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I'm studying Palaeolithic art in clay in Spain and France for my masters and would like to know if you have any palaeolithic art and whether any is made in/from clay
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Dear BJormanYes,
Yes I can help and assist You with clay art recoveries from Archaeological Field Excavation research. Which need more studies about them.
I wish You interested.
We talk about that...
Frederick Wadie
MPhil Archaeology (Goldsmith).
Postai Address :
Department of Archaeology and Heritage Studies Studies,
University of Ghana - Legon.
P. O Box LG3 Legon, Accra.
I just send You this to get some news from You.
Thank You.
I see You soon.
Take care of You.
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I’ll ask Anthony Marks or Ofer Bar-Yosef. Perhaps they are still around.
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Hi,
I'm looking for the coordinates of three Croatian Middle Palaeolithic sites: Podumci, Razvodje and Tatinja Draga.
Does anyone know a good resource I can use, as I am having trouble finding articles with the locations, let alone a reliable reference.
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Thank you, Katarina!
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At neolithic to modern sites it is often possible to spatially delimit a settlement or even classify functional areas with the help of a soil phosphate mapping. Does anyone know of such attempts for open air sites of the palaeolithic period? Because I cannot find anything about it and I wonder whether soil phosphates have been substantially enriched by this former occupation at all and whether the phosphates can outlast 40,000 years.
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Your question focuses on two points: "Paleolithic" and "Open air sites". If you are interested only in open air Paleolithic sites, these are quite fragile to the passage of time being readily exposed to the elements and the effects of post prepositional processes that directly affect phosphate concentrations of any kind. However there are examples that directly or indirectly involve the analyses of phosphates in Paleolithic cave sites. Cave sites are not "open air" obviously, but constitute close systems that involve specific sedimentary, taphonomic and diagenetic processes that affect phosphates concetrations and their preservation differently. Phosphate "signatures" are still distinguishable in caves because of these specific processes. Such research for instance, has been conducted in Paleolithic cave sites assessing different functional areas or degree of preservation etc.. :
Schiegl et al (2003) Paleolithic Burnt Bone Horizons from the Swabian Jura: Distinguishing between In Situ Fireplaces and Dumping Areas. Geoarchaeology: An International Journal, Vol. 18, No. 5, 541–565 (2003)
Karkanas et al (2007) Evidence for habitual use of fire at the end of the Lower Paleolithic: Site-formation processes at Qesem Cave, Israel. Journal of Human Evolution 53 197e212
Shahack-Gros et al (2004) Bat guano and preservation of archaeological remains in cave sites. Journal of Archaeological Science 31 (2004) 1259e1272 This may not be exactly what you were looking for, yet i hope it was useful to you somehow.
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This piece (see image), coming from a middle palaeolithic site, is most likely a compact (silicified?) limestone about 65 mm in length. One side is convex and seems to be a natural surface, the other side is somewhat flatter and shows a certain degree of iron staining. Most notable, and undoubtedly anthropogenic are two big removals at struck from the flatter side, removing flakes from the cortical side. Further removals can be observed on the flat side, struck from the bottom (cf. the image). 
Although the piece shows various scratches across its surface going in variable directions, the top part of the cortical side show a strong concentration of (sub)parallel scratches, starting from the concave extremity up to about 1 cm onto the piece. These traces are matched by small (incidental?) removals on the reverse side. 
My question is whether the scratching at the top can be considered the result of anthropogenic activity and what for what kind of activity this partly flaked, partly scrachted piece could have been used? I have considered a retoucher, and a kind of wedge/chisel like piece (the latter possibly struck from the base), but I am lacking comparative finds in the literature. Do people know of comparable finds from other sites?
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We have found several similar artifacts from Hohle Fels cave in the Swabian Jura. One is the "Phallus" from the Gravettian which has several scratches and has been interpreted as a hammerstone. There are also a couple of limestone pieces with similar scratches and to me, they look anthropogenic as they have some diagnostic features that differ from the "Bärenschliff" (smoothed/scratched limestone from cave bears) that we also find in the cave. Not sure what the original use was though! A photo of one of these pieces in on this poster from URMU is Blaubeuren.  I'm glad to read your post as I myself am curious about the similar artifacts we have at Hohle Fels! 
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I am preparing a term paper on the use of plants with pharmacological properties by Neanderthals (in Europe or Eurasia).  Also, what information is there about how these properties may have changed over time.  
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Dear Elizabeth,
in the Middle Palaeolithic site of Weimar Ehringsdorf charred remains of Cornelian cherry (Cornus mas L.) were found in the upper travertine (MIS 7 ?):
Dieter Schäfer & Klaus-Dieter Jäger, Verkohlte Steinkerne der Kornelkirsche (Cornus mas L.) aus dem Paläolithikum des oberen Travertins von Weimar-Ehringsdorf. Alt-Thüringen 20, 1984, 15-22.
According to en.wikipedia.org : "It is eaten in Eastern Europe in many ways including as a medicine. It is very high in vitamin C and is used to fight colds and flus."
for more details about the medical use see:
Best regards,
Stefan Wenzel
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I´m looking for Middle Palaeolithic sites (either residence, symbolic or other activity-related) which have been found in the deep cave interior, or at least in zones lacking natural light, and thus far away from the entrance. An outstanding example of this would be the stalagmite structures of Bruniquel cave, but other not so deep and not so spectacular sites are welcome.
Many thanks in advance.
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Yes, cave Muierii from Baia de Fier - county Gorj, Romania.
Biblio: MARIN CÂRCIUMARU, Le Paléolithique en Roumanie, Editions Jérôme Millon, Grenoble, 1999, 260 p., 100 fig., 19 tab.; ISBN 2-84137-082-8.
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Historiographical analyses based on epistemologial, externalist and contextual approaches published later than 2012 would be very much appreciated. Focus of research could be also Archaeology or Prehistory as a whole, but the Palaeolithic field should be addressed in detail.
Many thanks in advance.
Manuel Alcaraz-Castaño.
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Guillomet Malmassari V. (2012) - D'une révolution à l'autre. Pour une épistémologie de la problématique de transition en Préhistoire. Mémoire de la Société Préhistorique Française n°54.
It's in french but it's very interesting !
Best regards,
Lorène Chesnaux
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1950s-1990s, esp excavation methods for open air and cave sites.
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There's also Marc Groenen's Pour une histoire de la Préhistoire which provides a non-exhaustive summary of the history of excavation methods.
And some more about Leroi-Gourhan's techniques by Paul Courbin (1987):
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Sandstones they are printed on these forms belong to Wadi Malik Fm. (Lower Carboniferous) outcropping in Jebel Uweinat (Sudan, on the border with Libya and Egypt). This may be footprints of tetrapods?
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I agree with Jérôme, but to be sure, you should contact Per Ahlberg from Uppsala University, Sweden, he's a specialist in tetrapod footprints, his e-mail is Per.Ahlberg@ebc.uu.se
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The body of Paleolithic finds and information from southeast Europe has been growing to a great extend in the recent years. Nevertheless from certain areas such as Kosovo there are no finds reported whatsoever. Is this due to lack of accessible publications or lack of research in this particular field of archaeology?
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Thanks!
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I'm working about changing diets from the Late Palaeolithic to Neolithic times. Right now i'm interested in the Mesolithic period.
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Hi Frank,
Also have a look at the Iron Gates (Danube Gorges) - this also covers the Meso-Neo transition
e.g. 
Bonsall, C., Cook, G. T., Hedges, R. E. M., Higham, T. F. G., Pickard, C., & Radovanovic, I. (2004). Radiocarbon and stable isotope evidence of dietary change from the Mesolithic to the Middle Ages in the Iron Gates: new results from Lepenski Vir.
Borić, D., Grupe, G., Peters, J., & Mikić, Ž. (2004). Is the Mesolithic-Neolithic subsistence dichotomy real? New stable isotope evidence from the Danube Gorges. European Journal of Archaeology, 7(3), 221-248.
Nehlich, O., Borić, D., Stefanović, S., & Richards, M. P. (2010). Sulphur isotope evidence for freshwater fish consumption: a case study from the Danube Gorges, SE Europe. Journal of Archaeological Science, 37(5), 1131-1139.
Best wishes,
Rosalind
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I've read those most famous of papers regarding Palaeolithic raw material movements (e.g. Feblot-Augustins 1993, 1997, 2009) and am aware of the localised collection and limited transport distance of lithic raw materials in the British and European Palaeolithic. However, I have been reliably informed that the Mediterranean area displays some differences to this pattern. Can anyone provide references to raw material movements in this area that provides a starting point from which to find out more?
Many thanks. 
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Dear colleague,
In addition of the papers previously mentioned, you could find some extra works for the South western of Europe, notably for sites located in the Iberian Peninsula, in two special issues.
Quaternary International, 247 (January 2012). Special Issue: The Neanderthal Home: spatial and social behaviours
Treballs d’Arqueologia, 14 (2008). Special Issue devoted to Variabilidad técnica del Paleolítico Medio en el sudoeste de Europa, published by the Autonomous University of Barcelona.
I hope you’ll find there some interesting subjects. Best wishes,
Xavier
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Within the Mousterian record of western Europe, we have evidence for usage of black pigment made from MnO2 by Neandertals (50 000 years old at Pech-de-l'Azé I for instance). I've been using the analogy with the ethnographic record as well as some preliminary experiments to argue that they might have been used as dye stuff/stain (see Soressi et D'Errico, 2007 as well as Soressi et al 2008). Would anybody know of usage of MnO2 pigment for other purposes than body decoration/symbolic purposes?
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Dear Marie
I have been studied the medical and cosmetical uses of various minerals (see my papers on academia.edu) .
For the MnO2 (pyrolusite, ) I documented rather accidential use of it.
The by-product of the cave art was probably the intoxication and altered states of consciousness due to inhalation of MnO2 in suspension (the MnO2 is the only mineral that causes this kind of biological reaction - see works of M. Lorblanchet (e.g. 1995 Les grottes ornees de la prehistoire) and various works on intoxication in the manganeese mines in 19th and 20th centuries, e.g. Hine, Ch. H. & A. Pasi. 1975. Manganese intoxication. Western Journal of Medicine 123(2): 101-107; Dietz, M. C., A. Ihrig, W. Wrazidlo, M. Bader, O. Jansen & G. Triebig. 2001. Results of magnetic resonance imaging in long-term manganese dioxide-exposed workers. Environmental Research 85: 37-40; and some Polish if you want :)
Another use (external) is for antiseptic reasons - it is the mineral of negligible toxicity for humans.
From Neolithic pyrolusite (in various minerlogical forms) was used for pottery and angoba decoration.
Iternal use of MnO2 in the treatment of anemia was discredited at the beginning of 20th century and even claimed as dangerous due to iron absorbtion disorder caused by it.
In 20th century for steel production, as pigments, in pils technology.
Sincerely
Michal Wasilewski PhD
PS. I will be delighted for any articles or informations on medical uses of any minerals.