Science topic

Political Ecology - Science topic

Political ecology is the study of the relationships between political, economic and social factors with environmental issues and changes. Political ecology differs from apolitical ecological studies by politicizing environmental issues and phenomena.
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I'm working in the broad field of political ecology and I'm currently co-authoring an article about the social-ecological consequences of the digital economy (material anchor, territorialities, conflicts). I'm therefore looking for literature about the digital economy I might have missed so far. I'm pleased about all suggestions. Many thanks in advance!
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Felix Malte Dorn NFCC & HMPP
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I am working on a research proposal on the issue of agricultural expansion, intensification and deforestation in tropical Latin America. I am particularly interested in looking not only at socio-economic and technological drivers, but also institutional ones. In particular, which aspects of governance are important in preventing further spatial expansion of agriculture in tropical Latin America? How do different land tenure systems affect the process? What is the role of indigenous communities? So far I have been thinking of looking at the dry Chaco in Northern Argentina and perhaps another case in Ecuador (in order to perform a comparative analysis). I would very much appreciate collaborations with local institutions/researchers.
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The concept of metabolic vehicle, stemming from Virilio's Speed and Politics, is central in the Urban Political Ecology approach. Despite the fact that "metabolic vehicles" appear in most of the works on metabolic flows and circulation and its persistent use by the most oustanding scholars (e.g. Swyngedouw, Heynen, Kaika, Gandy, Arboleda, Cooke, etc.), the concept rests little developed theoretically. How would you define it?
The concept is very intriguing and might help us to crystallize manifold social relaitons and power dynamics, but at the same time it can be seen as to vague.
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I think you can find the definition in this book page 33 to 34
In the Nature of Cities: Urban Political Ecology and the Politics of Urban
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I'm interested to know about good Sci-Fi books that deal with e.g., species extinction and/or recovery, habitat destruction and/or restoration, climate change, ocean acidification, land-use change, and so on. If you read interesting Sci-Fi books on this type of topics, please let me know. I'd be very grateful :)
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I would also recommend the Atwood books and the Dune cycle (F. Herbert - 6 books). The Dune books are known for their exploration of religion and politics, but ecology is very important to the global story, dealing with resource dependance, ecosystem balance, ecological engineering (...) at a planetary scale. In particular, the first book includes a « planetologist » and an appendix explaining the ecology of Dune/Arrakis : '... the highest function of ecology is the understanding of consequences’.
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I believe there are limitations related to general or specific arenas, e.g., carbon trade.
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Less of a critique than an addition, the paper linked below emphasizes that "access" isn't a static condition shaped by categorical frameworks (legal or otherwise), but agency-driven action and skill that is socially and ecologically situated. In short, access isn't something people have, it is something that people do.
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Hello: I am applying for a grant to fund my PhD project (Political Ecology, Oil Conflict). My worry is that I got a master in natural sciences (Mineral resources and energy engineering/ Environmental Engineering) and my PhD is in social sciences. I am struggling to highlight why I am the 'perfect candidate' to conduct my project and want to hear your ideas on transferable skills between both disciplines. Thanks.
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Very interesting . First thing , inter-discipline experience is always good with regard to quality output of any work. Secondly , your experience in social sciences during Ph.D will do a world of good to management of human resources ( oil as natural resource and conflict of human is surely a social issue) , who says you are not an ideal condidate ..? There is a better alliance while working with such cross-disciplines...
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Are there studies linking the associational power of the working class (collective labor rights: Collective bargaining and unionization) to political ecology theory (Blaikie and Brookfield, 1987)?
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Gracias!!
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I am currently drafting a research project and before narrowing my research I'll need material to read on a broad range of issues related to the extractive model of development, accountability of TNCs, and concepts of political ecology.
My area of research is Colombia but any research on similar topic are welcome!
Thanking you in anticipation!!
Best
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Please check these PDF attachments also.
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A previous question would be what types of commons can be created, but I am specially interested in the potential link between commons and environmental justice. Any reflections about it?
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Dear Sergio, in 2010 I shared a view of the commons under natioalization and privatization pressures, you may find the ideas interesting at least as food for thoughts....I am sharing the article here:
Nationalization as Privatization in Reverse: Understanding the Nature of the Commons to Identify a Possible Point of Optimal Nationalization.
Have a nice day
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I am interesting in finding key political ecology studies that take into account gender perspectives as well as feminist and masculinities perspectives. 
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Hi,
Having a background on forest resources, I had two other names in mind as key pioneering influences: Louise Fortmann, Dianne Rocheleau. The volume edited by Rocheleau, Thomas-Slayter and Wangari (1996) is commented in this recent chapter: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/280741205_Feminist_Political_Ecology
You will find other references in the textbook of Paul Robbins, as well as in the part IV of the Routledge Handbook of Political Ecology.
For examples of political-ecological texts explicitly adressing gender, here is the keynote delivered by Nancy Peluso at the ENTITLE conference in Stockholm in March: https://entitleblog.org/2016/04/28/nancy-peluso-on-maids-and-other-mobile-subjects-remaking-forests-and-agrarian-environments-in-indonesia/
I would also suggest an older paper by Matthew D. Turner, not so well-known but with impressive empirics and subtle arguments: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1467-7660.00187/epdf
Regards!
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I am mainly interested in perspectives from sociology/anthropology/political ecology, but open for a wide disciplinary scope. The more recent the better.
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Thank you Edgar,
I have actually used that reference extensively in my work already, but thanks again for your tip.
Gard
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In Tarija, Bolivia I have found a paradox, a WWTP project which has funding and technical support from NL and Argentina has been stalled for already 10 years, it is being said that is due to social resistance (rural communities). But  according to empirical data gathered, it seems that the underlying causes are political interests...
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Hi Mariel,
It seems to me that many links could be done with another researches, one concerning the National Park Sanjay Gandhi (Munbai, Indian Republic) made by 2 geographers Émilie Edelblutte and Yanni Gunnell (file below), the second concerning the pacific Colombia area made by the anthropologist Arturo Escobar (file below) I used theses papers  for lecture in France and they are really clear and interesting concerning the links between ecological/political groups and social/spatial conflicts.
Even if you cannot read french papers, you can, at least, have a look on their bibliographies which is almost in english or spanish.
Hope it can be useful,
Christophe
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Are there articles that document the effects of bioprospecting by an advanced country on a developing country both ecologically and economically? Is bioprospecting by an industrial country on a developing country more beneficial than the other way around? I'd like to know more.
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A related question: Some countries are putting in place safeguards against biodiversity 'poaching' that can hinder international research. What is the evidence that there is a problem that needs fixing? In other words, how many cases do we know of in the last twenty years where a scientists form one country have 'stolen' biodiversity of value from another country? Any review available?
I am posting this as a separate question.
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In 1983, geographer Michael Watts published an influential essay entitled “On the Poverty of Theory: Natural Hazards Research in Context,” where he launched a powerful critique of cultural ecology and traditional hazards research which had tended to look at natural disasters in isolation from broader political economy systems embedded on [local] human-environment interactions. At that time, climate change could be considered a minor controversial topic discussed mostly by physical scientists. More than 30 years later, climate change is now considered one of the greatest challenges of our time and calls for adaptation are everywhere. Adaptation to climate change has become an imperative, many would argue. In the developing world, governments, international organizations and NGO are implementing adaptation projects to support what is being called more resilient communities, here understood as communities that are capable of bouncing back from adverse situations and to adapt to change through self-organization and learning. Although often acknowledged, development deficits remain outside the scope of many of these projects that tend to focus on the symptoms of the problem and less on its causes.
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It is indeed surprising that PE is not a stronger field in climate change adaptation work, given that cultural ecology was all about human adaptability, and political ecology pointed out that the processes of human adaptability are deeply imbued with power relations and struggles.
There have been several conceptual nods to the relevance of political ecology in the field of climate adaptation (see especially several works by Adger), but not a lot of published case studies thus far that explicitly analyze climate change adaptation processes/projects from a PE lens. These are starting to emerge, however.
Much of the PE literature on environmental change and development is quite relevant, but not necessarily integrated into the CCA field, which often (but not always) tends to have more technical or instrumental bents. That being said, CCA is a still a relatively young field, both in academia and policy, so I see this as a significant growth niche for PE research.