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Piano - Science topic

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In the early childhood music education, The reading ability of piano score will affect the learning ability and interest. Are there any effective methods or activity that can be applied to general teaching activity?
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How about designing an APP, which is basically a game, connected to a MIDI keyboard, wherein, if the player hits the right keys, the game progresses, while playing the correct music.
Similar to this, only for 2 hands, and with the right melodies (could input MIDI)
Also more examples here:
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yes, because they affect the heart rhythm
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Listening to music while studying promotes mental performance. Let's face it - it will not raise our IQ by a few points, but it will help create better conditions for acquiring knowledge
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How can someone learn to deal with /control/overcome fear for playing/performing on the piano, when it is learned at an older age?
Are there helpful treatments?
What can bring that anxiety to a person?
What can be the underlying reason?
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I think that calling "anxiety" the logical resentment for starting a new psychomotor learning at certain ages - already without "many reflexes" - is perhaps exaggerated ... but if it really is ANXIETY (in its psychopathological sense) a DESENSITIZATION PROGRAM SYSTEMATIC or RECIPROCAL INHIBITION "ad hoc" must be sufficient, since this is how PHOBIAS are expired, being the Treatment of choice
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We have a new research project that seeks to understand the characteristics of performance careers across the cAreer lifespan. Please join in the new Twitter conversation using #PerformanceCareer, or respond to us here. Our questions are: What does a performance career look like? How is it sustained? What else does it involve? We would love your help!
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I work with systems that process payments, but I can point you to some basic research and data sets in this area. I've worked with these people and they are very good:
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This is part of a project examining the use of technology in group learning environment. We're familiar with the music technology used in piano classes in the states, but are interested in learning what takes place in other countries.
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Unfortunately there are no group classes at our university at this time. Instead individually students hire others to individually train them or go off campus to learn from professionals.
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It could even be a book or paper that deals with that kind of approach.
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If we make a graph of the pitch values and the piano key numbers then we have what seems to be a graph of the line x = y.  If we graph the strings of the guitar then it seems the strings do not intersect.  In fact, the graph does not lie in the R2 plane.  The guitar strings actually do intersect at the system fundamental by gluing, which makes a directed multigraph.   This means music is defined in projective space and not in affine space.  In affine theory all guitar tunings are the same, but that is obviously not true.
You may think the guitar fret board has two dimensions (string, fret) but in fact there are 3 directions of tone movement.  To demonstrate this consider the isotonic line that connection notes with the same pitch, starting at the top string, zero fret.  Along this line the fret and string numbers move in opposite directions but pitch does not change.  The isotonic line is not movement by string or by fret because in these directions the pitch rises or falls in the same direction as the string or frets.  That is, pitch goes up, so does the string or fret number.
In the same way, it is easily shown in the graph of pitch and piano keys that the graph is not correctly drawn because there is a a triangle that is 1 octave in length on three sides and has at least one right angle.  Therefore the pitch position triangle does not lie in a plane.
Similarly, on piano there are 2 directions of movement: by pitch value and by musical key.  But the transposing piano with a lever to shift the keyboard shows there is a third degree of freedom.
Tablature is an algebraic system that represents guitar music.  Sequences in tablature are written using a typed alphabet of fret numbers on a horizontal staff representing the string lines.  Since sequences in tablature are written using integers, the central question is how the integers are induced by the system fundamental using basic set theory operations.  Briefly, construction starts with the null set and then defines the system fundamental by a key function that maps F to the frequency domain.  This defines a point (0, 1) which is a new direction and a unit of measure.  Then the octave point (1, 1) makes an identity (an a filter) in a metric space.
The guitar strings are the open cover of the guitar model because every point on the guitar is contained in at least one string.  Therefore the guitar is convex,  compact, and complete.  Convex means there is no line between any 2 points on guitar that lies outside the guitar.  Complete means that it is possible to construct every possible sequence.  The union of the strings is the interior of the guitar and the intersection is the closure.   The numbers in tablature are ordinals and the numbers in the guitar tuning ring signature are a cardinals.   So if the guitar tuning EADGBE is expressed as the intervals (0 5 5 5 4 5), then we have a Zariski topology that is a  decidable 6-tupple.  In this theory the piano have at most 1 tonal center while the guitar has 5.  This makes the guitar tuning a Baire metric space.
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I am looking for any studies that have examined injuries, common pain issues, and other related factors that effect successful piano performance.
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Rozanski VE, Rehfuess E, Bötzel K, Nowak D. Task-specific dystonia in professional musicians—a systematic review of the importance of intensive playing as a risk factor. Dtsch Arztebl Int, January 2016 DOI: 10.3238/arztebl.2015.0871
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The sound generators of string and non-electronic keyboard instruments are nearly always coupled via the soundboard or organ case. Sympathetic resonance between two notes is strongest for pure intervals. With tempered intervals, this effect should be weaker, but in addition the coupling should "pull" the two frequencies away from the frequencies of the notes played separately.
People such as Werckmeister who developed tempering systems defined the intervals in terms of length ratios on the monochord. Nowadays, published data are given in cents, presumably on the assumption that the length ratios are an accurate indication of the frequency ratios. I'd like to know whether this assumption ought to be questioned.
A supplementary question would concern possible differences between tuning a harspichord or piano note-by-note with the aid of an electronic device, and doing it the difficult traditional way by listening to pairs of notes played together.
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One interesting point is that Bach, himself, tempered his intervals by actually counting the beats. Therefore each interval (be it a 3ed , 4th 5th etc) had a characteristic number of beats. The intervals being determined independent of string length. It was empirical. This approach was a bit different for concert and chamber music, the  beats per intervals being some what different.  It was said that the cover page to the Well tempered Clavier has a code with this information. 
If the cents approach should be questioned depends on your perspective. The difference can be heard. But,  Musial instruments are different  from Pitch references.  But because this effect can vary between instruments it is hard to generalize.  My impression with tuning is, that with harpsichords ( I made several Z-boxes), that the resonant characteristics of different sound board may vary, so the same note on different instruments have a different quality in tone and resonance. On key bound instruments it is exactly this quality and the  "pull" that gives the instrument its characteristic "color".  Bach was able to exploit it for his uses, as were the Impressionists. Though in different ways. The piano being one of the Impressionists most effective instrument because of this effect. Did they know what the frequency was, unlikely.