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Organizational Change - Science topic

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I'm looking to do research utilizing (STOC) as a conceptual framework for a qualitative study. Was wondering if anyone knew of other research that used the same framework that had a sample interview guide that explored the various stages.
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Most welcome! Improving strategic decision-making with evidence-based management: A public sector case study. You'll find it easiest at rayoung.academia.edu. Let me know if I can assist.
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Hello, Is there previous study regarding the impact of organizational change and work life balance?
Appreciate your input
Keepsafe and Godbless
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People who are emotional healthy perform better at work, which leads to job satisfaction. When people feel they are doing well at their job, it will spill over and increase life satisfaction. The spillover effect is defined as when attitudes in one role positively spill over into another role. Change at work is linked to employee stress, distrust, and the intent to quit. Addressing these issues will help to destress your employees and overcome resistance to change.
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Please explain more.
Thank you for sharing your valuable ideas.
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If organizations treat resistance to change as an opportunity rather than a problem then they can manage change smartly. In other words, they need to follow discursive approaches to change in which resistance is considered a legitimate right of employees that can provide an excellent opportunity to the management to take their employees on-board to make the entire change process inclusive. The traditional approach to change considers resistance as an illegitimate and irrational act of employees. Maryam Rahimi
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I am a final year MBA student and would like to use your Organizational Change Recipients’ Beliefs Scale described in your research with your colleagues in the Dec 2007 issue of the Journal of Applied Behavioural Science. Have you developed the questionnaire since this paper and is there any other information you can share to help me develop a suitable design for my own research? FYI, I am seeking to understand the relationship between beliefs about organisational change and the decision to leave an organisational, the objective of which is to help reduce attrition by better understanding the key reasons why individuals leave organisations during organisational change. I was thinking of using your questionnaire with individuals who left their organisations during a change programme and then analyse the results for patterns and trends.
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Hi there,
through my research, I am more and more coming to the conclusion that the contexts of corporate change turn out to be essential. For example, a transformation in agriculture is regulated quite differently than in the aerospace industry. In a recent presentation by Daimler's CEO, this aspect was emphasized in particular (ecosystems, increasing networking, etc.).
Beyond the ambiguous definitions of change, there are, as you surely know, various approaches to characterizing corporate change. One comprehensive approach is presented by Albach et al. 2014 (https://t1p.de/rk70), see appendix.
There are also characterizations for economic activities, the International Standard Industrial Classification of All Economic Activities, both as a broad and very detailed industry specification: https://t1p.de/7cth
Do you know if there is already research in this area? Which disciplines are addressing the question of how industry contexts (macro) influence corporate change (micro)?
Certainly, it is not possible to cover all industries, but is there, for example, research in the context of C - Manufacturing? How do the industry-specific characteristics of the manufacturing industry affect corporate change projects? Are there certain change characteristics (features, certain dynamics, etc.) that are always expressed in the same way on a broad or detailed industry classification?
How would you proceed methodically with the investigation? I thought first of all of an investigation of the rough structure, e.g. expert interviews and a subsequent survey? Feel free to "brainstorm" as an answer as well.
Thank you and best Greetings from Aachen, Germany
Alexander Kwiatkowski
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In addition to Weill and Ross in “IT Savvy," see their "Enterprise Architecture As Strategy: Creating a Foundation for Business Execution" as well as Ross et al's more recent "Designed for Digital: How to Architect Your Business for Sustained Success" (see my review) https://www.amazon.com/gp/customer-reviews/R33HX594W0I7TL?ref=pf_ov_at_pdctrvw_srp
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How is organizational culture created and sustained?
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Organization culture consists of values, norm and beliefs.
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Controls on Cultural change in Organizational Change Management and how to add good questions for survey
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For a thesis idea I wanted to combine the process-oriented famous John P. Kotter 8-step change management Framework with the contextual dependencies from the Balogun and Hope Hailey Change Kaleidoscope and the individual characteristics of people ( co-workers) involved in the change process? With the formulation of the Research question as in: What type of people are needed in each phases of the Kotter process ( and involving the context perspective from the change kaleidoscope?
Do you think there is enough academic evidence / literature to forumulate such propositions for each (change) step to say what charactericts of people are needed? For example resilient and goal oriented Workers in the 1. Step: Establishing a sense of urgency (for change) and so on
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All the best in your study Val Vj
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Is there a research implement the developing of an organizational tool? and where?
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Thank you Mohammed Khalis
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Hello!
I want to investigate three levels of organizational change (Individual, group and organizational level), each includes different variables, for example the organizational level includes climate, organizational justice, and communication. I am interested to investigate the effect of the organizational change in these three levels at different time periods.
What would you recommend appropriate tests to use in this case?
Note: I am not sure if repeated measures ANOVA and Dependent T-test are appropriate in this case, or I need to add more or something completely different.
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I think group will more effectively.
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How should neurological tests be designed?
Can they be said to be valid and reliable?
What kind of test design should be done in this field?
What should be considered in the interpretation of analyzes?
Which devices should be used?
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Miguel Gil thanks
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How is organizational climate created and sustained?
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What are the philosophical foundations of Organizational Change? What are the other reasons apart from "Survival" that results in an organisation's need to change? Can these be generalized for all organizations?
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I recommend the readings below, all of which touch on what organizational change is about, what motives other than survival may exist for it, and philosophical underpinnings. Best wishes with your research.
Burns, T. 1961. Micropolitics: Mechanisms of organizational change. Administrative Science Quarterly, 6: 257-281.
Imershein, A. W. 1977. Organizational change as a paradigm shift. Sociological Quarterly, 18(Winter): 33-43.
March, J. G. 1981. Footnotes to organizational change. Administrative Science Quarterly, 26(4): 563-577.
Poole, M. S., Van de Ven, A. H., Dooley, K., & Holmes, M. E. 2000. Organizational change and innovation processes: Theory and methods for research. New York: Oxford University Press.
Sakhartov, A. V., & Folta, T. B. 2012. Rationalizing organizational change: A need for comparative testing. Organization Science, 24(4): 1140-1156.
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Dear research community,
I am currently writing a proposal for a meta-analysis. I am aware that meta-analyses are applied in, for example, medical settings to identify the effectiveness of a treatment/intervention, which means that the meta-analysis tests the same variables but from different sources. What if I look into studies with different variables but with a similar research question (e.g. how do employees cope with organizational change) and would like to run a meta-analysis to identify which are the most relevant predictor and outcome variables?
Thank you in advance for your help!
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I've collected a host of resources on meta-analysis as well as non-parametric effect measures on Frank Harrell's data methods website. That is a great place to discuss the statistical aspects of research, particularly in the health care context.
Nonparametric Effect Size estimation, Likelihood Methods, and Meta Analysis
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My research is mainly focused on OCB changes based on a scenario. I am assuming that a scenario about the future organizational changes given to participants between pretest and posttest will affect the OCB. But I am having problems to match the pretests and posttests since I will not demand any ID info. I need to match this tests, because before the pretest, I will examine a characteristic trait and conduct the research on the groups based on these different characteristic traits. I mean the participants will be categorized as A and B groups based on their characteristic traits, then I will be able to say that the OCB changes on group A is like this, and on group it is like that...
Thanks in advance.
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One way is with self-generated identification codes. These are factual questions you ask someone that will create unique answers that you can match the surveys on. We use questions like the city where you were born, and the name of the high school where you graduated. Here's some references to papers about this technique:
Kearney, K. A., Hopkins, R. H., Armand, L. M., & Weisheit, R. A. (1984). Self-generated identification codes for anonymous collection of longitudinal questionnaire data. The Public Opinion Quarterly, 48(1), 370-378. doi:10.2307/2748630
Schnell, R., Bachteler, T., & Reiher, J. (2010). Improving the use of self-generated identification codes. Evaluation Review, 34(5), 391-418. doi:10.1177/0193841x10387576
Yurek, L. A., Vasey, J., & Sullivan Havens, D. (2008). The use of self-generated identification codes in longitudinal research. Evaluation Review, 32(5), 435-452. doi:10.1177/0193841x08316676
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I want to be sure that my investigation of the extant literature is thorough in identifying all terms used to describe the manner in which deliberate/intended and emergent strategy (Mintzberg, 1978) unfold to become realized or unrealized/ephemeral strategy (Mirabeau & Maguire, 2014). For instance, another name I've found is adaptive strategy (Andersen & Nielsen, 2009). Does anyone else have additional terms I may need to research?
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Dear Ann:
I remember an author whose name is Quinn who coined the name "incremental strategy" (in spanish "estrategia incremental"). You can read some book by himself or several readings by Scholes/Whittington/Johnson or Mintzberg et al in "Strategy Safari". According to Quinn, managers have an initial strategy they pretend to use, while developing it they realize certain problems so they have to adapt it. These steps are small compared to the first one, so that´s why he speaks about "incremental strategy".
Regards
Gustavo Concari
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Fellow Bourdieusian scholars,
I am fairly new to RG and to this particular feature. Thus, if this is not the intended way to use the "Ask a question" please bare with me. In my work, I use Bourdieu to direct attention to the importance of history in organizational change. In my analyses of change management as a practice, I have found Bourdieu's points about the way practices are an act of temporalization as they bring into existence a past and a future for the present (Bourdieu and Waquant, 1992) particularly useful. Does anyone know other references in which he elaborates on this?
Thank you
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I shall have to think
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Schumpeter (1934) describes this distinct feature of entrepreneurship that involves with innovating a product with which consumers are not yet familiar or a new source of raw materials or a new market either to unexplored or a new combination of means of production or a new way of operation not yet applied.
Thus, entrepreneurship foresees the potentially profitable opportunity and tries to exploit it in a new and better way.
Wilken (1979) summaries a list of innovative activities entrepreneurship does. They are shown below:
Initial expansion- Original production of goods.
Subsequent expansion- Subsequent change in the number of goods produced.
Factor innovation- Increase in supply or productivity of factors.
Financial- Procurement of capital from a new source or on the new farm.
Labor- Procurement of labor from a new source or of a new typo; upgrading existing labor.
Material- Procurement of old material from a new source or use of a new material.
Production innovations- Changes in the production process.
Technological- Use of new production technique
Organizational- Change of form or structure of relationships among people.
Market innovations- Changes in the size or composition of the market a Product.
Production of new good or change in quality or cost of existing good.
Market- Discovery of a new marker.
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Thank you dear sir it is really beneficial and valuable information . regards
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I want to change the name of my project from Public Sector Organizational Change Management to People Sustained Organizational Change Management. However, I can't find a way to do this.
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u can create new or u can make the new one
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I am coducting a PhD research about the effect of change type, method on the change outcomes.(case study about an organization that experiencing a change)
I want to investigate the relationship between the three above mentioned variables and hopping to find a certain relationship that could help to enhance the success of the change outcomes.
I'm not sure what will be the research methodology , how start and what to measure as well as what will be the research question and research hypothesis...any insights for that?
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The study is involves a large category of variables. First you will have to identify and classify the variables into broad categories viz. Type of Change and effect/Outcome of Change. At first stage you can collect data and establish validity and reliability and then proceed further. Factorial Designs can also be used to establish causation as you are trying to establish or investigate relation between a stimulus(type of change) and outcome(effect of change).
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I am making a point in an article about organizational change management that certain neurotransmitters influence behaviors in ways that many people do not control as much as they would like to think. Another one would be: do oxytocin+adrenaline play a big role in a parent's aggressive behavior in protecting the family? I am pulling from David Rock's SCARF model in explaining approach-avoid responses but want to understand more of the neurotransmitters behind it, beyond dopamine being related to rewards and oxytocin being related to bonding.
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Hi Brooks, I'll echo Femke's comments to a certain extent, but also point out that you need to carefully consider which sex you are talking about. For example with the role of vasopressin in aggression, it has opposite effects in males and females in multiple species. There is evidence that some of oxytocin's effects may be regulated through vasopressin receptors. It is also important to realize that recent studies indicate that oxytocin is not always positively associated with bonding. It is becoming apparent that it can increase the general salience and consolidation of social interactions, whether they are positive or negative.
Getting back to your initial question, I'd agree that dopamine and adrenalin are likely to play majors role in hunting. You need the adrenalin to ensure that the required caloric resources are quickly available, and the dopamine is likely to reinforce the rewarding aspects of the process.
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I am working on the relationships between HRD practices (Training, career development and performance management) and employee readiness for change. I read different articles to identify suitable theory that would support my relationship but not able to find. I would like to request researchers to provide your valuable suggestions and any suitable theory.
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The so-called "Change Formula" has undergone modifications since it was developed by Gleicher in the early 1960s to underscore what key factors and relationships can affect readiness for organizational change: in its first iteration, the Change Formula read C = (ABD) > X, where C = Change, A = Level of dissatisfaction with the status quo; B = Clear or understood desired state; D = Practical first steps to the desired state, X = "Cost" of changing. Subsequently, Dannemiller refined the Change Formula to read D x V x F > R, where D = Dissatisfaction with how things are now, V = Vision of what is possible, F = First, concrete steps that can be taken towards the vision; and R = Resistance. (Note the addition of multipliers.) With other inputs by Beckhard and Harris, the Change Formula now usually reads C = D x V x F x S > R, where C = Change; D = Dissatisfaction with how things are now; V = Vision of what is possible; F = First, concrete steps that can be taken towards the vision; S = Support systems; and R = Resistance. Nowhere in the change formula can we find direct reference to a role for human resource development; at most, as @Teja intuits, it might be made part of S (Support systems).
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From organizational theories and management, do you think people and organisations in built environments consider and manage change as a threat or as an opportunity?
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An organisation can only perform effectively through interactions with the broader external environment of which it is part. Organisations must be responsive to change. Change is a pervasive influence and an inescapable part of social and organisational life. There is a wide range of forces acting upon organisations that make the need for change inevitable.
People are naturally wary of change, and resistance to change – or the thought of the implications behind the change – is a common phenomenon. The successful management of change is a key factor of organisational effectiveness and requires a sound understanding of human behaviour at work.
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Organisational change authors often refer to the famous Heraclitus fragment, 'Everything flows. Nothing remains the same.' I am interested in identifying references to Heraclitus and other presocratic philosophers in published work on organisational change. These may relate to the above fragment, either drawing on the Platonic interpretation that this means that the world is in a constant state of change, or on alternative interpretations. There may also be references to other fragments of Heraclitus, such as those related to his theory of opposites.
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If you see the world as something constantly changing, you will be unable to to grasp the nature of things. Greek philosophers believe that time is a constant line of events. However this view is object-centered, meaning, that here we just take a look at the object and from this we try to say something about the history, present state and future. This is not a good idea and it tells us nothing about correlations and choices which have been made.
Events are rather like fields of influences. A plant only grows at daytime and when night comes the plant rests. When we only look at the plant we will never know why it grows. Likewise certain fields of influence allow growth, others do not. And other fields make it necessary to make changes.
In your own interest I would suggest to let the Greek view go and rather concentrade on a more Jewish view. The Greek view is outdated and also wrong in many ways. Heraklit was not able to grasp the deepth of the topic. Also did the available knowledge not allow him to translate his ideas into correct concepts sharp enough, but he stranded on the island he tried to build here up. The concept of wisdom goes way deeper (don't confuse it with the idea of wisdom like defined in a Greek way), but it needs to be studied extra. Lewin might be a good introduction, also he had problems too and was restricted. Then I also recommend to read the book of Proverbs and Ecclesiastes (especially chapter 3). They talk about time rather like states, comparing it to seasons.
We need a complete other language here to describe a different concept. For this we must go back to the roots and take a look at what we have missed.
Also watch this to get a feeling for the problem: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KSqyvvoHmAw
For an overview about the books watch this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gab04dPs_uA
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I'm investigating the role played by anxiety (related to future performance, job security, etc.) in facing organizational change
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A short scale by Caplan et al. that we have used measures anxiety, depression, and irritation. The anxiety items are:
I feel nervous
I feel jittery
I feel calm (reversed)
I feel fidgety
They used a 4-point scale:
1 = never or a little of the time
2 = some of the time
3 = a good part of the time
4 = most of the time
We changed to a 5-point scale for use in a specific time frame (e.g., past month) for Spector et al.:
1 = not at all
2 = once or twice in total
3 = once or twice per week
4 = almost every day
5 = every day
Caplan, R. D., Cobb, S., French, J. R. P., Van Harrison, R., & Penneau, S. R. (1980). Job demands and worker health. An Arbor: University of Michigan, Institute for Social Research.
Spector, P. E., Yang, L.-Q., & Zhou, Z. E. (2015). A longitudinal investigation of the role of violence prevention climate in exposure to workplace physical violence and verbal abuse. Work & Stress, 29(4), 325-340. doi:10.1080/02678373.2015.1076537
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Dear researcher,
The critical transformative change that many companies are currently addressing need attention, one perspective is the digitalization process affecting companies to various degree. As practitioners become more enthusiastic about adopting design thinking it becomes increasingly important to deepen scientific scrutiny of the phenomenon. So what can be of use from fields of organizational change that links people-centric practices of design thinking or other research that put strong attention on; background research, empathy towards user needs, problem definition, ideation, prototyping, decision-making, and reflection?
Best,
Anders
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Dear Chauncey,
Thank you for addressing context, and how to approach one's surrounding. The redesign of behaviour and action is inevitable. Understanding past as a consequence for shifting behavior and action become critical, yes. Yet, for many this shift is overwhelmingly big due to the fact that process redesign (org/team/ind) do take time... still no one has said that it would be easy.
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I will be researching an structural change (from hierarchical to holocratic) in a company with the ethnographic observation method. I have no experience with this approach and would be glad to hear your personal recommendations about this kind of studies. My Scales and Behavior anchors are still to be constructed, so I'm really open to new perspectives.  Thank you! Best regards, Eliana 
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I am glad to hear that you are willing to explore the benefits of enthnography.  With prior degrees in engineering, I had always assumed that I would pursue only quantitative methods.  Then... I was exposed to qualitative research, and on recommendation of my dissertation advisor,  ethnography.  It was life changing.  
The best book on ethnography in my opinion is 
Murchison, J. (2010). Ethnography essentials. San Francisco, CA: John Willey & Sons.
Here are others (some are a bit older, but still good)
Borgatti, S. (1999). Elicitation techniques for cultural domain analysis, In J. Schensul, M. LeCompte, B. Nastasi & S. Borgatti (Eds.), Ethnographer's toolkit: Vol. 3: Enhanced ethnographic methods (pp. 115-151). Walnut Creek, CA: AltaMira Press.
Emerson, R., Fretz, R., & Shaw, L. (2011). Writing ethnographic fieldnotes (2nd ed.). Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.
Heyl, B. S. (2010). Ethnographic interviewing, In P. Atkinson, A. Coffey, S. Delamont, J. Lofland & L. Lofland (Eds.), Handbook of ethnography (pp. 369-383). London, England: Sage Publications.
LeCompte, M. & Schensul, J. (1999). Ethnographer’s toolkit: Vol. 1. Designing and conducting ethnographic research. Walnut Creek, CA: Alta Mira Press.
Schensul, J., LeCompte, M., Hess, G. A., Nastasi, B., Berg, M., Williamson, L., Brecher, J. & Glasser, R. (1999). Ethnographer’s toolkit: Vol. 7. Using ethnographic data. Walnut Creek, CA: AltaMira Press.
Schensul, J. & LeCompte, M., Nastasi, B. & Borgatti, S. (1999). Ethnographer’s toolkit: Vol. 3. Enhanced ethnographic methods. Walnut Creek, CA: AltaMira Press.
 Schensul, S., Schensul, J. & LeCompte, M. (1999). Ethnographer’s toolkit: Vol. 2. Essential ethnographic methods. Walnut Creek, CA: Alta Mira Press.
Smith, V. (2010). Ethnographies of work and the work of ethnographers, In P. Atkinson, A. Coffey, S. Delamont, J. Lofland & L. Lofland (Eds.), Handbook of ethnography (pp. 221-233). London, England: Sage Publications.
Wolcott, H. F. (2005). The art of fieldwork. (2nd ed.). Lanham, MD: AltaMira Press.
Wolcott, H. F. (2008). Ethnography: A way of seeing (2nd ed.). Lanham, MD: AltaMira Press.
For a foundation and really understanding the concept of ethnography I would recommend quickly reading Wolcott's Ethnography Lessons: A Primer.
Look up Wolcott's Stinky Kid.  You may have a moral reaction to how things transpired, but as far as being a leader in the ethnographic field,  it is hard to learn more than when one relies on Wolcott's readings.
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I need to find the scale of the three dimensions of organizational structure (centralization, formalization and complexity) 
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Yes I find but not the Robbins questionnaire
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For my research i need an instrument that measure organizational change frequency. I already have Rafferty and Griffin (2006) 3 items instrument. But i need an instrument that have approximately more then 3 items.
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Does anybody know where I can get detailled information about variables and scales for organizational change content, process and context which are proposed by Armenakis and & Bedeian (1999)?
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The research of Bouckenooghe and colleagues is very important to actually understand organizational change. I underline trust in leadership, participation, and emotional readiness for change as the crucial climate dimensions in every organizational change. It´s also important to consider informal powers and its influence on formal ones.
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I am using AMOS for data analysis so i need an instrument that have 3 or more then 3 items. i shall be very thankful.
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Whichever instrument you choose, it's important that your questions are theoretically-based if you are using structural equation modelling. This means you might want to take a closer look at other organizational change theories and use a much more detailed instrument. It will be worth taking the time to do this, and I hope others are able to point you in the direction of some sound theories (I'm sorry I can't help with that).
The Blunch (2012) is a useful reference, and there are numerous others. While you don't need a minimum of 3 items per construct in SEM, it is strongly recommended as a minimum. You will, of course, need to check these items are appropriate ones to use in your analysis (through doing a confirmatory factor analysis first - even an exploratory factor analysis in SPSS is a good idea to check how many factors you really have, and whether each item loads in the factor you expect it to). James Gaskin's statwiki website is also useful for SEM and AMOS.
Good luck!
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I am using translation approach B Czarniawska, & Joerges but I couldn't find any analytical framework especially  for translation studies 
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Yes I think thematic analysis works, but you may be right that narrative analysis works better for processual data. You would then end up with some form of combination of thematic and narrative analysis. I am interested in reading your paper once it is completed.
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For my data collection i need a validated instrument of "Employees participation during organizational change". the items should not be more than 10.  I shall be very thankful.
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you can refer to following article ,it can be a help to you
  • Measuring Empowerment - The Perception of Empowerment Instrument (PEI)
by WK Roller - ‎1998
  • Organizational Change Questionnaire–Climate of Change, Processes, and Readiness: Development of a New Instrument
Article in The Journal of Psychology Interdisciplinary and Applied 143(6):559-99 · December 2009
DOI: 10.1080/00223980903218216 · Source: PubMed
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Corruption is rampant in many democratically elected governments, particularly, in third world countries; as the elected representatives, instead of serving people , tend to serve their own interests. Corruption exists in spite of media surveillance and judicial scrutiny.
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Dear Jaharkanti,
Corporate governance is mainly concerned with the alignment of interests between different groups involved wth the entity. But if the very groups regard corruption as a means of selling bureaucratic services, there is no possibility to tackle corruption just by creating, say, a diverse cabinet of ministers. If you expect from such a cabinet the same benefits as you do from a diverse boad of directors, you will struggle, if all the ministers are open to corruption. Exactly the same is due if the (diverse) directors do not monitor and control the entity, but actively participate in transgression. Corporate governance is just a means, but it dos not create proper governance by itself.
Paul 
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The case here is that in this organization the change has already been implemented and we are in the transition phase of the change we needed to understand the trend that this change has brought into the organizations.
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You have to understand there are different types of change.  If you are looking at measures of productivity (output per person hour) or quality (scrap, or the need to rework or correct something), you have a zero based fixed numerical scale to measure changes over time.  If you are talking about measures on an attitude survey, often using a Likert scale, you are talking about perceptual scales.  If you tell a group of people they can and should have more involvement than they had before, it can shift responses on many perceptual scales.  The employees may well now expect more than they did when you measured prior to the change.  Last, you need to think about system changes.  If you have removed portions of management, and delegated more power, and passed more information to the lower levels, the meaning of some of the survey questions may have changed.  Decisions are now being made in a different way, so some of the survey items have taken on new meanings.  For example, items dealing with the adequacy of supervisory direction and support might no longer mean the same thing.  These three issues have been termed alpha, beta and gamma changes.  The first is the easiest to deal with, and the last is particularly hard, because the instrument is not producing results you can meaningfully compare to an earlier measurement period.  You would need to add other forms of measurement, such as interviewing and observation to deal with things that are hard to handle via multiple survey applications.  I hope this helps, Bruce
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Ghoshal and Bartlett in their 1994 Quality of Management (QoM) model posited that the old command and control management model was demotivating and dysfunctional and that leaders in firms should manage with the aim to encourage individual initiative, creativity, engagement, collaboration, learning and development. Birkinshaw and Gibson used this model in their organisational ambidexterity frameworks. Has any further empirical work been done on the QoM?
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Seminal article on Quality of Management from Prof Sumantra Ghoshal and Prof Christopher Bartlett 1994
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Where to now, in terms of public sector reform? What is the future of public sector reform? We have already moved post-NPM.....
Your comments and relevant publications would be appreciated.
Thank you.
Kind regards
Neale
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Hi Neale:
I'm back again with another "out on a limb" response to your question regarding public sector reform. My answer will be found in the attached article which you should read at your leisure (if you afford yourself that luxury :-)).
If you want the "short answer" it can be found in the final section of the article but I fear that without muddling through the preceding pages you will automatically reject the "short answer."
Either way, enjoy the journey my friend. 
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Changes in organisations will inevitably meet resistance. Different approaches for dealing with resistance are likely to become self-evident once we have defined the case and extent of the resistance. One size does not fit all. The most common mistake managers make is to use only one approach or a limited set of approaches to resistance, regardless of the situation they face. What are demonstrated, effective approaches to addressing resistance? Recommended relevant publications would be appreciated.
Kind regards
Neale 
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Organizational change in public service require a different kind of cognitive styles by managers. they should not be revolutionary in leading change rather adapt with the socio-cultural and political reality of the organization. Leaders need to have patience and openness.  resistance is a natural phenomenon. You can over come by creating a team of change agents who are with you and promote readiness. "If we will not change, will perish" or you all get better benefits'' Change should be meaningful to people and should find a deeper sense of purpose in company's change efforts. As we resist change, similarly we love to work for collective and sacred goals which are important for humanity and the country. So create a bigger purpose and meaning in life of public service agents. 
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The notion that people are motivated to work in the public service as a result of a desire to serve or to have a positive impact on society is a long-standing one. How is the current public service reform process, and the wider context of reform, impacting on the motivation of public servants?
What methods can public service managers use to maintain employee motivation in a difficult environment, and to promote morale and performance?
Any insights and recommended publications would be appreciated.
Kind regards
Neale
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Hello again Neale:
Having served in the public sector I am aware that raises and promotions can be few and far between. I also realize that there are few, if any, non-monetary motivators that are built into the HR system. Therefore, I have attached a simple (but unfortunately not referenced) document. It may, however, be useful to you if you search some of the "motivational currencies" in your library.
Enjoy the journey.
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Can you provide any examples of public sector and parliamentary reforms monitoring and evaluation systems that have integrated relevant corruption indicators?
What are relevant corruption indicators?
Thank you.
Kind regards
Neale
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I am awaiting feedback, Neale.
Thanks
Mirza Arshad Ali Beg
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It pays to recognize the especially complex political and sequencing issues in public sector reform projects. That in turn puts a premium on understanding the political context, identifying the prerequisites to achieve the objectives, focusing on the basic reforms initially, and being realistic about the time it takes to get significant results. How does the political context impact on public sector reform?
Your comments and any relevant publications would be appreciated.
Thank you.
Kind regards
Neale
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in the (Central and Eastern) European context this was partially topic within NISPAcee. There was at least one publication regarding politico-administrative relations. Next to this there is bulk of literature regarding the topic.
However, i didn't came across any research regarding your very important question - how much time it takes that something really happens. educated guess is: depends on the willingness of political elites to grant political support to the reforms. and this could be connected to the spirit of democracy - more political elites are confident that reforms will be publicly accepted - faster the reforms will be done and will also provide serious results. And vice versa. So basically political context  (if we understand this as daily political situation/composition of government) is factor of speeding up or slowing down public sector reforms.
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I would like to write a report on the current issues facing the healthcare services in norway at this point in time. I have been informed that there has been much debate in to the transition of the role of leadership between health professionals and central government; however, I cannot find any valid literature on the subject. If anyone could give me some ideas of where to look or have any articles they could share with me I would be very grateful. Thank you.  
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Dear Gabriel Jarvis, Hi, With kind regards, Attachments for your question. 
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HRD plays a prominent role in change management by improving employee commitment to change, change self-efficacy, change competencies, but I am not able to find articles on these relationship and also with employee readiness for change. I would be thankful if any one would provide these research articles.   
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As people have commented, organizational  culture has an enormous impact on how people the second is to explore literature related to3mbrace, or not, change.  As the saying goes, culture eats strategy for breakfast. Even if management does all the *right things* in terms of things like trsining, for exsmple, if the culture works against change, such as squashing innovation, autocratic communication, etc., change readiness and action will most likely be sub-optimsl.  I agree very much with the idea that people don't resist change so much as resist being cganged, and one of the biggest drivers of culture is leadership apptiaches.  
Two things to consider are, one, whether the type of change has any influence on change readiness.  For examp,e, transformational change, in which the need for change is clear, but the end state is not or less clear, generates considerable ambiguity, and that is much harder on people - employees or management, than more straightforward chaange.  
Two, take a look at the literature around the strengths paradigm.  If HRD is focused around bui,ding employee strengths rather than fixing weakness (which does not mean ignoring weaknesses ) then you are more likely to improve the degree to which people will embrace chsnge.  See work by David Cooperrider, Diana Whitney really using appreciative inquiry and appreciative leadership approaches to change.  Also see work by Fred Luthans on psychological capital.  Strong levels of psy cap in an organization can have a large impact on the degree to which people embrace change.
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In their 1992 paper Warner Burke and George Litwin outlined a fairly well thought out integrated I-P-O model of organisational behaviour that embraced exogenous influencers as well as performance output variables.  It was presented as a comprehensive causal model based on their vast experience as organisational consultants in the 1980's and 90's.  Now a quarter of a century later, is that model still relevant ?  Has the model been extended or made more parsimonious over the period ? Is it as relevant to the goods producing sector as it is to the services sector;  particularly the knowledge-intensive business sector ?
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For decades, organizations felt comfortable with policies, strategies, structures, systems, and business processes that kept them in the middle of the road—it made sense: after all, that is where clients stood or sat. These days, however, the middle of the road is the road to nowhere: there is so much change; there is so much pressure. There are so many different ways of doing everything that business-as-usual is dead. Without going into details, I am not sure such models as the McKinsey 7S Framework or the Burke–Litwin Model can serve sufficiently well in the 21st century: they are too tight wedded to Taylorism.
In 1994–1995, Sumantra Ghoshal and Christopher Bartlett published a trilogy of articles on Changing the Role of Top Management. The first, Beyond Strategy to Purpose, set the scene and argued that purpose—not strategy—is the reason an organization exists. In that and in the other two pieces, they recommended that organizations should move beyond strategy, structure, and systems to a framework built on purpose, processes, and people. They reckoned that a fatal flaw of the traditional strategy–structure–systems construct—which of course owes to scientific management mindsets—is the intention to minimize the idiosyncrasies of human behavior. They recommended (i) less emphasis on following clear strategic plans, and more importance to defining engaging purposes; (ii) less focus on formal structures, and more attention to effective processes; and (iii) less concern for control through systems, and more appreciation of capabilities and perspectives.
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What are the Effects of Organizational Change on Employees Commitment.
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The effect depends of how management handled the whole change process. There are known models for effective change process which when followed will educate employees on the reason and necessity for change, on how management is concerned about the emotional effects of change on the employee etc. If management properly articulated the change, and the urgency of change and also role modeled and institutionalized the change, the chances are that employees will buy into the change and will be favourably disposed to the organisation. Hence, employee commitment will not be negatively affected. For example if the change process will involve reduction of staff, the emotional connection of employers to the plight of those affected will tell a lot to those that are left and affect their commitment to the organization. If management did not care much about the situation of those affected, the remaining employees will simply extrapolate the management action to determine what would happen to them in future. In this case their commitment will be negatively affected.
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Are there any other comparative models or new research available?
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Sorry to not have an answer for you - but perhaps you can point me to the source on Melville's Model of virtual teams?  Thanks!
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Business Excellence Frameworks have been adopted / adapted by several jurisdictions around the world.  The most easily recognized of these BEF's are the Baldrige BEF of the USA and the EFQM BEF of Europe.  These frameworks encourage firms to strive of quality and excellence in their business operations with attention paid to leadership, strategy, people, processes, services, products, partnerships and outcomes. Does empirical evidence exist demonstrating the relationship between BEF's and positive outcomes in people results, business results and societal results ?
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true
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I am investigating the success/failure of an organizational change initiative and I was wondering if anyone is aware of methods or validated survey questionnaire which measure success/failure in organizational change management. Any suggested papers in this area would be appreciated.
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Ahmad:
There are many ways to measure success in organizational change management.
The success/failure of an organizational change initiative depends upon many factors including the strategies and tactics chosen for change managements. The following paper outlines few important methods to validate such survey questionnaires. 
Take a look...
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Hello, my name is Adam and I am currently working on the primary research for my dissertation. The literature reviewed suggests that authors stay in dissagreement wheter it is a number or the scale of the organisational changes that has the bigggest impact on employees' motivation. I would be grateful for any answer that might increase my knowledge in that area. Thank you. 
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A tricky question Adam. In my research I´m studying consequences of lean implementation in health care. In specific the importance of social capital for employee engagement in improvement work, redesign of care processes. I have found that social capital is a predictive factor for employee engagement in Clinical improvements and to their general work engagement, also to job satisfaction. These outcomes are stressed to be important factors for sustainable organizational developments. My colleagues in this researchproject have found that how the change is done also matters (top-down, support by change-agents, pace....). Some years ago Academy of Management Review published an article "Studying Org. Change and Dev. Challenges for Future Research by Pettigrew et al. Maybe you have read it but otherwise it is a tip for further reflections.
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How do I get a fomalized Questionnaire for researching organizational change?
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You might also be interested in the article:  A Primary and Second-Order Component Analysis of the Organizational  Identification Questionnaire.  This article examined the primary and second-order "factor structure" on the Organizational Identification Questionnaire (for many years to most widely used instrument for organizational identification).  As a researcher in higher order factor structures,  my co-author and I published SPSS and SAS programs for assessing higher order  structures. This article was been referenced many times worldwide.
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Perhaps this would involve organizational theory/behavior or social psychology. 
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You may check Karl Weick's sense making theory.  Identity threat is a core concept in the theory. Organization change often causes identity threats to its members.  I think people have individual differences on perceiving and coping with identity threat.  
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My research is ''­­ E-procurement Adoption and the Impact of Culture Mediator towards Assessment of Acceptance a New Technology in Organisations''
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Check out the work of Geert Hofstede
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I have experienced a number of work changes that has resulted in individuals finding it difficult to transition to the new way of work, that causes them psychological and physiological problems. Has anyone come across any papers that deal with this loss of confidence?
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You may also find the work of Kegan and Lahey on Overcoming Immunity to Change useful. They provide a process for surfacing underlying worries and assumptions that cause the individual to remain captive and immobilized.
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I am keen to identify recent literature that sheds light on this question. Most of the relevant literature that I have been able to identify was written 20 or more years ago, and I am wondering why this would be the case.
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This is indeed a very interesting question regarding the likely role to be played by  newly recruited executive team in managing organizational change. Firstly, it must be recognized that old team members would tend to view the need for organizational change in their own myopic vision, thereby rendering the change ineffective. The new team members with new ideas and without any bias are likely to be more effective in implementing the change, as they would start with a clean slate. In their role as change agents , they are likely to view organizational change as strategic need, and are likely to act towards organizational flexibility and adaptability. In knowledge era of today, organizational changes are effected thorough empowerment, participation and inspirational leadership.
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If schools, colleges, and universities are in the knowledge business and knowledge is their raison d'être, why are there relatively few examples of knowledge management initiatives (at least, publications on that subject) in the education sector compared to, say, health? Assuming knowledge management has a role to play, even under a different appellation, what are some obstacles to and opportunities for knowledge management efforts in educational institutions? What might be areas for research? What do you think?
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From where I sit, these are the problems faced by putting all of our university-taught knowledge into a knowledge base system:
Some of education is not meant to convey knowledge, but to change attitudes (E.g. the teaching of ethical behaviour.)
The best-practice textbooks / videos which are prescribed are copyright.
Helpful ancillary textbooks / videos are recommended and are copyright too.
Lecturers guide the students through the textbooks, helping them to learn what is important, and resolving any discrepancies and gaps.
The lecturers augment the textbooks using their tacit knowledge from their experience of teaching over the years and their own research.
Lecturers add further value by including local examples.
Lecturers arrange suitable field trips, lab work, etc. to help make the abstract more concrete.
Based on the above, each year lecturers invent new quizzes, tests, assignments and exams to assess the student's learning.
The lecturer is loath to put the above tacit and explicit knowledge into the public domain as it undermines the lecturer's own job security.
Knowledge management in education is present, but partially hidden under keyphrases like “learning objects”, e-learning etc.
Nevertheless, there is a wealth of papers available and the topic is wide open for research. See e.g.
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Several papers have been published related to culture or subculture. However how can the culture or subculture of a project team be characterised? Looking forward for any oppinion and/or publication in this topic.
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You might find this recent Springer publication of interest (although it looks at the specifis of managing diversity in the area of ICT projects): http://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-81-322-2151-7_2 
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My intention is to analyze the teaching networks of university employees and especially what influence an organizational change program has on the formation and structure of these networks.
Therefore I don´t want to look into the ego-centric networks. Instead I am interested in the structure and development of the “whole” teaching network.
But in order to create a “whole” network I want and need to collect egocentric network data. Therefore I want to ask each participant how his egocentric network looks like now. This is my data at the point T1. My question is: Does anybody know which software can connect egocentric network data or nodes in order to create a  “whole” network? I especially don´t want and cannot collect the data with a snow ball approach.
I really appreciate any help and information I can get! Thank you very much in advance!
Best regards,
Elena Stasewitsch
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Hi, 
for everybody, who is interested in this topic: I just got an email from Prof. Molina. He created EgoNet, which also can connect Ego-Networks to a whole network. And there might be no limit how many ego-networks you want to combine. It maps the networks using the names, but there is no possibility to map them using the attributes of the nodes, which would be really cool... 
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I am attempting to pinpoint any perceived gaps in the literature in the field of Autism studies, and my focus is on the self-efficacy of vocational learners within an organizational change context. It would help to know if there is a correlation between the use of video games and higher levels of self-efficacy within this population.
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Yes. There are a number of videogames that seem to help with autism, and even some studies have shown that kids with ASDs respond better to video modeling (for teaching social skills) works better than in vivo modeling. There are a series of studies by Parsons and colleagues that looks particularly at virtual environments and social skills training. I'll add some citations below.
There's also a game called "Let's Face It" developed by Tanaka and colleagues (2005) that teaches accurate emotion recognition in facial expressions. There is also a game called TeachTown (Whalen et al, 2006), which teaches receptive language, social understanding, attention, memory, and other early skills for kids with ASDs.
There is lots more as well, but this should get you started nicely.
Parsons, S., Leonard, A. & Mitchell, P. (2006) Virtual environments for social skills training: Comments from two adolescents with autistic spectrum disorder. Computers and Education, 47, 186–206.
Parsons, S., Mitchell, P. & Leonard, A. (2004) The use and understanding of virtual environments by adolescents with autistic spectrum disorders. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 34, 449–466.
Parsons, S., Mitchell, P. & Leonard, A. (2005) Do adolescents with autistic spectrum disorders adhere to social conventions in virtual environments? Autism, 9, 95–117.
Whalen, C., Liden, L., Ingersoll, B., Dallaire, E. & Liden, S. (2006) Behavioral improvements associated with computer-assisted instruction for children with developmental disabilities. Journal of Speech and Language Pathology – Applied Behavior Analysis, 1, 11–26.
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Dear colleagues! In what articles are the questions of mathematical modeling of organizational change discussed?
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Pavel,
I would like to suggest the first search by using Google Scholar. You can set and vary your keywords and get nice results. Some of the results can be downloaded from the Google Scholar, while for some you need access to digital libraries. An example search is:
You can also find some guidelines on conducting systematic literature reviews at Internet, which will ensure the most reliable results.
After that you can try with journals that publish work in the area of interest. Try with the following publishers: Emerald, SAGE, Wiley, ScienceDirect. They have a lot of journals related to your area of interest.
Regards.
Zeljko
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Thinking more on the line of Tsoukas and Chia reasoning of emerging change rather than on the traditional views of change as exceptional in IO context. 
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Hi Sebastian, Kevin and Fernando,
For me Kevin has articulated very well this process perspective which Hari Tsoukas and I have been keen to elaborate upon for quite a while now. Let me add a little to what he has written.
Our outlook on process is not so much processes OF change to otherwise stable entities, but process as a fundamental feature of reality; hence the Heraclitean dictum (but of course the ancient Chinese philosophers thought this way as well, hence I Ching or the Book of Change). entities, structures, agencies and other forms of order such as 'organizations' are therefore precariously-held stabilities; like a tightrope walker they are a delicate balance between change and stability. So emergence and becoming is a fundamental feature of reality. Actions therefore are taken more to ARREST and momentarily stabilize this ever-changing substrate and it is the aggregate of these actions that produce relatively stabilized patterns of relations and interactions that we then label 'an organization' or better we call it a 'firm'. But why 'firm', if not because it is the firming-up of actions and practices that give organizations the appearance of solidity (that's why when our bodies become weak and unable to hold together we become INFIRMED and end up in an INFIRMARY!).
But what does this mean for organizational change, as you rightly ask? First a caveat. to say something is 'Better' than another is to judge according to some criteria, and even more importantly, to judge according to a specifiable time-frame. Better today, may not be better tomorrow. Short-termist thinking may emphasise the immediacy of outcomes and neglect future unintended consequences; the financial crisis is one such example of how easy it is to overlook longer-term unintended consequences. So a 'process outlook' (or worldview) simply recognises that change is always already happening in the ongoing enactment and re-enactment of ordering actions that we call 'organization'. No structuring action is needed for change to happen; it is already happening. Since this is the case, the way to facilitate this change is to 'let change happen' by RELAXING our ordering and Stabilizing  IMPULSES. The changes that are already happening are 'unowned', they are not a consequence of agentic action (indeed agents themselves are 'effects' of stabilizing actions). Our only intervention consists in the TIMELY nudging and channelling of the changes already  taking place along directions that favour us in terms of what we aspire towards ( a bit like training a creeper plant to grow along a trellis). These 'nudges' are more like 'lighting little fires' and fanning them so they become a bonfire. This is ultimately a quieter, less spectacular approach to managing change; almost natural and unnoticed precisely because it is less dramatic and 'heroic' as compared to the 'grand plan' approach. The planned approach very often generates unintended consequences precisely because it intervenes too abruptly into the goings-on of an organization shatters the familiarity and harmony and generates resentment and  resistance because it is too singularly focused on its planned agenda; what the sociologist Robert Merton calls 'the imperious immediacy of interest' that then precipitates the unanticipated consequences that thwart planned initiatives.
I hope this is not too long-winded and that it is clear enough. I am attaching a piece I wrote which may further expand on what I am saying. In short, the process outlook leads to significant shifts in how we approach organizational problem situations
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Hi everyone,
I've just read a brilliant paper by Podsakoff, et al., 2003 on common method biases and I was wondering if you have any further thoughts on this topic. I am particularly interested in identifying common method biases in organizational setting at the time of restructuring/merging of companies.
Looking forward to hearing Your ideas! :-)
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Hi Lukasz
He followed it up in a more recent view (attached).  The only thing is I'm not sure (a) it is that easy to account for and (b) whether it's as big an issue as it's made out to be (a and b might actually be interlinked).
Basically CMV is often cited in relation to relationships between self-rated constructs...but whilst this monomethod approach may, indeed, bias estimates upwards, another issue that is attributed to self-ratings, unreliability, would attenuate estimates of your constructs downwards.  Therefore, the interpretation and magnitude of an observed relation in terms of CMV may be over-exaggerated.
Cheers
Tom
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The study aims to show that the type of organizational culture has an impact on entrepreneurial orientation, and consequently, it influences positively or negatively organizational performance.
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On Organizational Configurations, available at http://www.adb.org/publications/organizational-configurations, shines a light on Henry Mintzberg's seven types of organization: (i) entrepreneurial, (ii) machine, (ii) diversified, (iv) professional, (v) innovative, (vi) missionary, and (vii) political. In an article titled On Networked Organizations, available at http://digitalcommons.ilr.cornell.edu/intl/268/, specific analysis is made of an eighth type, which could not have been foreseen in the 1980s given the (then) prevailing state of information and communications technology. The point is that internal and external influencers push and pull to shape an organization's operations, including its culture. Appreciation of organizational configuration helps enhance the strengths and minimize the weaknesses of a structure. The important point is that rather than considering the impact of organizational culture on entrepreneurial orientation (and performance) one might more beneficially examine what organizational configuration best releases entrepreneurship across the seven or eight types identified.
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I work in Organisational Development using a mix of systemic and dialogical principles and want to bring some rigour (and imagination) into my use of the ideas of Gregory Bateson and wondered whether anyone had attempted to develop a methodology that built on the various ideas Gregory had about systems and cybernetics, aesthetics, grace, tight and loose thinking, etc?
Thanks,
Gareth
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Bateson's own methodology was eclectic especially in his anthropological work. What is it that particularly appeals to you about his thinking and why? Bateson can be seen as one source of  "strategy without design" thinking so maybe an improvised and responsive methodology is implied...
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Some like Chemmanur and Yan (2003) posit that spin-offs discipline management by increasing the firm's exposure to the possibility of takeovers. Thus perhaps takeover threats may put pressure on parent-firm's decision to restructure through a break-up of assets?
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Hi, Patrick:
A recent research study (Powell, & Yawson, 2012) examined the impact of two common methods of internal restructuring, layoffs and divestitures on the survival of a sample of UK firms.
Using a Poisson regression model, the authors found that divestitures improve survival likelihood by reducing the probability and speed of market exit via takeover or bankruptcy, whereas layoffs increase the probability and speed of market exit via bankruptcy.
Surprisingly, classifying firms into financially distressed and healthy groups, the authors found that distressed firms are less likely to restructure. Furthermore, while divestitures improve survival likelihood in both groups, layoff firms are less likely to survive, irrespective of whether they are distressed or healthy.
Findings of this study are consistent with event studies that examined the market reaction to layoffs and divestiture decisions, and so provide some support for the view that the market correctly values the consequences of these restructuring actions on firm survival. The results are robust to several econometric and modeling issues, including controlling for potential self-selection bias!
  • Powell, R., & Yawson, A. (2012). Internal Restructuring and Firm Survival Internal Restructuring and Firm Survival. International Review Of Finance, 12(4), 435-467.
Hope this helps!
Nadeem
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We're looking to use such an instrument in a study that will attempt to change policies and procedures around health promotion for specific populations...
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Yes Yochai - the posts, so far, have been trying to further understand the nature of what it is that you are actually doing or wanting to do. I get the impression that you have not implemented organizational policy change - but you are wanting to. The tool posted by Stefan is a useful one - but instruments such as this assess a 'snapshot' of the current state of play in an organization. You have said that you want to assess actual change. My recommendation would be not to think about a measuring tool - but an actual approach. Participatory Action Research (PAR) is a valid and recognized approach (call it a measuring tool if you want - as it contains regular use of both process and outcome evaluation) to implementing and assessing organizational change related to health promotion programmes. Here is a past article of mine that highlights how it is implemented and illustrates a framework model that demonstrates its processes.
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I am currently involved in working with a team of researchers facilitating organizational change for a rural school district wishing to incorporate global collaboration in their classrooms.  We are working with 16 teachers in a coaching model as they develop projects ranging from global awareness to direct collaboration with classrooms in another country.  Any experience with working directly with another school would greatly be appreciated.
Thank you in advance for your help.
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Currently I'm writing a proposal on K12 and work trajectory in local setting. Can I join in your team research? i will appreciate your reply through my email flormaldia@gmail.com. Best wishes and thank you
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I am looking at the literature on organizational culture impacts on health care improvement. There are dozens of papers on tools, methods, etc. But the hard evidence that would motivate a major organizational culture change effort to improve the performance of health institutions is hard to find.
May any of you pinpoint any major reference reviewing this hard evidence of organizational culture change impacts over health services impact?
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  1. Result very good 
  2. Management by objective
  3. Satisfaction among customer
  4. everyone khow and understand what their portfolio
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My research topic is "Impact of HRD Interventions on Organizational effectiveness". To measure organizational effectiveness (OES) I have to develop a scale. Recommend any articles or books related to OES. 
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Some papers or books such as:
Gregory, B. T, Harris, S. G, Armenakis, A. A, & Shook, C. L. (2009). Organizational culture and effectiveness: a study of values, attitudes, and organizational outcomes. Journal of Business Research, 62(7), 673–79. doi. 10.1016/j.jbusres.2008.05.021.
Griffin, M., Neal, A., & Neale, M. (2000). The contribution of task performance and contextual performance to effectiveness: Investigating the role of situational constraints. Applied Psychology: An International Review, 49(3), 517-533. doi. 10.1111/1464-0597.00029.
Hartnell, C. A, Ou, A. Y, & Kinicki, A. (2011). Organizational culture and organizational effectiveness: A meta-analytic investigation of the competing values framework’s theoretical suppositions. Journal of Applied Psychology, 96(4), 677–94. doi. 10.1037/a0021987.
Kahya, E. (2008). The effects of job performance on effectiveness. International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics, 39 (1), 96-104. doi. 10.1016/j.ergon.2008.06.006.
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Denison, D. R. (1990). Corporate Culture and Organizational Effectiveness. New York: Wiley. Or his new book, see Octavio.
 Good luck!
Thiago Nascimento
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Work Culture and individual silence - how do they compliment each other?
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Hello Dileep,
You are rising a very good question! As with many other hot topics, there is some debate going on about the role of organizational silence. However, most of the research that I have seen in this topic sees silence as more negative rather than positive organizational behavior. Thus, this may complement some of the previous answers here. 
One of the first papers in the topic of organizational silence was a conceptual piece by Morrison and Milliken (2000). The authors developed a model outlining the characteristics of the organization that lead to a collective "culture" of withholding information.
On 2003 the journal of management studies (JMS) published an special issue on employee silence. I think they publish about 7 papers and most of them where conceptual ones. I strongly suggest you to take a look at them.
More recently, I've seen a little increase on empirical papers being published in the topic of employee silence. For example, Detert and Edmondson (2011) published a four studies paper on AMJ investigating when and why speaking up in the workplace is appropriate. This papers is absolutely fantastic! I think this paper may may help you because if we understand why people do or do not speak up we can also understand the causes of why people remain silent. On a similar line of research, Brinsfield (2013) investigated what are the motivational causes of employee silence. Lastly, on the topic of leadership and power, you may want to take a look at a recent paper by Tost and colleagues (2013) . They study how negative spillovers from leaders affect team performance. In particular, they show how a leader's dominant position affects the team's communication dynamics.
I hope you find this comment helpful. If you need further help with the topics of organizational silence or voice, do not hesitate to ask again (or directly send my a PM).
Good luck with your research!
Cheers,
Felipe
References
Brinsfield, C. T. (2013). Employee silence motives: investigation of dimensionality and development of measures. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 34(5), 671-697.
Detert, J. R., & Edmondson, A. C. (2011). Implicit voice theories: Taken-for-granted rules of self-censorship at work. Academy of Management Journal, 54(3), 461-488.
Milliken, F. J., Morrison, E. W., & Hewlin, P. F. (2003). An Exploratory Study of Employee Silence: Issues that Employees Don’t Communicate Upward and Why*. Journal of management studies, 40(6), 1453-1476.
Tost, L., Gino, F., & Larrick, R. (2012). When power makes others speechless: The negative impact of leader power on team performance. Academy of Management Journal, amj-2011.
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I am interested in research on the emotions OD practitioners experience as they transition from internal employees to external OD consulting roles.
How do these emotions impact organizational change?
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Thank you Ashutosh for your comments, do you know of any articles/research in this area?
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A recent Rand Corporation report for the US DoD considers the "research-practice gap" in terms of how, as "innovations," suicide prevention-related research results are diffused to the field (see pp. 61-88 of linked .pdf). It notes that the usual channels for dissemination of study findings better serve other researchers (e.g., journal articles, conferences) than suicide prevention professionals. Of course, in many areas such "innovations" may not be considered at all because suicide prevention is not recognized as a serious need and available research reports never cross the threshold for adoption even if they are widely disseminated. Have the concepts of innovation theorists such as Rogers (2003) been applied in suicide prevention?
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I am aware of youth engagement programs focused on suicide awareness and prevention, organised in First Nations communities here in Canada if you are interested.
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I'm seeking more examples/case /documentary evidence on where public organizations have redefined administrative boundaries, in order to aim for greater efficiency and/or effectiveness.
Positive and negative information will be appreciated.  
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To explain Organizational health, it is essential to examine the aggregate health in relation to the health of various components of the organization. Systems theory underpins this aggregate health scenario. Systems theory was conceived by a reach of scholars as a means of examining and engaging with a miscellany of topics in complex Organizational systems (Ashby, 1962; Boulding, 1956; Churchman, 1968). Systems theory elaborates into two fundamental issues: firstly, the correlation of several constituents within the organization and with the organization as a whole; and secondly, the kinship between the whole system and its feeder environment.
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I agree. The balanced Scorecard model given by Kaplan and Norton  , yeah it does talk about measuring the sales and brand together. It may be contradictory , but I hold a belief that until and unless we have a good brand value and past performance ( in case of startups it may differ) , it is very unlikely that we will get a good sales. In my view sales is directly proportional to Brand performance. Quoting Kaplan " The balanced scorecard includes financial measures that tell the results of actions already taken. And it complements the financial measures with operational measures on customer satisfaction, internal processes, and the organization’s innovation and improvement activities—operational measures that are the drivers of future financial performance. The balanced scorecard allows managers to look at the business from three important perspectives.  It provides answers to three basic questions:
How do customers see us? (customer perspective)
What must we excel at? (internal business perspective)
Can we continue to improve and create value? (innovation and learning perspective)"
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During the past decades obsolescence has been assessed in various ways (Kaufman, 1989; Pazy, 2004; Rosen, 1975; Rothman & Perrucci, 1970; Van Loo, 2005). Kindly link any questionnaire which is open access. 
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Hari and Marie,
Please find both files. I have attached both of them.