Science topics: LinguisticsPhilology
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Philology - Science topic

Philology is the study of language in written historical sources; it is a combination of literary studies, history and linguistics.
Questions related to Philology
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Is not the term anti-Semitic, as it is used today to refer to bigotry against Jews, used loosely and erroneously? “Anti-Semitic” literally and technically means being opposed to someone who speaks a Semitic language (e.g. Arabic and Hebrew). My question is: why then was the term “anti-Semitic” coined in 19th century Germany to refer – rather confusingly – to a phenomenon of hatred of Jews in Europe who, however, did not speak a Semitic language at the time? Do we know with any certainty and rigour how much knowledge of philology and linguistics Wilhelm Marr, the German writer who coined the term “anti-Semitic” in 1879, had?
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The University of Bristol has sacked David Miller, a sociology professor who was accused of making antisemitic comments...
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In researching the enduring place of racism in society, I have been impressed with Leon Poliakov's 1971 analysis of various social mythologies/genealogies in "The Aryan Myth." I am also interested in hearing other perspectives on the "stickiness factor" of these ideas.
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The cause of racism is not skin color, but human thinking. Therefore, healing from racial prejudice, xenophobia and intolerance should be sought primarily in rescuing from misconceptions that for centuries have been a source of misconceptions about the benefits or, conversely, the lower position of various groups among mankind.
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I am 1st year PhD student of foreign philology specialty and it is totally new field for me, so if you share any important and reliable sources on text analysis, I would be grateful.
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What about using Gracia maxims or Austin's speech acts!
I think these may help you. However, if you want your analysis to be more critical, you can use Wodak's hermeneutics, Van Dijk's sociocognitive analysis, or any other CDA method.
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Hello, RG Colleagues!
Greetings!
I have a peculiar philological question as follows.
How to know whether what one says, irrespective of matter, is true?
Is there any scientific sort of "truth-meter"?
This question is motivated from a panoptic observation that, a "fallacy", on majority support, becomes an absolute "truth"; and vice versa.
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Through his words if it is logical and does not contradict the mind.
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It strikes me as if discourse analysis is concerned with all that is taking place or is implicated in discourse; that is, all that ‘lies hidden’, as Michel Foucault would say, in the depths and in fact all levels of discourse, to enable it ‘to emerge and become clearly visible’. In this case, discourse analysis is to proceed in two stages: exploration, for example by means of philology, and secondly by description. But quite other tools and procedures than these are probably called for in approaches to discourse where the guiding principle is to point out the item of communication, whether intended or not, which is received consciously or subliminally, showing how the transmission and reception are achieved. Which of these two approaches describes adequately the task of discourse analysis; or should we rather be searching for a practice that combines the explanation of all that is going on in discourse with focus on information content that is passed across or garnered?
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A very insightful question. You have astutely observed the functional role of discourse analysis in demystifying the byzantine complexities underlying the argumentation models dominating acts of communication.
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I'm analysing the relation between the work with literary drama on the stage in the theatre and the theory of new philology (medieval texts).
Do you have an example for it in the contemporary theater?
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García Izcalbazeta studied nahuatl texts and was the pioneer. Later Gibson and Lockhart has contributed on the field. Indian teatre spoken on their own dialects is important to understand history and art.
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I need some practical sources to find out self-assessment and self-repair forms in foreign language teaching/learning?
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John Burnet's book on Plato's Phaedo (1911) is the kind of work I'm looking for.
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I don't see that there is in English.  In German there is Epikur, Brief an Menoikeus : Edition, Übersetzung, Einleitung und Kommentar, by an Erik Hessler. In English it seems there is no commentary, but you might want to look at several works that probably treat the letter, e.g., Tim O'Keefe, Epicurus on Freedom or Jeffrey Fish and Kirk Sanders (eds.), Epicurus and the Epicurean Tradition.
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In my corpus of Dutch Creole texts there are several eighteenth century variants of the same text. However, the chronological distance between the oldest and the youngest variants is only about forty years. In traditional philology, for instance of medieval texts, fifty years between the variants was already considered to be too close for reliable diachronic research. Can you help me with related literature? Thanks in advance!
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Dear Cefas:
I suggest breaking with tradition and defining your own criterion, based on the specific requirements of your corpus, theoretical framwork, and methodology.
Best regards,
David
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Here's my Bibliography of Literary Theory, Criticism and Philology. It includes listings on many (very many) topics, but for those interested in narrative, you can find listings on narrative theory and narrative genres under "Subjects: Genres: Narrative"
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Thanks for sharing your big work of organizing bibliography with us. It is a very comprehensive list.
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I was wondering if anyone can suggest some good sources about attitudes towards languages in general, and about attitudes towards native language among students. I'll have to make a questionnaire for the research and now I'm looking for non-Serbian sources on this.
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try these - they all have extensive language attitude research bibliographies
Baker, C. (1992) Attitudes and Language. Clevedon: Multilingual Matters
Garrett, P., N. Coupland and A. Williams (2003) Investigating Language Attitudes. Cardiff: University of Wales Press.
Garrett, P. (2010) Attitudes to Language. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
McKenzie, R.M. (2008b) Social factors and non-native attitudes towards varieties of spoken English . International Journal of Applied Linguistics 18(1): 63-88.
McKenzie, R.M. (2010) The Social Psychology of English as a Global Language. Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.
McKenzie, R.M. and D. Osthus (2011) That which we call a rose by any other name would sound as sweet: Folk perceptions, status and language variation. AILA Review 24: 100-115
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I would like to find out the nature of language acquisition and perception of a language where word meaning is determined by lexical tones and if it is possible to teach tones to students who have hearing disorders and if anybody has already done that. Do you have any experience or advice?
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We seem to be trying to answer this question without considering the requirements of the question. The original question addresses the case of persons with hard of hearing. For example, if a short-sighted person wears glasses and can see properly, his sight problem is no longer an issue when it comes to visual capacity. So, teaching that person is no longer a case of teaching a blind person. Similarly, if a hard of hearing person wears cochlear implant and can hear, that person cannot be considered as hard of hearing from the standpoint of language pedagogy. The point I raised earlier above relates to the task of teaching audio signals to persons with hearing problems. If the children's L1 is Chinese and they can hear by wearing cochlear implant I do not see the problem because you do not have to teach tones to them - they acquire them naturally. If the students are learning as L2, the best method is the signifier/signified (sound/word to object) in which they will pick up the tones without you having to teach them. It is important to know that you are trying to help people speak another language rather than trying to produce linguists.