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I want to make a post-doc on the topic of political culture.
I want to know is there any facility to make a post-doc with a TUBİTAK scholarship at your mentor. I don’t demand any financial support from you. TUBİTAK is going to funded all my education and other expenses.
I will send my CV and work plan which are already prepared.
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@ Emre, I don't have any facility at TUBITAK scholarship. However, I suggest Nigeria and Ghana as study areas. Thanks
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Whenever there is a paradigm shift because of changing technology, religion, politics, culture, etc., new concepts are brought into the language. And when there are no words to talk about these new concepts, then new words must enter the language. This PowerPoint gives examples of semantic gaps and the linguistic processes that are used to fill these semantic gaps: Borrowing, Loan Translation, Shift in Denotation or Connotation, Metaphorical Shift, Suffixation, Prefixation, Compounding, Clipping, Blending, Back Formation, Acronyming, Metathesis, Onomatopoeia, Reduplication, and Part of Speech Change. We also discuss “Sniglets.” Whenever we have a paradigm shift based on changing technology, religion, politics, or culture, how do we bring new words into the language to talk about the changes?
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You've already got quite a list of hows in the subtext to your question. I guess whim and serendipity might be added. Possible examples: the mathematical term "google", the original word for quark, namely "quork" (it was changed because "quark" appears in Finnegan's Wake), and perhaps the names of some of the types of quarks.
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Where are the long-term political, cultural and socioeconomic legacy of colonialism, which altered Africa's history forever and looks set influence its future as well ??
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European (and American) Colonialism changed as well the colonizer, for better, for worse, who knows? Now it is also a strong bond between former oppressors and oppressed. One of the smartest analyses on the whole issue come from Mbembe.
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I am researching political and electoral violence and I need latest electoral violence theories propounded from 2011 to date because all the theories accessible to me are from 2010 and earlier and they will not be accepted by my institution.
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Уважаемые коллеги!
В России политическое насилие на выборах исследуется в рамках "Электоральной криминологии", а в целом политическое насилие как средство достижения политических целей в рамках "Политической криминологии", а жертвы политического насилия исследуются "Криминальной политической виктимологией".
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It promotes tolerance and understanding above and beyond our political, cultural and religious differences, putting special emphasis on the defence of human rights, the protection of ethnic minorities and the most vulnerable groups, and the conservation of the environment.
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Dear M.M. Fazil .. we have done similar project in Bahrain after the Arab Spring. I believe it is very important that you bring the different parties into one field or community project that would address a common value. Both you and they (the students) would learn a lot from the experience.
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I would like to know your opinion about the content of the civic competence. Thus, my main question can be divided in the following sub-questions:
1) How would you define civic competence?
2) Do the democracy require any civic competence in order to function properly?
3) In your are opinion on which political topics the citizens should have some kind of basic knowledge?
4) Are there levels of civic competence?
Thank you for your contribution!
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It is a challenging question rather set of questions. Let me try:
1) Civic Competence: The ability of the people to actively and judiciously carry out their duties and responsibilities for the effective functioning of their society and state.
2) Democracies would certainly require civic competence in order to function properly. Democracies are based on reflection of will of people and thus active participation by citizens in raising their concerns, identifying the tasks to be undertaken, reacting to the functioning of the government, monitoring and evaluating the performance of the institutions of governance, conscientious voting in the electoral process - all is needed. Thus, thriving democracies would necessarily require active involvement of its citizens holding civic competence.
3)There are several political topics on which citizens should have some kind of basic knowledge: Constitution; Legislative Framework; Nation Building; National Symbols; Rights and Duties; Electoral Process; Manifestos of Political Parties; Accountability Channels/Mechanisms; Financial/Budgetary Provisions; Public Private Partnership Mechanisms; Civil Society; Civic Responsibility - and many more.
4) Very difficult to give answer to levels of Civic Competence. Because in every society some people would be having higher level of Civic Competence than others. Some would always acknowledge/feel their sense of responsibility to the society and the state and contribute more towards the cause, while some may not be that committed. Nevertheless, the broad idea is to keep pressing the need for higher civic competence, while taking into stride the smaller acknowledgments and contributions towards this direction. Higher the level of Civic Competence - Higher would be the Accountability asking capacity from the institutions of Governance and Higher would be the strength of the Democracy.
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Present humanity is based on application of S&T. Political and social framework provide a base to development of S&T. This framework is not so strong due to selfish nature of individuals in a community.
The other issue is that invertebrates and primitive organisms may be more successful in the changed climatic conditions in future due to their adaptability and immense reproduction rates.
Knowledge provides ability to change the environment at the place of changing own DNA and genes. How far humanity can be successful by changing (and damaging) the environment. Adaptability of human society is being ceased due to increasing dependency on medical facilities.
Can S&T sustain without strengthening political, cultural and ethical framework?
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OF COURSE NOT.
above the salt , it means:
— Of or in a position of high standing, rank, regard, or repute. The term is derived from the social hierarchy of nobility in medieval times, in which salt, a precious commodity then, was set in the middle of the dining table. Those of high noble rank were seated "above the salt," that is, closer to the lord and lady of the house, while those in lower social standing were seated "below" it.
So, Knowledge is not the whole thing, I guess.
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Given the current unrest in South Africa as regards intra-continental migration, isnt it time to revisit academic discourse on the socioeconomic, political and cultural perspectives of migration?
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There is one going on in Europe as we speak and it is called Brexit. Brexit is a confluence of a panoply of factors that include nationalism, sovereignty, culture, as well as other sociio-economic considerations. Immigration forms a large part of Brexit and for some, it is the main or determining factor in Britain's decision to exit the EU. This is an example of intra-continental migration.
Social science has always addressed the subject of inter as well as intra continental migration and often the same themes recur, such as mentioned above. Other additional features may include the racial and ethnic composition of migrants and how they are perceived by host nations.
i am not sure that what is happening in South Africa is significantly different to other cases where tension arises between migrants and their host, despite the need to identify specific factors that may lie at the heart of this occurrence. While the violence is deplorable, the facts that attend as causality appear to be the same.
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Unfortunately, managers in organizations are politicians before they are managersو They often think a bout chairmanship, not management.
There are also undesirable behavior patterns in politics, which are found in the management process.
Is it necessary for managers to change as governments change? Regardless of their merits?
what should we really do?
How to separate politics from management?
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Because politics or pirate politics may be far easier than proper management.
There is an aspect of selfishness.
Also values. You desire to increase your own position, power, benefits, resources etc instead of that of others.
One way to overcome it may be strict performance evaluation based on contribution and value added - the amount of value the person added and his contribution.
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Globalization has made the entire world global village. this brought about free flow of trade, communication, political and cultural affinity. The fundamental is that it has enhance competition among counties. But the problem is that it has further polarized the world into the two, the highly developed nations and developing nation. iIt is obvious that the gap is becoming wider
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Yes but negative. Globalization has achieved poor performance to globalize poverty .
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Historically speaking, we say Winston Churchill, FDR, Charles De Gaulle, Mahatma Gandhi, Nelson Mandela, Dr Sun Yat Sun, Mao, V.I. Lenin and the like have been good leaders. We do not get to talk about people in our times in the same tone. What qualities and attributes mark out a good leader? Are there some characteristics in 'good leaders' that we can say are universal and worthy of emulation by others?
PS: please do not take on any individual person in the political arena anywhere in the world. Let us discuss only the leadership qualities that they must have or should not have, from academic perspective.
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I believe this is an outstanding question. From my perspective, a leader is that individual who has presence, knowledge, the ability to communicate, a moral compass, strong ethical values, concerned for those within their organization and the ability to analyze and act on the dynamics around your organization. They must envision and self-confidence. We have all worked for outstanding leaders and individuals who have fallen short lived and placed in leadership positions. What I expect from our leaders is a moral integrity, vision and encourage to do the right thing at the right time. Sometimes when it is unpopular. For most leaders ultimate success or failure depends directly on how they respond in the situations that they encounter when they are in leadership positions. Today it is extremely difficult for leaders, especially in light of the media that can either represent or miss represent their intent and either strengthened or weakened their images leader. While you used some interesting examples of leadership, Ultimately, there judged by history and the successes or failures attributed to them.
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Undoubtedly Democracy is the best system, but is there any room of improvement?
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1- The democratic system of a democratic country should be taught in schools.
Have the students grow up with the idea that they are going to be the leaders of tomorrow and they must all be informed and engaged by making their voice heard through their vote. In most schools we do teach by example. We have student governments or voting systems when choices need to be made, etc.
2- Voting should be mandatory for all the adult citizens.
There should be some kind of system to set up to ensure that all the able citizens that are eligible to vote actually vote. ( I believe it is possible with the technology we have.)
I would like to see some kind of type of reward to all the citizens that vote. Of course, with a reward there might be some kind of consequence to those that vote.
An idea I have is to give the citizens a certain percentage, 5 % for example, added to their income tax returns if they are to receive a refund and by ricochet leave the refund as is if they do not vote.
For those that have to pay income tax, 5% would be deducted from the amount owed and again, nothing deducted for those that do not vote.
This is just an idea. Perhaps, others have better ideas.
Come to think of it, in my country, Canada, a 20$ Tim Horton gift card might do the trick. LOL
3- Transparency
Transparency must prevail at all echelons of governments.
Politicians have to be honest and actually care about the citizens that they need to vote for them. I am so tired of that shit.
4- Lobbyists
This way of doing deals behind closed doors with politicians should be illegal. No wonder, we, as voters, feel that these so called, democratic governments, are not representing the voice of the people but cater to those big multi nationals that basically bought them.
5- Career welfare transferred from one generation has to be dealt with somehow.
I do not have the perfect answer to this. In my life experience, I have seen this happen. Honestly, they seem to have a better life than those of us that are trying to be productive citizens to our country. Honestly, I think they are on to something.
I know of a family where the wife 'divorced' the husband in order to get welfare. The 'ex' still lives with his family and he too is on welfare and works 'under the table' and has extra undeclared income. They seem to live happy contented lives. Their kids are growing up in that kind of value system and it looks like they are on their way to having the kind of life their parents adopted.
6- Working under the table issue.
We all know it exists. I am sure billions of dollars of untaxed sales go uncollected.
I find that to be simply wrong. There is only so much money any democracy can squeeze out of the middle class that live more or less an honest life.
7- Freedom of speech
Coming from a democratic country, I feel blessed that I can express myself without the fear of being silenced by the leaders of my country.
As long as we are able to express ourselves and voice our concerns, perhaps in time we, as citizens, will MAKE a difference.
I mean, I can still hope that things will imporve... I hope.
8- Civil servant issue... Where do I begin!
Also, I truly believe that civil servants must try to be engaged in actually caring in giving a decent service to its citizens. With extreme passion I simply hate those  1-800 numbers where you end up in some obscure voice mail where no one returns your call. Or if you are lucky, the human on the other end of the phone transfers you and if you are lucky, an other human answers and again you are transferred to an other person on and on it goes until you end up in some obscure voice mail where you do not have the phone number of the actual idiot, I mean civil servant, that is supposed to give a hoot to solve your simple question. This way of doing things is immoral, in my opinion.
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Macho politics is the norm, a confrontational zero-sum approach.
But when women become political leaders, think of Scandinavia, do they do politics in a different way?
If so, is this a gendered difference or just a different way of doing politics?
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I live in Scandinavia, being exposed to many female politicians. There are no signs here to indicate that women do politics any other way than men. This is good, as it underlines the similarities between the genders also in this area. On the other hand, for the public, it is not so good. Some might have had the illusion that female politicians would save the world for aggressive men. No reason to hope for such. :)
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I am thinking something like how unions move from striking against an employer to striking against the government.
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Thank you very much, I had missed these responses.
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Please notify if you think Imran Khan is a game changer in Pakistani politics?
And should political parties use social media sites as communication tool for politics?
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 As has been the trend of late, social media has come to the fore in the political domain thanks to the concept being immensely popularized by the-then US President Barack Obama who used it extensively and with much success twice, in 2008 and then again 2012. In fact, the 2008 Presidential Election was dubbed as the first social media election. In India, the 2014 general election which resulted in the formation of BJP-led NDA government and saw Mr Modi becoming the PM was also testimony to the advent of social media in politics. In fact, his campaign style was likened to that of Barack Obama. As far as effectiveness of social media with regard to influencing the final outcome of any result is concerned, the same is not validated as pointed out by authors like Cameron et al who in his work studied the impact of social media in the outcome of the election in NZ and asserted that there is no concluding evidence that social media influences the outcome on its own owing to the complex nature of such campaigns.
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Hi again.
Another important contact may be Dr. Jose Maria Monteiro Semedo, a local geographer from Santiago Island who has studied some aspects of Fogo Island (mostly human geography and ethnography), including the area affected by the most recent volcanic eruptions. If you want I can give you his e-mail. 
Best regards, and good luck. 
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Can the politicians of western democracies be really democratic? The apparatuses of power execution and public security are said to be states within the state. In the last consequence they conduct illegal actions against assumed enemies of the state, errors of justice and state murders included. Edgar Snowden had to flee from the USA to be able to object a violation of basic rights. In effect he had no right of democratic criticism in his own country.
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Dear Holm;
Dear Napoleon;
I agree with the trouble dichotomization of the the West-East or North-South. However, I believe in looking, as academicians, to analytic boundaries beyond the established cannons and look evidence from context and get back to revisiting and rethinking on the established approaches, methods and analysis. Maybe, cann't we search for alternative or supportive explanations outside what is established for democracy or otherwise? I encourage Holm and hope more thought provoking issues emerge along the discussion. 
Filmon (Ethiopia)
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One relatively gentle definition of "predatory" is "addicted to or characterized by a tendency to victimize or destroy others for one's own gain." Thus self-obsession would be typically present to the exclusion of empathy. That rather clearly describes the nature of predation in the animal world, in human terms.
The word "predatory" has a generally understood meaning of an effect that renders one entity subordinate to another, wherein actually being a meal for a predator is the most extreme case.
A word that pragmatically describes the following human activities effectively (that is, with useful effect) could be useful to focus constant and consistent attention on the general nature of harmful political (etc.) behaviors:
   extremism, hate speech, rape, war-mongering, profiteering, corruption, slavery, discrimination, greed, theft, domination, terrorism, intimidation, usurpation, cannibalism, aggressive narcissism, fear-mongering, road-rage, trolling, pure callousness, compulsive lying, incitement, authoritarianism, chicanery, jingoism, hegemony,lusting for power, predatory lending, predatory pricing, malicious rhetoric, etc.  
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I too would like to see a more benevolent and less destructive form of decision-making throughout the world.  Regrettably, "predators" are very ruthless, very skilled in their predations, and often very practiced at disguising their actions.  After reading THE DARK WEB, it is apparent that many whose public lives seem quite mundane, are actually "closet predators" and "regressive provocateurs" when in the privacy of their own Internet communities.  Concurrently, many who act publicly have contrived to have marketers create a benevolent image. I see the real challenge in this regard, as being to present the case "against predation" so that it will resonate with the wider public to such an extent that they, en masse, will demand an end to it.  Until someone figures out a way to do THAT, we are reduced to merely fighting predation "around the margins!"  What argument would move the public to action?
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I really want to know any latest theories related to the causal relationships between increased exposure of international communication (e.g., overseas students, visiting professors) and democratisation process. Thanks.
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There is a vast literature on democratization and its various influences. Your best bet is just to access a good library and use the digital search engines. Should take you about 45 minutes to find many good sources.
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I am looking for any (ethnographical, political, cultural, anthropological,...) information about this community in Switzerland, Liechenstein, Italy or Austria. 
If I could find answers to my questions there, it would be perfect. My questions are:
  1. Are Walsers more like a separate ethnic group, or more just like an ethnic subgroup?
  2. How and to what extent did Walsers integrate into mainstream society?
  3. What are the main Walsers' traditions and what assists (or avoids) in their maintenance?
  4. What is the impact of government interventions in Switzerland, Italy, Austria and Liechtenstein to maintain (or loss) walsers' traditions?
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Hi,
you can look at the ethnographic work on Walser of  P.P Viazzo, 1989, Upland Communities, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
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I´m interested in collecting data from 2002 to 2012 on germans trust in government and in institutions as well.
The Eurobarometer provides a good amount of data on EU institutions but lacks (sometimes) of national government and parliament data.
Any help would be greatly appreciated! 
Thanks!
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Or in other words, in what way has it been reflected about the consequences of the role of electronic media in modern times to make receptors who don´t have direct access to the reality of things, recognize these realities?
My primary interest is to make a reflection of how electronic media produces information without taking into account location and territory, and how this affects the receptor in these locations or territories. Also, if information produced locally can be effective in contributing to the lives of the receptors, and to their agency too.
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This is a huge question.  However, it could be argued that electronic media remains unfamiliar territory for many and unknown for the majority of people on the earth.  Moreover, reality is not necessarily created by electronic media or at all. At best, it is simply another form of communication, perhaps unreflective of reality and potentially even unnecessary relative to the reality of people's lives.
The issues are worthy of wider debate.
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Taking into account that both Conservative parties and Islamist parties in Turkey highlight the role of Islam, how can we discern and contextualise them? Can we stress that Erdogan and AKP is inscribed politically and culturally on the path that inaugurated in Turkish politics by Menderes and its Democratic Party? Is AKP nowadays a more conservative or Islamist? Using the term conservative i exclude the far right nationalists of MHP. 
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The question itself is a paradox - conservative vs Islamist? Better still we discuss conservatives and progressives.
The second  generation of Islamists is what we have coined over here in Malaysia which can clearly be gleaned from the latest political developments here.
Would you need an elaboration?
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I am currently researching this issue to prepare a paper to be delivered at the conference of the Canadian Political Science Association, in late May 2016 in Calgary.
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Au groupe de gens se considerant comme Québécois, du point de vue identitaire collectif. Aussi simple que cea.
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Can you explain here a brief historical account.
According to my understanding this movement, critical thought, historical approach or critical school commenced in 1970 to amend power-based or elite based flaws at historical grounds (Especially after colonialism and emperialism, third world people found themselves lost. They were without history (i.e., without identity) of their own. I know, I am making here a mistake by using the fuzzy term third world but it is, for me and for most of the people, a general term to distinguish people of undeveloped country from the people of most advanced and powerful countries. Then from 1990, the term became a weapon, a tool, a methodology to voice the voiceless at academic, social, political, cultural etc grounds. Now, this multidisciplinary approach has no boundary and is applicable for all people marginalized in any country at any level.
How far am I correct? What is the difference between its initial objective and now its application in modern time? 
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I recommend works of Camila Góes, who has made research and got an MA degree in São Paulo University with a dissertation on this theme. Please, get in touch with her. Please, see her profile in researhgate.net below:
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E.g. How they interfere with other people's lives. The question is among others related to parties political culture and methods of communication.
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This will differ enormously depending on the context you look at.
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Do you trust some specific
--Newspapers (web based or printed)
--Radio or TV programs
--Magazines.
--Blogs
--Social networking sites.
--Other Information Websites.
--Other
Do you prefer a mix of these sources?
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Websites as infocatolica.com and forumlibertas.com are very interesting for me (in Spanish).
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I am teaching a political communication & Media Lobbying course to undergraduate students. Can anybody suggest me a good handbook on this course which covers both political communication and media lobbying.
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Hi Muhammad, 
i think this book gives you a good intro about media lobbying, with united states as example:
"The Irony of Democracy: An Uncommon Introduction to American Politics".
not the whole book, but some chapters are really good.
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Whither multiculturalism?
How are we to best understand multiculturalism, and is it good or bad thing for each multi-ethnic country?
Though he applauds the encounters and broadening of the people of differing societies and cultural backgrounds as positive, Kenan Malik, a British intellectual of Indian background has recently offered the following criticism of what is called “political” or “state multiculturalism”
As a political process, however, multiculturalism means something very different. It describes a set of policies, the aim of which is to manage diversity by putting people into ethnic boxes, defining individual needs and rights by virtue of the boxes into which people are put, and using those boxes to shape public policy. It is a case, not for open borders and minds, but for the policing of borders, whether physical, cultural or imaginative.
---end quotation
Whether multiculturalism is a good or bad thing, Malik describes the division of opinion:
It's a question to which the answers have become increasingly polarised in recent years. For some, multiculturalism expresses the essence of a modern, liberal society. For others, it has helped create an anxious, fragmented nation.
---end quotation
See:
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Multiculturalism is the superior level of interactios between different cultures. When the guest and the local and the foreign know that all have knowledge and traditions to share and when tney knos each other le outcome is better for all
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what is the military culture of Iran (ways to achieve the strategic objectives, principles of training, behavior patterns, ethical codes). The second issue is the political culture or norms, beliefs and priorities.
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Hi,
Your question is too wide and I thinks is Hard to answer, But here some tips:
*Iran has 2 parallel Armies with two different norms. The first one is like every other Country with Men's interested in Weapons and Combat. The Second army called "Sepah Pasdaran" involves Soldiers with strong Ideological faith. Sepah Soldiers are trained Ideologically science school, and do the Job more for their beliefs than money. In Iraq-Iran war the Iraqis feared the Sepah Pasdaran troops much much more than the classical Army.
*The Reason Iran has 2 Armies is to prevent a coup.
*In the Strategical regions like border Cities, the Commanders are chosen from the same Cities. 
*Since the Islamic Revolution, Iran never attacked any Country.
* Many weapons Iran builds today are renewed Weapons from Russia.
*15 Million people work for the Army, there for Iran has the biggest military in middle east. For Example Saudi Arabia has only 1 Million Soldiers. 
* The Chief Officer of both Armies is Ayatollah Khamenei. Analysing his speeches about Army gives you the best view form Iranian side.
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I'm looking for a Europe-wide surveys that are similar to what we see in the Latinobarometer, Afrobarometer. In other words, questions on economic perceptions, vote intention and partisan id. The Eurobarometer is largely a EU-wide survey that lacks any national component. The EES is largely a survey on second-order EP elections that dont measure voting in first order elections. The CSES lacks proper questions on economic perception. They include a retrospective sociotropic question and a "improvement of standard of living question." I'm look for a cross-national survey in Europe that asks such questions as
1. If Presidential elections or (parliamentary election) were held this sunday for whom would you vote for?
2. In the last election, did you vote for the opposition or the incumbent?
3. In the last 12 months, how has your household economic situation changed?
4. In the last 12 months, how has the country's economic situation changed?
5. In the next 12 month, do you expect your household's economic situation to get...? (better, worse, etc)
6. In the next 12 months, do you expect the country's economic situation to get?
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My hunch is that the European Social Survey is probably indeed the best bet for you. You might also want to have a look at the World Values Survey. These are the only other major comparative surveys of this nature apart from Eurobarometer, EES and CSES that I am aware of.
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Perhaps Pope Francis could be enough understood as a sensible Jesuit in dialogue with up-to-date global social, economical, political and cultural happenings.
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Certainly Pope Francis is an amazing Pope and a more than refreshing change from the previous Pope.  Personally, I have read a great deal of liberation theology and Jesuit teachings; however, I know almost nothing about Argentina. I think understanding liberation theology provides depth and insight into Pope Francis's thinking but it is surely not "required" to understand the theology.  As Mary noted above, few Christians know the milieu of Christ and Muslims may not know much of the social milieu of the Prophet Muhammad and his Companions, but they can read the stories and follow the teachings. His openness to people, ideas, other cultures and faiths is remarkable and can one day lead (one hopes) to more peaceful co-existence among people of a variety of faiths.  Even his name "Francis" is impressive; were my mother alive, she would be so thrilled since she was a sincere admirer of Saint Francis.
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Can you cite specific example on how the in-group orientation affect the political system in the locality ? The Filipino values are significantly studied to strengthen the understanding of the society as the culture and tradition is now gradually changing its cultural perspectives because of the advent of science and technology including the use of internet as a means of social networking. The primordial existence of man is the life support of biological maintenance such as food that would change the perception and attitude in dealing with the ideas of respect, dignity, integrity as influenced by the existence of social influence and power exploited by the economic dimensions of in-group orientation. Therefore, the foremost concern of our society is survival that transcends the idea of kapit sa patalim just to save the mere existence of the collective group particularly in the depressed communities.
This study reflects the transitional analysis of the cultural concept of sakop that has been existed as part of the cultural life processes and structures in a given society. The cluster of values is related to in-group orientation on what is known as sakop. It has deeper meaning in social relationships in the concept of the extended family ties. Furthermore, the family worth brings the social analysis of the political power and authority relevant to the idea of sakop. The collective action encompasses the values of human respect, honor, integrity, compassion and etc.It must be noted that social and political relationships defined the group values of pakikipagkapwa, pakikitungo, pakikiramay, utang na loob and other sociological values reflected in our society.
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 Dear Mr. Rajamanickam
       Thank you so much for your interest to know the English translation of the Filipino word " Sakop" and other relevant  cultural and political concepts about this social phenomenological research. In the realm of politics, we can consider this as the  sphere of influence and authority of a local leader to  govern a particular community. The political influence is deeply embedded by extended family relationships in the social system with the presence of the cultural development on the concept of clan and tribe that originated the core of political power of the local leader. The political inclination in the sphere of influence in the locality transcends from sociological ideas of group processes that affinity and consanguinity are the derivatives of the social complexity in the locality. So the  political orientation of the sphere of influence and occupation reflects from the extended families, close relatives and other relevant kinship system as a  social baseline in the in-group orientation.
       The political recognition in the sphere of influence is therefore related to the kinship system in the locality. Basically, the origin of this social system is the family as  the multiplier effects transcends to inter-marriage of the other families that may later grow into clan controlled by the parents which is known as the elderly. The clan expands to a tribe or a community closely-related to the blood lines from the original family which we call it the stages of generation identifying the forefathers in the locality. So the idea of "Sakop" as to its sphere of influence or occupation may not simply mean the political control of certain territory by a local leaders but there is an cultural attachments from the forefathers. So, when you deal with in-group orientation in the political sphere of influence may not simply mean elective local officials in a community but a closely knit family system that controlled specific local territory.
  In the community, where there are established cultural norms and  social beliefs and traditions the political influence and control usually originated from the family through the sociological process of assimilation and acculturation as a result of inter-marriage. Certainly, this is distinct when you discuss the general idea of "politics" where majority votes will have the political authority and power to have the vested sovereign influence for a town, city, province or state. The development agenda of the politicians are reflect by political interests and motives to enjoy the vested political rights on the so called democratic votes covered by deception and greed.  This may have different story when you deal about the sphere of political influence You may read the book entitled  CONTEMPORARY REPUBLIC : THE EMERGING POLITICAL AND ECONOMIC PHILOSOPHY IN THE  21st CENTURY  published in the AMAZON to understand the real meaning of public service in the concept of POLITICS. There are other emerging  political concepts that have been integrated in the sociology about the idea of POLITICS.
    I have many researches conducted not only the idea  of SAKOP that I presented in international conferences and amazon publications such as the CONTEMPORARY REPUBLIC you may even read savior websites to give  more glimpsed about  EMERGING CONCEPTS OF POLITICS that  provides extensive information about political and economic philosophy that transcends from the genuine meaning of public service.
      Finally, the idea of  "Sakop" reflects not only the sphere of political influence but the relevant to the ideas of cultural reciprocity which Filipinos are familiar with the sociological terms on social and political relationships defined the group values of pakikipagkapwa, pakikitungo, pakikiramay, utang na loob and other sociological values reflected in our society.  You may not understand these Filipino concepts, however, the shortest way to discuss it evolves in the meaning of friendship in a particular group with collective interest to work together on a common goal. The interesting part about these cultural concepts describe the essence of the Filipino people as compassionate, loving, friendly, humble and dignified in its character. You may visit our country and find out more about the interesting cultural and social facts about the Filipino life. I am sure you will love what you see about the Filipino identity that the foreigners really love about this race.
     I am sure you will discover the greatness of the Filipino People ....MORE FUN IN THE PHILIPPINES  !!!
    MABUHAY !!!!  Oh, please don't ask me again the Filipino term " MABUHAY" that may be a good question for you to discover its cultural value... in the  Ilokano language we also say to you 'NAIMBAG NGA ALDAW MO APO"
   MARAMING SALAMAT PO !!!
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Last decades of political life in Europe showed the gradual shift of many political parties to neo-liberal policies. From the other point of view the left very often are doing what right do, and the opposite - there is no any more clear left-right boundaries which existed in seventies-eighties of last century. What is the future for political spectrum in Europe?
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It is intellectually difficult to defend dismantling things like universal health care or public education, so the right can't paint the left into that corner. Meanwhile, it's intellectually difficult to defend that everything should have zero fees because people will overuse them, for example studying additional degrees that they never plan to use, and so the left can't so easily pain the right into the corner of being anti people for wanting to charge fees for things.
I think left-right bodies of thought still very much exist, but the areas of most acrimonious disagreement are now largely agreed on, and the disagreement is 1% this way or 1% that way, not open or close whole ways of doing things. So now election campaigns are not fought on the same divisions, and we will see different sorts of divisions emerge after previous areas of disagreement become essentially intellectually indefensible, except for matters of marginal difference (should fees rise a bit, should access improve a bit, etc.)
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The last decades have witnessed the development and implementation of several early warning systems initiatives to help communities in the developing world reduce their vulnerability to extreme weather events and long-term climatic changes. These initiatives have been supported by governments, NGOs and international organizations. However, research has already shown that many of the root causes of vulnerability to these events are linked to complex socioeconomic, political and cultural aspects, entrenched in processes of marginalization, lack of resources, assets and power. So, in this sense, what are the limits of early warning systems and the risks of using them as major components of climate change adaptation strategies? Does anyone have literature to suggest on early warning systems and climate change adaptation in this context?
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Installation of an early warning system was one of short-term responses to Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment for City of Sihanoukville, Cambodia. More can be found here http://www.fukuoka.unhabitat.org/programmes/ccci/pdf/CMB1_Sihanoukville-web.pdf
As I understand, it was not a major component, but was an affordable, relatively simple, early response to the report. This is in accordance with Risk Management theory and principles, you may wish to refer to the ISO standard and other literature on RM.
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Modernization and Postmodernization presents an interesting and quite cogent theory about the congruity of change in economic, social, political and cultural factors, and about the path of development.
How we can adapt the curriculum to this kind of needs and especially for social development?
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I think that besides criticising the traditional curriculum, post-modernism and post-colonialism helps little with the question of what content ought to be taught to the next generation...they give more on pedagogy - like 'border-crossing'pedagogy -  the curriculum could make known what is relevant in local contexts but what about decontextualised/objective/conceptual forms of knowledge?  
I think the curriculum ought to make students aware of other realities and contexts as well as their own...the knowledge society requires them to know more... globalization  has disrupted local and antional boundaries. 
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I still don't see any other viable and meaningful alternative to economic liberalism (democracy) except socialist democratic alternative that emerged in parts of Latin America in recent years. Without it, we are permanently damned to discuss the non-politics of the apolitical politicians. Those who disagree will do me a favor.
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Considering the world-wide impact of the book 'Capital in the 21st Century', by French economist Thomas Piketty, and its meaning for social priorities and goals, I am pleased to send you my attached evaluation of this book. I hope this will inspire your reflections about the moments we are going through. Kind regards,
Ronaldo Campos Carneiro – June 2014
Brasília - DF - Brasil
About Piketty’s Book on Capital -
The Answer of a convinced Liberal
After fifteen years of research (1998-2013) aimed at understanding the historical dynamics of income and wealth in around 20 countries, mainly in the last 200 years, analysing remarkable facts about humanity such as the industrial revolution, world conflicts and economic crises, using and harmonizing data broadly accepted by credible institutions like the World Bank, the UN and the IMF, this French Professor at the Paris School of Economics, Thomas Piketty, aged 43, came to the conclusion that:
Capitalism, or what is left of it, just as it is now put in practice or crony capitalism is heavily concentrating income and wealth, in a process where the rich get richer and the poor get poorer. Estimates for the XXI century are alarming and define human coexistence as unfeasible under the rules prevailing nowadays.
The current market competition is like an athletic race in which some are well fed and have access to health assistance and education, whereas crowds of excluded are left far behind: the minimally decent atitude is to place them on the same starting line or to equal their opportunities at the beginning of the race.
“The 85 richest people in the world, who could fit into a single London double-decker, control as much wealth as the poorest half of the global population– that is 3.5 billion people”.
“Strong inequality is corrosive of growth; it is corrosive for society. I believe that economists and politicians ignored inequality for too long.” (Christine Lagarde, Executive Director of the International Monetary Fund)
I personally think that these conclusions are irrefutable. No scholar will, after Piketty’s research, ignore the enormous social exclusion generated by capitalism, or the urgent need of actions to revert this dramatic situation. Inequality is complicating the market economy. One must never forget that the economy depends on supply and demand – it is useless to have supply facing a reduction in demand, or vice-versa. No one, but a liberal dreamer, can imagine that the economy will operate with supply only! Economics is a science where agents are regulated by the inexorable law of supply and demand. Politics is an art where the human will prevails. This is the reason why they cannot blend: economics and politics have diferent natures.
My complete agreement with Piketty’s conclusions also take me to a complete disagreement with his recommendations of a progressive tax and a global tax on wealth. This would be a shortcut to hell: it would mean more government, bureaucracy, war, corruption or, in the economic view, it would transfer assets from the domain of supply and demand to the changing human will of bureaucrats and politicians – an antechamber to hell. Nothing is more predatory than the action of governments in the economy – indebtedness is what governments know how to do, and they do it unreservedly.
“Deficits mean future tax increases, nothing less. The increase of deficits must be seen as a tax on future generations, and the politicians who create deficits should be judged as tax generators”. (Ron Paul, former US Senator – Republican).
Our generation has been the victim of decisions from past generations, that increased indebtedness, just like future generations will have to pay for the inconsequence of our own generation, that expanded those debts even further. The European discussion about austerity or Keynesian stimuli mean to penalize our generation or our descendants. The problem is that policy makers search immediate applause, transfering the solution of structural problems to the future. These are inconsequent acts, showing no concern with future generations.
“Do not forget that I have found out that more than ninety percent of all the national deficits, from 1921 to 1939, were caused by the payment of past, present and future wars” (Franklin D. Roosevelt)
“People do not make war. It is the governments that make it” (Ronald Reagan)
I would go back to the time of the American Revolution – “You will never strengthen the weak by weakening the strong” – and to the moments when the French Revolution was promising “liberty, fraternity and equality”.
Inequality of opportunities in human coexistence has been generating the most terrible process of domination and human bondage: the dictatorship of bureaucracy. The enormous amount of financial resources under the power of the State, to be allocated by acts of human will, stimulates an unbridled race of unscrupulous politicians in search of power at any cost; “They do not disdain, in certain cases, to associate with cheating, fraud and corruption”, to use the words of Vilfredo Pareto.
It would be very efficient and useful if economic policymakers became convinced that applying more measures under the same keynesian references they would come to the same results. We must migrate to another reference frame if we wish to improve our development process.
Economic rulers must be aware of the fact that: “If they do only what they have always done, they will end up having what they always had”. Piketty’s proposition, however, is for more of the same, and it would certainly lead to poor results.
The relation between income and wealth is like a river flowing to a dam, where income is the variable of flow or the fluidity of the river, and wealth is the variable of stock or the accumulation in the dam. They both have the same nature, because wealth is no more than accumulated labour, and only labour can generate wealth. Piketty proved that there are some who harvest without planting, or who generate wealth with the labour of others; when the rate of return on capital is higher than the rate of economic progress, it results in predatory accumulation. This is the patrimonialist economy, that produces income from inherited family properties or from political connections: to be a friend of the king produces more than merit or competence. It would be risible, were it not tragic, to imagine that the control of financial flows (currency, exchange and credit) can generate development, as suggested by Keynes. Only productive labour can generate capital.
“Labor exists before, and is independent from capital. Capital is just the fruit of labor and it would never exist without the previous existence of labor. Labor is superior to capital, and deserves much more consideration.”
This truth expressed by Abraham Lincoln must be recognized by all the zombies who are wandering, lost and disconnected from the basic concepts of economics.
One must not criticize without a corresponding proposition. The solution is not among the tools of economic theory, but in the scope of politics, by means of a broad, full and true agreement around a new Social Pact, in which nutrition, health and education will become a responsibility of the private productive process, after the corresponding reduction of taxes by the government, who will also reduce its interference in the economy. Instead of transferring resources from the rich to the poor, this pact will equal opportunities concerning nutrition, health care and education. I do not mean philanthropy, but a new concept of human labor as a process of transformation of human energy in physical or intelectual energy. This would replace the changing logic of ideas –ideology- by the invariable logic of life – biology. Of course, entrepreneurs will not act out of philanthropy: full productive labor will be the broker of this agreement of wills.
This idea is perfectly simple: Piketty proved that after centuries of distributive measures in all countries, in which resources were transferred from the rich to the poor, the result was more social exclusion.
To prohibit wealth with a ceiling on income, as Piketty proposes, means to weaken the strong to strengthen the weak. Better would be, instead of a ceiling on income, to establish a groundfloor, so as to permit wealth and prohibit poverty, in an open system that would open the pressure cooker after the progressive dissipation of pressure.
Let us equal, for all, the access to nutrition, health care and education, and liberate all the tools and values of the market economy.
It was these values that made the West prosperous since the XIX Century and their efficiency has been confirmed.
Instead of terming this my proposition utopic, theoretical or unfeasible, one must keep in mind that the complete liberation of prices and wages will lead us to full productive labour, that is: salaries will be ascending – there will be no need to establish a minimum wage – imagine the Industrial Revolution, at the beginning of the XIX Century.
“Governamental institutions:
a) protect the powerful and interest groups;
b) generate hostility, corruption and hopelessness;
c) hinder prosperity; and
d) repress free expression and the opportunities of individuals”. (IMB - Mises Institute).
I offer, below, some challenges in the scope of this proposition, for the reader to ponder:
1) the agricultural sector and the reversion of migration to the cities;
2) health care, education and the power in the hands of the private sector; profit linked to people health.
3) the financial sector and its incapability in the purchase and sale of papers having monetary expression.; Christine Lagarde: “crisis has prompted a major course correction—with the understanding that the true role of the financial sector is to serve, not to rule, the economy.
As Winston Churchill once remarked, “I would rather see finance less proud and industry more content”.
4) the political area and the prevention of speculation when resources are reduced.
Finally: In a Soccer World Cup or in the Olympic Games, just imagine how the competition would happen if political or bureaucratic influences were present in the choice of teams or in the rules of the games!
“In Hell, the hottest places are reserved for those who chose neutrality in times of crisis’. (Dante Alighieri (1265-1321)
Lets learn with the best lessons of Von Mises:
• If history could teach us anything, it would be that private property is inextricably linked with civilization.
• Those who are asking for more government interference are asking ultimately for more compulsion and less freedom.
• Governments become liberal only when forced to by the citizens.
• Both force and money are impotent against ideas.
THE GREAT DIVIDE 2014, JUN 27 6:16 PM 793
Inequality Is Not Inevitable
By JOSEPH E. STIGLITZ
“We need not just a new war on poverty but a war to protect the middle class. Solutions to these problems do not have to be newfangled. Far from it. Making markets act like markets would be a good place to start. We must end the rent-seeking society we have gravitated toward, in which the wealthy obtain profits by manipulating the system.
The problem of inequality is not so much a matter of technical economics. It’s really a problem of practical politics. Ensuring that those at the top pay their fair share of taxes — ending the special privileges of speculators, corporations and the rich — is both pragmatic and fair. We are not embracing a politics of envy if we reverse a politics of greed. Inequality is not just about the top marginal tax rate but also about our children’s access to food and the right to justice for all. If we spent more on education, health and infrastructure, we would strengthen our economy, now and in the future. Just because you’ve heard it before doesn’t mean we shouldn’t try it again.
Widening and deepening inequality is not driven by immutable economic laws, but by laws we have written ourselves”.
Conference on Inclusive Capitalism
By Christine Lagarde
Managing Director, International Monetary Fund
London, May 27, 2014
“A greater concentration of wealth could—if unchecked—even undermine the principles of meritocracy and democracy. It could undermine the principle of equal rights proclaimed in the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights.
Pope Francis recently put this in stark terms when he called increasing inequality “the root of social evil”.
It is therefore not surprising that IMF research—which looked at 173 countries over the last 50 years—found that more unequal countries tend to have lower and less durable economic growth”.
Best wishes,
Ronaldo Campos Carneiro – June 2014
To understand Piketty’s book:
http://piketty.pse.ens.fr/en/capital21c2 - Paris School of Economics
Skidelsky’s blog –
“Too Much”: Special Thomas Piketty issue (26 May – Sam Pizzigati
John Weeks – “Why is ‘Capital in the 21st Century’ (C21C) Such a Success”? 30 May 2014
Debate Piketty and Senator Elizabeth Warren
I also suggest reading the texts on this subject by:
David Harvey (“Afterthoughts on Piketty’s Capital”), plus Paul Krugman, Dani Rodrick, Joseph Stiglitz, Lawrence Summers, Robert Solow, James Galbraith.
---------------------------------------
From: Thomas Piketty <thomas.piketty@psemail.eu>
Date: 2014-06-13 3:37 GMT-03:00
Subject: RE : Piketty’s Capital - The Answer of a convinced Liberal
To: Ronaldo campos carneiro <rcarneiro4@gmail.com>
Thanks Ronaldo, I appreciate it. Best, Thomas
__________________
Thomas Piketty
Ecole d'Economie de Paris/Paris School of Economics
Page personnelle : http://piketty.pse.ens.fr/
From: Thomas Piketty <thomas.piketty@psemail.eu>
Date: 2014-07-02 7:38 GMT-03:00
Subject: RE: Piketty’s "Capital" - The answer of a convinced liberal
To: Ronaldo Carneiro <rcarneiro@salutecafe.com.br>
Thanks Ronaldo, this is a very interesting reaction! Best, Thomas
_______________
Thomas Piketty
Ecole d'Economie de Paris/Paris School of Economics
Page personnelle : http://piketty.pse.ens.fr/
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From: Hector Julio Melchiori - june,13,2014
Creo que la diferencias comienzan en los tres primeros años de vida al no tener nivelado el alimento, ya que el intelecto se relaciona con la primera capacidad de ingesta, luego ya es tarde.
CREO QUE LA IGUALDAD DE OPORTUNIDADES DEBE NACER ALLÍ, DESPUÉS MISMA EDUCACION Y MISMA INSTRUCCIÓN, LA EDUCACION SE DA EN EL HOGAR, PERO SI TENEMOS PADRES NO EDUCADOS, QUE A SU VEZ SON HIJOS DE OTROS PADRES NO EDUCADOS , VAMOS PEOR.
POR ULTIMO LA INSTRUCCIÓN SE DA EN LOS COLEGIOS QUE DEBERÍAN DAR LAS MISMAS POSIBILIDADAES PARA TODOS, CON ESAS TRES COSAS ARRANCAMOS A UN FUTURO MEJOR,
ES MI PERSONAL OPINIÓN QUE NO TIENE PORQUE SER NADA MAS QUE MI VERDAD, QUE ES ABSOLUTA SOLO PARA MÍ, PERO TODOS TIENEN EL DERECHO A TENER SUS VERDADES PROPIAS Y PARA ELLOS SERÁN VERDADES ABSOLUTAS TAMBIÉN,
LO QUE HACE FALTA ES CONCORDAR PARTE DE LAS OPINIONES DE UN GRAN NÚMERO DE PERSONAS DISPUESTAS A TRABAJAR PERO QUE SABEN QUE ELLOS NO VERÁN LOS FRUTOS,
ESO ES PARA LAS GENERACIONES VENIDERAS
"SI TODOS CUMPLIERAMOS CON NUESTROS DEBERES HABRIA MENOS PERSONAS RECLAMANDO POR SUS DERECHOS" GHANDI DIXIT.
ATTE. MELCHIORI.
---------------------------------------------------------------
From: Pedro Schwartz <pedro@pedroschwartz.com> june,13,2014
Dear Mr. Carneiro:
I find what you say complicated and will think on it. However, I think Piketty is wrong in his forecast of the future of capitalism.
Sincerely
---------------------------------------------
Dhian Chand <mdhianchand@hotmail.com> june.14,2014
2006-7 DG - 3080 District
Shimla Him. Pr. India
Dear PDG Ronaldo Carneiro,
Thank you for sending me your evaluation of Piketty's Capital - the answer of a convinced liberal. You have motivate me to buy and read his book "Capital in the 21st Century". You have rightly concluded in the last four points, the people responsible to create balance in the social economic status in the society. However, the question remained unanswered that politicians and bureaucrats have no limit for their greed for money and power which ultimately encourage corruption in the country and war between neighbouring countries. If we are able to influence these two category of our society the balance in distribution of economic growth will be maintained and there will be no poor in the modern world which due to technology evolution has become one a global village.
Regards
Dhian Chand
--------------------------------------------------------------------
From: Anthony de Jasay <jasay@wanadoo.fr> 14/6/14
Dear Mr. Carneiro,
I have had your letter of 13 June read to me (as you may know I have lost my eyesight long ago). I agree with most of it , but as you must know very well it is not by condemning politics and politicians for being toxic and nasty that thay will become any less harmful. They are a probably inevitable product of one man, one vote.
Yous sincerely,
Anthony de Jasay
-----------------------------------------------
From: Stephen Raudenbush - 13/6/14
Dear Ronald
Thanks for sending this. I have admired your work and made very good use of your book with James Heckman on inequality.
I do have a few questions
* Why are key elements of Sen's "human development index" so much better in the European social democracies than in the US?
* Why have the countries that employed a Keynesian stimulus done so much better during the recession than countries that used the recession to reduce government spending?
I believe you have offered a false choice between heavy government involvement and light government involvement. All sides are competing to use the government to support their own special interest. If the government does not intervene to insure child care, education, health, housing, minimum wage, unemployment insurance, and social security for the elderly, and protect the environment, the result will not be a utopian laissez faire society. Instead, government resources will be directed entirely to prop up agri-business, build roads to support real estate developers, save failing banks, generate unneeded contracts for lobbyists, etc. In sum, we will have neither social democracy nor laissez faire but rather socialism for the rich, which is pretty much what the US has now.
Why did you not comment on our extraordinarily corrupt political system in which running for low level offices now requires millions of dollars? Where huge firms literally dictate legislation to the office holders they have bankrolled?
I would propose a government role that does the good things I mentioned above while aggressively intervening against oligopoly and favoritism to insure competition in the market place. The government can be a friend of the free market and a friend of meritocracy while insuring basic necessities, particularly for the children and the elderly, and supporting human capital development.
Sincerely
Steve Raudenbush
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From: William Anderson - 13/6/14
If these points are true, then are you saying that the vast amount of people are materially poorer than they were, say, in 1980? That they have fewer goods and services available to them now than they had then?
It seems to me that the theories depend upon (1) homogeneous capital (capital as a lump of stuff that is useful primarily for how much is spent in creating and accumulating it), and (2) underconsumption. We have been getting underconsumption theories at least since “Fable of the Bees.”
Now, we do have a lot of what is called crony capitalism today, in which owners of capital, through political alliances, are able to force resources into a direction that would not be profitable (or would be less profitable) without the government intervention. However, from what I can tell, Piketty is not so worried about this development. Piketty would prefer lots of people to be poor to make Bill Gates and a few other people pay more taxes.
If Piketty’s thesis is true, then the vast majority of people today are poorer than were the people of the early 1800s, when the development of large-scale capital really took off in Great Britain and in Europe. Are you prepared to say that? Think of the logic of his thesis; are you prepared to claim that a larger percentage of people are poor today (and living in worse conditions) than were people of the early 1800s?
Then, to follow Piketty’s logic, the bifurcated returns to capital (versus ordinary income growth) would have to be consistent from the very start. Thus, you are having to claim that the poor today are poorer than the vast majority of people in the early 19th Century. Can you empirically justify that statement?
-----------------------------------------------
From: g.reisman@capitalism.net - 13/6/14
Dear Mr. Carneiro:
Thank you for your review of Piketty.
Attached, please find a copy of my review of him, which I’ve just posted to my blog.
Sincerely,
George Reisman
--------------------------------------------
june, 16, 2014
Dear fellow Rotarian Ronaldo Carneiro,
thank you very much. your thoughts on the book of Piketty are very interesting, especially in this period we are going through.
I will continue to reflect on this, and I will send it to my daughter who is studying Economics.
Many greetings.
Salvatore Sarpietro
2007-08 DG – 2110 District
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Benegas-Lynch, Jr., Alberto
National Academy of Sciences, Argentina
abenegaslynch@yahoo.com – june,20,2014
Dear Ronaldo Carneiro, thak you for sending your papers that I will read with great interest. In the meanwhile, I copy one of my weakly columns on the subject. Cordially, Alberto Benegas Lynch, Jr
------------------------------------------------------
From: Jeff Deist
jeffdeist@mises.org - june,20,2014
Excellent, thank you. Jeff
--------------------------------------------------------
From: Floy Lilley <floylilley@mises.com>
Date: 2014-06-20 17:29 GMT-03:00
Subject: Re: About Pikettys Book on Capital - The answer of a convinced liberal
To: Ronaldo Carneiro <rcarneiro@salutecafe.com.br>
Hello Mr. Carneiro,
Your enthusiasm for this project is palpable. That's a fine way to feel about whatever you do.
You embrace Piketty's work in ways that I do not. I do not find that he proves his thesis.
Thank you for having thought of me.
Best,
Floy Lilley
---------------------------------------------
From: Rev. Robert A. Sirico <rsirico@acton.org>
Date: 2014-06-21 13:30 GMT-03:00
Subject: RE: About Piketty’s Book on Capital - The Answer of a convinced Liberal
To: Ronaldo campos carneiro <rcarneiro4@gmail.com>
Dear Ronaldo:
Your email arrive just as I had begun reading Pikettey’s book Capital, so I shall now do so with your critique in mind.
Many thanks,
Fr. Robert A. Sirico,
President
The Acton Institute
-------------------------------------------------------
From: Gary North <gnorth@poetworld.net>
Date: 2014-06-23 9:02 GMT-03:00
Subject: RE: About Piketty’s Book on Capital - The Answer of a convinced Liberal
To: Ronaldo campos carneiro <rcarneiro4@gmail.com>
Don't start with Pikkety. Start woth Pareto: 1897
From: Jaana Woiceshyn <jwoiceshyn@gmail.com>
Date: 2014-07-11 1:29 GMT-03:00
Subject: RE: Why competition is good and regulation bad
To: Ronaldo campos carneiro <rcarneiro4@gmail.com>
Thank you, Ronaldo.—My silence does not imply anything but me being swamped and not being able to find the time to correspond—sorry. I hope my life will get less busy soon. But in general, I disagree with Piketty’s thesis. Inequality is a non-issue! Regards, Jaana
From: Noam Chomsky <chomsky@mit.edu>
Date: 2014-07-11 1:56 GMT-03:00
Subject: Piketty’s "Capital" - The answer of a convinced liberal
To: Ronaldo Carneiro <rcarneiro@salutecafe.com.br>
Thanks for sending. Hope to get to it soon.
Date: 2014-07-18 5:41 GMT-03:00
Subject: RE: Inequalities
To: Ronaldo campos carneiro <rcarneiro4@gmail.com>
Hello,
Thank you so much for your email below.
Unfortunately, Profile books do not accept unsolicited material. However, we do recommend the following websites as industry standard for gaining a reputable agent as well as other tips for publishing. Please do not pay an agent either – this is usually not a good sign.
• Writers and Artists yearbook
• Preditors and editors
• Absolute write
We most certainly wish you the best with getting published.
Kind regards,
Olu
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Olu Ubadike
Office Manager
Profile Books
3A Exmouth House
Pine Street
Exmouth Market
London
From: Ieva NAVICKAITĖ <Ieva@llri.lt>
Date: 2014-08-01 4:07 GMT-03:00
Subject: RE: Inequalities
To: Ronaldo campos carneiro <rcarneiro4@gmail.com>
Thank you for sharing, Ronaldo. It will be very interesing to read your remarks on Piketty‘s book. Let‘s keep in touch.
Best wishes. Ieva
Christopher Spackman comentou sua publicação.
Christopher escreveu: "Thanx for the article. Thoughts. 1. Agree that capitalism is well on the way to eating itself 2. Agree that war is a major problem. Nation states have abrogated the right to billions of unprofitable dollars. 3. Agree that answer is probably not a 'ceiling' but a 'floor' - in other words, the tax system. If the 'haves' agree to pay generously, then the problems you point out with health, education, etc. will disappear. The problem occurs when the 'haves' think they own their money and try to hold it all. Conclusion: a neat summary of the problem ;-) Christopher"
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Bureaucratic clientelism is a category of clientelism, where political parties and state authorities try to create more posts into the state to give them to their followers. I really appreciate if you can give some paper with empirical approach to this subject.
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There is more of this kind of stuff in the works of Steven Levitsky (informal institutions in Latin America) and in Peter Mair, about organizational patronage within political parties.
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Are they guidelines that depicts the process of recovering? Is there or isn't there a need to build up in a post-conflict area? If so, are there specific regulations one should follow in the action to move forward and 'preserve' the significance of the post-conflict site?
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Hi Caroline….
In terms of power, I'm keen on addressing about the power of the government. In terms of 'built environment', I'm looking at the context of rebuilding the site.
For example, Ground Zero was previously the site of the World Trade Center, where once the twin tower stood (high-rise/skyscraper) before the catastrophe of 9/11 and in the present day, there are more high-rise/skyscrapers are built, yet again.
Therefore, I'm looking into investigating/researching on how does this particular hierarchy of power influence the outcome of the rebuilding of the site.
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As a novice in the field of political culture, this thinking has lead me to this question. There are various backgrounds for understanding political culture. For some, it is characterised more on the societies' wealth (and value change) (Inglehart, Welzel) while others speak about a social capital (Putnam), etc. But in certain circumstances it could be difficult to see a mechanism through which these approaches operate. If institutions are ineffective to punish somebody for breaking the law civil society should put these institutions under pressure and force them to punish offender. The problem is when civil society mobilizes. When it finds the situation as necessary for improvement. Therefore my question is whether there exists some concept of political culture which deals with such a problem.
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Thanks for your helpful answers... I was pretty sure that it will be necessary to use more concepts to deal with this idea... I just was not sure, whether I have not missed any concept of political culture which deals with proposed idea...
My field of interest is the elections' performance, so maybe the question of legality could be in this sense more complicated. For example, the secrecy of the voting act or indifference of citizens could be complications in pursuing the law. In my opinion, the punishments for breaking the Electoral Law are usualy not embodied in these laws and it is not clear what the consequences for violaters are... This fact highlights necessity of exploration of a triggers of citizens' mobilization...
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One could notice that many countries' social economic status grows up when science practice is highlighted in their policies; whereas the evolution of others decreases once science is no more looked as priority.
Differently from many countries who do not know what science they need and how to operate with it, exhibiting chaotic socioeconomic development. However few countries think that science is not useful for their progress, those show likely archaic behavior.
However some countries think that science should be democratized for fast growing up of human knowledge and best human progress (they are thankful) while others think that they should confine their science into their frontiers.
In the same time some of them deny science to some countries and set  them under control through lobbying, squeeze and/or predation  of their intellectual and scientific matter.
And few of them do influence political leaderships of some countries via arrangement or concession of particular intellectual or scientific stuff.
So how science could be free of  political ideologies and ego schemes, and be neutral with political power ships for worldwide progress??
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Political leadership of a Country should recognise that science and education brings the progress and prosperity.
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In general, there are two big perspectives about political culture: functionalist and cultural. Almond and Verba are the representatives of the first one. But I don't know enough theorists of the second one. Could anybody suggest theorists of the cultural perspective on political culture? Thanks.
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Sorry for joining this discussion with a question, but... I think understand the way how Inglehart thinks about political culture. But is there any concept which is defined more in the way how societies are able to, for example, tolerate some kind of (bad) behavior?
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What would be the first references that come to your mind regarding the topic of the political uses of pictures (caricatures, drawings, photographs, engravings) in 19th and 20th centuries mobilizations? As a French researcher, I'd be curious to know your must-reads.
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Another great topic in the Uncle Sam history is the history of Miss Columbia, the female figure of "America", and the equivalent of Marianne. In some caricatures Miss Columbia appears as the couple of Uncle Sam. The rise, fall and down of this woman image of the United States it's a very interesting theme.