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Organizational Development - Science topic

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Hi!
I am working on organizational development (OD) as the dependent variable in my doctorate studies; kindly suggest to me that the potential research streams in OD have a strategic impact?
Who are the living research gurus in the field of OD?
Or any good suggestion, welcome?
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Thank you sir Mahfuz Judeh to share the link I must read this article.
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Hello,
I am interested in an effective and synergistic Organizational Development process (plan, implementation, operations, improvement).
Please advise if you could provide such an academic/professional framework.
Thank you.
Andre
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Organizational development is a critical and science-based process that helps organizations build their capacity to change and achieve greater effectiveness by developing, improving, and reinforcing strategies, structures, and processes.
There are a few elements in this definition (adapted from Cummings & Worley, 2009) that stand out.
  • Critical and science-based process. OD is an evidence-based and structured process. It is not about trying something out and seeing what happens. It is about using scientific findings as input and creating a structured and controlled process in which assumptions are tested. Lastly, it is about testing if the outcomes reflect the intention of the intervention.
  • Build capacity to change and achieve greater effectiveness. Organizational development is aimed at organizational effectiveness. It, therefore, has a number of (business) outcomes. These can differ between organizations, but usually, they do include financial performance, customer satisfaction, organizational member engagement, and an increased capacity to adapt and renew the organization. These are not always clear-cut. Sometimes it is about building a competitive advantage, in whichever way we define that. We will explore these outcomes later in this article
  • Developing, improving, and reinforcing strategies, structures, and processes. The last part of our definition states that organizational development applies to changes in strategy, structure, and/or processes. This implies a system-approach, where we focus on an entire organizational system. This can include the full organization, one or more locations, or a single department.
Organizational design has become more crucial over time. Today’s world is characterized by Volatility, Uncertainty, Complexity, and Ambiguity (VUCA). This VUCA world requires new agility from organizations, and organizational development is the means to that end.
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Dear Research Community,
I am asking for your participation and especially for your feedback on our Self-Assessment for Digital Transformation Leaders: https://t1p.de/mwod
The goal is to provide leaders a mirror to reflect on themselves and the skills as well as personal attributes required for digital transformation. In the end, participants receive an integrated presentation of their results (see appendix).
  1. Are all questions understandable?
  2. Which questions lack precision?
  3. In your opinion (as a digital leader), are essential aspects still missing? If so, which ones?
I am looking forward to any kind of suggestions.
Best regards
Alexander Kwiatkowski
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Depends upon the structure and culture of the organisations
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Hi there,
through my research, I am more and more coming to the conclusion that the contexts of corporate change turn out to be essential. For example, a transformation in agriculture is regulated quite differently than in the aerospace industry. In a recent presentation by Daimler's CEO, this aspect was emphasized in particular (ecosystems, increasing networking, etc.).
Beyond the ambiguous definitions of change, there are, as you surely know, various approaches to characterizing corporate change. One comprehensive approach is presented by Albach et al. 2014 (https://t1p.de/rk70), see appendix.
There are also characterizations for economic activities, the International Standard Industrial Classification of All Economic Activities, both as a broad and very detailed industry specification: https://t1p.de/7cth
Do you know if there is already research in this area? Which disciplines are addressing the question of how industry contexts (macro) influence corporate change (micro)?
Certainly, it is not possible to cover all industries, but is there, for example, research in the context of C - Manufacturing? How do the industry-specific characteristics of the manufacturing industry affect corporate change projects? Are there certain change characteristics (features, certain dynamics, etc.) that are always expressed in the same way on a broad or detailed industry classification?
How would you proceed methodically with the investigation? I thought first of all of an investigation of the rough structure, e.g. expert interviews and a subsequent survey? Feel free to "brainstorm" as an answer as well.
Thank you and best Greetings from Aachen, Germany
Alexander Kwiatkowski
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In addition to Weill and Ross in “IT Savvy," see their "Enterprise Architecture As Strategy: Creating a Foundation for Business Execution" as well as Ross et al's more recent "Designed for Digital: How to Architect Your Business for Sustained Success" (see my review) https://www.amazon.com/gp/customer-reviews/R33HX594W0I7TL?ref=pf_ov_at_pdctrvw_srp
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How is organizational culture created and sustained?
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Organization culture consists of values, norm and beliefs.
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The great social transformations coming from the new technologies have brought to the same work environment at least three different generations. This is possibly an unprecedented event. It is not just a question of ages, but of paradigms, of mental models. Organizations have not yet developed into the new scenario and retroacting is far from a possibility. What management artifacts should compose a enabling context full of opportunities and able to create extraordinary value for stakeholders. Will we experience a new cycle of theories related to Organizational Development?
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Nice question
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Could someone please help in finding the specific questionnaire used in this book?
Survey of Organizations: A machine-scored standardized questionnaire instrument , by Taylor & Bowers, 1970
However, it does not contain the pages with the questionnaire and I still remain unable to obtain it. Would anyone be willing to help provide me the questionnaire?
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I have the same question? Did any body find a solution?
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A recent study in Pakistan has proved that the integration of various sectors i.e. organizational development, health and disaster management does accelerate the pace of strengthening community resilience (https://www.henrystewartpublications.com/jbcep/v11). The results show that the following initial benefits of sectoral integration could be achieved:
• less fatigue/time-consuming for communities;
• optimum utilisation of resources;
• minimum human resources for maximum outputs;
• cost sharing;
• community involvement;
• easy planning;
• harmonisation of various tools;
• shared ownership;
• cost effective;
• impact-oriented;
• avoids duplication of resources;
• sustainable in terms of local management, ownership and adoption by local communities;
• addresses root causes of vulnerabilities associated with all sectors, and many more.
I have the following queries:
1. Are there any similar findings of sectoral integration in other countries or regions?
2. If yes, why do we need to implement sectoral programs in standalone for strengthening community resilience?
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Interesting
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How is organizational climate created and sustained?
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Dear colleagues!
Kindly explain how I can get a questionnaire for this topic, quantitative research. Findings will be on HR impact and HR Activities.
Aim to examine the effect of hrm in an organizational development
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The questionnaire i developed was rejected by my supervisor. And asked me to use the past questionnaire.
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Volatility, uncertainty, complexity, and ambiguity call for different ways of perceiving the world, different approaches to sense and decision making, and different modes and combinations of leadership.
  • Administrative Leadership. Administrative leadership is the managerial approach followed by individuals and groups in formal roles as they plan and coordinate activities in standardized business processes to accomplish organizationally-prescribed outcomes efficiently and effectively.
  • Adaptive Leadership. Adaptive leadership is the informal process that emerges as organizations generate and advance ideas to solve problems and create opportunity; unlike administrative leadership, it is not an act of authority and takes place in informal emergent dynamic among interactive agents.
  • Enabling Leadership. Enabling leadership is the sum of actions to facilitate the flow of creativity (e.g., adaptability, innovation, and learning) from adaptive structures into administrative structures; like adaptive leadership, it can take place at all levels of an organization but its nature will vary by hierarchical level and position. (Uhl-­Bien, Marion, & McKelvey, 2007)
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Seems that corporate culture must also be considered in order to answer the question. Culture can have a synergistic or countervailing effect on the effectiveness of a given style of leadership.
One way culture could have an effect is by how change or threat is perceived by the organization. Is it seen as an opportunity? Does it trigger post traumatic flashbacks of past events ? Does it open or close the organizational dialog and operations?
I suppose I've added more questions rather than answered yours. But thank you for the provocative question.
Unamuno reportedly said : The truth is not merely the lawful, but rather that which provokes the mind and causes growth.
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Considering the mind-sets of the millennial and gen Z, I am wondering how will organisation develop future leaders.
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The Makings of a Successful School Leader
But what makes a successful school leader? How do you become truly effective as a principal or in a leadership position? While there is no one solution to successful school leadership, there are certain strategies, skills, traits and beliefs that many of the most effective school leaders share.
[RELATED] How to Advance Your Career: A Guide for Educators >> 
The following traits are common among the most successful school leaders.
1. They Understand the Importance of Building Community
Effective school leaders build and sustain reciprocal family and community partnerships and leverage those partnerships to cultivate inclusive, caring and culturally responsive school communities. This is an essential component of effective leadership and the best leaders know it. To build these community networks it is essential that school leaders are visible in their schools and community, develop trust and create a sense of transparency and shared purpose with parents, staff, community members and students.
Megan Tschannen-Moran, author and professor of educational leadership at the College of William and Mary, discusses the importance that trust plays in building communities in her book, “Trust Matters: Leadership for Successful Schools.”
Tschannen-Moran explains, “In schools with high levels of trust:
  • Teachers are motivated and willing to try new strategies because they trust leaders to support them.
  • Students are motivated and connected to the school because they trust their teachers.
  • Families are supportive because the principal and teachers have built trusting relationships with them.”
2. They Empower Teachers and Cultivate Leadership Skills
Great school leaders know that they are not running a one-man show; that they cannot do it all alone. They know that they must surround themselves with great teachers and colleagues and not only that, they must fully support teachers and staff by encouraging them to continually learn, develop and perhaps most important, become leaders themselves.
It is no secret that when people are fulfilled and given opportunity for career growth, as well as autonomy and control over their careers, they are more productive, more engaged and more effective overall. In a recent Gallup poll, it was discovered that 31 percent of U.S. teachers are engaged in their work, while 56 percent are not engaged and 13 percent are actively disengaged. These statistics are startling to say the least.
Through offering professional development opportunities and support services to teachers, as well as by creating an environment where teachers are able to experiment, innovate and lead, principals can ensure a healthy environment for educators that will have positive repercussions for students. Another Gallup study found that “highly talented principals on Gallup’s Principal Insight assessment were 2.6 times more likely to have above average employee engagement at the schools they lead three years later.”
In his book, “What Great Principals Do Differently,” Todd Whitaker wrote:
“Great principals focus on improving the quality of the teachers within their buildings. By carefully hiring the best teachers, by supporting their efforts and their ambitions, by holding all staff members to high expectations, and by working to carefully support the individual development of each professional, principals impact student achievement.”
3. They Utilize Data and Resources
Successful school leaders use data, including standardized and school-based assessments, to drive continuous improvement through site-based decision-making for the express purpose of promoting equitable and culturally responsive opportunities for all students. The opportunities that data present are many and the most effective leaders are able to leverage that data to make strategic decisions to benefit their students.
One example of how data can reveal surprising results and help educators implement strategies to improve learning was discussed in an ASCD article:
“Staff members at Canyon View High School wanted to use their data to understand why more than half of the school’s 9th grade students failed the state reading proficiency examination. Working backward through the students’ education experiences to determine the earliest occurrence of a characteristic common to all students who had not passed the exam, the teachers were shocked to see that most of these students had missed up to 30 or 40 days in a 180-day school year when they were 1st graders.”
And according to the Wallace Foundation:
“When it comes to data, effective principals try to draw the most from statistics and evidence, having ‘learned to ask useful questions’ of the information, to display it in ways that tell ‘compelling stories’ and to use it to promote ‘collaborative inquiry among teachers.’ They view data as a means not only to pinpoint problems but to understand their nature and causes.”
4. They Have a Vision and a Plan
The very best leaders are also visionaries. They have a goal that they can unite a team around and a plan to help them get there. Not just that, but they are able to clearly articulate their school vision and goals.
Vision is perhaps one of the most important qualities a leader can have as it provides momentum and direction, not just for the team leader but for each and every team member. Of course, in order for leaders to be successful in pursuing their vision and enacting their plan, they must pair their vision with unrelenting passion. Vision and passion from an effective leader should generate inspiration, motivation and excitement that permeates throughout the school.
In a study published by the UK-based Education Trust entitled “Successful School Leadership,” it was reported that “effective headteachers provide a clear vision and sense of direction for the school. They prioritize. They focus the attention of staff on what is important and do not let them get diverted and sidetracked with initiatives that will have little impact on the work of the students.”
5. They Create Collaborative, Inclusive Learning Environments
Inclusive learning provides all students with access to flexible learning choices and effective paths for achieving educational goals in spaces where they experience a sense of belonging. The best educators know this and prioritize inclusivity, creating safe learning environments that nurture every student. Leaders that prioritize inclusive learning also typically believe that every person can contribute to the greater learning community and therefore they encourage collaboration between faculty as well as students.
“Perhaps the most critical role in successful inclusive schools is the role of the principal,” wrote the Inclusive Schools Network. “The school principal’s active participation is the single most important predictor of success in implementing change, improving services, or setting a new course. The school principal is central to facilitating systemic change and leading faculty to adopt new attitudes and new practices.”
6. They Are Passionate About Their Work
Passion is a critical ingredient for nearly anyone who wants to be successful and happy in their job. But passion is especially important for school leaders, who typically have a great influence on their school’s climate and culture.
Passionate people have a contagious energy that can greatly affect teacher satisfaction and drive as well as student performance. “All the knowledge in the world can’t make a good leader: It’s the care for the work and the people who collaborate with you that makes the difference,” wrote Forbes. “This is in large part because people want to follow a passionate leader. Someone who cares about not only the cause for which he or she is working, but also the other people who are involved in the effort. Passion for the projects, for the company and for the people involved are key to successful leadership.”
7. They Encourage Risk-Taking
What most educators already know is that failure can be the greatest teacher. Just as teachers should encourage risk-taking amongst their students in order to spur growth, truly effective leaders encourage risk-taking amongst their subordinates and colleagues by creating a supportive environment that rewards not just successful ideas or initiatives but effort as well, no matter the outcome.
“Failure is required for learning, but our relentless pursuit of results can also discourage employees from taking chances. To resolve this conflict, leaders must create a culture that supports risk-taking,” wrote the Harvard Business Review. “One way of doing this is to use controlled experiments — think A/B testing — that allow for small failures and require rapid feedback and correction. This provides a platform for building collective intelligence so that employees learn from each other’s mistakes, too.”
8. They Lead by Example
We’ve all heard the saying, “Do as I say, not as I do.” Of course, the irony is that actions are much more telling than words. Leaders who lead by example position themselves as tremendous role models for not only the students in their school or district but for colleagues and parents as well. A leader that leads by example almost always receives respect and admiration, without which he or she will find little luck in leadership. As philosopher and physician Albert Schweitzer once said, “Example is not the main thing in influencing others; it is the only thing.”
9. They Persevere – Staying with a School for at Least Five Years
Change, while good, can also be disruptive when it occurs too frequently. In the case of school leadership, it has been documented that frequent turnover results in a negative school climate, which in turn has a negative effect on student performance.
“Committed and effective principals who remain in their schools are associated with improved schoolwide student achievement. As a corollary, principal turnover is associated with lower gains in student achievement,” reported the Learning Policy Institute. “Principal turnover has a more significant negative effect in high-poverty, low-achieving schools — the very schools in which students most rely on their education for future success. The negative effect of principal turnover suggests that principals need time to make meaningful improvements in their schools. One study found that it takes, on average, 5 years of a new principal leading a school for the school’s performance to rebound to the pre-turnover level.”
The best leaders, therefore, are willing to commit to a school and persevere despite the obstacles or challenges. After all, realizing a vision doesn’t happen overnight; true transformation takes time. A leader’s commitment displays not only passion but dedication, which can have a tremendously positive effect on school culture.
10. They Are Lifelong Learners
Perhaps the most important of all qualities that a school leader can possess is the unquenchable thirst for knowledge. As John F. Kennedy said, “leadership and learning are indispensable to each other.” The best leaders, no matter what industry they work in, know they will never know it all. They are humble in their knowledge yet confident in their abilities. They’re endlessly curious individuals who never stop questioning, and learning. The Harvard Business Review put it perfectly when they said:
“It takes a real sense of personal commitment, especially after you’ve arrived at a position of power and responsibility, to push yourself to grow and challenge conventional wisdom. Which is why two of the most important questions leaders face are as simple as they are profound: Are you learning, as an organization and as an individual, as fast as the world is changing? Are you as determined to stay interested as to be interesting? Remember, it’s what you learn after you know it all that counts.”
The report also quotes the noted writer and professor John Gardner, who observed, “The best leaders I’ve gotten to know aren’t just the boldest thinkers; they are the most insatiable learners.”
“LEADERSHIP AND LEARNING ARE INDISPENSABLE TO EACH OTHER” —JOHN F. KENNEDY
It is hard to think of an industry where constant learning is more applicable than education.
To be a successful and effective leader is no easy feat. Yet, effective school leaders are desperately needed in thousands of schools and educational institutions across this country and around the world. As Kenneth Leithwood stated in a Hechinger Report, “Indeed, there are virtually no documented instances of troubled schools being turned around without intervention by a powerful leader.”
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Dear Professors/Researchers,
I would like to ask to you that
1. How we can capture the Practices of HR analytics in particular sector ?
2. and which one "research methodology" is best for this .
#hrm #shrm #hranalytices #professor #hrm
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If you want to find out the degree or intensity of HR Analytics being practiced by a particular set of organizations, it is possible to develop a self-administered questionnaire which consists of instruments measuring various types of HR Analytics (percentages, ratios, metrics, etc at functional level, strategic HR level, and strategic level). After that, in order to get clarifications and further details it is possible to conduct interviews with a selected group of HR Managers.
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i need some source about it
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my advise is to use articles and research papers more in your research rather than theoretical textbooks alone 
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I do my research on the changes that was recently experience by different company. The changes can be in terms of downsizing and so forth that can help the organization to adapt to the changing environment. 
I need some article that focus on discussing the changes experience by one company. 
thanks
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This field is where you should enter a question about your research. Your sentence should end with a question mark.
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- What role do you think that process mapping and flow theory will play in the future digital organisation?
- Do you think the lean methodology will fade as organisation develop into digital organisations?
- Can process mapping in your perspective offer distinctive capabilities to the digital organisation? 
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Absolutely agree with @Izak Wilhelmus van der Merwe!
1) There are many software products that help visualization of workflows and process mapping including information ones (simple example is MS Visio).
2) Lean methodology is not just a set of tools, it's a way of thinking and many companies apply it to improve their efficiency. Try to remove PDCA (a typical lean tool) from ISO standards, and there will be no common base for integration of management system, incl. ISO 27001. Information Security Management Systems ;)
3) Sure - I can not imagine how a company will be transformed into digital without correct process planning.
Of course, some of the tools may be modified, some of them will not be applicable, or new will appear, but from my point of view, the philosophy will not be radically changed.      
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This research aims to “investigate, explore and identify” external factors that could influence “management decision-making processes” in pursuing CO2-EOR projects. The CO2-EOR is a process or technique that aimed at sustaining productions of depleted oil fields. The method is based on utilising recycled natural or anthropogenic CO2 that allow to significantly extend the life cycle of mature oil fields and create additional revenue for oil producers (NEORI, 2012).
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The most important factor is likely to be the CO2 price. The lower the CO2 price, the more economic the EOR project becomes. If somebody pays to get rid of CO2 (negative CO2 price), then even better.
The concept is that the CO2 injected undergroud during CO2-EOR operations (the net amount, after allowing for recycled CO2) stays underground for tens and hundreds of thousand years (see for example the Weyburn CO2 research project results, http://www.ieaghg.org/docs/general_publications/weyburn.pdf, or http://ptrc.ca/+pub/document/Summary_Report_2000_2004.pdf ).
If a CO2 emission tax  valorizes any CO2 safely stored away more that the cost of capturing and transporting it, then CO2 becomes price-negative. I hope to see this soon, worldwide.
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I need to find the scale of the three dimensions of organizational structure (centralization, formalization and complexity) 
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Yes I find but not the Robbins questionnaire
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I would like to investigate the group/work faultlines among teachers in schools. But I don't know how I can measure that. Could you recommend to me, how I can designed the study?
Thanks
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Bezrukova, K,. Thatcher, S.M.B., Jehn, K. A., & Spell., C. S. 2012. The effects of alignments: Examining group faultlines, organizational cultures, and performance. Journal of Applied Psychology. 97: 77-92.
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Working on how organization intend to increase market share, by adopting strategies to compete effectively on the market in the catering business.
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Many key factors were mentioned by the experts in this forum and, certainly, government policies could greatly affect a firm's performance.
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I am keen to identify recent literature that examines ways in which downsizing and organisational restructuring can contribute positively to strategic organisational change. I am particularly interested in examinations of how it can change the behaviours and competencies of a workforce by changing its membership. I am also keen to find recent literature that examines the risks and uncertainties associated with such efforts, including ways in which downsizing and restructuring may itself disrupt efforts to bring about organisational change.
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Yes, downsizing/organisational restructuring contribute positively towards strategic organisational change. We have adopted a similar strategy with the assistance of BCG group. 
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I need to develop an instrument/qualitative data gathering questionnaire for my dissertation topic; 'The Effect of Technostress on Organizational Performance and Employee/Job satisfaction'. 
I need questions and information to be added to the instrument.
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One reference with some measures:
Ragu-Nathan, T. S., Tarafdar, M., Ragu-Nathan, B. S., & Tu, Q. (2008). The consequences of technostress for end users in organizations: Conceptual development and empirical validation. Information Systems Research, 19(4), 417-433.
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More and more organizations are looking to create a positive image towards its stakeholders, and therefore communicate in this direction. The employee communication seems an interesting element at several points. The first is that communication by the employees seems to be more credible than the organization itself. This communication is both inexpensive and can reach a exponential number of individuals whether future candidates, but also consumers, ... - Integration of social media helps bring a new look on participatory management. Consider the look of employees vis-à-vis their organizations to better understand some reluctance, motivations, prior to any changes in the organization and more broadly answer the question of the meaning of their work.
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Experts in the field of Micro-finance.
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thank you sir.
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can the employees' social capital enough to reflect the organizational social capital?
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My dear I hope my attached paper be interested for you about measure social capital in organizations.
best wishes 
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With modern value driven businesses I mean businesses that align all their management activities with their values. For example hiring and firing decisions are based on their values, their employee performance measurement system is based on their values etc. An example of such a business is Zappo. With traditional family businesses I mean the family businesses where most of the employees are relatives or are recommended by family members. Having worked in countries where most of the businesses are family business, I see a lot of similarities between the traditional family businesses and the modern value driven businesses in the way of managing their employees and their business. I am interested in research of others concerning this topic as well as in opinions and experiences of others concerning this topic.
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Is there a difference between a Process Culture and a Corporate Culture? And if so, can both coexist?
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is it me or are almost all responses off topic and boiler plate philosophy?
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Though there is plethora of literature on the relationship b/w board independence and firms performance, none (to the best of my readings, so far) has explained the channel through which board independence affects firms financial performance. any particular article? suggestions? much appreciated. 
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As a practicing management consultant, I would say independent directors help by : 1. Asking the right questions- they do not have an axe to grind or a stake to think of, so they can be unbiased; 2. Provide advice based on their knowledge and experience; 3. Leverage their network to further the cause of the organization as required; 4. Provide valuable oversight.
I suggest you look for articles on such (and other behaviours) by directors on the board. You could in the next step explore the relation between such behaviours by independent board members and firm performance.
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Hi everybody! I try to write a little article about the new trend of Reinventing organizations and I am searching for pros and contras of this new methods. I have found it really hard to get any empirical data (peer reviewed), even Holacracy-traders theirself said that they don't have any empirical Data (yet!). Do you maybe have any idea where I can re-focus my research? Or maybe an approach-advice? What would you reccomend to base on? What are for you the main points about this "Paradigm-Changing Phenomena"? I will be thankful about every advice! Greets from Switzerland! 
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There is no need to limit ourselves to two-choice arguments à la Holacracy vs. Teal: polarized thinking removes options from reality. In all likelihood, as regards organizational configurations, a "paradigm-changing phenomenon" will take a while to emerge if it ever does; however, there is a real chance of increased hybrization. (Hierarchy, market, and network forms of organization are not mutually exclusive: in fact, only in rare cases does one form triumph over others.) On Networked Organizations, available at https://www.researchgate.net/publication/266477071_On_Networked_Organizations, may be of interest.
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HRD plays a prominent role in change management by improving employee commitment to change, change self-efficacy, change competencies, but I am not able to find articles on these relationship and also with employee readiness for change. I would be thankful if any one would provide these research articles.   
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As people have commented, organizational  culture has an enormous impact on how people the second is to explore literature related to3mbrace, or not, change.  As the saying goes, culture eats strategy for breakfast. Even if management does all the *right things* in terms of things like trsining, for exsmple, if the culture works against change, such as squashing innovation, autocratic communication, etc., change readiness and action will most likely be sub-optimsl.  I agree very much with the idea that people don't resist change so much as resist being cganged, and one of the biggest drivers of culture is leadership apptiaches.  
Two things to consider are, one, whether the type of change has any influence on change readiness.  For examp,e, transformational change, in which the need for change is clear, but the end state is not or less clear, generates considerable ambiguity, and that is much harder on people - employees or management, than more straightforward chaange.  
Two, take a look at the literature around the strengths paradigm.  If HRD is focused around bui,ding employee strengths rather than fixing weakness (which does not mean ignoring weaknesses ) then you are more likely to improve the degree to which people will embrace chsnge.  See work by David Cooperrider, Diana Whitney really using appreciative inquiry and appreciative leadership approaches to change.  Also see work by Fred Luthans on psychological capital.  Strong levels of psy cap in an organization can have a large impact on the degree to which people embrace change.
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Hi, I look for articles, books or any other types of academic works on the futurology of architecture and living space. Namely, I'm interested in the structural (organizational) development in this field. In addition, I study the changing character of interaction between user and living space, and look for texts about it. Any suggestions are welcome!
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What is the difference between Corporate Entrepreneurship and Entrepreneurial Orientation?
I read that CE related to activities while EO is linked to qualities.
Can you provide me with reliable articles?
Thank you in Advance.
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Shaima, 
This is an interesting question and I was quite pleased to read the variety of answers in this thread. Corporate entrepreneurship usually refers to the development of new ideas and opportunities within large or established businesses. Corporate entrepreneurship is an umbrella term that can house a wide variety of entrepreneurship concepts, including entrepreneurial orientation.
Entrepreneurial orientation (EO) on the other hand is the degree to which a firm is entrepreneurial and has been studied for a vast array of firms (e.g. startups and large corporations). 
I hope that helps.
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Are there any other comparative models or new research available?
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Sorry to not have an answer for you - but perhaps you can point me to the source on Melville's Model of virtual teams?  Thanks!
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Has anyone undertaken research to study training systems for government employees? If yes please share the work and outcomes.
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Having worked in both the public (Banking) and private sectors (IT) in the last thirty odd years, I want to share an important difference in approach in both kinds of organizations:
In the public sector, I found that the employee and the management viewed each other with a long term perspective. The employer invested in the training of the employee, preparing her for senior positions, using planned job-rotations, and planned role based trainings. Expensive trainings were arranged for, at national and international institutes of repute, if defined for a particular role and position, for all such position holders.
In the private sector, both employee as well as management viewed each other with a short term perspective, and indeed average job tenure in the private sector was usually far less than in the public sector. The training in private sector was within strict budgets, need-based, more dynamic, being at times project based, or for a particular technology. Expensive trainings were often given as part of incentives, or as a reward and recognition.
You will find a comparison between training practices at public and private sector banking organizations at:
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Once curricula reforms occur, principals have to foster implementation of the proposed changes. How do they ensure whether teachers are implementing the new curriculum following a proposed strategies? 
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I suggest you read the article The Road to Commitment by Ron Koller and me. We have found that before anyone will make any change, such as teachers accepting and following a new curriculum, that he/she must believe in the change. Four questions each teacher will likely ask and need to answer positively before they believe in the change are: Is this change good for me? Is this change good for my students? Is this change good for our school? Will our school leadership continue to champion and lead this change or will the leadership abandon the work that is necessary to make this change?
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Does anyone know of an instrument to measure SMEs productivity? It should be answered by uneducated and educated managers, and must provide comparable data along different economic sectors.
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So probably not helpful problems rather than solutions..... however, Having worked as a business profession within an SME, not just studying them, there are many non-tangible aspects that employees add to the business or tasks for them to complete to facilitate job completion that will be missed as part of most metrics. So although you maybe get a tangible figure for productivity that may tell a story (output/resource input), that snapshot will be insufficient on its own. I think productivity as a term is to broad to measure with any accuracy. I think you need to draw down further in my opinion. A firm can mass produce and look effective, but at what quality, how many returns? etc. 
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I am looking at how to best mitigate things like drift and how to ensure quality.
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Articles on this can be found in the Directory of Open Access Journal located at DOAJ.  As I just pointed out in another response information can be found in several other open access journals by simply searching for Train The Trainer or Train the Trainer Models.   I have compiled a listing of open educational resources in case you do not have access to paid databases.  My list is located at Open Educational Resources
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How can we develop a list of micro foundations for organizational capabilities? is such a list different for different capabilities?
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Interesting differentiation - I appreciate the clarification. There seems to be an interesting parallel between foundations at various levels. Starting with foundations for structures - they must be inter-connected to be useful. Similarly, on another level, assets must be interconnected to be effective (must be able to draw on funds, access organizational efficiency, etc.). And, for mental models, the same is also true.
There is a study using "integrative complexity" that shows a correlation between managerial success and the level of structure of their mental models. That is to say, when we have mental models whose concepts are more complex and interconnected, we have a better understanding of the world, and are therefore able to make better decisions and be more successful.
reference provided in the attached paper.
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My intention is to analyze the teaching networks of university employees and especially what influence an organizational change program has on the formation and structure of these networks.
Therefore I don´t want to look into the ego-centric networks. Instead I am interested in the structure and development of the “whole” teaching network.
But in order to create a “whole” network I want and need to collect egocentric network data. Therefore I want to ask each participant how his egocentric network looks like now. This is my data at the point T1. My question is: Does anybody know which software can connect egocentric network data or nodes in order to create a  “whole” network? I especially don´t want and cannot collect the data with a snow ball approach.
I really appreciate any help and information I can get! Thank you very much in advance!
Best regards,
Elena Stasewitsch
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Hi, 
for everybody, who is interested in this topic: I just got an email from Prof. Molina. He created EgoNet, which also can connect Ego-Networks to a whole network. And there might be no limit how many ego-networks you want to combine. It maps the networks using the names, but there is no possibility to map them using the attributes of the nodes, which would be really cool... 
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I am working on a conceptual model (three independent variables as Organizational development, career development and training & development) and the dependent variable is 'Change Agent'. I have asked questions 5 questions on each of independent variables but for dependent variable I didn't ask any question. Now I wanted to know is there any possibility to estimate the model using the responses of independent variables only (by using AMOS)?
Note: If anybody has any relevant research paper in this regard then do share kindly.
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Read this manuscript. Chapter 3 from my book on Structural Equation Modeling using Amos.
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I am looking for a measure of behavioral complexity in a strategic leadership context (in this case, nonprofit boards of directors). The most common instrument for this purpose seems to be Cameron & Quinn's Competing Values Framework. However, the wording of the language is very managerial and at the interpersonal level (even in the most recent version of the instrument from Lawrence et al., 2009).
In a strategic leadership context where the leadership tasks are more oriented toward environmental scanning, sensemaking, and decision making around deployment and alignment of organizational resources, it seems to me that the interpersonal-level framing of the CVF does not fit. This is all the more true in a governance context, where the leadership of board members does include have some interpersonal interaction, but they do not have supervisory relationships with staff. (Even the CEO reports to the board as an body, not to individual members.)
Does anyone know of a validated version of the CVF that has been used in this context? 
Or are there other measures of behavioral complexity that would fit what I am looking for?
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I agree with Sylvia, some sort of combination or comparison is the way to proceed, consider the following:
The Leader Attributes Inventory (LAI) measures the degree to which individuals possess each of 37 attributes (characteristics, knowledge, skills, and values possessed by individuals) that predispose successful leadership performance as a leader in vocational education.(Liang, 1990; Moss, Johansen, & Preskill, 1991; Moss, Lambrecht, & Jensrud, 1994).
The Leader Competency Inventory (LCI) is a method for measuring an individual’s use of four specific dimensions of leadership – information seeking, conceptual thinking, strategic orientation, and service orientation. (Stephen D. Kelner, 1993)
The Leadership Practices Inventory (LPI) is a 30 item questionnaire containing five subscales for each of The Five Practices of Exemplary Leadership. Each subscale contains six questions, with a 10-point Likert response scale. The Leadership Practices Inventory exists in a "Self" and "Observer" version and takes approximately 10-20 minutes to complete. (James M. Kouzes and Barry Z. Posner)
The Leadership Skills Inventory (LSI) is designed primarily for leaders, letting them assess their own abilities in relation to a leadership model created by the author. Anderson’s model is based off of five dimensions: Self-Management Skills, Interpersonal Communication Skills, Consulting Skills for Developing Groups and Organizations, and Versatility Skills.(Terry D. Anderson, 1999)
The Leadership Skills Inventory - Karnes (LSI-Karnes) is one of several instruments that measure an individual’s abilities in the area of leadership. Nine domains are used in the LSI assessing strengths and weaknesses related to leadership.(Frances A. Karnes & Jane C. Chauvin, 1985.)
The Leadership Skills Profile (LSP) identifies which individual’s have the best leadership qualities. Each organization can use this model due to the customizable format for their specific interest.(Douglas N. Jackson, 2003)
The Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (MLQ) evaluates three different leadership styles: Transformational, Transactional, and Passive-Avoidant. It allows individuals to measure how they perceive themselves with regard to specific leadership behaviors (using the Leader/Self form), but the heart of the MLQ comes in the rater/other feedback that is enabled with the Rater form. The MLQ was designed with the 360-degree feedback method.(Bruce J. Avolio & Bernard M. Bass)
The Toxic Leadership Scale (TLS) was developed in order to better study behaviors that make effective leaders. This scale can be used with both qualitative and quantitative methodologies and is different from other leadership constructs or scales in that it can significantly predict employee outcomes such as job satisfaction and satisfaction with the supervisor.(Andrew Alexander Schmidt)
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Transformational leadership can be defined as “a motivational leadership style which involves presenting a clear organizational vision and inspiring employees to work towards this vision through establishing connections with employees, understanding employees’ needs, and helping employees reach their potential, contributes to good outcomes for an organisation” (Fitzgerald and Schutte, 2010, p.495).
My question is how to inspire others? any solid techniques?
Thank you so much.   
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Motivational/Transformational leadership creates a culture of motivation, inspiration, and development of employees, so that the leader can gain the confidence and assurance of subordinate managers/employees to achieve mission, vision, and objectives of the organisation, and ultimately achieving overall organisational performance.
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I am currently doing research on a public training organization and intend to identify employer support, trainees intentions and training protocols affecting performance.
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Try The Effectiveness of Health and Safety Committees: Results of a Survey of Public-Sector Workplaces The Effectiveness of Health and Safety Committees by Eaton and Nocerino on: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/0019-8676.00166/abstract;jsessionid=29C6C8EDF8966769C6AFDD2B4878F67F.f01t02
Also
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Edgar Schein claims that: "Culture and leadership are two sides of the same coin. When organizations start or when groups start there is always a leader who has a preferred way of doing things, and those preferences by definition are going to be imposed on the group members. If you don’t like the way I run this group, I’ll replace you. The leader’s values and preferences are the first ways that a group or organization does things and if that works it becomes eventually the culture of that group. So in a very real sense, founders and leaders create culture.
Can the same be true for an organization within business ecosystem?
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Sorry, that was supposed to be Bruce Chatwin
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How significant to your organization are these two: 1. Sustainability and 2. Competitiveness? What are the significant considerations that management must engage to get to them?
In case you are preparing a survey to determine how much your leadership has achieved in the two areas, what will be your certain questions?
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I would say the following are critical success factors for a sustainable organization in the modern business environment:
1. Thoughtful and workable strategy
2. Customer-centricity
3. Insightful talent management
4. Focus on innovation
5. Flexibility as an important value
6. Change leadership
7. Focus on High Performance Work System & people engagement
8. Alignment of all functional areas
9. Speed (that is higher than the speed of change i business environment)
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We are carrying out a research on organizational determinants of university-industry cooperation in Latinamerican universities. One of those explanatory factors is university leadership. We would like to measure the characteristics of university leaders that determine the impact of these linkages with firms.
We first measured this using the short transformational leadership scale developed by Carless et al. (2000). However, we realized the university leadership is distributed (Rector/President, deans, heads of Departments, …). Any idea about how to face this issue?
Anyone interested in a joint research to further study this?
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Folks,
It appears to my mind that we are mixing two very different concepts- leadership and management. Equating leadership to management may produce very misleading results, in determining  university management
Vecchio (2006) and Shaskin and Shaskin (2004) suggest that real leadership in organization devolves not on organizational structure, but out there, based on competence, trust and the use of influence, not authority and power conferred by regulatory specification or organizational structure, necessarily.This may presuppose that some managers may be leaders while some may not be leaders.
A university is a huge bureaucracy that works on positions of authority with very defined roles and authority levels. Subordinates obey instructions not because they trust and appreciate the superior, but they must carry it out as a day job or vacate their positions. True leadership gets people to do things because they are convinced and pursued that it must be done for the group good-without coercion
Leadership may therefore not necessarily coincide with management, and may be found at different levels of the strata of management ,or even in the lower ranks. Measuring leadership is therefore an uphill task, even though some work has been done over the years  to measure leadership
Some of the proposed leadership measuring scales developed  include:
a)Leadership Skills inventory scale( Karnes and Chauvin, 1985)
b) Least Preferred worker scale ( Peters et al.1985)
c) Leader member exchange scale (Graen et al.1982; Klein and Kim, 1998)
d)Multi-factor leadership questionnaire ( Bass and Avolio, 1985)
e) Leadersship practices Inventory( Posner and Kouzes, 1993)
What need to be noted with any, and every one of these scales of leadership measurement may be as follows:
a). None has a universal answer to measuring leadership. Some measure leadership quality by trait method, while some measure the degree of bonding and acceptability of the leader by group members
b). Some of the scales are better suited for identifying leadership in small groups and some in larger ones. In the same vein, some are better predictors of leadership in manual work than in clerical work
c) Despite empirical findings in support of some of them they are relatively poor predictors of leadership quality and behavior over time
Perhaps, I confused the waters the more . Sorry
References
Bass, B., & Avolio, B. (1985). The multifactor leadership questionnaire. Palo Alto: Consulting Psychologists Press.
Graen, G., Novak, M., & Sommerkamp, P. (1982). The effects of leader-member exchange and job design on productivity and job satisfaction: Testing a dual attachment model. Organizational Behavior and Human Performance, 30, 109-131
Kinicki, A., & Vecchio, R. (1994). Influences on the quality of supervisor-suborinate relations: The role of time-pressure, organisational commitment, and locus of control. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 15, 75-82.
Klein, H., & Kim, J. (1998). A field study of the influence of situational constraints, leader-member exchange, and goal commitment on performance. Academy of Management Journal, 41(1), 88-95
Peters, L., Hartke, D., & Pohlmann, J. (1985). Fiedler's contingency theory of leadership: An application of meta-analysis procedures of Schmidt and Hunter. Psychological Bulletin, March, 274-285.
Posner, B., & Kouzes, J. (1993). Psychometric properties of the Leadership Practices Inventory - updated. Educational and Psychological Measurement, 53, 191-198.
Posner, B., & Kouzes, J. (1994). An extenstion of the Leadership Practices Inventory to indovidual contributors. Educational and Psychological Measurement, 54(4), 959-966
Sashkin, M. & Sashkin, M.G.(2004) Leadership that matters. The critical factors for making a difference in people’s lives and organizations’ success. Benin City. Nigeria: Gospel Press and Literature Int.
Vecchio, R.P(2006) Organizational behavior: core concepts.6th edition. Mason. OH: South Western.
Vecchio, R., & Gobdel, B. (1984). The vertical dyad linkage model of leadership: Problems and prospects. Organizational Behavior and Human Performance, 34, 5-20.
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Looking for theory around management education using games or simulations
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Maybe one of my papers could help :-)
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We are about to start to develop the Human Resources Development strategy for an oil and gas company. Can someone share the methodology to do such works and experiences of the oil and gas company in this matter?
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Thanks Syeda. Our core business is E&P.  This year can not attend the Oil&Gas HR Forum, but will keep eyes on this
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How does transformational leadership affect organisational performance?
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You may be interested to the articles; Regards, Katarzyna
Alina M. Waite , (2013),"Leadership's influence on innovation and sustainability", European Journal of Training and Development, Vol. 38 Iss 1/2 pp. 15 - 39; link to this document: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/EJTD-09-2013-0094
Müge Leyla Yıldız, Esra Dinç Özcan, Organizational Climate as a moderator of the Relationship between Transformational Leadership and Creativity, International Journal of Business and Management Vol. II (1), 2014
Mariacristina Piva, Enrico Santarelli, Marco Vivarelli, The skill bias effect of technological and organisational change: Evidence and policy implications; doi:10.1016/j.respol.2004.11.005
Kearney, A., Harrington, D., Kelliher, F. 2013. Exploiting managerial capability for innovation in a micro-firm context, European Journal of Training and Development, Vol. 38 Iss 1/2 pp. 95 - 117. http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/EJTD-11-2013-0122
 Hunter, S. T. Cushenbery, L. 2011.  Leading for Innovation: Direct andIndirect Influences, Advances in Developing Human Resources, 13(3): 248–265, DOI: 10.1177/1523422311424263
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My research topic is "Impact of HRD Interventions on Organizational effectiveness". To measure organizational effectiveness (OES) I have to develop a scale. Recommend any articles or books related to OES. 
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Some papers or books such as:
Gregory, B. T, Harris, S. G, Armenakis, A. A, & Shook, C. L. (2009). Organizational culture and effectiveness: a study of values, attitudes, and organizational outcomes. Journal of Business Research, 62(7), 673–79. doi. 10.1016/j.jbusres.2008.05.021.
Griffin, M., Neal, A., & Neale, M. (2000). The contribution of task performance and contextual performance to effectiveness: Investigating the role of situational constraints. Applied Psychology: An International Review, 49(3), 517-533. doi. 10.1111/1464-0597.00029.
Hartnell, C. A, Ou, A. Y, & Kinicki, A. (2011). Organizational culture and organizational effectiveness: A meta-analytic investigation of the competing values framework’s theoretical suppositions. Journal of Applied Psychology, 96(4), 677–94. doi. 10.1037/a0021987.
Kahya, E. (2008). The effects of job performance on effectiveness. International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics, 39 (1), 96-104. doi. 10.1016/j.ergon.2008.06.006.
Kwantes, C. T., & Boglarsky, C. A. (2007). Perceptions of organizational culture, leadership effectiveness, and personal effectiveness across six countries. Journal of International Management, 13, 204-213. doi. 10.1016/j.intman.2007.03.002.
Mitchell, R., Parker, V., & Giles, M. (2011). When do interprofessional teams succeed? Investigating the moderating roles of team and professional identity in interprofessional effectiveness. Human Relations, 64(10), 1321-1343. doi. 10.1177/0018726711416872.
Quinn, R.E., & Rohrbaugh, J. (1983). A spatial model of effectiveness criteria: Towards a competing values approach to organizational analysis. Management Science, 29, 363-377.
Robertson, I. T., Callinan, M., & Bartram, D. (2002). Organizational effectiveness: the role of psychology. Chichester, John Wiley & Sons, LTD;
Walton, E. J., & Dawson, S. (2001). Manager’s perceptions of criteria of organizational effectiveness. Journal of Management Studies, 38, 173-199. doi. 10.1111/1467-6486.00233.
Wiener, Y. (1988). Forms of value systems: a focus on organizational effectiveness and cultural change and maintenance. Academy of Management Review, 13(4), 534-545. doi. 10.5465/AMR.1988.4307410.
Yilmaz, C., & Ergun, E. (2008). Organizational culture and firm effectiveness: An examination of relative effects of culture traits and the balanced culture hypothesis in an emerging economy. Journal of World Business, 43(3), 290‐306. doi. 10.1016/j.jwb.2008.03.019.
Denison, D. R. (1990). Corporate Culture and Organizational Effectiveness. New York: Wiley. Or his new book, see Octavio.
 Good luck!
Thiago Nascimento
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As per Jansen et al. (2013) HPWS lead to anxiety and role overload among its employees, which can be lessened by appropriately giving them the power to control (job control) but do organisations really empower their employees to lessen their stress level, which is of great concern in present scenario.
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Hi Jeevan,
I should tell you this as an entrepreneur and a field researcher that anxiety at work is very relative. Therefore, if you happen to do a case study in various environments (in different companies or within different departments of a company) perhaps your results would be different from case to case.
Therefore, if you insist that they are very relative, you need to do situation analysis to understand the cause-and-effect relation, or run a critical/mega analysis research to generalize the hypothesis.
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I am interested in research on the emotions OD practitioners experience as they transition from internal employees to external OD consulting roles.
How do these emotions impact organizational change?
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Thank you Ashutosh for your comments, do you know of any articles/research in this area?
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Is the value of organization triage greater than the value of organization autopsy?
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Marc - I agree.  Edie
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The literature in the area of organizational culture research is flooded with the traditional Positivist quantitative approaches.
Can an Interpretivist qualitative method be used to understand this phenomenon through a case study or ethnography approach?
Which is better suited and relevant to the academic pursuit of research?
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The qualitative and quantitative research paradigms are complementary and used together can  produce a more complete understanding of the organizational culture. See:   Complementary Use of Qualitative and Quantitative Cultural Assessment Methods by YAUCH C. A. and STEUDEL H. J, Organizational Research Methods, Vol. 6 No. 4, October 2003 465-481, DOI: 10.1177/1094428103257362. Personally, I found "interpretive" methodologies and methods better suited for a dynamic view of organizational culture. I prefer to "observe" interactions, role modelling, physical spaces and artefacts and to "listen" to gossiping and stories within organizations. Corporate culture  can be looked at as a network of conversations:how employees see the world and how they talk about it to themselves and others shape the environment of an organization.  Gossip particular  is "more than just idle chatter: it is the key to navigating social worlds” (Winerman 2006, p. 57). It can be a potent tool for forging alliances and ostracising others (Dingfelder, 2006). Trading information and opinions is not trivia, it carries with it trust and intimacy (Stambor, 2006) and helps employees developing trusting relationships and fostering social bonds (see Gianesini G. (2009). Building relationships in the workplace. Organizational Culture and Psychologically Healthy Workplaces, VDM Verlag)  
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To explain Organizational health, it is essential to examine the aggregate health in relation to the health of various components of the organization. Systems theory underpins this aggregate health scenario. Systems theory was conceived by a reach of scholars as a means of examining and engaging with a miscellany of topics in complex Organizational systems (Ashby, 1962; Boulding, 1956; Churchman, 1968). Systems theory elaborates into two fundamental issues: firstly, the correlation of several constituents within the organization and with the organization as a whole; and secondly, the kinship between the whole system and its feeder environment.
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I agree. The balanced Scorecard model given by Kaplan and Norton  , yeah it does talk about measuring the sales and brand together. It may be contradictory , but I hold a belief that until and unless we have a good brand value and past performance ( in case of startups it may differ) , it is very unlikely that we will get a good sales. In my view sales is directly proportional to Brand performance. Quoting Kaplan " The balanced scorecard includes financial measures that tell the results of actions already taken. And it complements the financial measures with operational measures on customer satisfaction, internal processes, and the organization’s innovation and improvement activities—operational measures that are the drivers of future financial performance. The balanced scorecard allows managers to look at the business from three important perspectives.  It provides answers to three basic questions:
How do customers see us? (customer perspective)
What must we excel at? (internal business perspective)
Can we continue to improve and create value? (innovation and learning perspective)"
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During the past decades obsolescence has been assessed in various ways (Kaufman, 1989; Pazy, 2004; Rosen, 1975; Rothman & Perrucci, 1970; Van Loo, 2005). Kindly link any questionnaire which is open access. 
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Hari and Marie,
Please find both files. I have attached both of them. 
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Often, organizations decay in effectiveness due to bad internal communication. Research has revealed that communication skills are the most important skills for determining success of managers in organizations. The salient question is of measuring the effectiveness of communication policies in organizations. Your views on some indicators in this regard?
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Measuring the impact of communication policies can include:
Audience perception measurements including factors such as:
  • percentages and types of messages received and communications remembered.
  • Were messages seen as relevant, consistent and credible?
  • Were the messages understood?
  • How well do employees feel they are being supported?
  • Do employees understand exactly what needs to happen as a result of the communication(s)?
Change in behavior, The objective of most internal communication is to change the attitudes and behaviors of employees. Therefore, it is valuable to identify and measure factors such as:
  • What changed?
  • Was there more or less of a behavior?
  • What is now different?
Impact on business goals / outcomes
Communication measurement should enable Internal Communicators to quantify the impact of communications on business objectives. For example:
  • The number of employees who signed up for share scheme (following its promotion)
  • The shift in attitudes regarding customer service and the projected impact of increased customer retention
  • The number of usable suggestions submitted via an employee suggestion initiative (and the financial value of those suggestions)
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Organizational effectiveness is commonly referred to as the degree to which predetermined goals are achieved, whereas Organizational Efficiency refers to the economical manner in which goal oriented operations are carried out- something of an input/output ratio. What are the indicators or variables to show that the organisation effective?
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I would say the following in this regard:
--Communication of vision to employees & their buy-in of the vision
--Employee commitment
--Leadership effectiveness
--Communication effectiveness
--Employee care
--Sense of accountability for results
--Customer centricity
--Customer satisfaction
--Growth and survival
--Organizational learning & innovation
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We always say / hear that bottom-up approaches stand a far better chance to succeed compared to top-bottom directives. Have you had any experience in that?
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I have taught in France, Ukraine and the US, and know from experience that faculty in each nation have some similar, and some different, assumptions that they bring to teaching. Also, colleges and universities are complex, and different in ways from other organizations. So one part of the answer for you will be toaddress the dynamics in Georgia, and not assume that what works somewhere else will fit your needs.
I have found that most organizations need several things to increase motivation. People need to be listened to, people at all levels. They need to be part of the change process. Neither bottom up or top down solutions will be sufficient – both are needed. Deming’s advice, take the fear out of the workplace, is still essential.
The classic organization development approach begins with action research, a means for listening to and then involving participants in the change process. This can be very effective.
The Socio-Economic Approach to Management (SEAM), which has 40 years of research history in over 1300 organizations of all kinds works on two fronts – how to involve people is respectful and effective ways, and how to make sure that the organization is as efficient as it can be financially. Part of the SEAM insight is that standard accounting does not factor in many hidden costs, which in Europe now add up to 20,000 euros per employee. The process of involving all employees in reducing hidden costs and improving management practices has made SEAM a model worth considering when it comes to change. You can see more at www.stthomas.edu/seam
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One of the leading strategic human resource management issues for employers in the developed world is managing collective and individual diversity. This facilitates employee engagement. More and more organizations use this intervention for building a more just, fair and exciting workplace. However, the developing world largely seems to be unaffected by this euphoria. Diversity is almost a non-issue there, or is just beginning to be noted. Why do you think this is so?
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Diversity of workforce at all levels at organisational, corporate, regional or national level is always shock absorbing and makes it resilient.
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I have found there is difference between personal characteristics and individual characteristics.
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Personal characteristics rather refer to dispositions, while individual ones are everything that is stated to profile the study sample including personal characteristics as well if needed. For example, individual characteristics may include age, gender, health status, addictions, qualification, marital status, etc.
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I would like to know more on the existing research on organizational innovation and innovative HR practices in highly successful organizations. I am planning to write a working paper on the subject hence looking for relevant literature.
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We recently released a book of the same name that hold impressive data as an organisational disruptor.See;
Share, Don't Take the Lead
Zac Henson
In book: Share Don't Take The Lead, Chapter: !, Publisher: Information Age Publishing,Inc., Editors: Craig L.Pearce, Charles C.Manz, and Henry P.Simms, Jr, pp.3-14
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ABSTRACT Share, Don't Take the Lead is a book that offers an alternative perspective on leadership. The philosophy of shared leadership is straightforward: Leadership does not derive solely from position, authority, or hierarchy. Instead, leadership is something that can be executed by anyone who has the best knowledge or skill to undertake the leadership necessary in any given situation. Shared leadership is especially relevant, for example, in empowered teams where shared leadership can be initiated from any team member at any time, depending on the needs of the moment and the capabilities of the individuals. But the notion of shared leadership is also appropriate in a larger context. For example, an individual lower in the hierarchy can provide leadership if that person is best qualified to exercise it. Shared leadership also shows how hierarchical leaders with formal authority can use empowerment to develop leadership in others. This book tells the tales of how multiple trail blazing organizations used shared leadership to build high performance. The notion of shared leadership seems to contradict many of the bedrock ideas of efficient management and effective organizations. A typical first reaction is, "It'll never work here!" Yet, the organizations that "get it" and implement this new powerful approach tend to be more innovative and to out-perform their "nay-sayer" competitors. In fact, shared leadership is one of the most important ideas to hit business in recent years-our recent feature article about shared leadership in the Wall Street Journal is testimony to that. Shared leadership can provide a way for companies to increase productivity, quality, and flexibility while meeting the competitiveness challenge. Share the Lead provides new insights and information about how to push the organizational envelope to new frontiers.
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Leading organizations are focusing on carving out appropriate values and creating such conditions that facilitate people to learn to live those values. This enhances organizational brand and helps in aligning people's attitudes and behaviors to business vision and goals. Thus, the focus is on personal development as well as organizational development.
But it has been found to be the most difficult task to do so. On the basis of your experience, what method/s do you suggest for this to happen so that people do not feel it stressful to learn and adapt to the new values?
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I need more ideas about the justification below to explain why by using heads of departments as respondents can reflect the innovation in organizations in general. With note that the study purpose is to examine the relationship between HRM practices, (knowledge sharing as mediating) on service innovation ( hotels are the case).
I have give justification as following: in order to collect information about the innovation in the whole hotel, it has been assumed that only the heads of departments are supposed to have the most relevant information about the innovation in their departments as the head of innovation. In addition, the head of each department considers the better position to simply discover and provide the right and precise information on the impact of HRM practices and knowledge, sharing on departments’ innovation. Thus, collecting information from all departments in the hotels may can reflect the level of innovation in the whole hotel
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In order to measure innovation (product, process, and organizational innovation), one has to look at how the organization structure of the department.
I have done some research on the topic. You may find this interesting. Find a link attached herein.
What Management Style is Considered Best for a Team-Based Organization and Why?
Let me know your viewpoints, if any.
Thanks
Brian
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Some suggest that the matrix organization is the next level in organization development were some areas consist of traditional functional departments, such as IT, or HR, whereas other parts of the organization, such as sales and marketing, completely transformed into a process driven organization.
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In a functional organization the resources and employees do what the boss says. In a process organization the boss is the customer and all resources and people work for the customer directly. In functional organizations bosses replace customers and they decide what is right to do in order to satisfy the customer requirements. In a process organization; bosses and people are to service the customers. Then what is matrix organization?. Matrix organziations are a mixed of both. Nevertheless, the criteria to manage the resources and people must be very clear. If the criteria is process then all resources and people must follow directly customer requirements. Empowerment, participation, commitment and decision making directly for customer are right features. But if the criteria is functions, then all resources and people must be follow the hierarchical bosses. Bosses will think what is right for servicing customer requirements with resources and people organization. Decision making is centralized, resources and people are to service to the organization hierarchy and lack of commitment and participation are present. The ideal situation is to combine both extremes, fucntional for short term profitability and process for long term customer satisfaction. Matrix is the right solution, some areas oriented to hierarchy and others to customers, but all with the same spirit: satisfy customer requirements a little better each day.
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While attitude involves mind's predisposition to certain ideas, values, people, systems, institutions; behaviour relates to the actual expression of feelings, action or inaction orally or/and through body language. I am sure, others will look at these somewhat differently.
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Dear Dan-Cristian
Thanks for the paper you attached. It is indeed very useful for the answers I am looking for.
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This question is more directed at Youth Sport but can be applied across the board in team sports for adults too. The rationale for the question is based on the importance or lack of, placed on sport specific skills when most 'screening' procedures tend to focus on physical capacity testing as the main basis for exclusion of players from progressing into High performance groups/teams.
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I would look for the emotional and contextual intelligence of a player. How they are able to read the game; their team mates; and their opposition. I suppose at the basic level I would look for their level of maturity. Especially if it's a youth player, physical capacity and even presence can be mistaken for talent at a young age, but if the kid is intelligent, willing to learn and constantly trying to better themselves I would think you're onto a winner.
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Mintzberg et al. talk about intended strategy and deliberate strategy in their model of business strategy; the difference between the two terms is not quite clear. I was wondering how the former gets converted into the latter when the former is not realized.
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According to Mintzberg and Waters, there are five kinds of strategies. These are: emergent strategy, intended strategy, deliberate strategy, realized strategy and unrealized strategy. The definition of some of these different types of strategies is the following: Emergent strategies can be seen as responses to unexpected opportunities and problems and are usually developed from the locations at which business-level strategies are usually implemented, i.e. within business units and not at corporate headquarters. The pure definition of emergence requires the absence of intentions. (Mcgee, Thomas & Wilson 2005 p 11)
Realized strategy is a blend of intentions and emergence, which can be interpreted by reference to the strength of pressure from the external environment—a kind of environmental determinism. (Mcgee, Thomas & Wilson 2005 p 11)
Intended strategy is strategy as conceived of by the top management team. Even here, rationality is limited and the intended strategy is the result of a process of negotiation, bargaining, and compromise, involving many individuals and groups within the Organization.
Mintzberg and Waters mentioned that realized strategy – the actual strategy that is implemented – is only partly related to that which was intended (Mintzberg suggests only 10–30 % of intended strategy is realized).
Deliberate and emergent strategies together identify intention of action in a corporation. Any business may fall under either deliberate or emergent strategy in the basis of daily operations. However, these strategies more likely occur in large business operations. Both strategies address a focus on the content of strategy. Such content includes initiatives, choices and policies or decision-making. Deliberate strategies mark acts or visions that emphasize intention. Deliberate strategy in corporations marks a concrete attention to detail concerning business operations. Deliberate strategy outlines exact business intention. These intentions concern the nature of the goals of the organization outside of matters of profit. Deliberate strategy attempts to minimize outside influence acting on business operations. In general, all employees of the company must learn perfect familiarity with future business goals and operations. The business then expects employees to work together in all aspects of accomplishment of these goals. Employees must think through and discuss all actions in the interest of matching company goals. Some refer to emergent strategy as a realized strategy. In the opposite effect, emergent strategy marks a pattern of action that develops over time. An emergent strategy develops within an organization in the absence of a specific mission and goals. Some business chooses an emergent strategy in daily operations to remain flexible to current demands. Most business theorists view emergent strategy as more flexible and upcoming than deliberate strategy. In general, they view emergent strategy as a method of learning while in operation. Dated or unproductive methods fall out of use while new methods of operation gain favor within the corporation. Emergent strategy grows to more predictable patterns of behavior over time. Businesses over time discover profitable methods of operation. Business owners then adopt such profitable operations techniques into a predictable goal somewhat resembling a deliberate strategy.
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see above
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In the Indian context, I have co-authored a paper published in: Human Resource Management. Its citation is as follows:
Cooke, Fang and Saini, Debi. (2010), ‘Diversity management in India: A study of organizations in different ownership forms and industrial sectors,’ Human Resource Management, 49:3, pp. 377-400
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I am interested in researching this further and would be interested in case studies using this methodology.
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I will recommend a small but very interesting book for practitioners:
Appreciative Inquiry: Practitioners' Guide for Generative Change and Development
Neena Verma (Author); you may search the net for availability.
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I work part time as an organizational development consultant, working with companies to help them develop and maintain good working relationships and productive organizational cultures. I would like to extend my skills and knowledge base in this area. What are some recent or classic books or articles that you might suggest?
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Leadership is the key to everything - success in personal life, professional life, community life or national life. A good leader may not get himself to his family, society, organisation or otherwise, final destination. But he would definitely take himself several 'progressive' notches above others. But what makes him what he is - his education, the sweat of his brow or just his natural self?
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