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Persuasion - Science topic

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Discipline is highly ambivalent in schools. Its military and un-liberal connotations, its anti-pedagogic conceptions in practice i.e. imposed to the degree of psychological violence have made the concept highly unattractive in policy makers.
However, persuasion and academic interest as factors are not sufficient to solve the issues discipline is supposed to be a prefered approach.
Authentic co-existence refers to a type of teacher leardership that brings the goods via a relationship that is authentic, in both demanding comformity on some issues, communication, including academic and general socialization.
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Α humanized space is a main elements in A. C.(authentic coexistence). It is a space in which less of us is hidden and more of us are known. It has 3 dimentions, classroom climate, students as person and academic.
In humanized school classroom climates, students feel valued, known, respected, and safe.
Seek to know the stories of your students in an effort to help.
In the academic side, Getting to know more about a child as the year goes on or knowing the child’s profile as a learner and their strengths and weaknesses, and then bringing this knowledge.
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Hello,
I collected data to pilot test four different persuasive messages. I had each participant answer the same questions (Likert scale) after viewing each message. Therefore, to compare the difference between scores I ran a repeated measure ANOVA but split the data by stimulus to compare the scores of each message. However, since I split the data, my Mauchly's Test of Sphericity shows four lines, each with a different significance level. A line for each message.
When reporting the results, do I report each Mauchly's test?? Two are significant (assumption violated) and two are not (assumption not violated). Looking for some insight on how / what to report.
Thank you!
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Thank you for your explanation and answer.
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I'm struggling to find a scale to susceptibility to 4 persuasion areas of PSD model. Just find the STPS based on Cialdini's Principles and a research paper by Oinas-Kukkonen itself that enlightened me about the influence between susceptibility to Cialdini's Principles on PSD areas.
Thanks in advance to anybody will just answer me in some way.
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Michele,
I believe the attached paper will answer you question.
I hope it helps.
Best,
Don Polzella
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I am in a search of psychological theories and research that can give a greater perspective on why failed persuasion attempts happen.
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Five Simple Tips to Increase Your Citation Number
  1. Write a strong and persuasive article.
  2. Submit your manuscript to the most respected appropriate journal.
  3. Write an effective title.
  4. Write a clear abstract so that your article is appropriately indexed and easy to find.
  5. Choose your key words carefully (use tools such as using MeSH on Demand to find the best terms)
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Thanks a lot for your valuable and informative information. @Monika
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Examples of some other contemporary theories related to Aristotelian will also needed.
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Are these of any relevance:
Higgins, C., & Walker, R. (2012, September). Ethos, logos, pathos: Strategies of persuasion in social/environmental reports. In Accounting Forum (Vol. 36, No. 3, pp. 194-208). Taylor & Francis.
Ting, S. H. (2018). Ethos, Logos and Pathos in University Students’ Informal Requests. GEMA Online® Journal of Language Studies, 18(1).
Demirdöğen, Ü. D. (2010). The roots of research in (political) persuasion: Ethos, pathos, logos and the Yale studies of persuasive communications. International Journal of Social Inquiry, 3(1), 189-201.
Cam, M. S. (2015). Aristotle is Still Persuading Us: Content Analyses about the Rhetorical Structure of Magazine Advertisements in Turkey. International Journal of Multidisplinary Thought, 5(02), 203-214.
Relating to the second part of your request:
An Aristotelian Approach for Contemporary Mathematics (conference seminar)
Kafetsios, K., & LaRock, E. (2005). Cognition and emotion: Aristotelian affinities with contemporary emotion research. Theory & Psychology, 15(5), 639-657.
Papouli, E. (2019). Aristotle’s virtue ethics as a conceptual framework for the study and practice of social work in modern times. European Journal of Social Work, 22(6), 921-934.
International Encyclopaedia of Civil Society: Civil Society Theory: Aristotle
Berti, E. (2011). The Contemporary Relevance of Aristotle's Thought. Iris: European Journal of Philosophy & Public Debate, 3(6).
I have not seen the full text to this:
Sanderse, W. (2015). An Aristotelian model of moral development. Journal of Philosophy of Education, 49(3), 382-398.
I hope some of these help,
Mary
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Hello everyone!
I am currently developing the study design for my Master thesis about the effectiveness of nudge interventions (" choice architecture").
I am interested in whether nudges can promote the attitude towards and intention to do physical activity. Therefore, I plan to show participants different ads with a varying degree of nudge/message intensity. There are many different nudges such as setting a default option, reporting values of the social, making information visible etc.
However, I have trouble classifying these nudges into low-moderate- and high intensity/persuasiveness messages/nudges/interventions.
Does anyone of you have any suggestions on how I can vary the degrees of intensity of nudges.
I haven't really been able to find much useful literature.
Your help is very much appreciated.
I am looking forward to your answers. :)
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Dear Helena Pokrivka,
Clearly, there is no obvious scalar basis for measuring a ‘nudge’ so we are dealing with non-parametric data. Such data can however be analysed in terms of order and ranking. An appropriate ranking measure is a Likert Scale, which consists of a pair of opponent 5 or 7-point scales with nominally linear increments that are distributed symmetrically about a neutral value midpoint. Thus for example, in the case of describing probability the midpoint might be denoted as “moderate” and the opponent extremes could be “extremely likely” to “not at all likely.” I leave it to you to devise a Likert scale representation of multiple nudges, the term convincing comes to mind.
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For decades, scholars and think tanks have debated the effectiveness of aid in reducing poverty. In this debate, we will build on previous arguments about the effectiveness and value of aid, but focus on its role in disaster risk reduction and post-disaster reconstruction and recovery.
Scholars, think-tanks, celebrities, and politicians have claimed aid is crucial to prevent famines, diseases, and deaths. They argue that donors’ money can be used to solve basic problems in areas like sanitation, vaccination, education, housing, and infrastructure. Aid can also be used to fund monitoring activities and learn from interventions. More importantly, they contend that traditional markets alone cannot resolve housing and infrastructure deficits. They note that the poor are often stuck in feedback loops that economists call “poverty traps.” In other words, millions are poor precisely because they live in poverty. Slum dwellers, for instance, find it difficult to escape poverty because they pay proportionally more for services and infrastructure than wealthier citizens. Foreign aid is needed to break these vicious cycles and replace them with virtuous ones that make vulnerable people more resilient. For defenders, the real problem is lack of funds, not present mechanisms of aid. From their view, people use criticisms of aid merely as excuses to justify not donating money.
On the other hand, critics often find too much money is “wasted” on aid. For them,  initiatives seldom produce positive long-term change and—in many cases—even create more damaging than desirable results. They contend that donors’ money is spent on band-aid solutions that rarely have long-term impacts. They argue that aid is largely controlled by political agendas, feeds on forms of neo-colonialism, focuses too much on technology transfer, creates dependency, and bypasses legitimate governments and authorities. They contend that aid is often based on centralized schemes produced by over-confident and idealistic decision-makers with little knowledge of what is needed “on the ground.” For them, aid is often driven by ideology, and lacks the performance incentives and accountability mechanisms found in competitive (and typically “more efficient”) markets.
For this debate, we have invited two internationally recognized experts in humanitarian assistance and interventions to defend each viewpoint.
Our panellists will present their most persuasive arguments over the next ten days, but the outcome of the debate rests in your hands. Don’t hesitate to vote immediately—you can always change your mind. Better yet, once you have cast your vote, add your voice to the debate and explain your decision.
Vote and participate here: https://oddebates.com/
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Dear Professor,
We have conducted few studies in poverty stricken areas and found that aid can enhance adaptive capacity of poor people and help to move out from poverty.
Thanks
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Sir, Are you going to research based paper based or more broaden using tehnology help like moodle?
What kind writing to investigate (narrative, opinion,persuasive ?
What about the participant? Is high school students or college students?
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Hi Dita,
Thanks for your questions.
My completed project involved only paper-based portfolios in the secondary school setting in HK. The writings I investigated were mainly persuasive which prepared students for their public exam. In fact, my next project will focus more on e-portfolios.
Best,
Ricky
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I am writing an essay for presentation on how culture affect the intake of persuasive messages ?
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Culture is a very important aspect of our lives and play a very significant role in it. It affects the way we think and the way we think affects our analysis of information when received. I will therefore say that culture affects how people resist or receive persuasive messages and different people will act differently to the same message due to cultural differences.
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“Even by conservative estimates, the average person is exposed to 300 to 400 persuasive messages a day from the mass media alone (Aaker & Myers, 1987; Ries & Trout, 1981) (Rosselli, Skelly, & Mackie, 1995, p. 163).”  That was the 80’s and 90’s.  Imagine how many persuasive appeals we get each day now!  This quote and quip are how I begin teaching the topic of Persuasion in Social Psychology.  What I’m wondering is, do we have any estimates for how many persuasive appeals the average person experiences daily in more recent times?  Intuitively, I wouldn’t be surprised if it’s 10 times as many.  But I don’t know and I’m hoping you have some insight. ~ Kevin
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Thank you for your thoughts, Daniel, Larry, & Chris!  All of you touched on the incredible difficulty in operationally defining what counts as persuasion.  My Social Psychology students have been wrestling with this question.  I decided it would be fun this semester, to not simply mention the ubiquity of persuasion, but to have our class collect data.  For a 24 hour period each student will use a hand-held counter (like those used as people enter arenas) and click for each persuasive appeal.  Daniel, using SenseCam would be a nice and a much higher tech approach that could allow for inter-rater reliability.  But unfortunately I don’t have the resources to buy enough for all my students to use at once.  In addition to calculating a descriptive statistic, we’re also going to see if various individual differences across class members predict their final counts.  Like Chris points out, one thing to consider is the “expertise” people might have in recognizing the persuasion.  You make some interesting points, Larry.  In a certain sense nearly every form of social influence could be considered persuasion.  We’ve discussed this and we’re defining persuasion more narrowly and to highlight just how powerful are results are if they’re high (i.e., rather than being true by definition).   We’re calling something a persuasive appeal if it’s intended as such and is beyond a group norm (e.g., saying “thank you” might be positively reinforcing and therefore alter future behavior, but we’re not counting it because we’re assuming the intent is to follow norms of politeness).  Our current plan is to treat persuasive appeals as direct efforts to convince us to buy a product, or support a cause, or similar.  I feel the main learning students are doing is in the process, rather than the outcome.  Even so, I would like to know if anybody has conducted a similar study so we can compare results and possibly refine our coding to match prior research.  Thanks again. ~ Kevin
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I am writing a conference paper on Linguistic persuasion as a strategy to conflict resolution in Nigeria. On the literature concerning linguistic persuasion, I found numerous literature on communication persuasion. please clarify me on this sociolinguistic issues.
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I believe you can help..
Md Rabiul Karim
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As part of his critique on capitalism, Marx made a number of interesting and persuasive points about human connectiveness and relationship with objects. To me, these seem as convincing as say Attachment Theory, which was perhaps influenced by Marx.
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Don't be rude to begin with. I do not have to answer your question. Temper your remarks and act like a scholar not some unpleasant juvernile
I took this from Marx Archive. If you actually had any sense you would be able to read it and understand it, not make silly unbecoming and offensive remarks. I am not a student. Watch what you say and how you say it. I suggest you get involved with other questions not this one.
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There are a number of such theories (Freud and Jung to name early ones) that sprung originally from German and Austrian universities, some concerned with understanding the mind others with altering personality. To your mind, which ones are the most persuasive?
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Since you're limiting the question to Germans and Austrians, my vote is for the three founders of Gestalt psychology: Max Wertheimer, Kurt Koffka, and Wolfgang Köhler. As for psychoanalytical theories, my vote goes to Viktor Frankl's existential psychology.
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Right after the 2016 US election, we heard a lot about the "echo chamber" that saw a lot of people talking about issues in social media, but mostly to people of similar beliefs.
Why did neither side have much success persuading people of conflicting beliefs and what should we do differently in the future?
What can we learn about future political persuasion?
See more thoughts here:
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I do recomend you to follow Richard E. Petty.
and The Attitudes & Persuasion Lab (https://richardepetty.com/apl/)
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I came across an interesting study from two decades ago where people were polled on issues of the day for if they supported or opposed various policies (e.g., affirmative action in college admissions). After participants responded indicating their support or opposition, the phone interviewer presented a single sentence key point for the other opposite side.  The dependent measure was if the participants changed their minds.  Visser & Krosnick (1998) were primarily interested in how much people could be persuaded as a function of age.  They found a U-shaped function where people were more persuadable in 20’s and 80’s, but not so easily persuaded in their 50’s and 60’s.  What I find most striking is that the majority of people were persuaded in most age groups, and over 40% of those in their 50’s and 60’s changed their mind.  I’m wondering if anyone has conducted a study with a similar design in more recent years?  It would be fascinating to compare the percents persuaded more recently, given the rise of partisan news and the internet. ~ Kevin
Visser, P. S. & Krosnick, J. A.  (1998).  Development of attitude strength over the life cycle: surge and decline. Journal of Personality & Social Psychology, 75(6), 1389-1410.
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Maybe this recent is interesting to you.
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Currently I am investigating the effect of online persuasion claims (categorical variable with 3 levels) and consumer star rating (categorical variable with 2 levels) on booking intention (continuous variable measured in 7 point likert scale), i.e Two categorical independent variables and 1 continuous dependent variable. Online persuasion claims has three levels: limited availability claim, product popularity claim and no claim.
In order to determine how many remaining rooms induce scarcity and how many rooms booked in 24h induce popularity, I plan to design a pretest. That pretest is a slightly different version of another pretest conducted in a study, yet authors did not report how they selected the stimuli at the end in a detailed way.
I plan to create 10 different versions of limited availability claim and 10 different version of product popularity claim and show all of them randomly to the participants and then decide on the numbers to be presented in the actual experiment. I am puzzled about what to ask the participants after they are exposed to each claim. 
1. Please indicate the level of the perceived scarcity of the hotel room in the ad. (1-Extremely Low 7-Extremely High)
2. Please indicate the level of the perceived popularity of the hotel room in the ad. (1-Extremely Low 7-Extremely High)
Do you think these questions are to the point? Is there a rule for doing pretests?
Moreover, do you suggest any method to analyze the responses? Do you think intuition is enough?
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My dear friend,
My new book has published. It is about design
as you are in this field i hope you will like it
Please read it and share it with everyone. It is talking about prosumer also for the first time in this book we talk about magic and its power in product design. It is talking also about future of consumers .I request you put the link of book on your page and your school website for your students.
Name: Everyone Is a Designer
Author: Mohsen Jaafarnia
Publisher: MJ
Ghochan, 2017
In Persian, Chinese and English
Topic: Industrial Design
Jaafarnia, Mohsen (2017). Everyone Is Designer. Ghochan, Iran : MJ Publication. ISBN: 978-600-04-7870-4
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Behaviour change (earlier: "persuasive") technologies are informed and partly explained by various psychological behavioural theories (papers by Fogg, Hekler, Carver...). On the other hand, in the philosophy of mind there is ongoing discussion of various attitudes, including the "paradigmatic pair": beliefs <> desires, which are supposedly distinguished by their opposite "direction of fit", and also by their revision conditions (Humberstone, Archer...). Apparently, the two lines of research are relevant to each other. Surprisingly, I have not been able to identify any work which would explicitly admit this and make use of the similarities. Is anybody aware of such source?
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Thanks, Beatrice. I know Hekler's "Mind the Gap". I am also aware that CHI series is indeed a good place to investigate. I will look into two other papers pointed by you (the provided link does not work...). However, neither Hekler, nor others (Fogg, Carver, Simons 2016, etc.) seem to address my specific problem. To reiterate: I am looking for any cases in which psychological theories normally used to inform/explain behaviour change refer to, or are referred to by philosophical approaches/theories about direction of fit and revision conditions for attitudes of the belief / desire kind.
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Mindfulness as raising awareness on the present moment non-judgmentally. It is about paying full attention(firing all cylinders) on an object in one's working memory. Since you do it non-judgementally, without an urgency to rush through (that is very much time insensitive manner), your mind is calm and relaxed (all senses, thoughts, emotions/feelings, actions/behaviours etc. are in harmony/synchrony), possibly helping to form new neural networks of knowledge, forming as many connections as possible in a coherent, meaningful manner. That is, one is able to identify new relationships with a flexible/open mind (being creative and insightful without being hampered by stereotypes) among pieces of knowledge held in working memory. Consequently, it should help creating lasting (long-term) memories. Further, a characterising ability of mindfulness practices is the development of self-awareness or self-knowledge. With this self-knowledge, one not only understands oneself better but also, using it as a reference, he/she tends to understand others better (possible more empathically.
An interesting development at GOOGLE. It has a program called GOOGLE Talks on Emotional Intelligence/Healthy Minds/Empathy/Compassion/Personal Growth/Optimal Performance/Productivity etc. (The tech giant invites leading researchers in related areas to talk to their employees to direct them to personal growth leading to productivity) 
Jon Kabat-Zinn (Professor of Medicine who introduced mindfulness practices to mainstream medicine) on "Mindfulness Meditation"
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Many thanks, Amir.
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Looking for research about persuasion profiles and specific customer journeys based on those profiles. Any suggestions?
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You should probably start with persona theory. There is a nice article by Pruitt and Grudin  who talk about the idea with some clear examples:
Pruitt, J., & Grudin, J. (2003, June). Personas: practice and theory. In Proceedings of the 2003 conference on Designing for user experiences (pp. 1-15). ACM.
Best wishes! 
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While I am aware of many ways in which websites and online services can fail, or appear uncomfortable to use, I am looking for specific manifestations of unpleasant design in the digital domain. My definition of unpleasant design is that which promotes social control through discomfort, pain, and persuasion. It raises the value of a product or its surroundings by preventing specific use scenarios such as sleeping on a park bench or loitering in a shopping mall. Unpleasant Design is not about the failure to make beautiful products but about successfully excluding certain social groups and restricting certain uses of objects.
Taking these into account, can there be such a thing as digital unpleasant design? Does anyone have an experience that would be relevant to share in this context? Which websites and online services come to mind when thinking of unpleasant design? Any feedback or suggestion is welcome!
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Such works are not always bad or unpleasant aesthetically, but reflect moments of unpleasantness in efficacy (i.e., the web site doesn't load properly, etc.) in juxtaposition with design that may be unpleasant for all kinds of reasons.
Also, cf. the uncanny valley in human simulation design.
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I am especially interested in the meaning of these presumptions regardin electronic seals an timestamps in UK and Irish Law.
Do they shift the burden of proof?
What kind evidence has to be presented to rebut them?
Are they in effect more like prima facie evidence or is their power of persuasion higher?
Can somebody point me to work on this topic or more general informations on statutory presumptions that might be applicable here?
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I concur to your point, that Art. 13 (3) eIDAS does not mean, that national law can supercede Art. 13 (1) and (2) or that they can be different from them.
Therefore (3) only regards the application of the burden proof in national law. I guess for example as to the meaning and application in court proceedings and rulings, possibility of shifts du to contract, obligation to disclose right toward consumer. 
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People have different ways in receiving messages, perceiving situations, and deciding on things. Ethos Logos and Pathos (termed by aristotle) may be likened to a persuading technique (for example emotional versus rational type). Withal, I hypothesize that there are some people who are persuaded more effectively through Emotional statements to elicit behavioral change, some more convinced with rational/logical statements, and some who are more convinced when people in lab coats (credential people) talk to them. I'm trying to find similar or related researches to such topic (possibly in the area of personality and/or counseling), hoping to expand my knowledge in this research idea.
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I'm not currently finding the reference I would most like to share, but there have been a number of suggestions in recent years that politically liberal-minded and conservative-minded persons demonstrate different styles of moral judgment formation. Put simplistically, liberals trend towards logic and explicit evaluations of fairness, and conservatives towards a kind of moral intuition or "gut instinct."
One related discussion is in the psychologist Jonathan Haidt's book, "The ­Righteous Mind," reviewed in the NY Times, here:
******
There are also suggestions that liberals trend towards attending to prospective positive futures and conservatives towards potential current threats:
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Update: I happened across this reference today -- Thomas Talhelm, a social psychologist with cross-cultural interests, finds that "training people to think analytically causes them to form more liberal opinions, whereas training them to think holistically causes shifts to more conservative opinions".
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The ways these two terms are used in literature have confused me. How are they similar or different? Thank you very much.
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Yes it is different ,Emotive language is the deliberate choice of words to elicit emotion (usually to influence). An emotional appeal is used to sway the emotions of an audience to make them support the speaker's argument. effective users of emotive language know their audiences well and are able to tailor their words to obtain the desired emotional response. An emotional appeal uses emotions as the basis of an argument's position without factual evidence that logically supports the major ideas endorsed by the presenter.
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I am writing a paper on the 'ethics of persuasive technology' and am looking for examples of coercive or deceptive technology. I have read the papers and books on the subject and seen their examples. The problem with the published examples is they are not recent. What I am looking for is up-to-date examples that you may have encountered or become aware of, in the last 6-12 months. The examples will be used in the paper as a warning. 
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The Get Windows X campaign keeps the upgrade dangers and pains a secret.
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We are working on a study in which participants wrote persuasively about an event from their lives. I know there is literature on how writing persuasively about a topic can actually change the mind of the person writing and would love to include this in our paper. However, I am having a hard time tracking down these references and would be very grateful to anyone who could point me in the right direction. Any guidance would be appreciated!
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It is not writing per se, but the work on self-generation of arguments (also role playing) seems directly relevant.  Following is a section from a 1998 chapter Rich Petty and I wrote for the 1998 Handbook of Social Psychology.  I've pasted references below the passage:
The powerful and persisting effects of completely self-generated messages were shown in early research on "role-playing" (e.g., Janis & King, 1954; Watts, 1967).  A consistent research finding is that active generation of a message is a successful strategy for producing attitude change (e.g., McGuire & McGuire, 1996).  It doesn’t seem to matter whether people generate the message because they are assigned a position to take, or they select a position based on a desire to communicate with another person.  For example, people tend to tell others what they want to hear (Tesser & Rosen, 1975), and construction and delivery of such biased messages can produce attitude change in the transmitter (see Higgins, 1981).   Change tends to be greater when people generate messages regarding attributes that a target possesses than attributes that a target lacks (McGuire & McGuire, 1996).
            Furthermore, self-generated attitude changes tend to persist longer than changes based on passive exposure to a communication (e.g., Elms, 1966).  Attitude changes that come about due to active generation of arguments might be more persistent to the extent that they are based on more extensive processing of attitude relevant information than are attitude changes due to passive receipt of messages (and argument generation might make the arguments more accessible than when they are passively received; Greenwald & Albert, 1968; Slameka & Graf, 1978).  Similarly, people who are asked to imagine hypothetical events come to believe that these events have a higher likelihood of occurring than before thinking about them (e.g., Sherman, Cialdini, Schwartzman, & Reynolds, 1985).  Furthermore, self-generation of explanations has been shown to be a powerful way to establish or change beliefs, and beliefs based on the generated explanations are remarkably impervious to change (e.g., Anderson, Lepper, & Ross, 1980; Sherman, Zehner, Johnson, & Hirt, 1983).
Anderson, C. A., Lepper, M. R., & Ross, L. (1980). Perseverance of social theories:  The role of explanation in the persistence of discredited information. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 39, 1037-1049.
Elms, A. C. (1966). Influence of fantasy ability on attitude change through  role-playing. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 4, 36-43.
Greenwald, A. G., & Albert, R. D. (1968). Acceptance and recall of improvised  arguments. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 8, 31-34.
Higgins, E. T. (1981).  The “communication game”: Implications for social cognition and persuasion.  In E. T. Higgins, C. P. Herman, & M. P. Zanna (Eds.).  Social cognition: The Ontario symposium (Vol. 1, pp. 343-392).  Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.
Janis, I. L., & King, B. T. (1954). The influence of role playing on opinion change. Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology, 49, 211-218.
McGuire, W.J., & McGuire, C. V. (1996).  Enhancing self-esteem by directed-thinking tasks: Cognitive and affective positivity asymmetries.  Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 70, 1117-1125.
Sherman, S. J., Cialdini, R. B., Schwartzman, D. F., & Reynolds, K. D. (1985). Imagining can heighten or lower the perceived likelihood of contracting a disease: The mediating effect of ease of imagery. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 11, 118-127.
Sherman, S. J., Zehner, K. S., Johnson, J., & Hirt, E. R. (1983). Social explanation: The role of timing, set, and recall on subjective likelihood estimates. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 44, 1127-1143.
Slamecka, N. J., & Graf, P. (1978). The generation effect: Delineation of a phenomenon. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Learning and Memory, 4, 592-604.
Tesser, A., & Rosen, S. (1975). The reluctance to transmit bad news. Advances in experimental social psychology, 8, 193-232.
Watts, W. A. (1967). Relative persistence of opinion change induced by active compared to passive participation. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 5, 4-15.
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I'm doing a survey of articles and experts whose research has touched on the ways people move from having some kind of realization (sudden epiphany or slow and gradual are fine) to taking action to change their lives. I'm particularly interested both in the internal dynamics (how people motivate themselves and then actually take action) and external parties (people who play a role either in the person obtaining the self-knowledge or helping to accomplish the change).
The "change" that takes place can be of any significance ranging from seemingly small (e.g. estranged friends/family who pick up the phone and call the other party) to very large (e.g. Nelson Mandela moving from being a militant to a peace activist).
If you can point me to any relevant people or articles I would be grateful. I am even interested in popular culture examples (e.g. movies showing this dynamic). Thanks in advance for taking the time.
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I'm not sure if this is quite perfect, but you can check out Prochaska's transtheoretical model of behavior change (Prochaska, J. O., DiClemente, C. C., & Norcross, J. C. (1992). In Search of How People Change. American Psychologist , 47 (9), 1102-1114.)
I found it interesting because it goes through the stages of change (from pre-contemplation all the way to action and maintenance) while including external factors.
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The question in other words is that even having clear cut academic definitions of Advertising, Propaganda ,Marketing , and Persuasion, it is very hard to differentiate them from Public Relations practices.Any tips?
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Propaganda in PR involves using mostly false rhetoric to lure an audience into believing the principles and ideas of the propagandist while publicity focuses on providing information on a particular product or subject to those who need it.
A publicist carries out demographic and psycho-graphic research and analysis to identify the needs of the public and then fashions his/her message to suite these needs. A propagandist uses existing phenomenon  and rhetoric that appeals to the emotions of the public  or group as a tool to create change in attitude and ideologies.
The message of the propagandist is provocative in nature while the message of a publicist is informative and persuasive in nature.
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I recently read about Bruke's theory and found it interesting to learn more about particularly in research perspective. It will be a great help if anyone can provide any article or other literature to enhance my understanding of the theory.
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Burke's theory of dramatism is IMHO an offshoot of symbolic interactionism.  The concept of language as symbol and the intersection of agents in the enactment of social life is not a new concept (see George Herbert Mead, 1934, Mind Self and Society).  You might review the work of Goffman as well in dramaturgy.  In fact to the ends that Burke is pointing, a review of the Chicago school of sociology (Dewey, Mead, Blumer, Parks, Goffman, and others) as well as those who operate within interactionism for a variety of perspectives on social action and interaction.  At the end of the day metaphors (dramatism or dramaturgy) serve the purpose of describing how society behaves.  
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The WT is reported as having one of the highest turnovers of active members of any religion. This warrants some type of investigation into its organisation.
Would like to administer one of Moos's organisational questionnaires online. The WT discourages their active members from participating in any research so the plan would be to recruit ex/inactive-jehovah witnesses, who are numerous online.
I'm a Ph.D (info tech). I prefer to keep my own beliefs private and am not looking for a religious based discussion. Having said that, I would like to work with a Psychology major for this project, to aid in ethical methodology design, data interpretation and co-authoring the findings.
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Every religious  belief and practice appears to be an expression of one or more of 16 intrinsic motives, at an above-average or below-average valuation.  In order to have mass appeal, a religion must address all 16 needs at all intensities, or close to it.  It is now possible to evaluate objectively the needs addressed by each religion.  If you are interested in doing this, read my theory on "the 16 strivings for God" in the journal called zygon.  My who am I book also is highly relevant.  I think this is the only technology to do your study.
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I need papers that show how to manipulate or induce modifications in regulatory focus. The original theory (Higgins, 1997) states that momentary regulatory focus can be primed or induced and I'm searching for the wider number of methods to do it. Any suggestions?
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Hi Kai!
Thanks for your help!
Best regards
marco
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Explain strategies that can be used to resist harmful or unwanted persuasion, while remaining open and flexible to alternative perspectives and new information.
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To get some background on persuasion and group pressure, you might consult the work of Muzafer Sherif and his work on the autokinetic phenomenon.  Solomon Asch's book Social Psychology also describes the effect of the group.  Hadley Cantril's books also provide an excellent basic understanding.  My own article (with Ross Stagner) now on Research Gate  (Group pressure, attitude change, and autonomic involvement) demonstrates the effect of group pressure.  In that investigation using instructed stooges, we were able to make Conservatives more liberal in most cases.  Liberals were harder to influence.  We were trying to show the effects of group pressure in changing attitudes for and against the United Nations.   Our conclusion was that the group was very powerful.
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Some people say that a great speech is one that changes your heart and mind. We could talk about Demosthenes (Third Philippic), Martin Luther King (I have a dream), John F. Kennedy (Inauguration address) or Nelson Mandela (I am prepared to die), among others. Which one is your favourite?
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Randy Pausch Last Lecture: Achieving Your Childhood is very good as well.
On September 18, 2007, Carnegie Mellon professor and alumnus Randy Pausch delivered a one-of-a-kind last lecture that made the world stop and pay attention.
It became an internet sensation viewed by millions, an international media story, and a best-selling book that has been published in more than 35 languages
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According to prospect theory, several small losses should have a strongest emotional impact than a single big loss of the same amount. On the other hand, persuasion practice shows that is often effective to split big losses/expenses into small pieces (e.g. buy the subscription, it costs like a coffee per day). What do you think about this apparent inconsistency? How would you explain the difference to your students?
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In effect you have two different processes at work. The former (experiecning a big loss) is omething you already have which is an endowment and so you experience loss aversion. In the latter, say like buying a sbscription, that is eomthing you buy. In effect i would argue you have two diferent decieion making processes at play
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Literature, studies
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Thank you all for your answers. My question arose when we moved with our children then 2 and 4 from England to Luxembourg. They were receptive bilinguals at the time and I was interested in seeing how quickly they would develop their Luxembourgish. I focused on persuasive speech. I have now been following the language development of the children for over a year. What I found (but have not published yet) is that both children have a wide range of strategies ranging from positive and friendly attempts (e.g. demanding) to friendly but more forceful ones (e.g. appeal to authority) to negative and aggressive ones (e.g. threatening). The oldest child has slightly more strategies but, above all, has more positive ones. He has began to negotiate more but does not (yet) use flattery or blackmail than other children. Having reviewed some of the literature, the children do not differ a lot from monolinguals when it comes to persuasive speech. However, there is one difference: they use language strategically to make a point albeit rarely. They would say something in Luxembourgish and make the point again in English. It is a very deliberate switch. In a way, it is amazing that they became fluent speakers of Luxembourgish within a year and have the same range of strategies that monolinguals. Having said that, the topic has been rarely studied in naturalistic settings with children of this age.
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We are starting a Master's course on Experiencing Persuasive Environments. Most examples are persuasive objects, but we are looking for persuasive environments. The pianostairs example of theFuntheory.com is a clear and nice example. Anyone knows any other nice examples (e.g. on Youtube, Vimeo, or pictures)?
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How about the courtroom, where formal argument is aimed at persuading either a judge or a jury? That setting would seem to be the prototype of a persuasive environment.
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We are doing a research project on using games to study how people can be seduced to display more cooperative or more competitive behaviour.
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Would any of the prosocial behavior assessments help? I looked into PsycTests and found the PCQ - Perceptions of Collaboration Questionnaire that assesses perceptions of the cognitive compensation and interpersonal enjoyment functions of collaboration among middle-aged and older married couples. There is the Smither, Robert & Houston Competitive Index....