep on hitting a brick wall when it comes to studies on treatment.
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Effects of psychology on PTSD in brain parts?
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The symptoms of PTSD are believed to reflect changes in the neurobiological system induced by stress.
There are several neurobiological systems implicated in PTSD, such as:
The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal system, as well as
Neurotransmitters (chemical substances produced by neurons "nerve cells"), Neuropeptides (Neuropeptides are basically peptides - amino acid chains used for intercellular communication, and can function as hormones or neurotransmitters) which are used by various brain regions that regulate emotions such as fear or stress including the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, or amygdala. See more in Heim & Nemeroff (2009).
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I would like to conduct research with refugees who speak Arabic.  I have the BSI-18, PTGI, PANAS, RSES, and SWL along with their psychometric properties for Arabic speaking peoples.  If someone has translated-backtranslated and centered the PCL-5 and CES then I can use them; if not, I need to do so.  I cannot find publications.  Are there any conference proceedings or contacts with whom I can talk?  Thank you for your help.
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Reliability and validity of the Arabic PTSD Checklist Civilian Version (PCL‐C) in women survivors of intimate partner violence
Eman Alhalal Marilyn Ford‐Gilboe Carol Wong Fadia AlBuhairan First published: 11 November 2017 https://doi.org/10.1002/nur.21837
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Hello Roy,
I am doing a PhD in nature based mindfulness and right now I am searching for intervention studies in the field.
In 2012 we had a project for veterans with PTSD in our therapeutic forest garden Nacadia. Maybe you have heard from Bo Netterstrøm. I was head of the outdoor treatment, combining yoga, mindfulness and nature.
If you would care to share, you are very welcome to write or call.
Best, Dorthe Djernis
+45 6168 8011
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Kære Dorthe,
tak for din mail. Selvfølgelig kender jeg til dit fremragende arbejde i og med Nacadia - så, det glæder mig at vi er i kontakt nu :-). Jeg tror, at vi i dén grad har fælles interesser.
Jeg er netop i gang med at lave de indledende litteraturstudier til mit nye projekt. Selvom jeg ikke specifikt har ledt efter mindfulness interventionsstudier i naturen, så er jeg heller ikke "by accident" stødt på nogle. Du kender naturligvis arbejdet på Mariendal - men rapporterne er jo ikke deciderede forskningsrapporter.
Det kan skyldes min egen søgeprocedure, hvor jeg kun søgte efter "meditation" (og heller ikke fandt noget, men du får mig til at lave nye søgninger nu:-). Sidstnævnte afspejler nok nuance-forskellene mellem os, idet du jo har en målrettet mindfulness uddannelse, alt imens jeg blot er kommet fra yoga & buddhisme siden.
Men nu har jeg et ekstra øje åben og sender dig links etc., såfremt jeg støder på noget, der kunne interessere dig.
Mit eget projekt er som sagt lige startet - og mere et hobby-projekt, sammen med en kammerat, der er passioneret friluftsmenneske. Og så - dette fremgår ikke af beskrivelsen - bruger vi en peer-tilgang, eftersom vi begge har været igennem stress-møllen og savnede supplerende tilbud specifikt målrettet mod mænd.
Mine kontaktdata udenfor r-gate: roylanger@gmail.com, 26847466
Bedste hilsner,
Roy
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I am looking for recent studies that have examined the relationship between treatment(s) for moral injury and posttraumatic growth. Any recommendations or citations are appreciated. Thanks.
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Do you the think the following link is of any use to you?
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I want to find out how spiritual struggle can play a mediating role in traumatic exposure and the development of PTSD.
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Thank you!
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Many Veterans are Service connected for their PTSD but have a difficult time having sleep apnea approved as secondary to PTSD? I read partial research which points to stress hormones hypothalamo-pituitary adrenal axis activity plays a role? Any suggestions?
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Dear Adam,
Maybe the following review will help you:
Jaoude P, Vermont LN, Porhomayon J, El-Solh AA.Sleep-disordered breathing in patients with post-traumatic stress disorder. Ann Am Thorac Soc 2015;12(2):259-68. https://www.atsjournals.org/doi/pdf/10.1513/AnnalsATS.201407-299FR
Best wishes from Germany,
Martin
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many thanks
Patricia Darke
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Many thanks Sarah.
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Many ex boarders are suffering and presenting at therapy with mental health issues such as disassociation, relationship issues, PTSD etc. Keeping in mind many of the U.K's leaders once attended B.S. is there a need for more research into the effects on the individual?
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We're piloting a novel exposure-based treatment for PTSD nightmares and anticipate a fair proportion of dropouts. Because it's a pilot, we'd like to ask participants their reasons for dropping out and assess suicidality, nightmare, insomnia, PTSD symptom levels at drop-out both to determine participant safety and to gather information about the treatment tolerability.
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I think it's fine to ask them their reasons. I was on a study recently where we included a statement in the consent form that said you may choose to drop out at anytime, but we may ask your reasons for dropping out so we can better understand the needs of patients like yourself and improve the quality of the study.
It's an important bit of information, especially in a pilot phase. I might suggest this phrase, "What could we do differently to improve the study?" as opposed to this phrase, "Why did you drop out?" You will get better quality answers with the first question. The "Why did you drop out" might just get you answers like - it was too time consuming, or I didn't want to do it. But I would definitely ask. Good luck!
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(IV's): Work environment, PTSD, Burnout
Moderating Variable: Job Satisfaction
Dependent Variable: Turnover Intention of employees
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Use Hayes’ PROCESS macro.
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I'm looking for any studies of sex workers (ex and current) that detail the content of their nightmares and any experience of sleep paralysis. There's great work by Dr. Melissa Farley on the prevalence of PTSD amongst sex workers but the content of their nightmares is never detailed in any of the studies I've read, apart from a few. The sleep paralysis incidences are there but, again, the details are not as deep as separate studies regarding sleep paralysis.
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I have not done such studies, but I would like to know what these studies are and what their impact on the person is because I hear a lot of people talking to them or seeing them in a dream causing them shocks
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