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Poetry Writing - Science topic

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What does the text reveal about the problematics of post-colonial identity, including the relationship between personal and cultural identity and such issues as double consciousness and hybridity?
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Try to read "Can the Subaltern Speak?" Spivak discusses the lack of an account of the Sati practice, leading her to reflect on whether the subaltern can even speak. Spivak writes about the process, the focus on the Eurocentric Subject as they disavow the problem of representation; and by invoking the Subject of Europe, these intellectuals constitute the subaltern Other of Europe as anonymous and mute. Reading Edward Said should help critics like you understanding this topic. All the best!
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The word "orange" is commonly cited as an example.
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Yes Stanley Wilkin , when I first asked the question little did I realize how complex the issues were, how many different criteria or desiderata might be invoked, and how nuanced the answers might become.
floccinaucinihilipilification .....
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My colleague Heidi Höglund and I are conducting a systematic literature review of research on poetry teaching through dance and visual arts. We are interested in both poetry reading and poetry writing in primary and secondary educational settings. We have searched various data bases and found about 50 articles to be assessed for eligibility. Now we also expand our search to possibly find articles not found in the data base searches.
Does any of you know of empirical articles (in English) reporting on this topic?
Thank you in advance!
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Your PhD topic is just what is needed, Sofia, giving clarity and justification for dance in education, especially creative dance. I taught in an era of a multidisciplinary approach to education which then seemed to go out of fashion before being reinvented some years later. I combined dance with literature, science, history, etc. but became disillusioned with the formal education system so moved to community-based dance which became the basis of my PhD. I wish you well for the final stages of yours.
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Rimbaud ceased to write poetry when he was 21. Up to that point, some consider the poetry he wrote started off modern poetry. He wrote of subjects that few poets had touched on before-initiating poets like Ginsberg.
Nevertheless, he sometimes reminds me of Villon in both his choice of subject matter and life-style.
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Rimbuad wrote A remarkable poem A season in hell , in which he personified his hallucinations
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(1) Public (media) discourse is mostly an industry of manipulation, in which facts and valid arguments are ignored.
(2) Academic philosophy is a scholastic play with concepts, which is mostly not interesting and which is mostly useless.
(3) Poetry can be enlightening and inspiring, but it is difficult to tell what is poetry, and what is an arbitrary play with words, without a clear meaning.
(4) I tried to join philosophical reflection and poetry into a sort of "reflective poetry". I wrote some "poems in prose" (in my/Croatian language) but I am not quite happy with what I have produced.
Can you give me some advice in this regard? - Suggest me some book of "reflective poetry". The authors I love the most are Nietzsche (in "Zarathustra") and Tagore (in "Gitanjali).
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Maybe I'm wrong, Mario, but I sense in your question more than a request for a reading list. You seem to be questioning not only the gabble-babble of social media, which it takes great discernment to navigate, but the very value of continuing to read and write. Am I correct? I too am tired of mediocre writing: novels that encase you in a word-construct so mundane it stifles you, academic articles beaten out of stale conceptions that don't enlighten you, philosophy of merely technical importance - and so on. What to do? I would be the last person to want to shut down broad public participation, but I no longer feel obliged to wallow in writing I find uncongenial. Perhaps the way forward for folk in this position, rather than tackling a reading list of vast length and unknown quality, would be to return to texts that have really moved one in the past: not necessarily only the classics of different cultures, but those texts which have shaped our own thinking. Are we clear in our own minds about what it is in those texts that we found (and find?) important? I had such an experience recently re-reading Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, which I first read as a kid. (I'm not suggesting you should read it, merely offering an example.) The book has been reissued with a new introduction which sketches what happened to the real-world protagonists (the author and his son) in the intervening years. I found it very valuable to revisit the impressions I had then with what I feel now. They are very different. I also think your instinct to search for satisfying poetry is sensible. Poetry at its best pushes the boundaries of conventional thought and feeling. So do the best novels, which have the impact of extended poems. This kind of reflection and recollection often moves one forward. Best wishes for your continuing quest.
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In the classical period, we find people writing poetry about scientific and philosophical problems and in the eighteenth century, there were many poems about landscape, natural science, e.g., Erasmus Darwin on the generation of plants, but in the nineteenth century, poetry ceased to be written about natural history or crafts or philosophy. What happened?
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Much here depends of what we mean by "philosophical." It's noteworthy that philosophy and science were integrated disciplines until the twentieth century, at which time philosophy was marginalized as a discipline (as science now is by engineering and entertainment). I would argue that the Romantic poets (and Milton, much earlier) were among the keenest in exploring philosophical ideas in their poems. Several (including Mary Shelley in Frankenstein) were obsessed with the Faust and Prometheus myths, both of which directly address problems of human "knowledge." Wordsworth was concerned about epistemological issues--the subjective responses to nature, the object-subject relationship. Blake was profoundly philosophical, providing poetic expression to metaphysical, ethical, and political issues. The deliberate disconnect between philosophy ("statement") and poetry comes with modernism in early twentieth century poetry. Then the "object" per se becomes the valid subject of poetry--e.g. the red wheelbarrow and white chicken, the cold plums in the refrigerator--in that the new modernism wants to draw readers away from abstraction and "statement" to imagery, metaphor and "direct experience" (through words, of course).
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I'm undertaking research which involves children and their self-perception with regards to writing poetry/being poets. One aspect being self-efficacy, but I'm struggling wit finding a relible method of measurement. Ant ideas?
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An interesting question with many possible answers.
Some work I did for a charity last year (with children) focused on developing a new method to track the 'distance travelled'. The beauty of this approach is that you can identify a certain number of things you'd like to track (whether it's attendance, attainment, progress in a certain area, etc), then decide how often you want to measure it through self-review and quantitative aspects. It can be used for both long term and shorter term measurements, though it would need altering in terms of data collection periods depending on the duration of study.
Let me know if you'd like to talk about this, I've got a few examples I could share with you.
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I am interested in the life and works of the 19th century English poet Alexander John Evelyn, the author (among others) of English Alice and Lyrics of the Sea. Unfortunately I have found no biographical info by Google searching; perhaps someone here happens to know about him? .
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Mr. Owen:
             Thanks for the page you attached; didn't know that he might have been an stage actor as well.
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I am trying to find out if when one writes poetry, does one hear what one's poems would sound like in one's heads. More importantly, if writing in a second language (say English if you're a Turkish, Chinese, Indian, whatever), does the "mental pronunciation" in your sound like your local variety of English or does it sound British or American?
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"On the few occasions in my life that I have written poetry, the words were just in my head as though they already existed. I only had to write them down." (Margaret)
The clearest demonstration of this process is seen with classical composers.  Inspection of their (auto)biographies clearly shows they were not really composers, more transcribers of their musical hallucinations which often comprised reworkings of sacred tunes, folk songs and their own previous work!  Yesterday was a MH during sleep, and it took Paul McCartney a long time to realise that though it sounded very familiar it was in fact original.
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We need to understand and analyze the poet's comparisons and imagination.
We also need to see the poet's stylistic features if they are related to any kind of fallacy in English Poetry. 
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No,it is not defect. Pathetic fallacy is a kind of personification that gives human emotions to inanimate objects of nature for example referring to weather features reflecting a mood. It is easier for the readers to relate to the abstract emotions when they observe it in their natural surroundings. The use of pathetic fallacy encourages the readers to develop a perspective that is creative. The pathetic  fallacy tells the truth by presenting the world as experienced by a man under the influence of powerful emotion. This device can tell us much about the inner life of another.
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Here are few "concrete poetic" examples.
Do you like such visual-verbal experiments?
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 I think specif visual messages get in to brain and the brain centers react and process the information in specific way. Rhythm, symmetry and alike vibes are more near to brain processing.  Might be some research study based on measuring brain response can help further for finding out the exact answers.
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I am doing my research on tholkappiyar, 8 types of emotions / feelings in tamil poems.
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Poetry is very rarely the spontaneous outpouring of emotions.  Generally someone writes a poem, or some lines, then has a think about them, a re-reading.  Then they try to improve the effect, often having their changes, and ideas of changes, read and reflected on by others. Sometimes this takes a long time. Poetry is not necessarily emotional.  Quite often it can be 'intellectual' or humorous or cynical, or tell a story... It is a means of expression, neither more nor less, though in a particular format. 
Mark 
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If we go by psychoanalytic theories, they prove that an artist has the capability to plunder deep into his subconscious mind but then he comes back to the normal world. The same is not in the case of Sylvia Plath. She didn't come back and finally committed suicide.
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This gifted woman was torn between her brilliance as a writer and the agony which the adultery of her husband brought her.  Subsequently, Hughes' mistress committed suicide and took their young daughter with her,(she was convinced Hughes would not take care of his daughter born out of wedlock).  Since suicide runs in families, it is no surprise that her Plath and Hughes' son Nicolas also committed suicide.  There is a riveting biography of Sylvia Plath's life available.  I really do not believe Plath was psychotic - I believe she was in great pain.   
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I'm putting together a PhD proposal looking at portraiture in poetry since modernism, and am interested to learn more about contemporary poets writing poetry in this vein.
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I would suggest you take a look at the American poet Jorie Graham's book The End of Beauty (1987). Some of the poems are:"Self-portrait as the gesture between them," "self-portrait as both parties," "self-portrait as Apollo and Daphne," "self-portrait as hurry and delay," and "self-portrait as demeter and persephone."
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The variations of emotions in biological terms are discernible.  This area needs exploration.
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Not sure what you mean by "gauging impact."  Rhyme being an excellent mnemonic, even a novice reader would tend to remember more of a rhymed poem, especially after reading it aloud, than one without rhymes.  On the other hand, an unrhymed poem would come closer to natural speech and so might come across as more approachable and less intimidating to an inexperienced reader.   Memory is one thing, but It would be difficult to gauge the degree to which a poem is better liked than others because pleasure is so subjective.  
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Can anyone recommend me some articles on K.Douglas to consider on his own view of Life and Death?
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From his WIkipedia page: sere especially the boldface below- biography
Bibliography[edit]
Selected Poems (Keith Douglas, J.C. Hall, Norman Nicholson) (1943)
Alamein to Zem Zem (1946), reprinted 1966
Collected Poems (Editions Poetry London 1951),[7] reprinted 1966
Selected Poems (Faber 1964)
The Complete Poems (Faber & Faber 1978), reprinted in 1987, 1997, 2011
Alldritt, Keith. Modernism in the Second World War ISBN 0-8204-0865-4
The Letters of Keith Douglas edited by Desmond Graham (Carcanet Press, 2000) ISBN 978 1 857544 77 0
Biography[edit]
Keith Douglas, 1920–1944 by Desmond Graham (OUP, 1974) ISBN 0-19-211716-5
References[edit]
^ Jump up to: a b CWGC/ABMC (7 August 2010). "Capt Keith Castellain Douglas". Find a Grave. Retrieved 16 April 2013.
Jump up ^ Douglas, Keith (2009). Alamein to Zem Zem. Faber & Faber. ISBN 0571252966.
Jump up ^ Kendall, Tim (2003). "'I see men as trees suffering': The Vision of Keith Douglas". Proceedings of the British Academy (Oxford University Press) 117: 431–432.
Jump up ^ Douglas, Keith (1987). Desmond Graham, ed. The Complete Poems. Oxford University Press. p. 102. ISBN 0192812319. Rosenberg I only repeat what you were saying
^ Jump up to: a b c Stallworthy, Jon (2004). "Douglas, Keith Castellain (1920–1944)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford University Press. Retrieved 17 April 2013.
Jump up ^ Michael Mayer & Sidney Keyes, ed. (1941). Eight Oxford Poets. London: George Routledge & Sons.
^ Jump up to: a b Sheers, Owen (28 May 2005). "Lest we forget". Guardian website (London: Guardian News and Media Limited). Retrieved 16 April 2013.
Jump up ^ Beevor, Antony (2009). D-Day: The Battle for Normandy. Penguin UK. p. 238. ISBN 0141959266.
Jump up ^ "DOUGLAS, KEITH CASTELLAIN". Commonwealth War Graves Commission website. Commonwealth War Graves Commission. Retrieved 17 April 2013.
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I would locate reading of human-animal conflict in the broad purview of eco-aesthetics or ecocriticism. Poems that deal with the animal world in my view most often contain an ecocentric worldview. When human-animal conflict arises, what actually happens is a conflict between two prominent worldviews, viz., ecocentric and anthropocentric. The changing patterns of urbanization, consumerism and materialism makes our world more susceptible to such conflicts. I think poetry is a suitable literary poem to search for expressions on such conflicts. Can anyone throw more light on this issue? 
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Hy, I am author of few poems on human/animal thematic (wrote in french). Some poems was published in RAL,m (link below). Others are not published, but i can send them to you.
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Because of his blind-related work.
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Critics maintain that Borges innovated as a result of `progressively losing his vision until he became totally blind at age 55. His first book was the poetic anthology "Fervor de Buenos Aires," a work of his youth. The distinguished U.S. Latin Americanist Robert G. Mead maintained that "Fervor de Buenos Aires" was Borges´s best work. If this rather surprising opinion is true, then Borges wrote his finest book when he could still see!
Now, his mature invention of his famous science-fiction short stories, wherein the scientific premises are drawn chiefly from theology or philosophy, took place when he was going blind. While I appreciate the avant-garde "Fervor de Buenos Aires" in its original version (as opposed to the mature revision), I believe that "Ficciones" and "El Aleph," along with the other short story and poetry anthologies of his maturity, are more universal. To what degree is this universality a product of blindness? To the degree that Borges´ loss of spatial perception was replaced by a heightened perception of temporality, his main theme in the mature works. Can we assume without question that this compensation actually took place? Borges loved to hide behind his fictional creatures and don endless masks. I firmly believe, therefore, that we will never know with certainty. In sum, I would maintain that this question, which is excellent, is impossible to answer. I would welcome other opinions of those who know more.
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I am interested in exploring how the conventions of the Detective Story have been explored in English Language poetry since modernism.
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Carol Ann Duffy The Devil's Wife is about a crime, the Moors Murders
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I currently wrote a manuscript in this field.
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International Journal of Applied Linguistics and English Literature
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Is there a different between poems that contain ars-poetica and reflexive poetry?
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If you write poetry without reflection--which is impossible unless it is automatic writing--, you cannot have ars poetica poetry by definition. Ars poetica poetry is metaliterature, It is writing about writing. Ergo, it is writing reflecting on itself.
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I mean: what newest American poets are being read nowadays?
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Andy Dugas, in Califirnia. A good poet and storyteller. Lately, he has been dedicating himself to haik, some posted on the street, several posted on facebook, as a new form of media and aesthetic response to poetry reading. His themes are typically based on haiku content and style, and his fiction rich in introspective conflict among characters.