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Good day!
Any suggested title for physical science ?
Thanks .
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Thank you so much Sir !
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AJPO journals consists of many journals. European journal of physical sciences is one of them. i want to know that is European journal of physical science or other AJPO journals predatory?
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First of all, my computer (with anti-virus etc. software) tells me that the website https://ajpojournals.org/ is not safe… I manage to enter the website through my smartphone. They are relatively new and most likely therefor not (yet) included in the Beall’s list (https://beallslist.net/ ). I see numerous red flags:
-Not much can be found in Google but here they are mentioned in a disturbing matter https://www.capitalfm.co.ke/thesauce/cue-threatens-to-recall-118-phds-from-jkuat-after-massive-irregularities-were-discovered/
-As you indicated way too many new titles. For a new player impossible to maintain a certain scientific standard
-Entering through my smartphone I see a prominent mentioning of DRJI, a notorious misleading metric (https://beallslist.net/misleading-metrics/) often used by predatory journals. I see a logo of DOAJ as well which is misleading since they are no member
-The journal “European journal of physical science” used to mention ISSN 2520-4638 (Online) which is/was fake. On the journal website (EJPS) it now mentions 2788-8223 which seems legit https://portal.issn.org/resource/ISSN/2788-8223
-Contact addresses are nonsense. Their USA address “w dixie avenue 251 kentucky usa” renders a … restaurant. Their “European chapter” address lacks details “eh2 uk frederick street edinburgh scotland” and is at best a virtual office but most likely fake, etc.
-They are from Kenya why come up with European journals? By the way the journal EJPS has no editorial board info (I was unable to find it but if present I am pretty sure there is not a single European involved)
So, if not predatory it is of very low quality: better avoid.
Best regards.
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I'm a grade 11 student from the Philippines and our school is currently holding online classes. Quarantine restrictions render us with no access to physical laboratories to hold tests and experiments in. We have been interested in the field of Physical Science and considered doing a comprehensive meta-analysis. However, our research coordinator discouraged us from choosing to do so. Is it still possible for us to pursue this topic? And what specific research topics could be feasible for us to do? Answers and suggestions are very much appreciated.
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For a background project see: Great Internet Mersenne Prime Search - PrimeNet
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Physics is one of the physical sciences. The two other physical sciences are chemistry and astronomy. Astrophysics is the branch of physics that deals with space and celestial bodies.
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@Weitter Duckss you just attacked the logical fallacy of "appeal to autority" and cite your own book in the same comment? It's not funny, but you make me laugh XD
"Astrophysics is a fabbrication of non-sense" is not satire, it's just you offending the work of hundreds of men and women; also satire is not a way of comunication in science.
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Journal of Multidisciplinary Applied Natural Science (abbreviated as J. Multidiscip. Appl. Nat. Sci.) is a double-blind peer-reviewed journal for multidisciplinary research activity on natural sciences and their application on daily life. This journal aims to make significant contributions to applied research and knowledge across the globe through the publication of original, high-quality research articles in the following fields: 1) biology and environmental science 2) chemistry and material sciences 3) physical sciences and 4) mathematical sciences.
We invite the researcher related on our scope to join as section editor based on their interest or as regional handling editor in their region. The role of editor is help us to maintain and improve the Journal’s standards and quality by:
  1. Support the Journal through the submission of your own manuscripts where appropriate;
  2. Encourage colleagues and peers to submit high quality manuscripts to the Journal;
  3. Support in promoting the Journal;
  4. Attend virtual Editorial Board meetings when possible;
  5. Be an ambassador for the journal: build, nurture, and grow a community around it;
  6. Increase awareness of the articles published in the journal in all relevant communities and amongst colleagues;
  7. Regularly agreeing to review papers when invited by Associate Editors, and handle these promptly to ensure fast turnaround times
  8. Suggest referees for papers that you are unable to review yourself
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Frank T. Edelmann yes sure, thanks for your good discussion. we create this journal based on the other multidisciplinary journal, as example Journal of King Saud University - Science (scopus indexed) publishes peer-reviewed research articles in the fields of physics, astronomy, mathematics, statistics, chemistry, biochemistry, earth sciences, life and environmental sciences.
Other example, PERIÓDICO TCHÊ QUÍMICA (scopus indexed) also publishes peer-reviewed research article in same fields with our journal.
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What is the possible research scope in physical science after this Covid-19 crisis?
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It has been found that some people in different countries have deliberately spread the Covid-19 virus. If this is true, the world needs psychological examination and treatment.
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Yep. RG is equating science with experiments. There may be those who like this, but experimentation is NOT THE ENTIRE SCIENTIFIC METHOD (and I would argue that experimentation is THE LEAST OF IT -- especially if one is developing a new perspective and approach). RG appears to have no appreciation for "just" verified observations -- even though that may be exactly what really new discovery looks like . Those observations may, in time (but not right away), be followed by experimentation. Verified observations by themselves may be very important and all we have for some time (in some new areas/kinds of investigation).
The outrageous bias of RG is so great that they now hide the Project Updates (of the Log) with multiple queries about one's experiments and hypotheses -- as if all good, clear hypotheses could be put "in a nut shell" (in a small "blank", with little context) AND that experiments are all that matter (or at least all that deserves several special headings). How about a heading for: "Verified Observations"?
I would ask: What experiments did Einstein do to lead and come up with his understanding of the universe? Did he start with experiments? NO!! He started with observation and MATH (which is basically verified observation). True, eventually some experiments were done to VERIFY HIS IMPORTANT OBSERVATIONS -- but all this did NOT begin with experiments..
And, all of this is not to mention major swathes of Biology. Come on, give us a break.
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And: Daniel Goldman:
OBSERVATIONS are are as falsifiable as experiments, if they lack high inter-observer reliablities (P.S.: p<.05 has NO magic). That all aspiring scientists do not know this is frankly disgraceful. Realize that science is just good reliable, and shown valid, COMMUNICATION -- as is true of all good communication; this can most certainly be found and true of sets of observations. Experiments are communication; observations are communication. DO NOT TRY TO PUT "MAGIC" IN TO ONE OF THOSE.
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Referencing is very useful in science, offering support for evidence, reasoning, ethos, leads to a more concise text, and other advantages.
But, quoting the words of another, which is widely used in the humanities and philosophy, to convey, e.g., gravitas and erudition, seems often futile and counter-effective in science. One should rather trust his own words, and calculations. A worrisome point-of-failure in papers, and not by the authors!
In general, also, inlined quotes have a lifetime, as anything else. The authors' paper may still be correct, but a quote inlined in the text, can fail sooner. The more the number of inlined quotes, the higher the probability of failure. The authors and readers would be better served by sumarizing each view, and referencing, providing credit where credit is due, and citations.
On the other hand, some say that quoting the words of another is good because it makes science more humane, more fragile, more context-dependent, more understandable. Others think that it mostly shows the futility of quoting in science, where previous views are treated as immobile scientific truths, whereas they should be considered in history terms only, not providing a scientific guidance of what would be truth necessarily. In science [1,2], YES means NOT YET FALSE, and NO means MAYBE TRUE. The ground shifts.
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RE: "quoting ... is widely used in the humanities to convey gravitas and erudition"
I can't speak for humanities in general but that is not how quotation is generally used in philosophy. It is used, for example, to show that what one claims about another’s position, is warranted, based on his own words. Or to present a passage for analysis and discussion. Or to show that one’s position is similar to or different from another that may already be under discussion in the literature. Or to provide context. Mere referencing would result in extra work for the reader; quotation may help him decide whether it’s worth his while to look up the original work (similar to the purpose served by abstracts).
And consider the role played by the quotation with which I began this answer.
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Trying to find out if my discovery is legitimate.
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They are actually round cylinders that are squeezed into a hexagonal shape. Look at the outer portion of drone cells beyond the worker cell walls. Bumble bee cells are round spheres of wax..
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Eddington [1] was one of the few who tried to answer the above question, for the case of the decomposition of white light by a prism; however, his answer is ambiguous. Burgers [2] reportedly (see Ref.[3]) reportedly also refers to this case, but his interest lies in the phenomenon of turbulence, where Fourier analysis and other methods of decomposition are employed. Also, Hinze [3], just before mentioning the Burgers paper, says: "... Though a harmonic analysis of the velocity fluctuations [in a turbulent fluid] can be carried out, this fact is no proof that, conversely, the turbulent fuctuations are composed of these harmonics. Compare the similar problem in the case of sound, where one may distinguish between noise (turbulent) and note (composed of a number of harmonics)."
This problem could conceivably appesr in every domain of physics. Is there an unambiguous abnswer to Eddington's dilemma: "discovery or manufacture?"
[1] Eddington, A.S.: "The philosophy of physical science". Ann Arbor, Ann Arbor Press, 1978. Chapter VII, section I.
[2] Burgers, J. M.: Proc. Koninkl. Akad. Wetenschap. vol.51, p. 1073 (1948).
[3]Hinze, O.: "Turbulence". Mc Graw-Hill, 1975, Ch. 1, pp. 7-8.
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To summarize:
1) Any function can be expressed as a linear combination of the elements which constitute an orthogonal basis.
2) The Fourier basis is composed of an infinite number of complex exponential functions.
3) Fourier analysis performs well if the sum of the first elements of the Fourier basis converges to the analyzed function. This occurs when the studied function is periodical and when the sampling rate respects Nyquist's criterion.
4) Fourier analysis becomes important in acoustics and optics because complex exponentials are the eigenfunctions of the wave equation which governs acoustics and optics phenomena. ie harmonic excitation will produce harmonic solution, which can be represented adequately in the Fourier domain.
5) For transient phenomenon, other basis (wavelets for example) can be used to converge faster towards the solution.
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The genetic information of retrovirus integrates into a host cell's DNA, which results in viral replication. The only solution is to attack the virus in order to get rid of HIV. Below is an attachment of how Biotechnology, Mathematics, Bio-process engineering and physical sciences can work together to find a solution.
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Nucleoside Reverse transcriptase inhibitor...like nevirapen that
Bind directly to RT enzyme or Retrovir ( zidovudine ) Its thymidine analoge use against Retro viruses because its Reverse transcriptase inhibitor or Didanosin , Zaicilabine , stavudin and lamivudin and others
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Most of the great ideas in philosophy, math, science and engineering were done with simple pen and pencil. Great thinkers such as, Pythagoras of Samos Leonardo di ser Piero da Vinci, Newton, Edison, Charles Darwin, and others have created their great works with contemporary technology. The technology today is much more advanced and sophisticated with so many tools and functionalities, and yet still quite simple and limited, compare to technology of tomorrow. Will the future much more sophisticated and smart technology of tomorrow contribute to creation of greater ideas and works of philosophy, arts, math, physics, science and engineering tomorrow.
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This is a wonderful question, but also very broad in its scope. I hope this kicks off an interesting conversation!!
FYI, my background and professional activities have spanned pharmaceutical sciences to physics (I am a pharmacist and Ph.D. in physics), and I have an interest in philosophy as well as the practice of science in multiple areas. I am also old enough to have depended on slide rules, then calculators, then crude computers with FORTRAN, then Excel... I have seen the explosion of technology impact the practice of science as well as education.
Just a single point for now (as I said, this is a wonderfully broad topic).
Most early progress was made with thought experiments (gedanken), pencil and paper. Mathematics was developed to be a tool (or the tool) of physics, and our minds took us a very long way.
Nowadays, there are still great thinkers and mathematics is actually in a bit of a golden age again. Physics is mired in the search for a theory of everything, and making great intellectual strides with string theory and the like, but those ingenious endeavors are perhaps not getting closer to the answer. (That is another topic for another day.)
On the other hand, technology is shiny and glamorous. Each new generation of technology can produce data that was not seen before, some of which is confirmatory and some of which is new and surprising. It has been my observation that we are currently in a period of big science, driven by technology more than thoughts and understanding. We see more and more papers published disclosing data and observations, while papers trying to explain systems with mathematical models are more and more criticized for lacking data. This seems to be the new paradigm in most arenas... data rules more than models.
Please do not interpret this as implying there is no thought nor greater understanding. This is just where things stand now. When the new data stops opening new avenues of thought or needs more complete explanation, the paradigm will shift. However, at this time, I notice very few scientists think first and do second... math and modeling should be at the forefront given the explosion in computing power, but there are fewer practitioners in this arena because the prerequisite knowledge in math and computation is too steep.
This will surely change... computational biology, computational chemistry and drug design, chemometrics, etc. all highlight what happens when the need for understanding on any level enters through computational abilities. (This is reflective of the history of physics, for instance.)
The bottom line is that we are now making faster progress in our ability to observe via technology than understand via analysis. It will change, and when it does, more thought will go into the physical meaning of what we observe.
However, thought will also go into the "meaning" of theories themselves. This will be motivated somewhat by what we actually see (objects that I can see with my eyes, like a tree for instance) vs. what we observe by inference (measuring responses that infer events, rather than directly observing the events... for instance, electronic orbital transitions giving off discrete light frequencies, or thermal events detected by differential scanning calorimetry).
So, as an extreme example... do we really know that electrons exist as we describe them, or are they just theoretical manifestations of a mathematical or physical model that explains what we "see"? If we interpret all experimental data in terms of the picture or model, then there would be no external footing to say we don't see electrons as described by the model. (I don't mean to imply that electrons don't exist, but am just using them as an example of the idea.)
I suspect that technology will progress faster than human thought, but will never completely leave it behind... we need to explain what we see, and specifically develop methods to quantitatively evaluate our observations, but also interpret the philosophical implications.
I do apologize for rambling, but hope this piques some interest.
Thanks for reading!
Bob
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I think we have clearly entered the time of the anthropocene. Does that change the way we should teach physics and sciences? Or is it just again about good science teaching, but with a specific content?
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Hi!
The anthropocence probably affects both the what and how of education. The world cannot any longer be seen as something separated from humans, something that is just there to study and learn about - it is affected by humans in many complex ways. As just one example, mining for metals can today access fewer and fewer untouched and rich resources that are easy to exploit in a way that contemporary society can allow under environmental restrictions  - instead bioleaching of complex ore, residues and waste and recycling of materials becomes highly important (see the youtube video "Invisible Miners"- or google for the large "Biominewiki" - I was managing the education part of this project.)  But what isn't already affected by humans?  
A more central factor that should be guiding education development is, I believe, the changing human life within the information society. This is nothing natural either of course. The Oxford philosopher Luciano Floridi argues that humans percieve the world around them more and more as information, not as matter or things. His advice for education (he is a general philosopher, a system builder with a new "prima philosophia") is that we should in education learn "the languages of information" - all from human languages to formulas, concepts and programming to connect data to one another. See the linked publication. 
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  • Science is an oversimplification or a simple explanation for a seemingly complex observed phenomenon--this is a universal definition applicable to all branches of science.
  • Science is not a simple accretion of facts or data and their manipulation through statistics.
  • While physical sciences (Physics, Chemistry and other branches, and their mathematical realms) remain theoretically far ahead of what is practically possible (see attachment), medicine lags far behind in rock-solid theory and tries to make that up with experiments in animals and humans and of course, through genetics -- the cart-before-the-horse approach. More so, medical researchers are surprised that their approaches to science might be called faulty or proven faulted.
  • "Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted"-- Albert Einstein. There are instances where the immeasurable is more important than the measurable -- see attachment. Science, and particularly medical scientists, and most specifically migraine researchers have no clue about the immense depth and width and length of the immeasurable dimension.  
  • Straight quote from my book (see attachment): "Migraine remains a classic example of a clinical entity that has not yielded its secrets to statistical legerdemain. Perhaps in no other clinical entity has the immeasurable proven so much more important than the measurable...The key cranial physiological system involved in migraine remains unidentified...Natural laws become apparent only when science becomes abstract, bordering on art...Whatever is statistically significant is certainly publishable; equally certainly, it is not biologically or medically original".    
  • "Obviously science follows no (man-made) plan. It develops at random. Its progress depends on fortuitous conditions, such as the birth of men of genius, the form of their mind, the direction taken by their curiosity...Men of science do not where they are going. They are guided by chance, by subtle reasoning, by a sort of clairvoyance...We have an almost irresistible tendency to select the subjects of our investigations for their technical facility and clearness rather than for their importance"-- Alexis Carrel, "Man, The Unknown",1959--Nobel Laureate. 
  • This scientific misery refuses to let up, except in a few pockets of excellence in medical research, that are there for us all to admire.
  • The accountant mentality of medical researchers of the 20th and 21st century is also there for all to see in medical journals published worldwide. The reversal of the swing of the pendulum is imminent with the demise of the p-value no longer a distant mirage -- see attachments. 
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I believe no.  Logic has its issues too.  Years ago if  person had a myocardial infarction, a heart attack, they were put to bed for usually 3 weeks.  They could not get up out of bed for anything.  We had to carefully watch the sneakers to the bathroom types.  They had to be fed even.  The logic was, the heart was damaged and needed rest to heal.  A physiologic study of five subjects put on bed rest showed bed rest to be  physiologically harmful.  These patients were and still are up out of bed early.  Medicine has made great strides through research.  Much more is need.
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Yes. The teaching and learning processes in Physical Sciences is made more interesting when learners DISCOVER how things in nature function through PERSONAL EXPERIMENTATION and BEING PART OF THE INVENTING MACHINERY (INVOLVEMENT). Every learner is woowed and more glued to see in PRACTICALITY or 'PHYSICALLY' how the learned concepts and theoretical constructs functions in life.
Thanks
Dickson Adom
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Convergence approach is viewed evermore as an approach to be adopted in scientific research. The life sciences, physical sciences, Engineering, culture & media studies seem to have made major advances with convergence approach. What need the social sciences to do to get out of their departmental ghettos and work in partnership with others? Produce research papers with co-authorship, or use citations from other areas in one's research? In historiography would be necessary to work more along the view of connected histories? 
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The biggest blockade to much of this is the fealty we have to our academic disciplines or subdiscplines. For example, I am an Organizational Communication Scholar. I  found myself "stuck," looking for ways to expand what I study into other areas. It wasn't until I started working people from other fields that my research really started taking off.
In the past couple of years, I've worked with rhetoricians, educational technology scholars, narrative scholars, journalists, autoethnographers, and media/pop culture scholars. We all have different backgrounds, different styles of writing, and differing research methods. However, this has been very productive.
Through these collaborations, I've been able to put together two edited collections, a special journal issue, and two academic articles since 2014. The first book was about the concept of polymediated communication. That has branched out to include polymediation and fan conventions/cultures, and polymediated narratives in television series. We are currently working on another article and a few big grants. And I have a contract for another edited collection on personal stories/autoethnographies in organizational contexts.
I now work via the following premises:
I will keep studying my field.
I will keep writing about my field.
I will always extend a hand to others by which we can collaborate together.
In effect, there's both fragmentation (we all work in our own fields) and convergence (where we collaborate on projects).
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In the article linked below,  there is a table listed tight binding hopping parameter obtained from DFT calculations, I want to know what method they used to get those results?
Thanks a lot!
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The authors derived their own Hamiltonian for this paricular system based on tight binding method. My guess is that they implemented it in their own code and used it to obtain all results. The entire code is most likely not published anywhere.
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By definition, a shape is an external form or appearance of something.   This is how the Oxford English Dictionary defines the term shape.   But then this definition raises more questions than it answers.
In his Essentials of Topology with Applications, CRC Press, 2010, Steven G. Krantz asks whether a ruler and a sheet of paper have the same shape, since both are rectangles.
We might also ask the following related questions.
Does a donut have the same shape as a wedding ring, since each one has a hole in its center?
For that matter, do all objects with a single hole in their centers have the same shape?
Is the concept of hole part of the concept of shape?   In other words, do we need to take into account the presence or absence of holes in every shape?
There are many different types of shapes in Physical Science.   For example, a Wulff shape is an an equilibrium minimal surface for a crystal or drop which has the least anisotropic surface free energy for a given volume.   Wulff shape are explained in
The theory of shape is a central topic in Mathematics.   For example, Karol Borsuk introduced the theory of shape in his 1970 lectures:
For Borsuk, shape theory is the focus of geometric topology, which is a study of the topological properties of metrizable spaces.  
Shape theory is also closely related to what are known as retracts.
Long before the study of shapes entered into the picture in the Physical Sciences and in Mathematics, shapes were the focus of the Fine Arts (painting and sculpture) and Philosophy.   Capturing shapes is a central activity in painting.  A classical example is the chiaroscuro effect using various forms of highlighting objects:
And shapes were (and still are) of great interest in Philosophy,   The classical example an interest in external forms can be found in the works of Plato and Artistotle.
What we mean by shape? is an open question.   A related open question concerns similar shapes.   When do objects have similar shapes?
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I have an EMG data for several muscles and i need to calculate the force produced from these muscles. Can anyone help me?
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For the short answer, no, you cannot determine force production from EMG. At best, you might determine the relative force production within a muscle (or muscle group) but that assumes you had a trial in which the subject did a maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and that the relationship between EMG amplitude and force production is linear, which may or may not be true. If the relationship is linear, you could normalize submaximal contraction EMG amplitude values to the MVC one and from that you would get relative force production values.
You also cannot compare different muscles (or muscle groups) on their absolute force production using EMG. At the same level of contraction force production, it is doubtful that two muscles would have the same EMG amplitude.
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I am currently writing up my PhD which is a mixed method evaluation of a workplace intervention. I am writing up as one study and would welcome the opportunity to read other people's PhD thesis that have done a similar thing.
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Ehhmmm - if no-one minds me saying - shouldn't all mixed-methods PhD theses be presented as one study? The only alternative is to present the different methods separately - and then that wouldn't be a single thesis - or a single project. 
Anna - you can't have 3 seperate studies to make a mixed-methods study. They have to be aligned from the beginning - otherwise they are simply just three seperate studies that are linked by the topic matter alone.
The attached chapter might illuminate.
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Is there anything similar to parametric down conversion in NMR?
(I know, NMR is an ensemble QC. But, how can I entangle a qutrit or qudit using it?)
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Gauav!
  My field is not Quantum Computing, I have experience with NMR. I know that Jones at Cambridge has an active research program in applying NMR to quantum computing. From what I have read, there  has been some progress in this regard although the computing  is still very primitive. If you can search for his papers I think it will answer some of your questions. He gives examples of the computation of simple cases.
                         Ciao,
                                   Dennis
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Hello, every friend!
I need to calculate the optical potential between two nuclei, so I've tried to find open source folding potential calculation codes.
I have known that there are DFPOT and SPI-GENOA, but I haven't found their codes that can be used directly, i.e., where to download them?
Thank you very much!
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Dear Prof. Rajiv Kumar,
 Thank you! The CPC library also have some corresponding codes.
Liyuan
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I use what I call the "historical-investigative" method, which focuses on presenting scientific concepts as in the process of their discovery.  The main vehicle for this is "rediscovering" these concepts while repeating historical experiments. See examples of how it is presented to teachers in the files attached.
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This question can be broadened to the most of the physical sciences and mathematics, but I'm mostly interested in chemistry concepts like 'bonding' and 'structure.' At which age can a particular concept be assimilated? I'm not an education theorist; please feel free to suggest appropriate background reading. I'm expecting the answer is contextualized on the dominant educational approach for a given culture.
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I haven't reviewed any literature on this, but I know it's related to questions in the debate on common core: whether or not it tries to introduce certain topics too early in development:
This is the only thing I've seen about this, and I only hope the video gives some additional information that is at least somewhat useful at narrowing the context of the conversation, regardless of people's thoughts on common core (i.e. I hope this helps us talk about the OP's question and not common core).
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Electron bubble (an electron/ positron occupying a self created spherical cavity in liquid Helium-4 or Helium-3) is an interesting real physical system which closely represents a quantum particle trapped in a spherical cavity. I am interested to know other such systems. I would appreciate your help in providing such examples.
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Thanks a lot Prof valeriy,
This indicates that several of these systems can provide additional experimental observations in support to the wave mechanics of a particle trapped in a spherical shell of impenetrable walls depending on the extent to which these systems represent such a particle.    In this context it may noted that: (i) our analysis of the wave mechanics of a particle trapped in a spherical shell of impenetrable walls reveals that the correct energy eigen values should be 1/4 times lower than what we have been learning from different graduate text, and (ii) two different experimental observations provide unequivocal support to our conclusion.   Our study is available at the following link.
I take this opportunity to express my thanks to you for sending me copies of your papers.   While I would try to understand your experimental data to examine additional support, it will be greatly encouraging if you could also try to examine whether our study renders a better account of your experiments. 
 
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I am looking for a good tool to use for a systematic review of oberservational studies
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Thanks for your answer. I am using the Quips tool specilized for prognostic factor studies
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Or simply what is the weightage difference (in terms of service for sciences) between the two?
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From the instruction of ''Journal of Plant Physiology'' I got the following statement:
''A Short Communication is not a publication that contains too few or preliminary data to justify a full paper. It should report "urgent data" that should be communicated to the scientific community prior to the completion of the full investigation.''
I think this information will be helpful for you.
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What are the important things other than qualifications, experience and research funding to apply for the academic level position in university. How to prepare for the interview. Suggestions welcome
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Be careful interpreting any answers and advice that you get. There are likely to be great differences depending upon the academic culture of your country and also on the nature of the academic position, such as wether it is teaching, research, both, tenure track or not, etc.