Science topic

Plankton - Science topic

Community of tiny aquatic plants, animals and photosynthetic bacteria that are either free-floating or suspended in the water, with little or no power of locomotion. They are divided into phytoplankton and zooplankton.
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Hello. I am a post-graduate student and I am doing a research on the blooming of bioluminescent algae. I came across this organism in my sample and failed to identify it. If anyone of you know what is it, please let me know.
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I am not an expert on marine diatoms, but if it is one, it looks similar to Palmeria sp. I hope I do not lead you astray with my guess.
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I have a catalogue of planktonic organisms that I have identified (mostly to order level) over the years which I would like to identify onto species level and also conduct research on their genetic make-up and nutritive values which would be impossible without the isolation technique
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The same micropipette technique can be done for phytoplankton. Heat glass capillary tubes to draw them out to a very fine diameter. This makes selecting small phytoplankton easier.
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Hello, could you suggest experiments and bioinfo tools to analyze the binding/interaction of peptides with bacterial surface & EPS (planktonic cells and biofilms).
Thanks!
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Kalaiyarasan Thiyagarajan Thanks! I shall try out the suggestions
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Can i use the enrichment factor for heavy metals in plankton samples? to compare the heavy metals concentrations in water and zooplankton bodies.
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Le facteur de bioaccumulation donnerait plus de renseignement sur le transfert du métal entre l'eau le zooplancton.
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Dear investigators,
In my study, i am trying to study the expression of a set of genes of MRSA and Staphylococcus aureus biofilms.
To isolate the total RNA, can i lysate the biofilm cells and later isolate RNA, or shall i use the planktonic 24 h cells?
Thanks a lot
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thanks a lot,
Harsh Maan
any suggestions for lysing kitt? or an optimized protocol?
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We have a new AFM with a capability to achive high resolution images (up to 50nm). The AFM tips can scan the surface of the object and as well, can penetrate into the object. We also have the capability to use the tip for scanning planktonic bacterial cells inside a medium.
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Thank you for your response Ofir.
Fortunately, I got a working protocol after repeated modification of the initial protocol.
The result looks good too. I am using the Nova PX software to analysis my images too. If you have any further recommendation, kindly share.
Thanks again
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In my study, i am studying coastal freshwater man made wetland which has abundance of Cocconeis sp. plankton, though it is difficult to identify species. do cocconeis genera had some ecological significance ?
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Cocconeis is known to occur in both freshwater and marine habitats, so it is very important to ID it to the species level to understand, or begin describing the ecology of that taxon. I recommend digesting and mounting specimens in Naphrax. If you are not familiar with that process, it is possible to outsource it to other labs such as the one where I work. You need clean specimens mounted in a medium with a high RI to resolve key distinguishing features. This genus is not really planktonic, but could be considered tychoplanktonic. They are really benthic taxa that often have a preference for a specific substrate, and can even have unique interspecific relationships with other algae i.e Cocconeis pediculus & Cladophora. Your species likely has a preference for a particular substrate, and if it does not, that is a perfectly valid and publishable conclusion. You may be capturing specimens attached to sand grains in that are suspended in the water column, resulting in an abundance of benthic taxa in planktonic samples. As mentioned by Arne Andersen, they are excellent food for zooplankton and benthic invertebrates. They are also important in nutrient and carbon cycling. If you really had a mind to you could estimate their biomass, estimate metabolic rate and make an educated statement regarding the amount of carbon fixed by that species in that habitat over the course of a year. One last thing, algae doesn't smell like fish, fish smell like algae. The importance of these organisms in the environment really cannot be overstated.
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I'm doing stable isotope analysis to construct a reservoir food web. For that, I need to collect zooplankton and phytoplankton separately. The use of different mesh sizes solved the problem to some extent but can't obtain pure samples. Are there any methods other than that?
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After segregating through separate mesh sized nets, staining methods can distinguish between both types of phytoplankton
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I understand there will be some persister cells in the MRSA biofilm that are in dormant phase. I wound like to know if this kind of cells also exist in planktonic MRSA?
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Yes, persisters can be both seen in biofilm as well as planktonic cells and are resistant to the action of antibiotics
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This plankton species was collected using a 45-micrometer plankton net from tropical freshwater. Want to confirm the species.
I really appreciate any help you can provide.
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I think it is definitely a Keratella, probably Keratella cochlearis. Look up rotifers of the Great Lakes for a good description.
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This sample was collected on a tropical coastal shore using a 45micrometer plankton net.
The species that I want to identify is the wine glass-shaped one in the middle.
Thank you in advance.
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Tintinnid
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This plankton sample was collected from tropical coastal water using a 45micrometer plankton net. The species that I want to identify is the one that looks like a slug.
Thank you in advance
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gastrotricha
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This plankton was found in tropical freshwater sources. want to identify the species on the top right (diatom). The sample was collected using a 45micrometer plankton net.
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I believe this resamble Mastoglia family but need acid clean to see the side chambers
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Hello,
do you know what can be any planktonic organism with size aprox. from 3-10 um, color green, H shape, maybe one or more cells. We realy don´t what is it. It weakly shine under fluorescence for cyanobacteria.
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The magnification is too low to give a positive identification. Judging from the size and coulour I think it could be Tetraedron minimum or Chlorotetraedron incus. I do not think it is P. kamillae, because the colour does not match the one of Xanthophyceae, also the shape is slightly different, P. kamillae is more 'rounded'.
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This plankton was collected from a tropical brakishwater estuarine ecosystem using a 20 micrometer plankton net. The spiky wheel shaped one in the middle is the plankton to be identify.
Thank you in advance,
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I think it is monactinus simplex
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Hello there,
please can you recommend to me an article or write any formula how to remove diatoms and other organisms from samples with cyanobacteria with concentration technique (filtration, centrifugation, or other). I know that Utermöhl (1936) described a technique in the article, but i don´t have access to this article. Unfortunately, i can´t find any other articles about centrifugation´s concentration techniques for separating desired organisms.
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Try this!
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I am working on P. aeruginosa Biofilm assays as a part of my research. Biofilm formation was carried out using Microtiter plate Biofilm Formation Assay.
  1. Can someone suggest a way to find MIC of the biofilms using the normal 96 well plates? I tried to get the results using the microdilution method, but it gave me smaller MIC values for the Biofilms compared to the Planktonic Cells.
  2. Is 620 nm wavelength too high to quantify the biofilm in 30% acetic acid? Because the plate reader in our lab provides readings only at 492nm and 620nm.
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Thank you All for your suggestions.
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Has anyone ever developed and/or experimented techniques based on the use of monoclonal antibodies for rapid and early detection of Ficopomatus enigmaticus planktonic larvae ?
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As you have access to a fluorescent microscope and FACS, analysis should be quite straightforward.
To test the method, use labelled secondaries off the shelf. Talk to your FACS specialists. If you have large quantities (5mg+) of your antibody, direct labelling with a fluorescent dye is a good way to go, as it will save you some clean-up work.
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What are the best cleaners used to clean the glass of the beaker from the plankton left after the preparation process?
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Dear Dr. Husham N Noori ,
I suggest you to have a look at the following, interesting document:
-A Methods Manual for the Collection, Preparation and Analysis of Diatom Samples V. 1.0
by JC Taylor, WR Harding & CGM Archibald (2007)
Good luck and my best regards, Pierluigi Traverso.
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Hello everyone,
Can someone kindly help me know what would be the right choice of currently used International standard for reporting the accuracy of Mg/Ca measurement of planktonic foraminifers using ICP-OES?
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These species look like planktonic foraminifera and they are observed along with lots of planktonic foraminifera of Cenozoic, however such spiny processeces belonging to planktonic foraminifera as I cheked with experts are unlikely.
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Images 1 and 2 are cross sections of benthic foraminifera the axial section is attached and they are not planktonic
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I have plankton samples preserved in Lugol and I am wondering if I pick cells from this sample, and resuspend them in PBS can I then use them for TEM imaging (if I then do the proper TEM prep protocol e.g. with dehydration etc.)?
I am aware that people use Lugol-preserved samples for SEM, but is the ultra structure preserved enough for TEM?
Thanks!
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Dear Mega,
I'm quite sure this won't work. As far as my experience goes you will not archive satisfactory fixation for ultrastructural analysis with lugol solution. You need proper cross linking fixation with glutaraldehyde or a mixture of formaldehyde and glutaraledhyde, followed by secondary fixation with osmiumtetroxide. I haven't got any experience with plankton, so I can't give you a detailled protocol, but I'm sure you'll find some in literature. When you work with marine organisms it might be a challenge to find a good buffer system for the fixative, depending on how sensitive you specimen are to osmotic changes. Often ist best to use a buffer based on sea salt solutions or the cultivation media (if used).
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I would like to know a details on how to use it, method to rinse net, variation in size, and method to preserve sample(plankton).
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Hi Muhammad,
could you be a little bit more specific? What exactly would you like to sample? Makro, micro or nano plankton? In your case I would check the literature and see what other researchers did for specific sampling types. For example, here is an article comparing two different types of plankton sampling nets. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0022098115000994
If you can access to it I can highly recommend this book which explains in great detail all variations of plankton sampling in Chapter 4 "Sampling methods for plankton":
Good luck with your future work
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Respected sir/Madam expert working in field of algae and Diatom, I found following article on,
T. V. Ramachandra Malvikaa Solanki. 2007. "Ecological assessment of Lentic water bodies of Banglore. "
This is the formula for that, I found it, these is easy method for counting density of plankton. Can any body had reference of it.
i am using 25 (L) of water to collected in 50 ml bottler, and tanking 0.1 ml for sample for analysis on normal slide and cover slip.
Total plankton count per litre = A * (1/L) * (n/v) Where, A = number of organisms per drop             L = volume of original sample (l)             n = total volume of concentrated sample (ml)             v = volume of one drop (ml)
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This is my first time of collecting water samples from marine environment. Could somebody please tell me the technique? I mean what kind of equipments (I usually used plankton net for freshwater) and procedures, in terms of collecting samples for metagenomic analyses. I could read from articles (and I did) but I need more practical quidance. Thanks a lot!
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Younes Boundir thank, but I can't read French
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This Question is related to study of plankton quantification and qualification
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Shannon-Wiener Index (H) may be calculated by the following formula:
H=∑[(pi)xln(pi)]
Where −
· pi = proportion of total sample represented by species i.
· Divide no. of individuals of species i by total number of samples.
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Please, we need memory specifications for image storage and video card
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FlowCAM® An Imaging Particle Analysis System for the Automated Identification and Classification of Particulate Matter Particle analysis has been practiced since the early days of the microscope, and microscopy still remains as a standard method for particle analysis due to the tremendous amount of information that microscope images can convey. However, microscopy is time consuming, manually intensive and generally can not produce high statistical confidence in results due to the fact that statistically significant numbers of particles take too long to observe in this fashion. Volumetric-based particle analysis techniques, such as Coulter counters, laser diffraction and light obscuration have the advantage that they can very rapidly and repeatedly measure statistically significant numbers of particles. These systems can measure tens of thousands of particles in a matter of minutes.
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I am working with co-cultures of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and bacteria. I typically streak my bacteria on tryptic soy agar, then grow overnight planktonic cultures in LB broth. Has anyone encountered adverse effects on MSC viability when MSC are exposed to small volumes of LB broth (1:6-1:10 ratio of broth: total media volume)?
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10.1002/stem.544
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my work is related to quantitative and qualitative plankton population.
and somehow while doing identification I am getting confused please guide me.
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Hello dear colleagues. I am to totally in agreement with @james des lauriers recommending a good solution. This is the same happened to me when I started my master thesis in 2010 and my supervisor requested me to focus on faunistic study of Class Collembola from phylum Arthropoda. I was totally unfamiliar with this group, but gradually with patience, collecting literature and working hours on mounted specimens and consulting with experts around the world, I could successfully write my master thesis and also continue the same research direction in my PhD thesis. Another challenge I have got into was in 2019 about determination of earthworms collected from tea gardens related to my current project. First, I got literatures to know the morphology, then know the experts in my country and in the world then ask them or I searched myself the keys. The last not the least, with patience identify your specimen, then contact with an active expert and consult with her or him and organize everything in your mind. Thank you.
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Hello everyone, I am interested to know what is your "go-to" microscope for live plankton organisms (Zooplankton, Phyto, bacteria,...) observation, identification, and pictures. What microscope would you recommend buying if money wasn't a problem... I am looking at all possibilities here. But I am surely interested to know what is needed in research. Thank you
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Of all the ones I've used before (Leica, Zeiss, and Olympus), the Olympus CX31 has never failed me in terms of getting good quality images of marine invertebrate larvae, copepods and even ciliates. As far as I know the CX31 has been discontinued and they've rolled out a new model: CX43/CX33 - which is of course more expensive than the last. For pictures the CX31 is modular which allows for a camera attachment. Leica is the go too if you have the funds, they have amazing imaging software that allows you to create composite images from different views of the specimen.
Hope that helps!
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As an example of Julia Child, whose first receipe was shark repelent, my team and I are looking for some chemicals which wont harm planktons but will help keep planktons from our robot in sea.
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Karla Mihić Youre welcome and all the best in your research!
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My team and I are curently working on a project is focused on preventing microplastics and collecting plastic particles up to 2 * 2mm. Our biggest concern is harming sea life and destroying plankton. I hope if you could advise us in which direction to go in our research. Is there a possibility that the filter / mesh and microplastic can be transformed by a biochemical process into something that would not harm sealife?
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Dear all,
I was wondering if anybody knows of a lab that analyses foreign powderised plankton samples via bomb-calorimetry for energy density? I got some energy values that are one order of magnitude too low and would like to compare my results with the readings from an external lab. If you know of such a facility, I would really appreciate a reply.
Best, Florian Lüskow
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Dear Florian,
You can find the research lab facility at General Motors, Nuclear Energy Research, Defense Lab, Santa Barbera, USA. Planter sampler can be equipped with a control door which can be opened and closed, a pressure indicator and photometer capable of measuring intensity and spectral light.
Reference:
Fundamental Nuclear Energy Research: A Special Report of the United States , By U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. Division of Plans and Reports
Ashish
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sample were collected from freshwater.
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Probably It is a diatom from the family Naviculaceae.
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I want the monthly trajectory of temperature, salinity, plankton data on 10 ° 15'00.5 N, 75 ° 37'32.6 W location.
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The temperature data can be downloaded from MarksimGCM at daily scale and satellite images of fine resolution can be used salinity and plankton.
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In my experiment, I have used 4 different organic compounds that inhibit the growth of biofilm. I have varied the concentration of compounds from 10- 50 mg at 24hrs to 96 hrs in 96 well plates and the crystal violet assay was performed which is specifically used for biofilm quantification. and is there any software available for kinetics?
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Nicolai S Panikov Thank for your detailed explanation. I'll check the variables suggested by you.
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Both Arthrospira and Spirulina is the member of Cyanophyceae. But in some texts, Spirulina is considered as the supplement material of Arthrospira platensis. So, are these both the names of a single genus or is Spirulina the other genus of Cyanophyceae family.
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Please take a look at this useful RG link.
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I found the protocol and formula of Sedgewick rafter cell but I am confused in substituting the values into the formula so, I need your help in understanding how to use the formula while analysing the sample.
The formula is as follows: # of cells/L = (Cells counted/Slide volume) x (1/Concentration factor) x (1000/L)
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Hi Basavaraj,
I give you a simple example to substitute the values ;
Eg.,
I collected 100 ml water sample and concentrated to 1 ml.
The concentrated sample (1 ml) added to the counting chamber (1 ml holding capacity) and as total I found 500 cells in it.
I should represent them in numbers per Litre.
Cells counted = 500
Slide/counting chamber volume = 1 ml
Concentration factor = 100 (100 ml concentrated to 1 ml)
So,
# of cells/L = (Cells counted/Slide volume) x (1/Concentration factor) x (1000/L)
=(500/1)*(1/100)*(1000/L)
=500*0.01*1000/L
=5000/L
I hope you are getting it.
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Are there any mobile applications or software to identify plankton from microscopic photos of pond water?
This is needed for a participatory training programme.
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How to claim a new plankton species discovered and how to name a new plankton species? What is the process?
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1. compare the morphology of your specimen with referenced photos for plankton until reach to the closest photo to your samples ( must there websites or books relate to this topic).
2. DNA isolation and make a sequencing
3. analysis by using bioinformatic software to make alignment with other plankton sp. to determine the similarity as well as build the phylogentic tree to decide the type of your sample
4. you can record it as a patent if you use it in application for first time
5. you can use NCBI to create the accession number
note: i think you may search in PubMed (Database) about Plankton to get information about all plankton discovered.
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Hi everybody,
I am looking for papers treating the relationships between the (paleo) climatic-oceanographic perturbations and the morphological adaptation of marine (phyto-/zoo-) plankton. Any suggestions are welcome!
Thanks in advance.
Luca
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Many thanks Mr. Mitra and Macedo!
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I know that biofilms are really complex and that they are often visualized with GFP markers in bacteria itself. However, I was wondering if there is a specific marker, an antibody or GFP-tagged gene, to be able to call something truely a biofilm. Some sort of switch between planktonic/biofilm bacteria.
Is eDNA staining considered a good marker? And can this best be stained with propidium iodide or are there better ways?
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Hello, depends which biofilm you have, biofilm can be single or mixed-strain biofilms. depends from it you can have specific marker, an antibody or GFP-tagged gene for exact bacterial strain from which biofilm formed.
The DNA staining with DAPI which preferable stains dsDNA can be considered a good marker too.
Cell numbers in the biofilms can be determined non-invasively by collecting the total fluorescent density in an image, then dividing by the average fluorescent density of a single cell determined earlier in an experiment.
Good luck!
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I am postgraduate student who is very stuck with some statistical analysis.
I am trying to calculate the biodiversity of continuous plankton recorder (CPR) data of phytoplankton which has been resolved to genus level. I was originally wanting to calculate average taxonomic distance but have had some technical difficulties there so have resulted to trying to find a different biodiversity index.
I know all the indexes have pros/cons based on research question, but am struggling to find anything to help inform my decision. So far am leaning towards Hill numbers?
If anyone had any advice about these biodiversity indexes, or could point me in the direction of some useful references, that would be very helpful!!
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For plankton biodiversity analysis, Shannon -Weaver index is the most popular index. You can measure it by using software like: R Srtatistix, Past etc.
Like you, I already identified plankton at genus level also find difficulties to do some statistical analysis. You can get technical help about using software from seniors or supervisor.
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Its really hard to match plankton with manuals. Because photo of manual are saturated and full of high contrast.
If you have identified sample from laboratory, then please help me out by sending your identified samples to
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Hi Mohammed Anas Chowdhury , Based on by observation most of the sample are detritus materials, you should try centrifugation as a method to isolate plankton samples take 10 ml of your sample then centrifuge it, decant the supernatant and at least leave 1 ml of sample.
For the identification, #10 is somehow a calanoid sa mention by
Malcolm Baptie
but you should dissect it to know what the genus and species. For #20, i do not not believe its a diatom its probably a shadow of the lens as you can see there is a detritus material in the middle. Probably im mistaken but a coscinodiscus has costae, spines, rimoportulae, fultoportulae which is not visible in LM.
I would suggest that you should try identifying the plankton samples upto species level its a good training and if your going to publish it. Read books on plankton taxonomy and you also try to draw for phytoplankton and zooplankton. There are taxonomy books that are free online. I know it will be hard at first but practice makes perfect. I know im no expert im just here to help but with proper practice you can identify plankton samples.
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I will be doing bulk DNA extractions from zooplankton samples collected with a plankton net. Can anyone suggest suitable methods to go from the plankton sample, which will be collected in a 250mL flat-bottom container filled with 100mL ethanol to a 1.5mL or 2mL tube suitable for extraction with Qiagen’s DNeasy Blood & Tissue kit?
Is there another way other than centrifuging and pouring off the ethanol/pipetting out the ethanol and using a wide-bore pipette to transfer the “slurry” at the bottom of the container to a 2mL tube? Should the sample remain refrigerated throughout?
Any advice greatly appreciated.
Thanks!
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Thank you, yes the filter clogging up is a concern, however we want to avoid picking out larvae individually.
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Need resources like manual, website, publication or book chapter for marine/estuarine Plankton identification.
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Dear All, I tried to make footage of the zooplankton with Canon G16 and a flash light with the wet macro lens in the sea. The problem is that while I am able to see individual zooplankton, it is bleary because of the movement. Will be thankful to receive any suggestions how to get better resolution of the plankton.
Also, for the plankton imaging in the laboratory conditions I was wondering if Dino Lite model AM3713TB (https://www.dino-lite.eu/index.php/en/component/k2/item/40-am3713tb) will be able to do the job?
Will be thankful to receive recommendations,
Jenny
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To achieve good quality and natural color, I take photos of anesthetized aquatic animals using MS-222 or magnesium chloride, depending on the salinity of the water.
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If I am interested in disrupting the biofilm, why does it matter that my treatment would also affect the planktonic cells? Sure, it isn't technically a biofilm as it is found in nature, but neither is a biofilm that is growing in isolation from other microbes found in vivo either.
If I am to centrifuge my 96-well plate, for example, then wash my plate and apply treatment, wait 24h, repeat wash, and apply resazurin, what kind of lashback and criticisms would I receive from the biofilm community?
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Manuele Martinelli - excellent response. Thank you so much for taking the time to put your expertise into words for me! :)
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Hi. I got a question about how to hold a pose when taking a picture.
When I have to take a pictures of Copepods using microscope, It's hard to hold the plankton's position. Once Copepods are fixed with EtOH (regardless of concentration %), It becomes like a pictures I uploaded. I mean I can only see the side or cannot see It's antenna and legs. If I touch it and hold it in position, it will turn over quickly.
So PLEASE let me know about how to get good pictures of Copepods using microscope.
Thank You :)
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There is only one way, the one always used: You must dissect the different parts like antennules, antennae, mouthparts (if required), and legs, after clearing the specimen with lactic acid or glycerin (not always required. Attention with glycerin, is very dehydrating and tends to shrink the specimens). You stain with methyl blue, and mount temporarily each part in a slide (just a drop of glycerin and a coverlid) and take a picture. You can also mount them permanently after de-hydrating and mounting in Canada balsam or similar and a coverlid.
Another method that allows tak ing of the whole specimen and concentrate in any detail is by using a scanning electron microscope, this gives wonderful results.
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I intend to understand how sustainable an aquatic ecosystem is based on its plankton population. Can anyone help me with suitable methods available?
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The species composition of the plankton community is very variable in the same place throughout the year. Therefore, based on the species composition it is difficult or impossible to draw a correct conclusion about the stability of the ecosystem. Moreover, the variability of species composition of individual communities is aimed at ensuring the functional stability of the ecosystem. The functional stability of the ecosystem is determined by the ratio of the processes of creation and destruction of living matter, primary photosynthetic production and destruction of organic matter, the balance of oxygen and carbon dioxide.
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Hello,
we want to study the vertical distribution of planktonic foraminifera in a high productivity coastal area. Unfortunately, we don´t have multinet hauls or sediment traps, at the moment.
We plan to combine bongo net hauling with samples of Niskin bottles at certain depths.
Would you recommend this? Is the volume from Niskin bottles enough for planktonic forams analysis in this type of environment?
Any piece of advice is welcomed.
Thanks.
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If you have SBE 32. It is possible to take enough sample in the same depth.
All best
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I'm performing assays on a number of bacterial strains, some of which are capable of forming biofilms.
What effects would a "tissue culture treated" plate and a "non-tissue culture treated" plate have on bacteria suspensions??
Would a TC treated plate cause lower amounts of planktonic cells and/or promote biofilm formation as compared to non-TC treated plates?
Thanks!
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Hello Kevin. My team compared the biofilms on different brands of 96-wellplates (TC-treated, non-TC-treated), and found that some non-TC-treated plates (super cheap) had the lowest biofilm of the same bacteria. We then concluded that non-biofilm experiments can be used on certain non-TC-treated plates, while biofilm experiments should be used on TC-treated plates.
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I found it in the plankton samples in the Black Sea. Could it be a hoplonemertean larvae or rather a flatworm juvenile?
Thank you.
Mihaela
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following
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Keeping in view the increasing food needs of rapidly growing population we my need more efficient food resources in future. In this context is there any possibility of Plankton's use as human food in future? Scientific research based answer of the question is needed.
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Hello, biochemical studies carried out on the chemical composition of some of the major constituents of zooplankton biomass show a very high percentage of protein when compared to other organic contents present in the body of such animals. In fact plankton are highly nutritious and the liquids of the cell contents of these tiny organisms contain
less salt than sea water. Most of these animals are edible and some palatable but are rarely eaten by man directly.
Some peoples have tasted plankton either dried to a biscuit or boiled.
But we shuld think about ecological balance in food chain before starting eat.
Also source of nutrients can be microorganisms which contain not less nutrients than plankton.
Think also about this topic.
If you compare time which need organism for dubling his weight In intensive growing period, you really can understand which nutrient is our future.
Cow about 1 year
Pig - about 6 month
Chicken about 1 month
All animals not less than 1month
Microorganisms - only 20 min.
And how many 20min contain 1month!
Hope this info will help you.
Good luck!
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Hello everyone
I am working on the plankton diversity of freshwater. Other than the research articles, we can make monograph. Recently I knew about database management system (DBMS) and I can make database using my excel data and photograph but i do not how to make database management system? is anybody know about DBMS and how to make online to get everybody access. please share your knowledge.
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Since you can store your data in excel file already, it means you are dealing with structured data which makes your problem even simpler. You may use the following guide:
1. Database: I recomend the use of MySQL to store your data and use Structure Query Language (SQL) to save and retreive data from it. MySQL can work with Linux & Windows servers. Also, it’s very light and open source.
...and since you want to make you system accessible online, then you need the following to make a complete system:
2. Serverside language: you may choose php, python or pearl etc. Any of this programming languages will help your web pages communicate with the server and your developed database.
3. Client-side: If your target is just the basic view, just use basic HTML or XHTML to design your page. Here, you may need to add some few things such as javascript, css etc. to get an advance user viewing experience (which you may not need at this stage).
To make your application accessible online after development, you need to communicate with a hosting company to subscribe and also get your own domain if at all you need to have your’s.
Hope this helps, good luck.
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I wonder if someone can recommend any buffer to preserve plankton, more specific, arrow worms (Chaetognata) in a single solution, to prevent from using formalin. We need to store samples collected from the sea and we would like to prevent using formalin on the cruises, and as well as we currently need to split the sample into 2 , Ethanol for DNA analyses and Formalin for morpghological studies. Any recommendation?
Thanks!
Tamara
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good question
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I am planning to evaluate the efficacy of certain phages on planktonic and biofilm forms of S. aureus using colony count. Could any one advise me what chemical to use to stop the effect of phages (kill phages) on the colony count media without affecting S. aureus ?
Thank you in advance,
Legesse
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Dear Legesse,
If you can sufficiently dilute your cell - phage sample, it should be possible to see colony growth on plates and capture both total resistant and sensitive cell numbers. If you are really worried, it might be possible to filter cell - phage mixtures and retain and plate the cells.
Regards, Andrew
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I will be doing some plankton tows off the coast of Southern California. I hope to identify what kinds of organisms are in the tows.
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I have been using the following keys:
1. Light, S. F. (2007). The Light and Smith manual: intertidal invertebrates from central California to Oregon, University of California Press, Berkely, CA, USA.
2. Kozloff, E. N. and L. H. Price (1987). Marine invertebrates of the Pacific Northwest, University of Washington Press.
3. Soule, D. F., J. D. Soule and H. W. Chaney (1995). "Taxonomic atlas of the benthic fauna of the Santa Maria Basin and western Santa Barbara Channel."
Hope this helps
Travis
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Hello evryone!!
I'm a PhD student and I work on planktonic food webs functioning.
So from my data, i should seperate autotrophic planktonic cells from hetrotrophic cells because i work on the grazing activity of microzooplankton on phytoplankton...one of my species called Prorocentrum which is a Dinoflagellate. in Some articles i found that it is an autotrophic dinoflgellate some others said that it is mixotrophic organisms..May you help me to take decision if i should considerate it as autotrophic (so as a prey) or hetrotrophic one (so as a grazer)....
Thank you for advance!!
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Hello, Prorocentrums is fed autotrophic or if there are enough organic substances and a mixotrophic. Depends on the amount of organic matter in your expirement.
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Árni Mathiesen, Assistant Director-General, FAO Fisheries and Aquaculture made that suggestion at the World Aquaculture Society meeting in France last month.
“When we look to the future we must recognise that there are some constraints that both aquaculture and agriculture have to face up to,” he reflected.
“Due to the deteriorating state of soils, biodiversity loss, climate change etc, the sunlight driven primary production on land might be limited in the future. Therefore aquaculture cannot rely on land-based external inputs as it has done so far and will still do in the short term future.”
As a result, Mathiesen pointed out, it is now crucial to look to the oceans.
As he explained: “Since both the overall and per area primary production of the oceans is far smaller than on land the overall contribution to food and nutrition is much lower, we must look to the ocean’s vast expanse and the fantastic turnover of plankton – both bacteria as well as phyto- and zoo-plankton – to seek opportunites to utilise sun-driven primary production in the oceans.
“Doing this we must look to reposition marine aquaculture in the food pyramid and create an all-inclusive marine aquaculture, sun-driven, primary production food system for the long term future.”
Might interest Dr Inigo Everson.
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Yes, we should, but not all proteins have to come from fish! We need to think about other aquaculture models/practices, such as Integrated Multi-Trophic Aquaculture (IMTA).
I started to write a column in International Aquafeed. Below are the links to the first three columns:
The next column should be on IMTA.
Happy reading and all the best,
Thierry Chopin
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I am looking for research papers of plankton accumulation using Synthetic Aperture Radar. I want to use the information for fish tracking.
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I performed some comparitive proteomics between planktonic and biofilm membrane proteomes using tandem mass tags. The mass spectrometry generated HCID and CID data . I now need to identify all the peptides and proteins using a database I constructed . The data has been sitting for some years now because much of the analysis of the raw mass spec data and adjustments is a black box to me. I was wondering if there is a software pipeline out there that can take the raw files and provide me with quantification of the proteins ?
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ah, great , thanks Varsha , I might try max quant as you suggested and then see how the results look .
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Hi everyone!
I am looking for the most accurate protocol for preparation of marine samples for SIA.
Specifically, I was wondering if there is a good protocol of preparation for samples such as small invertebrates with exoskeleton (acidification methods, etc), plankton, sediment, seagrass, bivalves, etc.
Thanks!!
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I am looking for the common larger benthonic foraminiferal assemblages within larger benthonic foraminiferal zone SBZ 6 and what is equivalent planktonic foraminiferal zone for it? I will be very grateful if you provide me with suitable papers. Thanks in advance.
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Amr:
Have a look at these links for insights:
Best
Syed
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It was collected with a plankton net in an estuary. It is about 10 mm length.
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Clara;
Your specimen is a dipteran larva. It looks very much like Ephydra, a genus of shoreflies/brine flies (Ephydridae). If you have access to the old (and somewhat out of date) "Aquatic Insects of California", check out the illustraion on p, 472. There are other families of aquatic larvae that somewhat resemble your photo- Empididae & Syrphidae. However, from what I can see, shoreflies are your best match.
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Indian oilsardines and mackerels are plankton feeders and their habitats are same. Then why is the difference in isopod infestation? . Please enlighten me on this.
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Thanks Dr Oum Kalthoum
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Did the Permian-Triassic extinction event's hydrogen-sulfide-tinted green skies shade out all non-green photosynthetic life on earth, leaving only today's mostly green plants and plankton?
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Hello Mr. Brian Cady,
It is a very thought provoking question and I think it deserves to be answered in multiple stages.
Firstly, present day phytoplankton are not dominated by chlorophycean members instead, the most ubiquitous and dominant ones belong to Bacillariophyceae and are characterized by their brown/golden masking pigments.
Secondly, the colour green appears in plants and algae not because of the so-called colour of chlorophyll pigments associated with their chromoproteins, as they have no colour of their own. The ability of various chlorophyll pigments to reflect the green part of the visible portion of the electromagnetic wavelength, by absorbing the other spectra (based on the molecular arrangement of the radical groups), that imparts specific hues to the organisms harbouring them. The absorption spectra associated with the ambient media composition and incident light intensity also play crucial parts in the final colour observed in aquatic media.
Thirdly, a green tinted sky due to the prevalence of H2S in the atmosphere would have meant nothing since the chlorophyll bearing organisms which ultimately phagocytotically and then endosymbiotically became incorporated and integrated within the ancestral bacteria like single celled organisms were within the aquatic realm and light attenuation within a few millimeter of the surface of the water ensures that the protophotoautotrophs never quite got accustomed to the atmospheric tint.
Fourthly, land plants evolved not before the Ordovician/Silurian periods as known to date and by that time the sky adorned a different sunset yellow tint. Hence land plant were not accustomed to anything green even to reflect that certain spectra for their own camouflage, if they ever needed one since there were nothing on land to munch on them.
Fifth point is in tune to your own question - every photosynthetic organism we see today has been here for at least the entire time period since the KT event and the sky has had predominantly been blue and we don't see any blue autotrophs, do we?
Thank you for an interesting question. I sincerely hope that my answer satisfied your query.
Regards,
Dr. Abhishek Mukherjee
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I have noticed that the micro and macro algae being studied to bioaccumulate Fukushima radiation aren't reported to uptake the Cesium and that Pacific plankton are increasingly reported as bioaccumulating radiation. I think there is a connection between Cesium, plankton and the extra oceanic carbonate (from higher CO2 levels). I wonder if any plankton has been tested for which types of radiation are present, since Strontium-90 mimics calcium and the Cesium-134 mimics potassium. Could there be shifts in the oceanic chemical equilibrium equations to favor radioactive plankton? Do diatoms outcompete other phytoplankton in the presence of extra potassium?
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I should rephrase my question to which phytoplankton species do well in the presence of extra potassium, and are there any links between these and radiation recently? Then, are there any links between irradiated marine plankton and the extra carbonate?
So could we connect the extra carbonate to irradiated marine species that thrive on it and potassium? If so, how are these species doing recently?
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Dear all,
I need to identify these eggs from Pacific ocean, collected with a plankton net.
The diameter range from1 to 5 mm. For me it could be a kind of coral eggs or squid/cuttlefish eggs (I know that some Thysanoteuthidae have floating eggs). Some specimens have 4 or 8 tentacules (see fig 3)...
As you can see, I am not familiar with these taxa...
Thank you.
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My objectives are first labeling in situ plankton samples with 14C to measure PP, sorting the samples to separate depending on size class and then measure PP of each size class. I won't be able to do that all of it at the same time, so my question is:
Is it possible to freeze these samples? Radioactivity will be stable during this frozen period (lack of contamination/transfer of 14C between cells and water?)?
Thanks
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Regarding the half-life, freezing radioactive materials does not have any effect on its half-life.
for the retention of isotopes in samples, freezing is a recommended preservation method for storage time beyond a week.
please refer the attachment. Hope it helps.
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This planktonic alga was found during the summer (from July to September) in a small oligotrophic mountain lake (altitude 2100m) in the French Alps.